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Diogenes
Number of Followers: 8  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0392-1921 - ISSN (Online) 1467-7695
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • P.C. Chang and the Quest for a Global Ethic

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      Authors: Hans Ingvar Roth
      Abstract: Diogenes, Ahead of Print.
      This essay aims to describe and analyse the important contributions of the Chinese philosopher and diplomat P.C. Chang concerning the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights (the UDHR). After a brief biographical sketch, Chang’s main contributions will be presented and discussed. A study of Chang’s contributions in this context may also highlight the ethical potential of the UDHR and its great relevance to global ethics and world politics today.
      Citation: Diogenes
      PubDate: 2022-08-09T04:34:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03921921221102761
       
  • A “Human Rights” of our own' Chinese and Turkish
           encounters with a Western concept

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      Authors: Çağdaş Üngör
      Abstract: Diogenes, Ahead of Print.
      This article aims to compare the Turkish and Chinese reception of the “human rights” term, which enjoyed wide currency across the globe after the end of the Cold War. During the 1990s, as the global human rights discourse was embraced by dissidents in Turkey and China, the state elites remained skeptical of this concept, which was often perceived as a tool of Western imperialism. Unlike nationalists, Muslim and Confucianist conservatives saw some merit in the term “human rights” and discussed ways to appropriate it in their local contexts. In China and Turkey, “human rights” was often instrumental in promoting collective identities during the 1990s. Although the term’s original emphasis on the individual somewhat disappeared in these countries, its embrace by various groups demonstrates that “human rights” discourse resonates with non-Western audiences.
      Citation: Diogenes
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T06:46:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03921921221103717
       
  • Liberty and responsibility

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      Authors: Marianne Bastid-Bruguière
      Abstract: Diogenes, Ahead of Print.
      Although China adopted in 1948 the Universal Declaration of Human Rights largely inspired by her delegate Zhang Pengchun (1892–1957), individual liberty remains a key issue in cultural dialogues between China and Europe. However, culture is an ongoing process with no territorial boundaries, affecting every human being differently. European freedom is becoming increasingly restricted the more it focuses on meeting social and environmental needs. More broadly, the concept of responsibility that expresses solidarity between humans, belongs to all cultures and could provide the common norm of a global ethic.
      Citation: Diogenes
      PubDate: 2022-07-28T04:37:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03921921221080808
       
  • Confucian “Humanity” (ren 仁) as a resource for a global
           ethics

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      Authors: Chun-chieh Huang
      Abstract: Diogenes, Ahead of Print.
      This article argues that the core value of “humanity” (ren 仁) in the Confucian tradition may serve as a resource for global ethics in the 21st century. After presenting three major questions raised by the COVID-19 pandemic, it proposes a “reconciliation” between Confucian and Western traditions for a solution to the challenges of the pandemic. Confucian “humanity”, based on the idea of interpenetration between what is inside and what is outside, may pave the way to a true “reconciliation” in our era.
      Citation: Diogenes
      PubDate: 2022-07-23T12:44:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03921921221102758
       
  • The global ethics of emotions – what ancient Chinese philosophies
           can teach us

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      Authors: Halvor Eifring
      Abstract: Diogenes, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores what ancient Chinese philosophies can teach us about understanding emotions and relating to them. It posits that emotions are fundamental and connected to everything in the universe, that much of their value lies in their sincerity, that they need to be cultivated to avoid excess and imbalance, and that, like everything else, they are permeated by a cosmic force that is at once transcendent and immanent.
      Citation: Diogenes
      PubDate: 2022-07-23T12:43:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03921921221080814
       
  • Ōtani expeditions into Central Asia (1902–1914)

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      Authors: Erdal Küçükyalçın
      Abstract: Diogenes, Ahead of Print.
      The three Ōtani Expeditions (1902–1914) constitute the first non-Western attempt to carry out systematic research in Central Asia. The mastermind behind these Japanese enterprises was Ōtani Kōzui, the 22nd lord-abbot of the Western Honganji temple in Kyoto and the patriarch of the Honpa Honganji denomination of the Jōdo Shinshū sect, which was and remains the largest Buddhist community in Japan. Kōzui’s position as a monk during the period the expeditions were carried out reveals his religious motivation as the planner and sponsor of these research trips. Inspired by the 7th century traveler-monk Xuanzang, the main purpose of the Ōtani Expeditions was therefore to find the routes through which Buddhism had passed before reaching Japan. This is what makes them unique when compared with other exploration missions.
      Citation: Diogenes
      PubDate: 2022-07-23T12:42:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03921921221103719
       
  • A Turkish translation of Genji Monogatari

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      Authors: Oğuz Baykara
      Abstract: Diogenes, Ahead of Print.
      The Tale of Genji (Genji Monogatari) is the probably the earliest prose fiction in the world that still lives today as a masterpiece since the first decade of the 11th century. This 1200-page Japanese classic was written by a noble court woman, Murasaki Shikibu, and it spans almost three quarters of a century. The first part has to do with the life and loves of the nobleman known as “The Shining Genji”, and the final chapters follow the fate and fortunes of the characters that survived after Genji’s death.There have been four English translations of the novel: one partial translation (1882) by a Japanese translator and three other complete translations by different English native speakers in the 20th century.This paper studies the Turkish translation process of The Tale of Genji from Edward G. Seidensticker’s English version. It points out the plentitude of potential translation choices and tries to explore the reasons of translators for their decisions. It compares the translators’ strategies and assesses their impact on the meanings and functions of the allusions and the connections between the adopted strategies.
      Citation: Diogenes
      PubDate: 2022-07-20T06:33:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03921921221103715
       
  • Tears of stone and clay: the affect of mourning images in middle-period
           China

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      Authors: Jeehee Hong
      Abstract: Diogenes, Ahead of Print.
      Representations of intense emotions are rare in the Chinese visual tradition in comparison with their counterpart in literary convention. While the reasons for this deserve an in-depth interdisciplinary study, such general reservation contrastingly highlights a distinct visual phenomenon that emerged and flourished during the middle period (9th-14th centuries). This time period witnessed a growing number of visual representations of grieving figures in funerary and religious (mainly Buddhist) contexts. By articulating various representational modes of mourning images, this essay discusses a significant development in the emotional lives of middle-period Chinese. Occupying seemingly disparate ritual spaces (the Buddhist pagoda crypt and the tomb) the images of sorrowful mourners conspicuously emerged as an appealing motif for adorning the burial spaces of their deceased. These two sites of intense affect reveal that era’s desire for placing the virtual mourner in the space designed for the dead as a visual agency conveying the emotive surrounding the death of the beloved, be they local monks or family members, who often lacked literary means to express their feelings. Recognizing this affective mode helps us to better understand the complex interplay between the emotions, the social and cultural sanctions in expressing them, and the visual codes created thereof, in post-medieval China.
      Citation: Diogenes
      PubDate: 2022-07-20T06:30:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0392192120970379
       
  • The new rich in their “palaces”: an aspect of urban transformation in
           the former socialist countries

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      Authors: François Ruegg
      Abstract: Diogenes, Ahead of Print.
      The paper addresses the scarcity of research on the new rich in urban anthropology. It argues that sumptuary spending is meant to establish and display an honourable ascendancy, and stems from a need for public recognition. This is particularly visible in the palaces of the nouveau riche in Eastern Europe. Too often, these buildings are unduly ethnicized; the paper claims that this ideological approach aims at denying Easter European Roma the possibility of taking part in the urban competition of the new rich and at excluding them from the wider urban context of the new rich in the post-Socialist territories, from Bucharest to Batumi and Astana. From Roma businessmen to a parvenu doctor in Cluj, the identity strategies of the new rich resemble each other. They draw on universal artistic heritage to create an image of ancient virtue for their owners.
      Citation: Diogenes
      PubDate: 2022-07-19T08:34:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03921921211065547
       
  • The Dialogue between Confucianism and its Translations

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      Authors: Jyrki Kallio
      Abstract: Diogenes, Ahead of Print.
      Using the translation of Confucian classics as an example, this article discusses the possibility for translations to serve as two-way bridges between two cultures. While translating is often seen as a one-way process, used to export ideas from the source language and culture to those of the recipients, the challenges in translating, and the solutions offered by the translator, may provide valuable insight, even to the benefit of the source culture. This article looks at the Confucian concept of ren (仁), and through its differing translations in different source texts and contexts, suggests that an understanding reached through translation may enrich the intuitive or even analytical understanding of the concept that pre-exists in the Chinese context.*
      Citation: Diogenes
      PubDate: 2022-05-30T08:50:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03921921211068267
       
  • Pro-American, Anti-Communist Propaganda, Stupidification, and Thai
           Identity in Two Cold War Novellas

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      Authors: Janit Feangfu
      Abstract: Diogenes, Ahead of Print.
      The fear of “communist subversion” in Thailand from the 1950s to the 1970s played a crucial role in the ongoing government control of public knowledge and the anti-communist propaganda. The companion piece novellas Made in USA and A Complete Idiot (Made in USA 2) by Sujit Wongthes (1973), a leading independent writer, disclosed the truth about the Vietnam War and challenged the pro-American hype in the context of 1970s Thailand. Made in USA achieved this through a blend of travelogue and journalist distance; A Complete Idiot through a portrayal of the internal struggle of a young Thai man who grew up under the extensive influence of the Thai state’s pro-American, anti-communist propaganda. In A Complete Idiot, the protagonist’s state of blissful ignorance crumbles when his old “knowledge” of the “evil communist” and Thai-American relations are juxtaposed with new(s) information about the 1971 reconciliation between the US and the People’s Republic of China. Reading the two novellas critically, this article investigates how the state-instilled perceptions of communism and propaganda construct a Thai identity that becomes inadequate vis-à-vis a different set of information. It also looks at the extent to which Thai internal politics was subsumed into the international politics of the Cold War and how such an entanglement informed Thai national identity. Finally, this article argues that the two novellas at once challenge the Thai government at the time and subvert its projection of the US. In doing so, the novellas open up a new space for alternative Thai cultural identities.
      Citation: Diogenes
      PubDate: 2022-05-30T08:48:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0392192120970391
       
  • From fragile heritage to the fragility of heritage models: diverse answers
           to pressing ethical and aesthetic questions

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      Authors: Zoltán Somhegyi
      Abstract: Diogenes, Ahead of Print.
      The appreciation, conservation, and reconstruction of ruins, deteriorating buildings, and archaeological sites of historical, religious or cultural value, as well as their safeguarding, lead to a complex set of issues and considerations. This brief paper suggests that a deeper understanding of the various models of heritage management can enhance acceptance of the different practices of heritage care. The fragility of heritage sites and of heritage models urges us to look for viable answers to global ethical and aesthetic questions regarding the management of heritage sites.*
      Citation: Diogenes
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T05:20:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03921921211068259
       
  • Chinese and western philosophical and ethical perspectives: Différance
           rather than incommensurability or sameness

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      Authors: Geir Sigurðsson
      Abstract: Diogenes, Ahead of Print.
      This experimental article claims that relatively recent trends in Western philosophy provide a much more open approach to philosophies originating in nonwestern traditions, including the Chinese, than found in most mainstream Western philosophy. More specifically, I argue that a slightly modified version of Jacques Derrida’s concept of différance offers a hermeneutic parallel to native Chinese philosophical approaches to interpretation. These converge in the view that Western and Chinese philosophies cannot be reduced to the other in conceptual terms and that a finalized meaning or interpretation of each is a priori unattainable, thus providing a future opening for – and even integration of – a Chinese-Western dialogue in global philosophy and ethics.*
      Citation: Diogenes
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T05:18:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03921921211068258
       
  • The cultural traditions of China and the quest for a global ethic

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      Authors: Torbjörn Lodén
      Abstract: Diogenes, Ahead of Print.
      This paper challenges the idea that there are essential and unbridgeable differences that separate the cultural traditions of China and Europe. The focus is on the belief that there is no transcendence in Chinese thought and the cluster of notions around this thesis, which have often been used in support of the thesis of essential differences. The conclusion is that this thesis is mistaken and that the multifarious traditions of China and Europe share many central features and can also mutually enrich one another. Together, they offer rich resources to a global ethic suited for the needs of our time.*
      Citation: Diogenes
      PubDate: 2022-05-21T09:16:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03921921211068235
       
  • Cosmopolitanism and Global Ethics

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      Authors: Longxi Zhang
      Abstract: Diogenes, Ahead of Print.
      Embracing all humanity as one’s own is the core of the modern idea of cosmopolitanism, but the present time with rising tribalism, populism, racism, and narrow-minded nationalism is not propitious for cosmopolitanism. At a time like this, the cosmopolitan effort to see cultures and peoples as close to one another rather than absolutely different becomes all the more important. The comparative study of different cultures and literatures may promote a cosmopolitan stance, and from a comparative perspective, we may draw some ideas from the ancient Chinese philosopher Mencius for a theory of global ethics.*
      Citation: Diogenes
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T09:09:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03921921221080806
       
  • Communication of ethics – across cultural boundaries

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      Authors: Göran Collste
      Abstract: Diogenes, Ahead of Print.
      Is it possible to communicate ethics across cultural borders' Not according to representatives of “the incommensurability thesis”, who claim that values and norms are culturally bounded. This article argues against this thesis. A first problem is that cultures and traditions are seen as comprehensive, delimited, and exclusive. Normally, however, a culture develops from and is in dialogue with other cultures. Further, the inner diversity of cultures and traditions opens the possibility of communication and shared understandings across cultural borders. Finally, the teaching and discussion of cross-cultural ethics provide practical evidence of the possibility of dialogue and mutual understanding.*
      Citation: Diogenes
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T04:15:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03921921221080805
       
  • Emotions and ethical life: perspectives from Asia

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      Authors: Suwanna Satha-Anand, Wasana Wongsurawat
      Abstract: Diogenes, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Diogenes
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T04:13:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0392192120970415
       
  • Ideas on Universal Ethics in Mahāyāna Buddhism

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      Authors: Jens Braarvig
      Abstract: Diogenes, Ahead of Print.
      Buddhism in all its expressions is often characterised as a ‘World Religion’. Thus, in principle, it harbours a universal message transcending any ethnicity and national boundaries, and it may be argued that it is historically the most important common ideology for all of South, East and Central Asia. In its canonical literature and religious thinking, Buddhism presents a number of elements easily characterised as global ethics, with an egalitarian and altruistic tone. As such, with its philosophically grounded virtues and morality, Buddhism can represent a reference point and a multifaceted background for an informed discussion of global ethics. The present paper describes in brief a few topics relevant to such a discussion.*
      Citation: Diogenes
      PubDate: 2022-04-08T12:52:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03921921221080815
       
  • The performativity of pain: affective excess and Asian women’s
           sexuality in cyberspace

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      Authors: L. Ayu Saraswati
      Abstract: Diogenes, Ahead of Print.
      This article employs a thumbs and thumbnails analysis to analyze the 85 most viewed Asian online porn thumbnails, videos, and their audiences’ comments to argue that cyberspace functions as a space of “affective simulation,” rather than simply as a space of representation. For these online viewers, the performativity of pain by Asian women porn stars functions as an entry point to access and externalize their affective excess.
      Citation: Diogenes
      PubDate: 2022-02-07T01:07:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0392192120970412
       
 
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