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  Subjects -> PHILOSOPHY (Total: 762 journals)
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The Monist
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.282
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0026-9662 - ISSN (Online) 2153-3601
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [419 journals]
  • The Holy and the God-Loved: The Dilemma in Plato’s Euthyphro

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      Authors: Frede D.
      Pages: 293 - 308
      Abstract: AbstractIs the holy holy because the gods love it or do the gods love it because it is holy' On the basis of this dilemma Plato works out the manifold and complex relationship between God and Morality in his dialogue Euthyphro. This dialogue not only plays a central role within Plato’s work on the question of the relationship between ethics and religion, but it also represents the starting point of the entire further Western debate about God and Morality. This article gives a basic interpretation of the text, situates the dilemma within the dialogue, traces its character, intention, and structure, unfolds the course of the argument, and offers a brief outlook on its reception.
      PubDate: Tue, 14 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/monist/onac001
      Issue No: Vol. 105, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • St. Anselm of Canterbury on God and Morality

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      Authors: Rogers K.
      Pages: 309 - 320
      Abstract: AbstractAnselm of Canterbury, as a classical theist, does not hold that there is a moral, or value, order independent of God. What is good, indeed what is necessary and possible, depends on the will of God. But Anselm’s development of this claim does not succumb to the problems entailed by divine-command theory. One such problem addresses the question of whether or not the moral order is available to reason, bracketing Scripture and Church teaching. Anselm holds that to be just is to conform to God’s will. Nevertheless Anselm proposes a eudaimonistic ethical theory that allows reason to assess moral principles. And Anselm holds that the non-believer recognizes justice, even before he can appreciate the more general category of “good.”
      PubDate: Tue, 14 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/monist/onac002
      Issue No: Vol. 105, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Aquinas’s Theory of Goodness

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      Authors: Stump E.
      Pages: 321 - 336
      Abstract: AbstractThe aim of this essay is to sketch the basic outline of Aquinas’s metaethics and its support for his virtue-based ethics. When Aquinas’s central metaethical thesis is combined with his theological views, especially his understanding of the doctrine of divine simplicity, then the theological interpretation of the central metaethical thesis constitutes the basis for a religious ethics that makes God essential to human morality but without tying morality to God’s will. The result is a metaphysically grounded, objective normative virtue ethics which is theological at least in this sense that it is ultimately based in God’s nature.
      PubDate: Tue, 14 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/monist/onac003
      Issue No: Vol. 105, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Contemplation

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      Authors: Hare J.
      Pages: 337 - 349
      Abstract: AbstractThe topic of the present article is a conceptualization of the notion of contemplation and will develop its reflection around three principal questions: (1) What is the role of desire in contemplation' (2) Is it we who contemplate, or the god who contemplates in us' (3) What is the relation between contemplation and the rest of human life'
      PubDate: Tue, 14 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/monist/onac004
      Issue No: Vol. 105, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Autonomy and Radical Evil: Kant’s Ethical Transformation of Sin

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      Authors: Dalferth I.
      Pages: 350 - 368
      Abstract: AbstractThe paper examines Kant’s idea of autonomy as well as his conception of radical evil against the background of the theological tradition relevant to him. It is shown that both of them can be understood as ethical secularizations of theological concepts—the freedom of God and the concept of original sin—and that in both cases the problems of the theological tradition reoccur.
      PubDate: Tue, 14 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/monist/onac005
      Issue No: Vol. 105, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Anti-Climacus and the Demoralization of Sin

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      Authors: Hüsch S; Viertbauer K.
      Pages: 369 - 387
      Abstract: AbstractThe paper develops the claim that in The Sickness unto Death (1849), Kierkegaard conceptualizes a demoralized understanding of sin. Rather than interpreting sin as moral guilt, he proposes a concept of sin that takes the form of alienation. The claim is unfolded in a three-step argumentation: First, we identify crucial hermeneutical issues and stress the role of the pseudonyms within Kierkegaard’s writings. Second, we offer a detailed analysis of the theory of self-consciousness developed by Anti-Climacus. Finally, using the romantic interpretation of Kierkegaard as a foundation, we demonstrate how Anti-Climacus conceptualizes sin as alienation
      PubDate: Tue, 14 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/monist/onac006
      Issue No: Vol. 105, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Could a Divine-Command Theory of Moral Obligations Justify Horrible
           Acts' Some Kierkegaardian Reflections

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      Authors: Evans C.
      Pages: 388 - 407
      Abstract: AbstractThis paper considers whether a divine-command theory of moral obligation (DCT) could justify morally horrible acts, partly by examining Kierkegaard’s writings. It argues that only the commands of a God who is essentially good could be morally justified, and thus no defensible version of a DCT could actually justify horrible acts. In Works of Love Kierkegaard defends such a DCT, and thus is committed to the claim that any actual commands of God must be aimed at the good. This is consistent with the claim that if we knew that a command that is alleged to be from God is directed at what is bad, the command must not be authentic. The issue raised by Fear and Trembling, where Kierkegaard’s pseudonym Johannes de Silentio considers the “binding of Isaac” story, thus raises crucial epistemic issues, which cannot be settled without considering how one might come to know that a purported revelation from God is authentic, as well as how one might come to believe that some particular moral belief is wrong. The paper defends the view that if one knew that a revelation from God was authentic, then one could be justified in holding a moral view on some particular issue, such as veganism, that clashes with the dominant views of one’s contemporaries.
      PubDate: Tue, 14 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/monist/onac007
      Issue No: Vol. 105, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • The Tribute of Faith: Theistic Commitment as Moral Gesture

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      Authors: Schellenberg J.
      Pages: 408 - 419
      Abstract: AbstractIn this paper I explore and defend the idea that those who struggle intellectually in theistic religious practice can be given a good reason to persist in it by treating their continuing practice as a way of paying tribute to people and projects and personal relationships and indeed to the whole moral dimension of human life, expressing how important and profoundly significant these things are to them. This ‘tribute of faith’ is a gesture that one makes with one’s life—a moral gesture. The key thought is that the sayings and other doings of a religious life allow one to treat the world as one in which the things, such as projects and people, that are, for one, most deeply imbued with moral value will achieve fulfilment—a fulfillment that without the truth of religious claims they would often be denied.
      PubDate: Tue, 14 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/monist/onac008
      Issue No: Vol. 105, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • God, God’s Perfections, and the Good: Some Preliminary Insights from the
           Catholic-Hindu Encounter

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      Authors: S. J. F.
      Pages: 420 - 433
      Abstract: AbstractThere are good reasons for envisioning a global discourse about God, premised necessarily agreed upon perfections considered to be by definition proper to God, and for thinking through the implications of our understanding of God for morality. Philosophically, it makes sense to hold that claims about omnipotence, omniscience, and other superlative perfections are indeed maximal, and define “God” wherever the terminology of divine persons is taken up. Religiously too, it makes sense to assert that a deity possessed of perfections is not just the deity of one’s own tribe or religion, but also the deity of the whole world, whether acknowledged as such or not. This essay delves into the larger set of rich complexities by three moves. First, I look into a single extended historical case of the extension of the discourse about God beyond the Christian West, the discourse on God proffered by Western Jesuit missionaries in India from the sixteenth to twentieth centuries. Second, I place next to that Jesuit learning the instance of a famed Hindu theologian’s discourse on God, God’s perfections, and their moral implications. Third, I briefly step back and assess the dangers and fruitful prospects inherent in thinking about God and morality in an interreligious context.
      PubDate: Tue, 14 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/monist/onac009
      Issue No: Vol. 105, No. 3 (2022)
       
 
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