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  Subjects -> PHILOSOPHY (Total: 762 journals)
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Dao : A Journal of Comparative Philosophy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.383
Number of Followers: 11  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1569-7274 - ISSN (Online) 1540-3009
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Fan, Ruiping, and Mark J. Cherry, eds., Sex Robots: Social Impact and the
           Future of Human Relations

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      PubDate: 2023-01-21
       
  • Chen, Lai 陳來, The Confucian Theory of Virtue
           儒學美德論

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      PubDate: 2023-01-17
       
  • Littlejohn, Ronnie, Chinese Philosophy and Philosophers: An Introduction

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      PubDate: 2023-01-16
       
  • Chen, Xia 陳霞, An Introduction to Daoist Philosophy 道家哲學引論

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      PubDate: 2023-01-11
       
  • Soteriological Mereology in the Pāli Discourses, Buddhaghosa, and
           Huayan Buddhism

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      Abstract: Abstract Extant discussions of Buddhist mereology give minimal attention to the soteriological significance of denying the reality of wholes. This is unfortunate, because the connection between mereology and soteriological is both significant and problematic. The connection is significant, because it supports an argument for the unreality of composite wholes that does not depend upon any claim about the nature of wholes. The connection is also problematic, because some Buddhists endorse the soteriological relevance of mereology despite admitting that composite wholes are real. I address these issues by reviewing early Pāli Buddhist attitudes toward the soteriological significance of mereology, developing an argument for the unreality of wholes from the work of Buddhaghosa, and explicating an alternative approach from the Chinese tradition of Huayan 華嚴 Buddhism that calls into question some common assumptions about parts and wholes.
      PubDate: 2023-01-10
       
  • Recharacterizing the Confucian Golden Rule: The Advent of the
           Post-Confucius Formula and a Shift of Focus from Ren to Li

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      Abstract: Abstract The “social-political-hierarchical” qualifications have long been identified as the essential features of the Confucian golden rule. This essay challenges this prevailing characterization by revealing the relation and differences between Confucius’ original shu 恕 and a series of post-Confucius reformulations in ancient Confucianism. Specifically, the premise of equality, which underlies Confucius’ formulation of shu in correlation with ren 仁, rendered shu incompatible with asymmetrical relationships. Besides the advantage of overcoming this limitation by adapting the golden rule structure of shu to specified asymmetrical relationships, the post-Confucius formula, especially “the measuring square” in the Great Learning, was devised to guide one to infer universalizable rules of conduct for various roles in diverse relationships. On this basis, I demonstrate a pivotal shift in the golden rule practice of ancient Confucianism—a shift of focus from its correlation with ren to its conformity with li 禮 as the system of rules of conduct and the principle of “discriminations.”
      PubDate: 2023-01-10
       
  • Incipient Cultural Evolution in the Xunzi as Solution to the Liyi Origin
           Problem

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      Abstract: Abstract Xunzi 荀子 provided naturalistic answers to questions regarding human sociality and our characteristic “groupishness” (qun 羣). Central to his theories were so-called “social divisions and righteousness” (fenyi 分義), which can be interpreted as a uniquely human package of “cultural technology” produced via cultural evolution to suppress intragroup conflict stemming from what Xunzi calls “the mind of covetous comparison” (liangyi zhi xin 兩疑之心). For Xunzi, fenyi is the uniquely human attribute which kickstarts a salutary causal chain which facilitates prosociality and the upscaling of cooperation, and ultimately results in human ecological dominance. This essay will argue that an incipient form of cultural evolution is discoverable in the Xunzi, and moreover that a solution to the problem of the origin of the “ritual and righteousness” (liyi 禮義) cultural package derives neatly from the incipient cultural evolution of the Xunzi. That is to say, while this solution is not explicitly adduced in the Xunzi, it is nonetheless consistent with Xunzian ideas and is an improvement on the much-lambasted solution Xunzi actually gives, according to which “the former kings hated … chaos, and so they established rituals and righteousness.”
      PubDate: 2023-01-07
       
  • “Having Respect for” and “Being Respectful”: A Comparison between
           the Kantian Conception and the Confucian Conception of Respect

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      Abstract: Abstract The notion of respect is central to many moral requirements in daily life. In the Western philosophical tradition, there is a tendency to explore the nature of respect based on the nature of the object of respect. The Kantian account of respect for the moral law is one representative of this approach. In contrast, the classical Confucian notion of jing 敬 not only has a meaning similar to the Western notion of respect but also emphasizes the value of having a respectful state of mind. Both Sin Yee Chan and Pengbo Liu argue that jing, the Confucian conception of respect, has significant theoretical and practical value for obtaining an adequate understanding of the role of respect in moral life (Chan 2006, Liu 2019). However, their discussions primarily focus on the distinction between Western and Eastern views of respect. In this essay, I will focus on revealing the theoretical and practical value of combining the two perspectives on respect. I aim to demonstrate that by borrowing insights from each side, we will gain a deeper understanding of the nature of respect and what it requires in terms of proper treatment of other individuals.
      PubDate: 2023-01-06
       
  • The Problem of Looted Artifacts in Chinese Studies: A Rejoinder to Critics

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      Abstract: Abstract Ten years after the publication of “Heng Xian and the Problem of Studying Looted Artifacts” in Dao, this rejoinder to critics begins by recapitulating my original argument, then considers the leading objections that have appeared in the interim. After dispensing with two trivial and ad hominem responses (that I am a hypocrite and an imperialist), the discussion focuses on the one serious objection, namely, that the benefits of studying looted artifacts outweigh the costs. I conclude with my reasons for disagreeing with this judgment.
      PubDate: 2023-01-05
       
  • Moral Perfection as the Counterfeit of Virtue

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      Abstract: Abstract It is sometimes assumed that the best people—those whom it would be appropriate to admire and emulate—ought to be free of all moral defects. Numerous contemporary scholars have attributed this assumption to the early Confucian philosophers with moral perfection said to be a necessary condition for sagehood. Drawing upon the early Confucian literature I will argue in support of two claims. The first is that the early Confucians did not insist on the moral perfection of the sage; on the contrary, the sage was explicitly understood to be morally fallible. The second claim is that the early Confucians were right to reject moral perfection as a suitable ideal. I conclude with a discussion of the relative merits of taking “love of learning” (haoxue 好學)—rather than moral perfection—as one’s ideal.
      PubDate: 2023-01-05
       
  • Meynard, Thierry 梅謙立, trans. and ed., Confucius, Philosopher of
           China: Chinese Translation of Confucius Sinarum Philosophus
           中國哲學家孔夫子

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      PubDate: 2023-01-04
       
  • Chai, David, ed., Dao Companion to Xuanxue (Neo-Daoism)

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      PubDate: 2023-01-04
       
  • The Laozi and Anarchism

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      Abstract: Abstract In recent decades, many researchers set out to draw links between Western anarchism and ancient Chinese Daoism. The present work aims at adding to this ongoing debate by answering the question of whether the Guodian Laozi’s 郭店老子 sayings can be labelled as “anarchism.” It defends the claim that the text endorses a unique kind of anarchist theory based on a distinctive theory of political authority grounded in Daoist moral commitments. To do so, this essay first offers an overview of the scholarly debate surrounding this topic. Second, it provides an account of the necessary and sufficient feature any theory must secure in order to be argued to be anarchist, as well as a framework that underlines potential differences between various anarchist theories. Third, a rigorous textual analysis of the Guodian Laozi is conducted to extrapolate its political advice, before analyzing it in light of the anarchist framework mentioned above. This essay concludes with an assessment of several objections that may be raised against its claims.
      PubDate: 2023-01-04
       
  • Worries in My Heart: Defending the Significance of You for Confucian Moral
           Cultivation

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      Abstract: Abstract While the conversations surrounding moral cultivation in Confucianism often focus on the debate regarding the starting point of moral learning (and corresponding features of the learning process) that is inspired by the disagreements between the Mengzi 孟子 and the Xunzi 荀子, there is another group of scholarship on moral cultivation which tends to the experiential qualities felt by the learning agents. This essay participates in the latter group of scholarship. The majority of discussions regarding the learning experience center around mental states such as an 安 (tranquility or equanimity) and le 樂 (happiness, joy, or pleasure) of a special kind. There is, nonetheless, a minor trend that emphasizes the significance of you 憂 (worry or distress). In this essay, I raise attention to the significance of you and argue that in the Analects, an indispensable and significant part of Confucian moral cultivation is to learn to worry well, which involves learning to worry broadly about society in general, and to worry deeply about particular individuals standing in important relationship to us.
      PubDate: 2022-10-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s11712-022-09850-y
       
  • Chen, Lisheng 陳立勝, From “Self-Cultivation” to Its
           “Methods”—Manifestation and Turn of the Confucian Theory of “Inner
           Sageliness” 從 “修身” 到 “工夫” — 儒家 “內聖學”
           的開顯與轉折

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      PubDate: 2022-09-27
      DOI: 10.1007/s11712-022-09857-5
       
  • What Is the Emperor to Us'—Relationships, Obligations, and
           Obedience

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      Abstract: Abstract In an award-winning essay, Shu-Shan Lee discusses scholarly commentary about obedience to the emperor, focusing on public and hidden records of protest. The thesis of Lee’s essay is that the relationship between authority and subject in imperial Confucianism was built on a conditional obligation of obedience, despite traditional accounts of it as absolute. On his account, the obligation of obedience should be conceived through the rubric of imperial Confucianism as being conditional on fulfillment of reciprocal obligations. As part of my response, I suggest that there is a third way to understand the obligation of obedience through the Confucian lens, which is less transactional than reciprocal obligation, while also providing a plausible alternative to absolute obligation as the correct understanding of imperial Confucian thinking about obedience to the emperor.
      PubDate: 2022-09-27
      DOI: 10.1007/s11712-022-09855-7
       
  • Kim, Sungmoon, Theorizing Confucian Virtue Politics: The Political
           Philosophy of Mencius and Xunzi

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      PubDate: 2022-09-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s11712-022-09861-9
       
  • Can the People (Min) Ever Grow Up' Comments on Shu-Shan Lee, “What
           Did the Emperor Ever Say'”

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      Abstract: Abstract In this essay, I find much to admire and little to disagree with in Shu-Shan Lee’s use of James Scott’s “public transcript” framework to excavate a theory of political obligation that applies to common people in premodern China. I offer some ways to further explore the implications of Lee’s analysis, in part by connecting Lee’s essay to related work on the obligations of elites. I then build on Lee’s own suggestions of connections to contemporary empirical attitudes and contemporary normative views, asking in what ways Lee’s account of public obligation might be able to make room for the idea that the people, as political children, might one day be able to grow up.
      PubDate: 2022-09-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s11712-022-09854-8
       
  • Fang, Xudong 方旭東, Confucianism, Daoism, and Modern Society
           儒道思想與現代社會

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      PubDate: 2022-09-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s11712-022-09858-4
       
  • The Debate over Xing in the Outer Chapters of the Zhuangzi

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      Abstract: Abstract Contemporary discussions of xing are often inspired by the Confucian tradition, but recent studies have brought the Zhuangzi 莊子 to the table as a viable alternative. In this essay, I present three different accounts of xing 性 in the Outer Chapters: (1) the primitivists who emphasize body vitality and simple life, (2) the Huang-Lao 黃老 school that emphasizes the balance among different things and the overall cosmological order, and (3) skill stories that look at individual skill masters rather than people in general or the role of the human species in the cosmos, entertain only the descriptive dimension of xing, and cast doubt on the normative status of xing. These three accounts can be read as responding to each other, and each shares certain themes with the Inner Chapters in different ways. Together, they demonstrate the complexity of the Zhuangzi’s view on xing and complicate attempts of cross-textual comparison.
      PubDate: 2022-09-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s11712-022-09852-w
       
 
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