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  Subjects -> PHILOSOPHY (Total: 762 journals)
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Dao : A Journal of Comparative Philosophy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.383
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1569-7274 - ISSN (Online) 1540-3009
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Moral Extension and Emotional Cultivation in Mèngzǐ

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      Abstract: Abstract Mèngzǐ’s 孟子 advice to King Xuān 宣 to take up his feeling of compassion for an ox and apply it to his people (Mèngzǐ 1A7) is equivocal, and can be understood in two markedly different ways: on one hand, to take immediate care of the people’s needs by performing a kind of (mental) act of applying compassion; on the other hand, to engage in a long-term project of cultivating compassion for them. These views, moreover, when combined with the assumption that emotion is the sole motivator of moral action, give us a perplexing picture of Mèngzǐ as urging the king to do exactly what he cannot—namely, acting out of compassion for his people that he falls short of feeling enough of. This essay explicates the Mengzian model of moral extension (tuī 推) through a solution to this puzzle, specifically by explaining how one’s immediate performance of moral actions are conducive to cultivating related moral emotions.
      PubDate: 2022-07-16
       
  • Chai, David, ed., Daoist Encounters with Phenomenology: Thinking
           Interculturally about Human Existence

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      PubDate: 2022-07-15
       
  • Democracy in China: Reply to My Critics

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      Abstract: Abstract Joseph Chan and Sungmoon Kim take me to task for my understanding and uses of Tocqueville, and because of the resemblance they claim to see between one of my major arguments and modernization theory. I think their charges are mistaken or misplaced. Chan and Kim reject my claims that China is already, in a meaningful sense and to a substantial degree, a democratic society, and that, unless such a society is matched by political democratization, a major legitimation crisis is almost inevitable in the foreseeable future. I try to show that they are wrong in their assessment of the state of Chinese society and in their dismissal of the crisis tendencies that only timely democratization can help avert. Chan and Kim completely misconstrue what my prudential argument for democracy in China means, and what it does not, and I explain why. Finally, I reaffirm, over Chan’s objections, the view that the fundamental choice regarding political legitimacy in China today lies between the Mandate of Heaven and democracy, given the demise of communism, and I restate this view in terms of the concept of sovereignty.
      PubDate: 2022-07-15
       
  • Is Democracy Coming to Knock on China’s Door' A Reply to Jiwei
           Ci’s Democracy in China

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      Abstract: Abstract Jiwei Ci’s Democracy in China: The Coming Crisis (Ci 2019) presents an extraordinarily rich set of ideas regarding the important subject of the prospect of democracy in China. The book argues that it is in the interest of the Chinese Communist Party to immediately begin to prepare China for democracy, as that is the only way to save the party and China from imminent crises of legitimacy, governance, and stability. Drawing upon Tocqueville’s discussion of equality of conditions in America, Ci argues that as China has already more or less become a society of equality of conditions, it already has a democratic society, which will inevitably exert enormous pressures for political democratization, thereby creating serious legitimacy and stability crises for the regime. In my view, Ci overstates the relevance of Tocqueville’s America for China, and his claim that there is a democratic society in China is disputable. In grounding his case for democracy in China, Ci also appeals to a larger species of argument—the argument from social circumstances to political regime, of which Tocqueville’s argument is an example. This is the argument that once a kind of society has become entrenched and is no longer amenable to a political regime’s effort to remake it, it is the political regime that must make itself fit the state of society. I argue that this argument is also problematic.
      PubDate: 2022-07-15
       
  • He, Jun 何俊, From Confucian Classics to Neo-Confucianism
           從經學到理學

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      PubDate: 2022-07-14
       
  • Mental Partitioning and Explanations of Mental Conflict: An Investigation
           of Han Sources with Reference to Greek Psychology

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      Abstract: Abstract This article examines the problem of mental partitioning and mental conflict in Han 漢 dynasty sources. It begins by outlining two Greek psychological models—the Platonic tripartite model and the Stoic monistic model—and explains the connection between the two psychological models and their differing descriptions of mental conflict. It then analyzes passages from a seldom discussed text, the Extended Reflections (Shenjian 申鑒), written by the Eastern Han thinker Xun Yue 荀悅. A combined analysis of the Extended Reflections with fragments from other Han dynasty thinkers uncovers debates on mental partitioning and mental conflict that are in some ways analogous to those found in Greek philosophical literature. One view posits that the human psyche is composed of two parts capable of producing conflicting motivations. The other view sees all actions as stemming from a single psychological center. The conclusions of this article offer new perspectives on early Chinese moral psychology that have important implications for modern research on early Chinese philosophy.
      PubDate: 2022-07-14
       
  • Confucian Political Order and the Ethics/Politics Distinction: A
           Reassessment

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      Abstract: Abstract The established view in Confucian scholarship today is that Confucian political order serves to promote the material and moral well-being of ordinary people (min 民). Loubna El Amine turns this view on its head by arguing that Confucian political order revolves not around the interest of the people but the demands of security, stability, and prosperity. Min are expected to be virtuous only to the extent that they help to sustain such an order. As such, Confucian politics does not follow from ethics in any straightforward manner. In this article, I argue against her revisionist reading. I argue that her account not only lacks arguments for her core thesis of the ethics/politics division, but also goes against Confucians’ concern over the universality of humanity, popular welfare, and the integrity of Confucian thought. I also draw on discussion on political realism to flesh out the sense in which classic Confucianism is realist.
      PubDate: 2022-07-14
       
  • Yang, Guorong 楊國榮, Humans and the World: From the Perspective of Shi
           (Affairs/Engagement/Action) 人與世界: 以事觀之

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      PubDate: 2022-07-13
       
  • Tocqueville between America and China and Democracy

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      Abstract: Abstract This essay critically revisits Jiwei Ci’s prudential argument for political democracy in China from the very Tocquevillian standpoint on which Ci’s core theoretical argument is predicated. I argue that Ci’s underlying assumption and argument regarding the enabling conditions of democracy actually depart significantly from Tocqueville’s own view due to Ci’s overly positive understanding of equality of conditions as directly constitutive of a democratic society and his assumed causal connection between capitalist society and political democracy. After clarifying what Tocqueville meant by equality of conditions and discussing his prudential remedy for the perils of democracy, I conclude by suggesting an alternative pragmatic and prudential justification for democracy in China that is more consistent with the Tocquevillian conception of democracy.
      PubDate: 2022-07-11
       
  • Wu, Chun 吾淳, A History of Chinese Philosophy: The Volume on Ancient
           Philosophy of Science 中國哲學通史: 古代科學哲學卷

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      PubDate: 2022-07-06
       
  • Moeller, Hans-Georg, and Paul J. D’Ambrosio, Genuine Pretending: On the
           Philosophy of the Zhuangzi

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      PubDate: 2022-07-06
       
  • The Golden Rule, Humanity, and Equality: Shu and Ren in Confucius’
           Teachings and Beyond

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      Abstract: Abstract This essay explores the correlation between shu 恕 and ren 仁 in Confucius’ teachings and its broader implications concerning the role of the golden rule. It first shows that whereas the golden rule is premised on equality between agent and recipient, Confucius’ correlation of shu with ren aims mainly at establishing a more solid foundation for the hierarchy-specific duty of the ruler to care for the ruled. It thus reveals that this conflict arises from the golden rule’s incompatibility with asymmetrical relationships, a long-standing issue concerning its validity as a moral axiom. It then addresses this conflict by demonstrating that the golden rule can effectively function in conformity with humanity even in asymmetrical relationships by way of inducing an agent’s viewpoint to shift from existing sociopolitical asymmetry to one-to-one human equality. On this basis, lastly, it examines the concurrence of the ideas of shu, human nature, and ren in ancient China.
      PubDate: 2022-07-06
       
  • Wong, Pak-Hang, and Tom Xiaowei Wang, eds., Harmonious Technology: A
           Confucian Ethics of Technology

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      PubDate: 2022-07-06
       
  • Huang, Yushun 黃玉順, The Formation of Chinese Theory of Justice: A
           Tradition of Ethics of Institution From the Duke of Zhou to Confucius,
           Mencius, and Xunzi 中國正義論的形成 :
           周孔孟荀的制度倫理學傳統

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      PubDate: 2022-04-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s11712-022-09831-1
       
  • Xu, Jiaxing 許家星, Scriptural Learning and Real Principle: A Study of
           Zhu Xi’s Scholarship on the Four Books 經學與實理:
           朱子四書學研究

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      PubDate: 2022-04-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s11712-022-09836-w
       
  • Parkes, Graham, How to Think About the Climate Crisis: A Philosophical
           Guide to Saner Ways of Living

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      PubDate: 2022-04-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s11712-022-09834-y
       
  • Ames, Roger T., Human Becomings: Theorizing Persons for Confucian Role
           Ethics

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      PubDate: 2022-04-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s11712-022-09830-2
       
  • Wu, Genyou 吳根友, A History of Chinese Philosophy (on the Qing Period)
           中國哲學通史(清代卷)

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      PubDate: 2022-04-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s11712-022-09835-x
       
  • Confucian Education: From Conformity to Cultivating Personal Distinction

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      Abstract: Abstract This article explores contrasting interpretations of early Confucian philosophy as they apply to education, focusing primarily on the Analects of Confucius (Lunyu 論語), the Mencius (Mengzi 孟子), and the Xunzi 荀子. I first describe a common interpretation of the Confucian worldview, according to which an already perfected way is thought to have been established. This view tends to encourage thinking of education as a process of conveying the True Way and ensuring conformity to the norms that constitute it. I then describe and defend a contrasting Confucian worldview, in which the learner’s initiative, critical engagement, creativity, and personal qualities play a significant role. According to this interpretation, the way is, to some degree, indeterminate and evolving, and thus more open to participatory inquiry as well as influence. Illustrious virtue, which Confucian learning aims at developing, is likewise to some degree indeterminate and legitimately personalized. Although some degree of conformity to established norms is involved, especially in early stages, Confucian education culminates in the cultivation of personal distinction, developing one’s own uniqueness.
      PubDate: 2022-04-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s11712-022-09826-y
       
  • Ng, Benjamin Wai-ming, ed., The Making of the Global Yijing in the Modern
           World: Cross-cultural Interpretations and Interactions

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      PubDate: 2022-04-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s11712-022-09833-z
       
 
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