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  Subjects -> PHILOSOPHY (Total: 762 journals)
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Journal of Catholic Social Thought
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1548-0712 - ISSN (Online) 2153-9979
Published by American Catholic Philosophical Association Homepage  [2 journals]
  • The Aesthetics of Solidarity: Our Lady of Guadalupe and American Democracy

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      Authors: Maureen H. O’Connell
      PubDate: Fri, 07 Oct 2022 05:01:38 GMT
       
  • Social Justice and Subsidiarity: Luigi Taparelli and the Origins of Modern
           Catholic Social Thought

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      Authors: Michael J. Schuck
      PubDate: Fri, 07 Oct 2022 05:01:37 GMT
       
  • Birth of a Movement: Black Lives Matter and the Catholic Church

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      Authors: Taylor J. Ott
      PubDate: Fri, 07 Oct 2022 05:01:37 GMT
       
  • Catholic Social Teaching and Global Public Health - Insights for COVID-19

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      Authors: Joshua R. Snyder
      Abstract: The novel coronavirus and its disease, COVID-19, have revealed how many health systems are ill equipped to respond to a population’s health needs. While the Catholic Church has nearly two thousand years of robust engagement in health care, it has been lacking in the realm of global public health. The Catholic Church’s health care ministries have been preoccupied with responding to illness by offering immediate relief to medical suffering. It is necessary to complement the focus on interpersonal healing by transforming the social structures that perpetuate patterns of illness. By drawing on their social teachings, Catholic health care ministries offer a unique contribution to global public health. This paper will develop four contributions for global public health and analyze them in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.
      PubDate: Fri, 07 Oct 2022 05:01:36 GMT
       
  • The Magisterium and Social Doctrine - Weighing and Interpreting the
           Documents

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      Authors: P. Bracy Bersnak
      Abstract: Debates about Catholic social doctrine often revolve around whether a given theory or practice is compatible with the magisterium or not. There is a body of scholarly literature on the nature and scope of the magisterium, but little has been written on the magisterium as it pertains to social doctrine. This essay explores what magisterial documents and scholarship say about the sources, levels, and scope of the magisterium in relation to social doctrine. It then considers how the levels of magisterium can help the faithful understand contemporary teaching on capital punishment. The better they understand the magisterium in relation to social doctrine, the more charitable and fruitful debate will be.
      PubDate: Fri, 07 Oct 2022 05:01:36 GMT
       
  • A Critical Race Theology Analysis of Catholic Social Teaching as
           Justification for Reparations to African Americans for Jim Crow

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      Authors: Nicholas Ensley Mitchell
      Abstract: This article is a critical race theology analysis that asserts that Catholic social teaching established in documents such as the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Populorum progressio, Caritas in veritate, and the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace’s Contribution to the World Conference against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance justifies reparations for the state of oppression commonly called Jim Crow, or segregation society, from the US government because it denied African Americans “truly human conditions.”
      PubDate: Fri, 07 Oct 2022 05:01:35 GMT
       
  • Overcoming the Irrationality of Hatred and Discrimination - John Lewis and
           Thomas Aquinas on Practical Reason

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      Authors: Justin Conway
      Abstract: John Lewis and Thomas Aquinas may seem like an unusual pairing for an essay. The first was a modern American congressman and civil rights activist, and the second was a priest, philosopher, and theologian from medieval Italy. Differences notwithstanding, their worldviews share a remarkable degree of overlap. This paper explores how each of these figures describes the development of right judgment and thus serves modern audiences seeking to understand how reason, emotion, and virtue operate in moral decision-making. Bringing them together, the author examines methods for rightly developing practical moral knowledge. Lewis’s political influence is studied theologically for how social formation, individual agency, and collective action function in perceiving and implementing natural law. Aquinas provides a theoretical framework for comprehending these concepts, by first defining synderesis and conscience, then discussing ways of knowing natural law, and, finally, explaining the virtue of prudence.
      PubDate: Fri, 07 Oct 2022 05:01:35 GMT
       
  • Introduction

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      Authors: Tia Noelle Pratt
      PubDate: Fri, 07 Oct 2022 05:01:34 GMT
       
  • Catholic Social Thought and the Capability Approach - Toward a More
           Democratic Form of Global Democracy Promotion

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      Authors: Tony DeCesare
      Abstract: Despite a growing body of literature that engages both Catholic social thought and the Capability Approach, little has been done to explore what these two traditions of thought might offer to a reassessment of the project of global democracy promotion. This essay brings Catholic social thought and the Capability Approach into conversation for this purpose. What emerges is a framework for thinking about and engaging in what the author calls democratic democracy promotion (DDP). DDP is based on a broadened conception of democracy and avoids a dogmatic commitment to the promotion of Western liberal democracy; it takes a needs-based approach to the allocation of externally driven democracy assistance; and it prioritizes education initiatives as central components of democracy promotion. Refashioned as such, democracy promotion has the potential to bring about more participatory democratic processes, a more inclusive global democracy, and a critical and caring mass of global democrats.
      PubDate: Fri, 07 Oct 2022 05:01:34 GMT
       
  • Pope Francis’s Social Encyclicals and the Social Teaching of the
           Church

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      Authors: Charles E. Curran
      Abstract: Pope Francis’s two encyclicals—Laudato si’ and Fratelli tutti—belong to the tradition of Catholic social teaching that began in 1891 with Pope Leo XIII’s Rerum novarum. There have been continuities and discontinuities within the tradition of Catholic social teaching, but there has been a tendency to downplay the discontinuities. Francis’s two encyclicals show both discontinuities and continuities with the earlier documents. The final section criticizes these two encyclicals as being too overly optimistic in their approach to solving the problems facing the environment and the social, political, and economic orders.
      PubDate: Fri, 07 Oct 2022 05:01:33 GMT
       
  • Catholic Teaching on Slavery: Consistency or Development'

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      Authors: Roger Bergman
      Abstract: In Fratelli tutti, Pope Francis wonders why it took the Church so long to condemn slavery unequivocally. Indeed, the place of slavery in Catholic teaching provides a test case of change in official Church intellectual tradition. This paper examines the divergent arguments of four authors who have written about Church teaching on slavery: Pope Leo XIII, Fr. Joel S. Panzer, Judge John T. Noonan Jr., and Fr. John Francis Maxwell. It considers the statement on slavery in the Catechism of the Catholic Church in light of Pope John Paul II’s meditation on the nature of human labor in Laborem exercens, itself a meditation on Leo’s Rerum novarum (On the Condition of Labor), and offers a critique of the position that papal teaching, because it must be self-consistent, is therefore irreformable or unsusceptible to development. This provides one response to the pope’s provocative question.
      PubDate: Fri, 07 Oct 2022 05:01:33 GMT
       
 
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