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  Subjects -> PHILOSOPHY (Total: 762 journals)
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Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.192
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1537-7814 - ISSN (Online) 1943-3557
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [352 journals]
  • JGA volume 21 issue 4 Cover and Front matter

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      Pages: 1 - 4
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S1537781422000330
       
  • JGA volume 21 issue 4 Cover and Back matter

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      Pages: 1 - 4
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S1537781422000342
       
  • Editor’s Note

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      Authors: Currarino; Rosanne
      Pages: 261 - 261
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S1537781422000329
       
  • The Power of Racial Mapping: Ellsworth Huntington, Immigration, and
           Eugenics in the Progressive Era

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      Authors: Lavery; Colm
      Pages: 262 - 278
      Abstract: Racial mapping during the Progressive Era played into the political narratives of eugenic intervention and immigration restriction. This article argues that the racial cartographic work of the Yale geographer and prolific eugenicist Ellsworth Huntington was both developed within and contributed to this racist milieu. Huntington’s middle-class and educated upbringing, his familial history, and his expertise as a well-travelled geographer all conspired to shape his views on eugenics, race, and immigration. By applying the critical cartographic theories of John Brian Harley, Denis Wood, Heather Winlow, and others, I show that Huntington’s racial maps were a product of his cultural and political environment. The success of a map’s impact was often due to maps being seen as objective depictions of spatial variation. Indeed, for Huntington they performed an essential role in communicating and portraying racial information. But, as I argue, they were susceptible to bias, misunderstanding, and intentional manipulation. I show that Huntington’s maps are not accurate snapshots of reality, but rather cultural texts or rhetorical images intended to create a narrative and convince the reader of a particular subjective point of view.
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S1537781422000299
       
  • “The Great White Mother”: Harriet Maxwell Converse, the Indian Colony
           of New York City, and the Media, 1885–1903

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      Authors: Winters; John C.
      Pages: 279 - 300
      Abstract: This article reveals the history of the unstudied “Indian Colony” of Gilded Age New York City through the life of its founder and governor, Harriet Maxwell Converse. Converse was a white woman adopted by the Senecas and a salvage ethnographer, a potent combination of Indigenous “authenticity” and scholarly authority that made her an object of fascination to white New Yorkers who read about her in extensive newspaper coverage. The Colony itself was composed of boarding houses, Converse’s own townhouse-turned-museum, and was connected to the New York Police Department. It provided housing and support to resident and visiting Native Americans who found work in the city’s “Indian trade” and booming entertainment industry.By highlighting the extensive newspaper coverage of Converse and her Colony, this article reveals a hidden history of the Indigenous people who lived and worked in the city. It also pushes the periodization of the earliest urban Indian communities backward in time by more than a decade and shows how the media fused the daily life of Converse and the Colonists with popular stereotypes of “savage” and “vanished” Indians, immigrant stereotypes, assimilation, gendered expectations, and the predatory academic desires of museums and salvage ethnographers.
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S1537781422000317
       
  • “A Simple Act of Justice”: The Pueblo Rejection of U.S. Citizenship in
           the Early Twentieth Century

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      Authors: Teeters; Lila M.
      Pages: 301 - 318
      Abstract: In January of 1920, the House of Representatives passed HR 288, also known as the Carter Bill, which would have made all American Indians born in the territorial United States citizens. While lauded by some as a “simple act of justice” to extend citizenship to America’s first peoples, many Native Americans protested the bill, which eventually led to its demise. In the press, the Pueblos led the protest. Their activism highlights key, yet overlooked, developments in American Indian citizenship in the early twentieth century. First, citizenship lost any pretense of a consensual nature. Second, Indigenous protests forced congressmen to change the very nature of citizenship: from a status that marked completed assimilation to something much more pluralistic. Highlighting the Pueblos’ fight helps historians analyze Native activism in the Progressive Era while problematizing citizenship as the ultimate aspirational status.
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S1537781422000287
       
  • “Showing Up America”: Performing Race and Nation in Britain
           Before the First World War

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      Authors: Defrates; Lewis
      Pages: 319 - 341
      Abstract: This article examines American travel and performance in Britain in the decades prior to the First World War, arguing that the expression of nationality in this transatlantic context played a profound role in formulating both America’s dominant culture and a culture of opposition advanced by African American performers. It explores this “oppositional” culture in detail, focusing on the transatlantic work of Ida B. Wells and the Fisk Jubilee Singers. Both found a sympathetic audience across the Atlantic at a time of increased repression at home. British support opened new avenues for these activists, but also limited the rhetorical possibilities of their work. By bringing into conversation previously separate historiographies on early waves of “Americanization,” the transnational dimensions of various reform movements and the international formation of the Black Atlantic, it illustrates the economic, infrastructural, and racial inequalities that shaped the United States’ emerging national culture.
      PubDate: 2022-07-25
      DOI: 10.1017/S1537781422000305
       
  • Slavery and Capitalism, Redux - Roberto Saba. American Mirror: The United
           States and Brazil in the Age of Emancipation. Princeton, NJ: Princeton
           

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      Authors: Sanders; James E.
      Pages: 342 - 344
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S1537781422000354
       
  • Warrior Queens of the Silver Screen - Liz Clarke. The American Girl Goes
           to War: Women and National Identity in U.S. Silent Film. New Brunswick,
           NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2022. ix + 169 pp. $29.95 (paperback), ISBN
           978-1978810150.

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      Authors: Rouleau; Brian
      Pages: 344 - 345
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S1537781422000366
       
  • Nationalist Rhetoric and Educational State-Building in the Progressive Era
           - Cody Dodge Ewert. Making Schools American: Nationalism and the Origin of
           Modern Educational Politics. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University
           Press, 2022. 232 pp. $39.95 (hardcover), ISBN 978-1421442792.

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      Authors: Groeger; Cristina Viviana
      Pages: 346 - 348
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S1537781422000378
       
  • Posthumous Pardons and Progressive Era Injustices - Scott D. Seligman A
           Second Reckoning: Race, Injustice, and the Last Hanging in Annapolis.
           Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2021. pp. 288. $32.95 (hardcover),
           ISBN 978-1640124653.

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      Authors: Polite; DJ
      Pages: 348 - 349
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S153778142200038X
       
  • Colonial Samoa - Holger Droessler. Coconut Colonialism: Workers and the
           Globalization of Samoa. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2022. 304
           pp. $39.95 (cloth), ISBN 978-0674263338.

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      Authors: Shoemaker; Nancy
      Pages: 350 - 351
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S1537781422000391
       
  • Beyond Memory: Race, Section, Labor, and the Meaning of the Civil War -
           Matthew E. Stanley Grand Army of Labor: Workers, Veterans, and the Meaning
           of the Civil War. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2021. xii + 297
           pp. $110.00 (cloth), ISBN 978-0252043741; $30.00 (paperback), ISBN
           978-0252052644; $19.95 (e-book), ISBN 978-005264-4.

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      Authors: Marten; James
      Pages: 352 - 353
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S1537781422000408
       
  • Democracy and Civility in Gilded Age America - Jon Grinspan. The Age of
           Acrimony: How Americans Fought to Fix Their Democracy, 1865-1915. New
           York: Bloomsbury, 2021. 384 pp. $30.00 (hardcover), ISBN 978-1635574630.

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      Authors: Sparacino; Anthony
      Pages: 354 - 355
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S153778142200041X
       
  • “Pastor was Trapped”: Queer Scandal and Contestations Over Christian
           Anti-Vice Reform—CORRIGENDUM

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      Authors: Hemphill; Katie M.
      Pages: 356 - 356
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S1537781422000421
       
 
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