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  Subjects -> PHILOSOPHY (Total: 762 journals)
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Journal of Theoretical & Philosophical Psychology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.351
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 4  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1068-8471 - ISSN (Online) 2151-3341
Published by APA Homepage  [89 journals]
  • "Advancing a phenomenology of law of migration and displacement: Centering
           recognition of persons and communities migrating and their lived
           experience of suffering": Correction to Morrissey (2022).

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      Abstract: Reports an error in "Advancing a phenomenology of law of migration and displacement: Centering recognition of persons and communities migrating and their lived experience of suffering" by Mary Beth Morrissey (Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology, Advanced Online Publication, Jul 28, 2022, np). In the article (https://doi .org/10.1037/teo0000208), the first recommendation that appears in the Collaborative Strategies and Policy Recommendations should appear as follows: building theorizing that helps to frame or reframe both the problem and experience of suffering in migration and displacement, including the contributions to suffering of law and policy, racism, and other structural conditions and social and economic determinants. All versions of this article have been corrected. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2022-85652-001.) In this contribution to the Special Issue on Law, Medicine, and Bioethics: Role of Interdisciplinary Leadership in Influencing Health and Public Health Policy and Democratic Systems of Governance, the author brings a phenomenological lens and heightened focus to bear on suffering as transcendentally constituted and the witnessing of social suffering across the global world at the intersections of migration and displacement, global crisis conditions prevailing during the COVID pandemic, and climate, conflict, and war that threaten human annihilation. Engagement with phenomenological processes of reflection opens the field of the lived experience of suffering in migration and displacement to inquiry and probing of the social imaginaries that shape law and structural conditions and determinants contributing to massive social suffering, including structural and systemic racism and policy harms to immigrants and refugees and their communities. A palliative turn toward dismantling such structural conditions of suffering is proposed as integral to social change processes and fostering of resilience among immigrant and refugee communities, including building environments that mitigate suffering. Expanding the social and ethical capabilities of both health care and public health systems and workforces is also essential to social transformation. Finally, centering recognition of persons and communities who are migrating or experiencing displacement is an ethical priority and a condition precedent to the pursuit of meaningful social change, equity, and justice for all communities. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 24 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/teo0000213
       
  • Advancing a phenomenology of law of migration and displacement: Centering
           recognition of persons and communities migrating and their lived
           experience of suffering.

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      Abstract: [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 42(4) of Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology (see record 2023-12694-001). In the article (https://doi .org/10.1037/teo0000208), the first recommendation that appears in the Collaborative Strategies and Policy Recommendations should appear as follows: building theorizing that helps to frame or reframe both the problem and experience of suffering in migration and displacement, including the contributions to suffering of law and policy, racism, and other structural conditions and social and economic determinants. All versions of this article have been corrected.] In this contribution to the Special Issue on Law, Medicine, and Bioethics: Role of Interdisciplinary Leadership in Influencing Health and Public Health Policy and Democratic Systems of Governance, the author brings a phenomenological lens and heightened focus to bear on suffering as transcendentally constituted and the witnessing of social suffering across the global world at the intersections of migration and displacement, global crisis conditions prevailing during the COVID pandemic, and climate, conflict, and war that threaten human annihilation. Engagement with phenomenological processes of reflection opens the field of the lived experience of suffering in migration and displacement to inquiry and probing of the social imaginaries that shape law and structural conditions and determinants contributing to massive social suffering, including structural and systemic racism and policy harms to immigrants and refugees and their communities. A palliative turn toward dismantling such structural conditions of suffering is proposed as integral to social change processes and fostering of resilience among immigrant and refugee communities, including building environments that mitigate suffering. Expanding the social and ethical capabilities of both health care and public health systems and workforces is also essential to social transformation. Finally, centering recognition of persons and communities who are migrating or experiencing displacement is an ethical priority and a condition precedent to the pursuit of meaningful social change, equity, and justice for all communities. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 28 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/teo0000208
       
  • The mentality of dieability/killability: Reflections on the special issue
           on law, medicine, and bioethics.

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      Abstract: This commentary discusses the Special Issue on Law, Medicine, and Bioethics: Role of Interdisciplinary Leadership in Influencing Health and Public Health Policy and Democratic Systems of Governance from the perspective of the concept of killability/dieability. Killability refers to the idea that the other can be killed as an active doing, whereas dieability means that certain people can be left to die, although their death could be prevented. Killability and dieability overlap and can be observed as mentalities not only in authoritarian regimes but also in existing liberal democracies. The four articles are analyzed within the framework of killability/dieability, and it is suggested that the special issue is paradigmatic for how philosophical–psychological studies should expand their traditional boundaries by incorporating reflections from a variety of academic disciplines and practices. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 14 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/teo0000205
       
  • Books briefly noted.

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      Abstract: Reviews the books Routledge International Handbook of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology: Critiques, Problems, and Alternatives to Psychological Ideas, edited by Brent D. Slife et al. (2022); Problematic Research Practices and Inertia in Scientific Psychology: History, Sources, and Recommended Solutions, edited by James T. Lamiell and Kathleen L. Slaney (2021); The Second Cognitive Revolution: A Tribute to Rom Harré, edited by Bo Allesøe Christensen (2019); Psychology’s Misuse of Statistics and Persistent Dismissal of its Critics, by James T. Lamiell (2019); Gadamer’s Hermeneutics: Between Phenomenology and Dialectic, by Robert J. Dostal (2022); Do I Look at You with Love: Reimagining the Story of Dementia, by Mark Freeman (2021); The Self-Field: Mind, Body, and Environment, by Chris Abel (2021); Viktor Frankl and the Shoah: Advancing the Debate, by Alexander Batthyány; We Built Reality: How Social Science Infiltrated Culture, Politics, and Power, by Jason Blakely; The Depolarizing of America: A Guidebook for Social Healing, by Kirk J. Schneider (2020); Good Science: Psychological Inquiry as Everyday Moral Practice, by Joshua W. Clegg (2022); Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience (2nd Edition), by M. R. Bennett and P. M. S. Hacker (2022); Fanon, Phenomenology, and Psychology, edited by Leswin Laubscher et al. (2022); Hermeneutic Approaches to Interpretive Research: Dissertations in a Different Key, edited by Philip Cushman (2022); How to Do Things with Emotions: The Morality of Anger and Shame Across Cultures, by Owen Flanagan; Character: The History of a Cultural Obsession, by Marjorie Garber (2020); and Ars Vitae: The Fate of Inwardness and the Return of the Ancient Arts of Living, by Elizabeth Lasch-Quinn (2020). These are recent publications and otherwise noteworthy books relevant to theoretical and philosophical psychology. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 09 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/teo0000204
       
  • The philosophy and social science of agape love.

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      Abstract: The moral virtues have had prominence in social scientific research ever since Piaget’s (1932) and Kohlberg’s (1969) pioneering work on the cognitive developmental stages of justice reasoning. A less explored moral virtue is the ancient idea of agape, or love that is in service to others which includes effort and even pain on the part of the one expressing the virtue. In this work, we attempt a precise definition of agape using Aristotelian philosophical views of virtue ethics and his principles of analyzing constructs for their essences and their specific differences with related but distinct constructs. From this Aristotelian philosophical framework, we then critique existing social scientific measures of love and of agape in particular. We then provide guidelines for the development of construct-valid measures of agape that are philosophically coherent. Possible research questions to expand the scientific study of agape are presented as a way forward with this important construct that could bring psychological health to individuals and peace and unity to families and communities. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/teo0000202
       
  • Toward a theory of maldaimonia.

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      Abstract: Maldaimonia is introduced as a concept that is both the counter-point to eudaimonia and a parallel construct. While eudaimonia entails self-realization of potentials in ways that are allocentric, constructive, and/or cooperative, maldaimonia, if it is a viable construct, would entail self-realization through exclusively egocentric, destructive, and/or exploitative activities. It is posited that both eudaimonic and maldaimonic activities are accompanied by a distinct set of cognitive-affective experiences termed feeling of personal expressiveness. Using criteria drawn from eudaimonic identity theory, six types of behaviors are evaluated as possible exemplars of maldaimonia: (a) psychopathy, (b) imposture and con artistry, (c) criminal competencies, (d) terrorism, (e) unscrupulous competition, and (f) playing video games involving extreme violence. It is concluded that several of these behaviors appear to meet the criteria employed. Distinguishing eudaimonia from maldaimonia requires the application of some conceptual standard of ethical conduct. A research agenda is proposed for investigating the construct of maldaimonia. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/teo0000198
       
  • Fascism in nowadays Brazil: On the topicality of Adorno’s
           Education after Auschwitz.

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      Abstract: Nowadays Brazil is marked by intense political radicalization and polarization that is directly associated with the expansion of the far-right and it alerts to the existence of a fascist modus operandi in the country. Motivated by such context, this paper intends to present certain peculiarities of this present “Brazilian fascism” using as a theoretical tool that can promote practical measures Theodor Adorno’s essay Education after Auschwitz. In conclusive terms, beyond illustrating some of Adorno’s propositions via articles selected from current newspapers, this work adds a welcome actualization of the reflection concerning the danger of an excessive liaison of the individual with technology as a possible means for joining antidemocratic regimes. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 15 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/teo0000197
       
 
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