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  Subjects -> PHILOSOPHY (Total: 762 journals)
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Studies in Philology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.101
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0039-3738 - ISSN (Online) 1543-0383
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • Writing "Home": Translating Belonging in Beves of Hampton

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      Abstract: [The child went off with his tutor's lambs. That day he led them to pasture in a meadow. He looked a little upwards and to the hill and heard, from the palace which had been his father's, much merry-making, rejoicing, din, and festivity. The child wondered what this might be.]2These two passages, one from the Insular French Boeve de Haumtone and the other from its Middle English counterpart, Beves of Hampton, depict the same scene: the eponymous hero, exiled from Hampton after his father's murder, gazes upon the town in which he lived and hears the celebratory sounds marking his mother's marriage to the emperor of Germany. While both passages are largely similar in content, their foci differ. The francophone scene ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Pleasing Analysis of The Faerie Queene

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      Abstract: Scholars have learnedly expounded on this passage from Edmund Spenser's "Letter to Raleigh," appended to The Faerie Queene's first installment but omitted from the second. Many have also prudently warned us not to take it as overly determinative for our interpretation of the poem. And yet, it has always been and remains intriguing to me why Spenser would here use the term "Analysis." It seems a strange term for merely accounting for a nonsequential narrative structure, conventional for epic anyway (in medias res), and yet neither does it seem quite right for advertising an inspired vatic project of momentous scope, as he seems implicitly to be doing. What I propose here is that Spenser was deliberately using a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Acting and Being Acted Upon: Hamlet's Delay, the Secondary Ghost, and the
           Purgation of Agency and Patiency

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      Abstract: Perhaps the most disputed issue in Hamlet concerns the question of delay. Following Hamlet's example, critics have traditionally construed the question in terms of action and agency: "I do not know / Why yet I live to say 'This thing's to do.'"1 Here delay—often understood by critics as the postponement of, resistance to, or antipathy toward the performance of an action—rebounds, sometimes unflatteringly, upon the evaluation of Hamlet's character. Indeed, Hamlet provides the first instance of such criticism: "But I am pigeon-liver'd and lack gall / To make oppression bitter, or ere this / I should have fatted all the region kites / With this slave's offal" (2.2.573–76). Yet the issue of delay can be approached from ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The "Puritan" Preacher and The Puritan Widow

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      Abstract: In the summer of 1606, the Children of Paul's staged an edgy new comedy by the twenty-three-year-old Thomas Middleton titled The Puritan Widow, or, The Widow of Watling Street. The Children of Paul's were unique among the commercial theaters of Jacobean London in that they belonged to St. Paul's Cathedral, the diocesan seat of the bishop of London and the city's chief ecclesial building. The children, ranging in age from six to about sixteen, were officially choirboys, recruited from all over England to sing elaborate liturgical music in the Cathedral's worship services. The boys, who lived and were educated in the cathedral's sprawling precinct, had used the cathedral precincts to perform occasional amateur ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Garden, the Granary, and "the basic stuff and raw material of true
           induction": The Eclipse of the Imagination in Francis Bacon's Poetics of
           Natural History

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      Abstract: Sir Francis Bacon's project of epistemological reform shows a double-mindedness about the uses of poetic fictions and the imagination. This essay will explore how Bacon's ambivalence develops as his career progresses, with the 1605 Advancement of Learning's initial strain of humanism fading to a resigned pessimism about any kind of writing that elicits a strong imaginative response. Bacon read his humanist forbearers with care and recognized the tension between legitimate, icastic imagination and fantastic excess in their poetics.1 However, he never advocates for his reforms without recourse to poetry—broadly defined as imaginative fiction—and throughout his career he concedes that imagination is necessary to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Jonathan Wild: Spinoza, the Foil, and the Jacobites

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      Abstract: Henry Fielding's Jonathan Wild (1743, 1754) has never been favored with a full historical and critical reading, because an important clue within the text as to its complex political and aesthetic identity has not been detected. This is a bold claim and will need careful and circumspect exposition.Such circumspection necessitates an unusual procedure. Rather than putting its best furniture forward and foregrounding the main clue at the start, the essay will proceed gradually, ab effectu, from observable qualities and details of the text at large, effects on the ground. A preliminary assumption is that the text's "subtle totality … resides in the very language itself," among "oscillations of linguistic usage."1 The ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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