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Journal of Nietzsche Studies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.166
Number of Followers: 5  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0968-8005 - ISSN (Online) 1538-4594
Published by Penn State University Press Homepage  [34 journals]
  • Abbreviations And Citations of Friedrich Nietzsche’s Works

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      Abstract: The same citation format is used throughout the journal. References to Nietzsche’s texts are given in the body of the articles and reviews. References to Nietzsche’s unpublished writings are standardized, whenever possible, to refer to the most accessible print editions of Nietzsche’s notebooks and publications: Kritische Studienausgabe (ksa), compiled under the general editorship of Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari and based on the complete edition of the Kritische Gesamtausgabe (kgw) (Berlin and New York: Walter de Gruyter, 1967ff) or the electronic version published in the Nietzsche Source collection (http://www.nietzschesource.org/eKGWB) [abbreviated ekgwb]). References to the print editions of letters ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • What Does Nietzsche Mean by “the Same” in His Theory of
           Eternal Recurrence'

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      Abstract: When Nietzsche first mentions his new theory in his note from the start of August in 1881—a note that he himself cites in his later published recollection of his discovery (EH “Books: Z”1)—he calls it “the recurrence of the same [die Wiederkunft des Gleichen]” and “the eternal recurrence of the same [die ewige Wiederkunft des Gleichen]” (KSA 9:11[141]).1 He then uses this name, or abbreviations and variations of this name throughout the rest of this particular notebook, often replacing the term “recurrence” (Wiederkunft) with the term “return” (Wiederkehr). This is also the name that he uses frequently in the rest of the notes he composed until the end of his writing career, with the last mention showing up in a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Morality as Cure and Poison in Nietzsche’s Genealogy

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      Abstract: In the preface to GM, Nietzsche calls for a “critique of moral values”: “the value of these values,” he says, “is itself to be put into question for once.” For this critique, he adds, “we need knowledge of the conditions and circumstances out of which [the values] grew” (GM P:6).1 We learn from the three treatises that follow that the “conditions and circumstances” Nietzsche has in mind are those under which various features making up morality as we’ve come to know it have arisen, as well as the impact those features continue to have on humanity. As he repeats throughout GM (P:6; I:6; III:13, 17, 21), these features emerged as a “cure”—a treatment of underlying sickness(es)—but their legacy is to “poison” us—to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Nietzsche, Nihilism, and the “New Materialist” Thought

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      Abstract: When Nietzsche declared in 1888 that he was a “destiny,” he described his discovery of the life-negating animus of Christian morality as an event without parallel, a real catastrophe: “Anyone who raises awareness about it is a force majeure, a destiny—he breaks the history of humanity in two. You live before him or you live after him. . . . The lightning-bolt of truth has struck precisely what stood highest hitherto” (EH “Destiny” 8).1 These lines, like so many from Nietzsche’s corpus, are oft-repeated, the starting point for concerted engagement with key ideas: “the death of God”; the advent of European nihilism (“the history of the next two centuries”); the eternal return; will to power; and the revaluation of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Kommentar zu Nietzsches “Unzeitgemässen Betrachtungen,” III.
           Schopenhauer als Erzieher; IV. Richard Wagner in Bayreuth by Barbara
           Neymeyr (review)

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      Abstract: The decision to split the Historischer und kritischer Nietzsche-Kommentar of the Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften on the four essays of the Unzeitgemässe Betrachtungen into two volumes, dealing with the first and second and with the third and fourth essays, respectively, points to the extent and depth of commentary required to gain access to these early, and sometimes overlooked, works by Nietzsche. One recalls that, originally, Nietzsche had planned not just four but thirteen essays (KSA 7:30[38], 744–45), although he never got beyond completing four and planning a fifth one, titled “We Philologists” (KSA 8:3[1]–5[200], 11–96)—a project that, at the suggestion of Heinrich Köselitz, he set aside for ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Nietzsche’s Dawn: Philosophy, Ethics, and the Passion of Knowledge by
           Keith Ansell-Pearson and Rebecca Bamford (review)

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      Abstract: Although caution ought to be exercised when it comes to his retrospective assessment of his past works, Nietzsche’s EH accurately describes D as a significant beginning, and a preparatory work. The preparation in question is for a broad critical reappraisal of the function of morality. More specifically, the object of Nietzsche’s critique is that which he titles “customary morality.” It is D that got the ball rolling on this project, as well as on many familiar Nietzschean themes that find arguably maturer exposition in later works, those more systematically studied on university syllabi. In this respect and others, Keith Ansell-Pearson and Rebecca Bamford are justified in their claim that D itself is a significant ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Problem of Affective Nihilism in Nietzsche: Thinking Differently, Feeling
           Differently by Kaitlyn Creasy (review)

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      Abstract: Kaitlyn Creasy has written a very fine book, in which she sets out an important question—how affect and nihilism correlate in Nietzsche’s philosophy—and provides a multifaceted and well-organized answer that pays due attention to the complexities in Nietzsche’s texts as well as to current scholarship relevant to the matters at hand. The term “affective nihilism” is not deployed by Nietzsche per se (it was coined by Ken Gemes), but it turns out to be a very useful concept for focusing and coordinating central aspects of Nietzsche’s thought. In the Nachlass, Nietzsche defines nihilism as “the radical repudiation of value, meaning, and desirability” in human existence (KSA 12:2[127]), where “the highest values ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The New Cambridge Companion to Nietzsche ed. by Tom Stern (review)

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      Abstract: Any companion will take on different features over the course of a long trip (cheerful, informative, interesting, grating, sullen, or dull), though very often it is one’s own moods that are to blame if things go badly. Similarly, whether the companion Tom Stern has assembled will find favor will depend on the moods of the one being companioned.If one is interested in gaining more thorough knowledge of Nietzsche’s own context, there are plenty of instructive discussions here. Andreas Urs Sommer, in “What Nietzsche Did and Did Not Read,” points out that for all of Nietzsche’s admonishments that we should learn from observation, “reading is in fact the foundation of his thought” (30). Sommer demonstrates that ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Nietzsche and Friendship by Willow Verkerk (review)

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      Abstract: This book proposes a novel interpretation of Nietzsche’s thinking about friendship, a topic that remains understudied. Verkerk’s project takes its point of departure from questions about the nature of friendship and its relation to other themes in Nietzsche. Primary among these are the intellectual conscience, the ubiquity of the agon, the project of “becoming who you are,” the relation (and distinction) between ego and self, the free spirit, the critique of pity, the multiplicity and (un)knowability of the drives, the will to power, and relations between men and women.How successful is Verkerk’s elucidation of Nietzsche’s thinking about friendship' At one level, the book does admirably what it sets out to do. It ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Nietzsche’s Pragmatism: A Study on Perspectival Thought by Pietro
           Gori (review)

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      Abstract: Pietro Gori dedicates Nietzsche’s Pragmatism “To the wanderers and Good Europeans,” and Anglophone wanderers into Sarah de Sanctis’s translation will indeed find good European Nietzsche scholarship. The table of contents is a helpful map of the book, with five chapters consisting of twenty-eight sections on a sequence of philosophical and interpretive topics. Perspectival thought, addressed in the subtitle, is the explicit topic of the third chapter. Pragmatism, mentioned in the title, is the explicit topic of the fifth and final chapter. While both topics also are discussed in many other places, the overall focus is on Nietzsche’s views of epistemology and truth.The first chapter discusses Nietzsche’s views of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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