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  Subjects -> PHILOSOPHY (Total: 762 journals)
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Journal of Speculative Philosophy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.159
Number of Followers: 6  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0891-625X - ISSN (Online) 1527-9383
Published by Penn State University Press Homepage  [34 journals]
  • Editors' Introduction

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      Abstract: The articles in this special issue of the Journal of Speculative Philosophy were selected from revised versions of papers that were originally presented at the fifty-ninth annual meeting of the Society for Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy (SPEP) in September 2021. This virtual conference took place on September 17–18 and 23–26 after the cancellation of the 2020 conference due to the COVID-19 pandemic.Bonnie Honig and Mel Y. Chen gave the SPEP 2021 Plenary Addresses and we are grateful to be able to include Honig's plenary, "Taking Back the Camera: Race and Agonism in Mr. Deeds and The Fits" in this special issue. Thinking both with and against Stanley Cavell's and Giorgio Agamben's respective readings of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • SPEP Plenary Address: Take Back the Camera: Race and Agonism in Mr. Deeds
           and The Fits

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      Abstract: In two short essays, Stanley Cavell and Giorgio Agamben, respectively, cast the camera as a powerful technology (Cavell) or a technology of power (Agamben).1 For Cavell, the midcentury Hollywood film camera can serve as a "somatogram," a machine-reader of bodily feeling that makes us known to ourselves. For Agamben, the camera of early motion studies betrayed us: abnormalizing certain bodily movements, it deprived the bourgeoisie of its gestures. While, for Agamben, the camera is part of an apparatus that disciplines the body into a dehumanizing efficiency, for Cavell, the film camera humanizes, ostensively recording a bodily cogito that is the only one left centuries after Descartes.Agamben calls the techniques of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • SPEP Co-Director's Address: The Question of the Normal

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      Abstract: One of the greatest of Edmund Husserl's many gifts to phenomenology, I would argue, has been his identification and analysis of the natural attitude: that familiar, taken-for-granted perspective on ourselves, others, and the world that underpins our daily experiences and helps us to make sense of them. What is especially striking about the natural attitude is that it is not natural at all, at least not as the term natural has traditionally been understood, namely, as something that we are born with or have possessed since birth. For none of us are born with our natural attitudes. Instead, they are something that we construct for ourselves, without even realizing we are doing so, and that we actively maintain ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Dred Scott Ontology and the Philosophical Significance of Slave
           Narratives

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      Abstract: In his classic essay, "What Is Wrong With Slavery'," R. M. Hare notes a tension at the center of chattel slavery: While the log books of the antebellum economy list enslaved persons alongside pulleys, mules, and horseshoes—reflecting the managerial equation of slaves with animals and "insensate property"—enslavers must have recognized the enslaved as fellow members of the human community. After all, Hare argues, slaves are "different from other animals in that they can look a long way ahead, and can therefore become the object of deterrent punishment." This explains the "atrocious punishments" inflicted upon them; "there would be no point in inflicting them on animals."1 Put differently, while the captive bodies ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Condensation of the Secret: Dream Analysis and the Literary Fragment

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      Abstract: In this article I introduce a path by which to use Freud's theory of dream condensation to analyze the literary structure of the fragment. Like many of the canonical treatments of the fragment (Didi-Huberman, Blanchot, Derrida, etc.), such analysis not only sheds light on the unique quality of the fragment but simultaneously affirms the inevitably fragmented constitution of all our dreams and sentences. To think about fragments is to think about the manner in which a fragment appears out of context—the way it generates such appearance and the way such appearance is received. Maurice Blanchot describes (condemns) the Western metaphysical response to the fragment as one that seeks to find the whole to which it ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Juliette's Endless Prosperities: Foucault avec Lacan on Sade's Illustrious
           Villain

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      Abstract: The Marquis de Sade's Juliette is well-known as an outrageously murderous, hedonistic anti-heroine who pursues a dizzying array of sexual and homicidal "delights" over the course of her short lifetime before mysteriously vanishing without a trace. The force of Juliette's fantastical orgiastic feats has evidently not been forgotten over the centuries, as Juliette has captured the imagination of several of the most influential Continental theorists of the last one hundred years, from Adorno and Horkheimer1 to Deleuze2 and Lacan.3 Most of these engagements with Sade—if not Juliette specifically—have attracted some critical attention; for example, Rebecca Comay explores the links that Adorno and Lacan both draw ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Kant's Conjectures: The Genesis of the Feminine

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      Abstract: Between the first two Critiques, Kant wrote what he called a "conjectural history" of the development of human freedom through a reading of Genesis. "Conjectures on the Beginning of Human History" (1786) is an account of man's ascent above animal society through a conjectural or speculative reading of Genesis that functionally carves up a division between the animal and the moral.1 Despite Kant calling his own conjectural history a "work of fiction," scholars have rightly taken seriously the developmental account of human freedom that Kant offers here in this text. While scholars like Dipesh Chakrabarty and David Baumeister concentrate primarily on the human-animal distinction in order to effectively reckon with ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Queering Gestell: Thinking Outside Butler's Frames and Inside Belu's
           Reproductive Enframing

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      Abstract: Judith Butler is concerned with the epistemological problem of framing, the process by which we come to apprehend knowledge and to discern the types of lives we consider worth living. Butler is primarily interested in the frames of war, including the nationalist discourse that delineates boundaries between "us" and "them." However, in the introduction to Frames of War, she notes that the knowledge-practice of framing may extend to issues regarding reproductive freedom as well. In this article, I first apply her notion of framing to an analysis of France's bioethics legislation that regulates access to assisted reproductive technology in order to demonstrate how such legislation frames who is considered the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Cis Sense and the Habit of Gender Assignment

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      Abstract: In this article, I give an account of cis sense. I argue that cis sense is a mode of perception that institutes and sediments an individual and social habit of the third-person conferral of gender, that is, a habit of gender assignment. Cis sense clarifies the institution of meaning that is central to cisnormativity; it elucidates how cisnormativity, to follow Maurice Merleau-Ponty's attention to the dual meaning of sens in French, sets up a domain of orienting, of giving meaning and direction to existence that prioritizes the third-person conferral of gender. Although it is only through and in relation to others that our existence comes to mean anything at all, cis sense grants indisputable authority to the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Is Philosophy Western' Some Western and East Asian Perspectives on a
           Metaphilosophical Question

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      Abstract: Is philosophy Western' Was philosophy born and raised exclusively in the Western tradition, or can it be found in at least some non-Western traditions'1 Is the phrase "Western philosophy" a specific restriction of a more universal field, or is it, as Heidegger and others have claimed, a tautology since philosophy defines the essential core of the Western tradition and the Western tradition alone' In fact, Heidegger's claim is often misunderstood and misused, since he equated "philosophy" with Western "metaphysics" and announced "the end of philosophy and the task of thinking"—and he maintained a deep and abiding interest in East Asian thinking.2 In any case, the question is, if we wish to use the term "philosophy" ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Negativity in Spinozist Politics

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      Abstract: In contemporary philosophical discourse, Spinoza is frequently presented as articulating a metaphysics of pure affirmation.1 He has regularly been taken up as a thinker whose metaphysics could potentially provide an ontological ground for ethics and politics that is anti-Hegelian, or more broadly anti-dialectical. At the forefront of this line of interpretation stands Gilles Deleuze, along with the work of Antonio Negri and Michael Hardt. For Deleuze in particular, Hegel constitutes the great enemy: the absolute idealist elevates the negative, in the form of contradiction, to a glorified position of ontological centrality. The work of contradiction, the labor of the negative, is both the dialectical form of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Making Sense of Problems: Toward a Deleuzo-Humean Critical Theory

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      Abstract: As Deleuze says on numerous occasions, philosophers have never been truly motivated by the "What is X'" question; rather, as Deleuze puts it "questions such as who' how much' how' where' when' are better questions,"1 questions that are integral to the process of encountering a problem, a problem that then prompts and shocks us into the effort of making sense. To expand upon what I mean, let us take the case of the jealous lover, as Deleuze does as well in his book on Marcel Proust. Proust was well aware of the pressing questions just mentioned, and the jealous narrator of The Prisoner admits that such jealous questioning "always made [him] more open to the world of the possible than to that of real-life ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Rhythm of Hegel's Speculative Logic

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      Abstract: The method of the logic is the absolute rhythm of all that is alive, the truth of everything in particular spheres as also in general inclusive spheres.This article argues that Hegel's speculative logic has an essentially rhythmic structure. The Phenomenology of Spirit opens with an image that invites the reader to imagine a fluid structure whereby conflict and contradiction are conceived as moments of a single organic whole. The bud that disappears when the blossom breaks and the fruit that emerges thereafter as "the blossom's truth" suggests a secret unity of contradictory elements. Conceiving such a unity requires that one conceive a reciprocal necessity within contradictory moments. Hegel describes the moment ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Phenomenology of the Work of Attention

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      Abstract: In The Sovereignty of Good, Iris Murdoch memorably describes the example of a mother-in-law coming to regard her daughter-in-law in a more positive and truthful way through "careful and just attention."1 In Murdoch's example, which is clearly generalizable to many other situations and contexts, the mother-in-law slowly and gradually comes to experience her daughter-in-law differently—no longer seen as "a vulgar girl," the daughter-in-law now appears "not vulgar but refreshingly simple, not undignified but spontaneous, not noisy but gay, not tiresomely juvenile but delightfully youthful, and so on."2 And Murdoch crucially points out that this change is not the result of a choice, or "jump of the will."3 However ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Explaining It Away' On the Enigma of Time in Husserl's Phenomenology
           of Time-Consciousness

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      Abstract: This investigation is motivated by what I call the "enigma of time," the paradox that, on the one hand, the givenness of a temporal being takes time, i.e., comes in installments and is never complete (never fully determinate), while, on the other hand, at each moment of manifestation the being is grasped as a unity, i.e., "pretends" to be complete. A methodological assumption underlying my investigation is that the paradox cannot be "solved" by postulating an atemporal foundation while compartmentalizing temporality1 to the extent that it becomes ontologically superfluous. Such an attempt only obscures or postpones the problem, for time is that paradox, and to eliminate the paradox (e.g., to assume the atemporal ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Heidegger's Nietzsche and The Origin of the Work of Art

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      Abstract: The concurrence of Heidegger's first lecture course on Nietzsche,1 "The Will to Power as Art,"2 and his Origin of the Work of Art,3 is enough to suggest Nietzsche is on Heidegger's mind4 when he poses the question of art in terms of the evental happening of truth. Hölderlin notwithstanding,5 I argue Heidegger's Nietzsche "confrontation" (Auseinandersetzung) sheds light on the axial mysteries of Origin. In what follows, I first explore the relation between art and truth in two of the four lecture courses Heidegger offered on Nietzsche between 1936 and 1940, and then turn to the 1956 Addendum to Origin to bring the question of the human to bear on the congruence between Heidegger's diagnosis of Nietzsche and his own ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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