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  Subjects -> PHILOSOPHY (Total: 762 journals)
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Journal of the History of Philosophy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.74
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 49  
 
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ISSN (Print) 0022-5053 - ISSN (Online) 1538-4586
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • The Metaphysics of Appearance in Republic X (596a5–598d7)

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      Abstract: plato's republic x attack on imitative poetry is based in the metaphysics of appearance. In the first stage of the argument (596a5–598d7), Socrates sets out from a restatement of the Theory of Forms to give a general account on which imitation has appearances (phantasmata) or images (eidola) as both its objects and products—what it seeks to imitate and what it makes.1 Imitation is "far removed from truth" because appearances are themselves three removes from reality and truth (598b6, 597e3–4, 602c1–2).2 Though scholars take Plato's ban on imitative poetry seriously, they often regard the metaphysics on which it is based as a theoretical kludge—a set of ideas jerry-rigged for the attack on imitative poetry, but ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Malebranche on General Volitions: Putting Criticisms of the General
           Content Interpretation to Rest

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      Abstract: divine volitions are bound to play an important role in any theistic metaphysics, but within Malebranche's occasionalist system their role is nearly all encompassing. Malebranche introduces occasionalism in the Search after Truth as the view that "there is only one true cause because there is only one true God; that the nature or power of each thing is nothing but the will of God" (Search, VI.2.iii/OC II.200/ LO 448).1 However, Malebranche does not simply explain everything by endlessly repeating "God willed it." His appeal to God's will is closely related to his emphasis on God's acting by way of general laws. Later in the same chapter he explains,Natural forces are . . . nothing but the will of God, which is ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Ambition, désir d'être despote, amour du pouvoir: Un aspect de la
           théorie helvétienne des passions entre De l'esprit et De l'homme

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      Abstract: "Les passions," affirme De l'esprit, "sont, dans le moral, ce que, dans le physique, est le mouvement": ce sont elles qui créent, anéantissent, conservent et animent tout, et sans elles "tout est mort."1 L'aspect le plus évident de la théorie helvétienne des passions est constitué sans doute par son approche matérialiste ou réductionniste qui ramène la complexité des formations affectives à la simplicité des sensations physiques, à cette attraction vers les plaisirs ou à cette répulsion des douleurs qui constitue le contenu originaire de l'amour de soi, voire de l'intérêt.2 La force de cette thèse générale, centrale dans De l'esprit comme dans De l'homme, a souvent détourné l'attention de détails plus discrets de ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Kant's Response to Hume on Natural Theology: Dogmatic Anthropomorphism,
           Analogical Inference, and Symbolic Representation

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      Abstract: In the Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, Hume seeks to uncover the problematic nature of the anthropomorphism that is at the heart of natural religion by submitting the analogies it employs to a series of criticisms. The primary locus of Kant's response to the skeptical threat posed by the Dialogues is often assumed to lie in the Prolegomena. There, Kant is taken to have laid the foundations for viable critical theology on the basis of a symbolic anthropomorphism that is insulated against Hume's criticisms. However, I argue that while the Prolegomena account addresses one aspect of Hume's skeptical worries, it is unable to resolve the central problem formulated in the Dialogues. In particular, I argue against ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Untrue Concepts in Hegel's Logic

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      Abstract: In several places, Hegel remarks that his logic is concerned with the truth of certain concepts or "thought-determinations," and that this question is to be distinguished from asking about the truth of the propositions in which these concepts occur.1 If Hegel does indeed think that individual concepts can be evaluated as true or false apart from their use in propositions, he stands almost entirely alone in thinking so. With one important exception of which he does not appear to have been aware—the Cartesian notion of "material falsity"—this idea has no major predecessors within the Western philosophical tradition.2 It would further appear that no one after Hegel has attempted to reformulate a similar view. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Linguistic Turn in the Early Frankfurt School: Horkheimer and Adorno

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      Abstract: A common complaint against early Frankfurt School Critical Theory—especially Adorno and Horkheimer's version of it—is that it is self-undermining: by engaging in a (purportedly) totalizing critique of modern reason, it makes itself impossible. This complaint is particularly known from the second-generation Frankfurt School theorist Habermas, who speculates that the (purportedly) totalizing nature of the critique of modern reason was the result of the particular historical hour in which Adorno and Horkheimer wrote Dialectic of Enlightenment. Habermas states, "It becomes intelligible how the impression could indeed get established in the darkest years of the Second World War that the last sparks of reason were being ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Kant's Transcendental Deduction by Alison Laywine (review)

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      Abstract: Alison Laywine's contribution to the rich literature on Kant's "Transcendental Deduction of the Categories" stands out for the novelty of its approach and conclusions. Laywine's declared "strategy" is "to compare and contrast" the Deduction with the Duisburg Nachlaß, an important set of manuscript jottings from the 1770s (10). But her approach is also deeply informed by Kant's writings on metaphysics from the 1750s and 1760s; moreover, she gives attention to ancient Greek geometry and its importance for Kant's thought.I believe Laywine's most important interpretative claim is that the Transcendental Deduction's "final step" addresses "the question of how nature is possible" (210). Here, 'nature' is understood in ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Dutch Cartesianism and the Birth of Philosophy of Science by Andrea
           Strazzoni (review)

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      Abstract: Andrea Strazzoni's Dutch Cartesianism and the Birth of Philosophy of Science is a clear step forward in our understanding of the rise and fall of Cartesianism. The work, limited to the Dutch context with one notable German excursion, covers roughly one hundred years starting from the 1630s. While the time frame is rather large in scope, the majority of the work is narrower in focus, with a heavy emphasis on the academic circles in mid-to-late seventeenth-century Leiden and Utrecht. It is thus a welcome addition to the growing body of literature dealing with the unique political, religious, and academic contexts in which Dutch Cartesians found themselves. While much of the book deals with the philosophy of Descartes ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The World According to Kant: Appearances and Things in Themselves in
           Critical Idealism by Anja Jauernig (review)

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      Abstract: After Peter Strawson's withering criticisms of the "Metaphysics of Transcendental Idealism" in The Bounds of Sense (London: Methuen, 1966), many Kant scholars devoted their labors to explaining and expanding his project of transcendental epistemology. Recently, however, the tide has turned, and major Kant scholars have tried to fathom the intricacies of his metaphysical doctrines. With its new, systematic, and boldly idealistic interpretation of transcendental idealism, Anja Jauernig's The World According to Kant is an important contribution to this literature.Jauernig casts her reading of Kantian metaphysics in relation to two traditional accounts: the two-world interpretation that seemed obvious to Kant's first ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Thomas Aquinas on the Metaphysics of the Human Act by Can Laurens
           Löwe (review)

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      Abstract: This book is about the way in which Thomas Aquinas understands the human act to be composed of form and matter. It provides a fresh reading of many central texts from Thomas and addresses philosophical concerns that are relevant to the contemporary literature. Although Löwe is not clear about this point, Thomas does not use in this context the terms 'formal' and 'material' in the strictest sense, as when he describes the soul as the form of the body, but in different extended senses, as when he says that charity is the form of the other virtues because it gives them a new character (Summa Theologiae, II–II, q. 23, art. 8).Löwe focuses on choice, which he considers to be antecedent to the human act, and the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Kant and the Divine: From Contemplation to Moral Law by Christopher J.
           Insole (review)

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      Abstract: The extent to which the philosophy of Immanuel Kant converges with or diverges from Christian thought has been a hotly debated topic in recent years. Central to that debate has been the resurgence of interest in Kant's classic Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason (henceforth, Religion). The most insightful interpretations and applications of Religion, it seems, have utilized resources from a broad range of Kant's writings, emphasizing his philosophy considered as an integrated whole. Christopher Insole's recent monograph—Kant and the Divine: From Contemplation to Moral Law—attempts to redirect this debate with an argument spanning Kant's precritical and critical periods in performing a deep dive on the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Traité des premières vérités by Claude G. Buffier
           (review)

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      Abstract: Born in Poland to French parents, Claude G. Buffier, SJ (1661–1737) emerged as one of the most influential of the Parisian scriptores librorum in the first decades of the eighteenth century. Buffier is perhaps best known as one of the founding editors of, and contributors to, the influential French Jesuit periodical Mémoires de Trévoux, but his works on general grammar, metaphysics, moral philosophy, and logic earned him widespread renown. His Grammaire française achieved translation into Spanish, German, Italian, and English, and his Cours de sciences sur des principes nouveaux et simples pour former le langage, l'esprit, et le cœur dans l'usage ordinaire de la vie (1715) was widely adopted in France and Spain ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Catharine Macaulay's Republican Enlightenment by Karen Green (review)

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      Abstract: Though she was once one of the most recognizable and celebrated public intellectuals in Britain and was read avidly in both revolutionary America and France, after her death in 1791, Catharine Macaulay's work fell into almost total obscurity for around two hundred years. This began to change in the 1990s, since which time interest in Macaulay from historians, philosophers, and feminist scholars has gathered pace. In the last decade and a half, no one has likely done more to advance this scholarship than Karen Green, who has published numerous journal articles and book chapters probing deeply into Macaulay's thought and intellectual context, and who helpfully edited The Correspondence of Catharine Macaulay (Oxford: ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Aristotle on Shame and Learning to Be Good by Marta Jimenez (review)

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      Abstract: Aristotle on Shame and Learning to Be Good is a close examination of an underappreciated topic in Aristotle's theories of moral psychology and moral development: shame. Jimenez argues that shame is a sui generis emotion that plays a crucial role in the habituation of moral virtue in young humans who are not yet virtuous and therefore cannot fully see the moral landscape as accurately as the fully developed virtuous adult. On this view, shame acts as a protovirtue that orients the developing moral agent toward "the noble" (τό καλόν), using social cues to learn not only what actions should be avoided or performed, but also what makes those actions shameful or noble, allowing them to eventually see beyond these ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Aristotle on the Concept of Shared Life by Sara Brill (review)

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      Abstract: This book is a sweeping survey of Aristotle's approach to human life. It covers what might seem to be an idiosyncratic set of topics: friendship, animal behavior, commerce, tyranny, and motherhood are among the more prominent. But Sara Brill pulls them together into a cohesive and illuminating picture, showing how each reflects Aristotle's conception of the concept "life" and the two Greek words, zôê and bios, that he uses to discuss it.The book rebukes thinkers who draw too sharp a contrast between animal life, on the one hand, and human politics, on the other. Until recently, Brill writes, that has been the dominant trend, uniting thinkers otherwise as different as Giorgio Agamben and David Keyt. For writers like ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Rudolf A. Makkreel 1936-2021

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      Abstract: Rudi Makkreel, longtime editor (1983–98) of the Journal of the History of Philosophy and President of its Board of Directors (1998–2018), died October 2021 in Atlanta, GA, of complications from ALS.Rudi was one of the foremost Kant scholars of his generation, helping to bring the Critique of Judgment into the broader currency it enjoys among philosophers today. He also made important contributions to the fields of aesthetics, hermeneutics, and the philosophy of history. His Dilthey, Philosopher of the Human Studies (Princeton, 1975; 2nd edition, 1992), nominated for both a Pulitzer Prize and a National Book Award, introduced the thought of Wilhelm Dilthey to the anglophone world, explaining the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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