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  Subjects -> PHILOSOPHY (Total: 762 journals)
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Utilitas
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.712
Number of Followers: 11  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0953-8208 - ISSN (Online) 1741-6183
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [353 journals]
  • UTI volume 34 issue 2 Cover and Front matter

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1 - 3
      PubDate: 2022-06-28
      DOI: 10.1017/S0953820822000267
       
  • UTI volume 34 issue 2 Cover and Back matter

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1 - 2
      PubDate: 2022-06-28
      DOI: 10.1017/S0953820822000279
       
  • A Letter from the Editor

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      Authors: Miller; Dale E.
      Pages: 119 - 119
      PubDate: 2022-06-28
      DOI: 10.1017/S0953820822000255
       
  • The Cosmic Significance of Directed Panspermia: Should Humanity Spread
           Life to Other Solar Systems'

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      Authors: Sivula; Oskari
      Pages: 178 - 194
      Abstract: The possibility of seeding other planets with life poses a tricky dilemma. On the one hand, directed panspermia might be extremely good, while, on the other, it might be extremely bad depending on what factors are taken into consideration. Therefore, we need to understand better what is ethically at stake with planetary seeding. I map out possible conditions under which humanity should spread life to other solar systems. I identify two key variables that affect the desirability of propagating life throughout the galaxy. The first is axiological and depends on which value theory in environmental ethics is correct. The second is empirical and depends on whether life is common or not in our region of the universe. I also consider two ethical objections to an interplanetary life-seeding mission: the risk of interfering with indigenous life and the risk of increasing suffering in our galaxy.
      PubDate: 2022-02-02
      DOI: 10.1017/S095382082100042X
       
  • Normative Resilience

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      Authors: Andersson; Henrik, Werkmäster, Jakob
      Pages: 195 - 208
      Abstract: This article discusses the phenomenon of normative resilience, with a focus on evaluative resilience. An object can become more or less valuable. In addition to this change in an object's value, the object's value can become more or less resilient. If it is less resilient, it cannot withstand as much evaluative change without its degree of value changing, as compared to an object with more resilient value. The article consists of three parts. First, examples of resilience are presented to give the reader an intuitive understanding of the phenomenon, Second, the Fitting Attitudes Analysis of value is invoked to provide a formal account of evaluative resilience. Third, the theoretical and practical advantages of acknowledging the existence of evaluative resilience are brought to light.
      PubDate: 2022-02-08
      DOI: 10.1017/S0953820821000418
       
  • Age and Illness Severity: A Case of Irrelevant Utilities'

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      Authors: Jølstad; Borgar, Juth, Niklas
      Pages: 209 - 224
      Abstract: Illness severity is a priority setting criterion in several countries. Age seems to matter when considering severity, but perhaps not small age differences. In the following article we consider Small Differences (SD): small differences in age are not relevant when considering differential illness severity. We show that SD cannot be accommodated within utilitarian, prioritarian or egalitarian theories. Attempting to accommodate SD by postulating a threshold model becomes exceedingly complex and self-defeating. The only way to accommodate SD seems to be to accept some form of relevance view, where some age differences are irrelevant. This view can accommodate SD, but at the expense of consistent priority orderings. Severity thus becomes unsuitable for systematic decision-making. We argue that SD should be dismissed and that we should accept a continuous relationship between severity of illness and age.
      PubDate: 2022-02-23
      DOI: 10.1017/S0953820822000024
       
  • Don't Go Chasing Waterfalls: Against Hayward's “Utility
           Cascades”

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      Authors: Doody; Ryan
      Pages: 225 - 232
      Abstract: In his article “Utility Cascades”, Max Khan Hayward argues that act-utilitarians should sometimes either ignore evidence about the effectiveness of their actions or fail to apportion their support to an action's effectiveness. His conclusions are said to have particular significance for the effective altruism movement, which centers seeking and being guided by evidence. Hayward's argument is that act-utilitarians are vulnerable to succumbing to “utility cascades”, that these cascades function to frustrate the ultimate goals of act-utilitarians, and that one apposite way to avoid them is by “ostriching”: ignoring relevant evidence. If true, this conclusion would have remarkable consequences for act-utilitarianism and the effective altruism movement. However, Hayward is mistaken – albeit in an interesting way and with broader significance for moral philosophy. His argument trades on a subtle mischaracterization of act-utilitarianism. Act-utilitarians are not especially vulnerable to utility cascades (or at least not objectionably so), and they shouldn't ostrich.
      PubDate: 2022-02-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S0953820822000012
       
  • Inder Marwah, Liberalism, Diversity and Domination: Kant, Mill, and the
           Government of Difference (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019),
           pp. x + 298.

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      Authors: Valdez; Inés
      Pages: 233 - 236
      PubDate: 2022-03-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S0953820821000431
       
  • Weak Superiority, Imprecise Equality and the Repugnant Conclusion –
           Erratum

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      Authors: Jensen; Karsten Klint
      Pages: 237 - 239
      PubDate: 2022-03-17
      DOI: 10.1017/S0953820822000048
       
  • Who Authored On Liberty' Stylometric Evidence on Harriet Taylor Mill's
           Contribution

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      Authors: Schmidt-Petri; Christoph, Schefczyk, Michael, Osburg, Lilly
      Pages: 120 - 138
      Abstract: It is well known that John Stuart Mill (JSM) repeatedly acknowledges Harriet Taylor Mill's (HTM) substantial contribution to On Liberty. After her death, however, he decides to publish the book under his name only. Are we justified in continuing this practice, initiated by JSM, of refusing unequivocal co-authorship status to HTM' Drawing on stylometric analyses, we make a preliminary case that JSM did not write On Liberty all by himself and that HTM had a hand in formulating it. Drawing on plausible standards for authorship ascription, we further point out that authorship status requires, in addition to a substantial contribution, the approval by all contributors. We discuss potential reasons to assume that HTM did not approve the published version of On Liberty and would have objected to including her name on the title page.
      PubDate: 2021-12-02
      DOI: 10.1017/S0953820821000339
       
  • The Harm Principle and the Nature of Harm

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      Authors: Folland; Anna
      Pages: 139 - 153
      Abstract: This article defends the Harm Principle, commonly attributed to John Stuart Mill, against recent criticism. Some philosophers think that this principle should be rejected, because of severe difficulties with finding an account of harm to plug into it. I examine the criticism and find it unforceful. Finally, I identify a faulty assumption behind this type of criticism, namely that the Harm Principle is plausible only if there is a full-blown, and problem-free, account of harm, which proponents of the principle can refer to.
      PubDate: 2021-12-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S0953820821000352
       
  • Does Abortion Harm the Fetus'

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      Authors: Ekendahl; Karl, Johansson, Jens
      Pages: 154 - 166
      Abstract: A central claim in abortion ethics is what might be called the Harm Claim – the claim that abortion harms the fetus. In this article, we put forward a simple and straightforward reason to reject the Harm Claim. Rather than invoking controversial assumptions about personal identity, or some nonstandard account of harm, as many other critics of the Harm Claim have done, we suggest that the aborted fetus cannot be harmed for the simple reason that it does not occupy any well-being level.
      PubDate: 2021-12-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S0953820821000406
       
  • Ex-Ante Prioritarianism Violates Sequential Ex-Ante Pareto

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      Authors: Gustafsson; Johan E.
      Pages: 167 - 177
      Abstract: Prioritarianism is a variant of utilitarianism. It differs from utilitarianism in that benefiting individuals matters more the worse off these individuals are. On this view, there are two standard ways of handling risky prospects: Ex-Post Prioritarianism adjusts for prioritizing the worse off in final outcomes and then values prospects by the expectation of the sum total of those adjusted values, whereas Ex-Ante Prioritarianism adjusts for prioritizing the worse off on each individual's expectation and then values prospects by the sum total of those adjusted expectations. A standard objection to Ex-Post Prioritarianism is that it violates Ex-Ante Pareto, that is, it prescribes choices that worsen the expectations for everyone. In this article, I argue that Ex-Ante Prioritarianism suffers from much the same problem: it violates a sequential version of Ex-Ante Pareto, that is, it prescribes sequences of choices that worsen the expectations for everyone.
      PubDate: 2021-12-17
      DOI: 10.1017/S0953820821000303
       
 
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