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  Subjects -> PHILOSOPHY (Total: 762 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted by number of followers
Philosophical Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 79)
Ethics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 75)
Journal of Political Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
European Journal of Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
Mind     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Philosophy & Public Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Australasian Journal of Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Contemporary Political Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Nous     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
International Journal for Philosophy of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Journal of the History of Philosophy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52)
Philosophical Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
British Journal for the History of Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Journal of Applied Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
British Journal for the Philosophy of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
American Journal of Theology & Philosophy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Moral Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Philosophy and Phenomenological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Philosophy of Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Erkenntnis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Medical Ethics     Partially Free   (Followers: 32)
Philosophy and Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Continental Philosophy Review     Partially Free   (Followers: 29)
Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Constellations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Ethics & Social Philosophy     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
British Journal of Aesthetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Canadian Journal of Philosophy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Ethical Theory and Moral Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Linguistics and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Philosophical Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
The Heythrop Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Philosophy Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Philosophy and Rhetoric     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Biology and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
BMC Medical Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Philosophy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Medical Ethics and History of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Mouseion: Journal of the Classical Association of Canada     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Jurisprudence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Studies in the Philosophy of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Episteme     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Philosophers' Imprint     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Assuming Gender     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Pragmatics & Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of the Philosophy of History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Media Ethics : Exploring Questions of Media Morality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Phronesis : A journal for Ancient Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Philosophy East and West     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Philosophy & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Midwest Studies In Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Social Epistemology: A Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Review of Philosophy and Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Reformed Theological Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Ethical Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Chinese Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Global Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Indian Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Pragmatics and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Dao : A Journal of Comparative Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Pacific Philosophical Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Utilitas     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Open Journal of Philosophy     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Film-Philosophy Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Polis : The Journal of the Society for Greek Political Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HTS Theological Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Philosophy of Photography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Diogenes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Philosophical Logic     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Research in Phenomenology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Philosophical Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Philosophia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Philosophical Books     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Philosophical Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Myth & Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Contributions to the History of Concepts     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Critical Realism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Metaphilosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Philosophical Investigations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Philosophical Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Zeitschrift für philosophische Forschung     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Speculative Philosophy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
SubStance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Dialogue Canadian Philosophical Review/Revue canadienne de philosophie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Nordic Journal of Aesthetics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Axiomathes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Contemporary Chinese Thought     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
History and Philosophy of Logic     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Think     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Philosophical Explorations: An International Journal for the Philosophy of Mind and Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Philosophical Magazine Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
The Southern Journal of Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Nietzsche Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Aisthesis     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of the Platonic Tradition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Endeavour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Zeitschrift für Religions- und Geistesgeschichte     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Review of Contemporary Philosophy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Philosophical Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Studies in Philology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Hume Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Critical Horizons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Estudos Bíblicos     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
The Philosophical Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
South African Journal of Philosophy = Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif vir Wysbegeerte     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Bulletin de Philosophie Medievale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Franciscan Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Theoretical & Philosophical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch für Antike und Mittelalter     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Philosophy in Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Bijdragen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Recherches de Théologie et Philosophie Médiévales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Studia Logica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Topoi     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Grazer Philosophische Studien     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Utopian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
CR : The New Centennial Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Pluralist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Erasmus Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Religion and Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Russell : the Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Kantian Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Husserl Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Kriterion: Revista de Filosofia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue Philosophique de Louvain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sartre Studies International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Scottish Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Quaestio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Poiesis & Praxis : International Journal of Technology Assessment and Ethics of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Aesthetic Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Philosophy & Theory in Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Australian Journal of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Friends of Lutheran Archives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Between the Species     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Empedocles : European Journal for the Philosophy of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cultura : International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Horizonte : Revista de Estudos de Teologia e Ciências da Religião     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Žižek Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for the Study of Skepticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ethische Perspectieven     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Astérion     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Noesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Le Portique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Temporalités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Estudios de Filosofía Práctica e Historia de las Ideas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veritas : Revista de Filosofí­a y Teología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
PAN: Philosophy Activism Nature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Laval théologique et philosophique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revue d’études benthamiennes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hobbes Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Eleutheria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Humanistic Mathematics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Latinoamericana de Filosofía     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nóema     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Éthique publique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Philosophia Scientiæ     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Social Quality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Collingwood and British Idealism Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Grotiana     Hybrid Journal  
Signos Filosóficos     Open Access  
Eidos     Open Access  
Cinta de Moebio     Open Access  
Cuyo Anuario de Filosofía Argentina y Americana     Open Access  
Tópicos. Revista de Filosofía de Santa Fe     Open Access  
Rhuthmos     Open Access  
Philosophiques     Open Access  
Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics     Open Access  
Studia Philosophica Estonica     Open Access  
Synthesis (La Plata)     Open Access  
Revista de Filosofia     Open Access  
Alpha (Osorno)     Open Access  
Circe de clásicos y modernos     Open Access  
Doctor virtualis     Open Access  
Humanidades Médicas     Open Access  
Methodos     Open Access  
Labyrinthe     Open Access  
Trans/Form/Ação - Revista de Filosofia     Open Access  
Russian Studies in Philosophy     Full-text available via subscription  

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Philosophy & Social Criticism
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.277
Number of Followers: 22  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0191-4537 - ISSN (Online) 1461-734X
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • From empire to nation: Management of religious pluralism in the Ottoman
           Empire and Turkey

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Salim Çevik
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      The transition from empire to nation-state poses challenges in managing religious and ethnic pluralism. Empires, characterized by hierarchical structures and diversity, contrast with nation-states, which aim for uniformity and unity. As empires modernize administratively, they grapple with different approaches to pluralism. While Habsburgs were more in favor of a federal plurality, the Romanovs pushed for centralization and assimilation. Throughout the nineteenth century, the Ottomans vacillated between these two alternative paths. This vacillation is most evident in their approach to millet system which simultaneously followed the contradictory policies of undermining millet boundaries in order to promote a sense of unity across the multi-faith society and policies of promoting and safeguarding the privileges and group-specific rights of non-Muslim communities. Ottoman nationalism eventually shifted towards a homogenizing model, akin to the Romanov approach, leading to the exclusion of religious minorities. This process of homogenization continued in the nationalist policies of modern Turkey and resulted in the secular Turkish Republic being less tolerant towards non-Muslims than the Islamic Ottoman Empire.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2024-02-23T03:25:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537241232962
       
  • Political friendship, respect, community: Hannah Arendt’s
           de-materialization of Aristotelian political friendship

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alex Cain
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      In this article I demonstrate how Hannah Arendt both appropriates and transforms Aristotle’s view of political friendship. I argue that the brief discussion of Aristotelian political friendship in The Human Condition relies on an earlier de-materialization of Aristotle’s work on friendship. This de-materialization of Aristotle’s view of friendship allows Arendt to discuss Aristotelian friendship as a kind of ‘respect’, where ‘respect’ is a philosophical notion unavailable to Aristotle. Ultimately, for Arendt, the experience of friendship opens up a space for human beings to begin to practice a distinct way of seeing one another – a ‘respect’ – that can in turn be practiced in public, making the experience of friendship an important precursor to action.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2024-02-21T06:55:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537241232580
       
  • Nominalism, materialism, and history

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      Authors: Timothy Hinton
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This article addresses two explanatory gaps in Althusser’s late work. One has to do with the relation between nominalism and materialism; the other engages the relation between Althusser’s later materialism and a broadly materialist approach to history. In the first part of the article, I develop a response to the problem of nominalism that makes use of Hobbes’s nominalism and Deleuze’s concept of the plane of immanence. In the second part, I address the problem of history by explaining the concept of an aleatory causal chain, and showing how such chains could be at work in human history. I also make use of Hobbes’s materialist account of causation, applying it to social relations, social collectivities, and historical events.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2024-02-20T12:51:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537241234692
       
  • Stalin and the Soviet theory of nationality and nationalism: Intellectual
           and political roots, implementation, and post-1991 legacies

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Andrea Graziosi
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      In this essay, I assess Stalin’s ideas and concepts about nationalities, their ‘manipulability’ and their legacies. I do this by briefly reconstructing their theoretical and political roots in both Tsarist and socialist traditions. Special attention will be paid to the discovery of a positive correlation between economic development and the growth of nationalism among ‘backward’ peasant peoples, which went against the grain of previous socialist beliefs, and to the appearance of a theory according to which socialism would naturally produce a superior national-popular society. After discussing the evolution of these ideas and concepts, their practical applications, and the reaction they generated up to 1953, I will focus on the Soviet post-Stalinist theories and practices, and their results, also by taking into consideration the development in Soviet times and after 1991, of new, hybrid variants of Russian nationalism, as well as of Eurasian trends.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2024-02-20T06:41:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537241232587
       
  • Mimicking myths of menopause. A critical phenomenological perspective on
           ageing and femininity in fiction TV shows

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      Authors: Marjolein de Boer, Annemie Halsema
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This article offers a critical phenomenological analysis of prevailing myths of menopause. By drawing on Simone de Beauvoir's conceptions of myths that essentialize existence, we have analyzed contemporary TV series in which menopause is portrayed. We identified the following myths of menopause: the myth of the liberated woman, the unnesting (s)mother, the old, ugly, and sexless witch, the mild, wise, and uncarnal woman. We first describe these myths and analyze how they may be interpreted as marginalizing in various and sometimes ambiguous ways. Then, we trace out two distinct ways in which some TV shows expose these myths as essentializing myths, which is important for allowing us to take a distance from them, and thereby to resist them. The first one is in line with what Beauvoir herself suggested as a fruitful dealing with myths: replacing mythical thinking with actual experiences. The second way is conceptualized on the basis of Irigaray’s thinking about mimicking myths. Such dealings with myths of menopause, we argue, may open the road to less marginalizing and more pluriform thinking about menopause.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2024-02-20T05:48:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537241232586
       
  • Does Richard Rorty have ‘anything to say to blacks’' Greater
           cruelties, lesser cruelties and the permanence of racism

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      Authors: Nathan W Dean
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Richard Rorty does have something ‘to say to [Black Americans]’ and to their racially conscious nonblack allies in the sense that his understanding of liberalism, his prophecies about the future and his urgent appeals to the American Left all paint a picture of a white middle class fully prepared to make life increasingly miserable for Black Americans unless it is ‘protected from catastrophe’. Rorty hopes that this group will undergo a moral transformation that enables it to see past its narrow group interests, but doubts that it will. He, nevertheless, prescribes a politics of hope and appeasement as a hedge against both despair and backsliding. In so doing, he fails to appreciate the availability and the suitability of an alternative ‘racial realist’ (and tragicomic) posture vis-à-vis American liberalism inspired by thinkers like Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin and Derrick Bell. This alternative enables racially conscious Americans to respond to the intransigence of (certain) white Americans with cunning rather than by escaping into fantasies of a ‘dream country’ unmarked by the damage caused by racism and its long-lingering effects. I uncover and explore this alternative through Rorty’s warnings regarding the white middle class, a somewhat surprising consistency between Rorty’s brand of class politics and Bell’s understanding of ‘racial fortuity’, and, finally, through a development of Bell’s ‘racial realist’ posture combined with Baldwin’s ‘uses of the blues’ resulting in a ‘hard-eyed’ tragicomic sensibility sufficient to effectively pair continued struggle with creative consolation and resilience.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2024-02-19T06:30:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537241233428
       
  • Judith Butler and future generations: Transtemporal relationality,
           generational trouble and future-oriented ruthless critique

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      Authors: Michael Reder, Simon Faets
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Radical theories of democracy deal only marginally with climate impacts. Judith Butler is part of this tradition and has worked on ecological issues in recent years. She might help contribute to beginning to close this gap. In this article, some of her theoretical elements will be explored in order to critically discuss whether and how climate impacts can be understood philosophically within the framework of radical democracy. These reflections include Butler’s interpretation of relationality, vulnerability, critique and resistance. By combining these theoretical elements and applying them to future generations, which Butler only touches on to some extent, we outline how radical democracy may contribute to the philosophical discourse on climate change, thereby significantly broadening the overall philosophical debate. Furthermore, the article puts forward a critique of radical democratic theory for neglecting the issue of future generations thus far and suggests a direction in which it could be developed further.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2024-02-16T01:15:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537241232965
       
  • Rescuing justice and stability

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Paul Weithman
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Though John Rawls's treatment of stability has received less attention than other parts of his work, it promises help in understanding how liberal institutions can reproduce themselves under non-ideal conditions like ours. But stability in Rawls's sense seems to depend ineliminably on society's justice, and Gerald Cohen powerfully criticized the connection Rawls drew between the two. Cohen contends that stability is ‘alien’ to justice rather than conceptually connected to it. It is therefore a consideration that should be studied separately. If we are to draw on Rawls's treatment, it needs to be defended against Cohen's critique. I argue that it can be. The defense depends upon establishing a conclusion that Cohen thought inconsistent with Rawls's theory and that might have discomfited Rawls himself: that the arguments he offered for the stability of a just society were more limited and tentative than he acknowledged. Locating those limits has two valuable payoffs. It sheds light on some of the more obscure and difficult, but neglected parts of Rawls's work. More important for our current political moment, it shows the points at which unjust societies such as our own need to be shored up.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2024-02-03T06:15:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537241230343
       
  • Toward a universalistic theory of political obligation: A
           post-structuralist approach

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Giorgi Tskhadaia
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Developing a plausible theory of political obligation is crucial for understanding our current political lives or constructing new ones. However, it proved to be hard to arrive at a theory that is universalistic and logically consistent. Without adherence to certain universalistic principles, such as freedom and equality, one might be tempted to justify individuals’ allegiance to authoritarian regimes based on particularistic reasons. Also, one may argue that if a general theory of political obligation cannot be devised, we are justified to resort to anarchism. Despite such high political stakes involved, a contention arose that universalistic approaches to political obligation are logically inconsistent because they run afoul of a particularity requirement. The latter is a demand that any plausible theory of individuals’ obligations toward a political entity should account for the reasons why they should obey the rules and orders of a specific authority. In this article, drawing on Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe’s post-structuralist theory, I demonstrate that the dichotomy of universalism vs. particularism need not have destructive effects for a successful theory of political obligation. Indeed, it is possible to accept a particularity requirement but at the same time, argue that political obligations have a universalistic thrust.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2024-01-27T11:07:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537241230013
       
  • Literature and the legacy of Empire: Approaching Turkey’s post-imperial
           condition through Ahmet Hamdi Tanpınar

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Johanna Chovanec
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      How does literature engage with the legacies of Empire' This article examines how imperial decline and nation building are reflected in textual production after the First World War. With Turkey as a case study, it focuses on the post-imperial narrative as a form of narration dealing with the experience of imperial loss, political contingency and possibilities of national belonging. I argue that Turkey’s post-imperial condition is shaped by coming to terms with the loss of the Ottoman Empire, on the one hand, and a nationalising present embedded in the experience of Western-dominated modernity, on the other. Against this backdrop, I examine essays from the compilations Yaşadığım Gibi (1970, ‘As I lived’) and Beş Şehir (1946, ‘Five Cities’) by Ahmet Hamdi Tanpınar, a key intellectual of the early republican era. The analysis of these post-imperial narratives reveals how Tanpınar tries to root Turkey’s national modernity in selected elements of the imperial past. For Tanpınar, continuity with (Turkified) imperial heritage is a prerequisite for a strong nation-state.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2024-01-27T04:44:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231225149
       
  • Public and private interests in Han Fei: A statist approach

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      Authors: Yutang Jin
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Han Fei was a central figure in Chinese Legalism, which was a leading school of thought in the Warring States period of China, and which left a huge imprint on political culture in imperial China. This article examines the complex duality of public and private interests in Han Fei’s political thought, a crucial aspect of his thinking. I argue that Han Fei adopted a sophisticated statist approach to understanding public and private interests. For Han Fei, public interests are embodied in the state while private ones have dual functions. On the one hand, private interests threaten public ones by inviting corrupt material interests, personal morality, and knowledge, as well as human relationships. On the other hand, self-centered human psychology plays a dialectic role in strengthening the state.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T12:06:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537241229052
       
  • Towards a decolonial political theory: Thinking from the zone of nonbeing

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      Authors: Charles des Portes
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This article offers to outline a direction for a decolonial political theory based on Aimé Césaire’s and Frantz Fanon’s thoughts. In doing so, I will first discuss some work of comparative political theory that could be associated with an attempt to decolonize political theory. Rather than a systematic critique of these works, this article aims to outline some of their limits from a decolonial perspective, such as their embedment in a continental ontology/logic, and their over-emphasis on methodology that can lead to an instrumental account of politics. In contrast, I will argue for a decolonial existential political theory that grounds its investigation in what Frantz Fanon called ‘the zone of nonbeing’ and that takes politics as first philosophy. To make my point, I will discuss Aimé Césaire’s Letter to Maurice Thorez and Frantz Fanon’s Political Theory of the Damnés.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2024-01-20T11:50:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537241229055
       
  • Borders, states, and armed conflicts in Europe and Northeast Asia since
           1945: The moral hazard of great-power encroachments

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      Authors: Mark Kramer
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This article discusses the significance of international borders in Europe and Northeast Asia during the Cold War (1945–1989) and after. Using the concept of ‘moral hazard’, the article examines what happens when great powers frequently violate the borders of neighboring countries without suffering adverse repercussions. Norms of sovereignty and territorial integrity are viable only if large countries are willing to uphold them most of the time. The Soviet Union used or threatened to use military force against East European countries on numerous occasions (1953, 1956, 1968, and 1980–1981) with impunity. The Russian Federation adopted a broadly similar policy toward neighboring countries that had been republics of the Soviet Union until 1991. Russian forces in Georgia, Moldova, Tajikistan, Belarus, and Ukraine served as instruments of Russian hegemony in those countries. Until 2014, Western governments made little or no effort to deter or counter Russian military encroachments in neighboring republics. By the principle of moral hazard, leaders in the Kremlin came to believe that they could act with a free hand in the former USSR.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2024-01-20T10:03:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537241228805
       
  • Introduction to special issue on book symposium Populism and civil
           society: The challenge to democratic constitutionalism (2022) by Andrew
           Arato and Jean Cohen

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      Authors: Regina Kreide
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Populism and Civil Society: The Challenge to Democratic Constitutionalism (2022) by Andrew Arato and Jean Cohen is an important book that addresses a widespread and ominous phenomenon around the world: The challenge of populism. This book forms a symposium by renowned authors which gathers commentaries on Arato and Cohen’s book. From different points of view, comments, suggestions and queries are put forward, to which the authors respond. The authors’ illuminating rejoinders not only present some of their arguments in a new light but also arrive at a clarifying interpretation of their approach.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2024-01-09T02:13:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231211822
       
  • Conclusion: The challenges of pseudo-nationalism and the lessons from
           intellectual history

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      Authors: Mark Lilla
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This article questions whether past experience with nationalisms rooted in history, language, custom and religion will be much of a guide to pseudo-nationalisms that arise in a globalized age with increasingly ‘liquid’ societies.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2024-01-02T08:42:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231225456
       
  • A full ideology as driver for authoritarian dynamics: Comment to Populism
           and Civil Society

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      Authors: Michael Zürn
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      “Populism and Civil Society” is a rich book full of insights. I see three crucial overarching points the book drives home: one about the character of current populism, one about the causes, and one about the consequences. First, they define populism in a way that goes beyond the prevailing juxtaposition of the people and the elite. Instead, the definition involves elements of the ideas about a good order, including the central role of popular sovereignty, the symbolic representation and embodiment of the whole of the people, the strict borders between in and out, and a focus on electoral competition. Second, Arato and Cohen provide an explanation of populism that focuses on politics and democratic tensions. Third, the book points to “strong authoritarian tendencies that are almost always fully evident when populism achieves political power.” These propositions are right on target and very convincingly developed. In fact, they are very much in line with an attempt to account for “authoritarian populism” that Armin Schäfer and I have provided. Against this backdrop, I want to comment on the core messages by raising some questions about the details of these issues. It will become evident that this commentary is a case of sympathizing criticism.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-12-27T07:12:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231221577
       
  • Against received opinion: Recovering the original meaning of ‘paradox’
           for populism and liberal democracy

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      Authors: Gulshan Khan
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      In philosophy and political theory, the term paradox is often used synonymously with antinomy, contradiction and aporia. This article clarifies the meaning of these terms through tracing their respective etymology. We see that antinomy denotes a deep-seated conceptual opposition, whereas contradiction and aporia represent alternative responses to antinomy. The former presents the antinomy as potentially resolvable at some future time, and the latter sees the antinomy instead as a constitutive impasse. By way of contrast, para doxa originally referred to a statement that is ‘contrary to received opinion’, but this idea has generally been subsumed – both in philosophy and more common place understandings – under the notion of aporia. This conceptual recovery enables a better understanding of key traditions in social and political theory, notably post-structuralism and Habermasian critical theory, which can be demarcated through their respective responses to the emergence of ‘paradoxes’. However, the article also demonstrates the material significance of these philosophical categories through their application to contemporary democratic politics. I analyse the constitutive tension between liberalism and democracy as well as the emergence of populism and show how these conceptual tools provide new insights for understanding these most pressing political developments of our time.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-12-27T06:27:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231219944
       
  • The spirit of ethical life as syllogism

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      Authors: Anna Katsman
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      In this essay, I take on the problem of how to explain the socio-historical dimension of practical reason in Hegel. In contrast to many contemporary socio-historical readings of Hegel, I claim that a logical concept of spirit frames Hegel’s account of the historical process through which human beings have come to know their practical agency as actualized in institutional relations of mutual recognition. On my reading, Hegel conceptualizes each shape in the ‘Spirit’ chapter of his Phenomenology of Spirit as syllogistically working out, practically and institutionally, how to mediate the demands of individual self-determination with the universal laws and customs of the community. At the same time, logical form doesn’t determine historical development, because the content of individuality, universality, and their mediation is earned only through historical experience.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-12-27T06:03:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231215697
       
  • Populism in power and its hybridizations

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      Authors: Paula Diehl
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      According to the authors of Populism and Civil Society, ‘populism is situated within the democratic imaginary’ but its logic is authoritarian. This article agrees with the first but challenges the second argument by focussing on the question of representation. In the case of ‘populism as government’ the tensions between bottom-up and top-down articulations seem to be more or less resolved by the repression of bottom-up organization, but in so doing, so the argument of this article, populism is mutating into something else. Furthermore, ‘populist dictatorship’ seems to be closer to a dictatorship strategically using populist tools than to an intrinsic populist logic. While I agree with the authors on the authoritarian cases of populism in government, my argument diverges from the book when it comes to populism as government and introduces a discussion about the nature of populism. To this purpose, I first propose a complex definition of populism which understands populism not as the essence, but as one component of hybrid authoritarian formations, thus enabling the disentanglement of populism, authoritarianism, and totalitarianism. Second, I examine two components of populism that Arato and Cohen lay out in the book: the specific representation pars pro toto and embodiment. Building on Lefort, I argue that these components are not populist but totalitarian and that the empirical manifestations of populism are always hybrid, mixing populist and authoritarian or even totalitarian components.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-12-26T08:34:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231219941
       
  • Forced marriages and unintentional divorces: The national attitudes in
           Armenia and Uzbekistan towards the ‘Russian World’

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      Authors: Riccardo Mario Cucciolla
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      In 1991, new political discourses emerged in the Soviet republics that had to reinvent themselves as independent states, redefining their national identity on several dimensions. This process matured ambiguous attitudes toward the former imperial center and different visions over the scopes, perspectives, and claims of a ‘Russian World’ in the former Soviet space, where Moscow still asserted an exclusive political and cultural sphere of influence. In this article, we will review the cases of Armenia and Uzbekistan with peculiar national projects and relationships with Moscow, reviewing their inclusion within the USSR, their path to independence, their post-Soviet relations with Moscow, and the changes during the turning points of 2014 with the annexation of Crimea and after the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-12-23T11:12:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231222867
       
  • Prisons of peoples' Empire, nation and conflict management in Habsburg
           Central Europe, 1848–1925

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      Authors: Pieter M. Judson
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Vladimir Putin’s legitimation of Russia’s brutal war of aggression against Ukraine raises questions about traditional understandings of nation and empire. Should we contrast the two in terms of values and practices' In this case, Putin uses both nationalist and Imperialist rhetoric to justify his actions. My essay questions how we understand nation and empire using the example of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. How did this empire develop laws, institutions and administrative practices to manage conflicts and claims around language use and nationalism' How did Austria’s governments rule a multi-lingual, multi-confessional society effectively, without resorting to brutal policies of nationalization' When nationalist conflicts arose in different settings, how and why did they originate' I conclude that in European terms, Imperial Austria and even nationalist Hungary apparently managed daily-life issues around diverse language use and religious practice far more humanely and effectively than did the successor nation states after 1918.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-12-22T02:59:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231223847
       
  • Illiberal polity as the retribution of post-imperial nation-building: The
           case of Turkey

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      Authors: Cengiz Aktar
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Turkey, in direct lineage of the Ottoman Empire, experimented a particularly violent nation-building out of the imperial ashes. Non-Muslims corresponding to one fifth of its population have been annihilated for the creation of a homogeneous nation State. These crimes have never been accounted for, giving way to a culture of impunity, self-righteousness, contempt for the rule of law and justice which, over years, pushed the polity towards an illiberal if not totalitarian essence and praxis, domestically against its own constituency and externally against neighbours through an extensive neo-imperial drive. Paradoxically, such an outcome seems to constitute a belated retribution for the unaccounted crimes.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-12-21T11:24:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231222879
       
  • Algorithmic sovereignty: Machine learning, ground truth, and the state of
           exception

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      Authors: Matthew Martin
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the interplay between contemporary algorithmic security technology and the political theory of the state of exception. I argue that the exception, as both a political and a technological concept, provides a crucial way to understand the power operating through machine learning technologies used in the security apparatuses of the modern state. I highlight how algorithmic security technology, through its inherent technical properties, carries exceptions throughout its political and technological architecture. This leads me to engage with Theodor Adorno’s negative dialectics to interrogate the question of ‘ground truth’ in machine learning. I conclude that most machine learning technology asserts identity between itself and bourgeois reality – and thus inherently reinforces and reproduces the relations of domination entailed in that image of the world. However, space still exists for machine learning to operate within spaces of political non-identity, or exceptions to the bourgeois totality, and aid in liberatory politics.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-12-19T10:11:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231222885
       
  • The populist critique of ‘Corrupted’ representative claim
           making

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      Authors: David Jenkins
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Populism sets people against elites. Most discussions of populism focus on the dangers that come with assuming too homogenous a vision of a ‘pure’ people against a ‘corrupt’ elite. However, an obvious question to ask is what elites do, or might do, to court populists ire. In this paper, I draw on Michael Saward’s work on representation to construct an account of populism that focuses on the ways in which elites can conceivably corrupt (and have conceivably corrupted) the institutions responsible for generating the representative claims that are central to democratic life. Specifically, I will sketch an account of the way elites have operated, within the American context, to corrupt the representative functions performed by political parties, those centrally important institutions tasked with producing representative claims within contemporary capitalist, liberal, representative democracies. If we are to properly evaluate populism, whether as an ideology, movement or set of tactics, it is necessary to take seriously and evaluate the stories populists tell of how elites have corrupted democracy. To simply assume they are wrong and dismiss populist critiques of democratic failures as wrong is to replace critical analysis with elite apologism.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-12-18T07:34:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231222899
       
  • Eyes on the street: To what end'

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      Authors: Anders Bartonek
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      In contrast to the constantly increasing surveillance of the streets of cities, Jane Jacobs’ theory of the ‘eyes on the street’ offers a theory of a positive form of surveillance and these eyes can thus perhaps take on the role of a counterforce to problematic forms of surveillance. To examine under what conditions Jacobs could help formulate such a counterforce is the main aim in this article. But for this purpose, certain obstacles need to be addressed, for instance, the usage of Jacobs’ theory in the field of CPTED. What in Jacobs’ theory makes it vulnerable to this kind of usage' In order for Jacobs’ street-eyes to avoid becoming a prolonged arm for state surveillance, this article suggests a critical reading of Jacobs’ thinking in relation to Foucault’s surveillance-critique, ultimately with the aim to strengthen her eyes on the street.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-12-16T04:10:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231219953
       
  • The historicisation of the human senses from Feuerbach to Marx

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      Authors: Robert Engelman
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This paper identifies and articulates a historicist turn in theorising the human senses initiated by Feuerbach and Marx. Both philosophers retain their predecessors’ view that human needs determine human senses, but they identify historical contingencies of human needs that they treat as introducing historical contingency into the character of the human senses. In accounting for Feuerbach’s and Marx’s respective historicisations of the human senses, this paper challenges some commonplace ideas expressed by Honneth and Joas about German philosophical anthropology in general as well as, more specifically, Marx’s critique of Feuerbach and the philosophical-anthropological legacy of Marxian thought.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-12-15T05:13:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231219924
       
  • Returning to totality: Settler colonialism, decolonization, and struggles
           for freedom

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      Authors: John Grant, Corey Snelgrove
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      A unifying feature of the most prominent social movements that emerged in the 2010s is their dissatisfaction with explaining injustices on a case-by-case basis. In Canada, movements against settler colonialism express a similar orientation. This elicits a return of totality thinking, which enables one to grasp the connections between what appears as isolated or fragmented moments that in fact constitute and are constituted by a larger whole. Drawing on Marxist and Indigenous theorists, we reconstruct an approach to totality and a conceptualization of settler colonialism as a totality. Through an immanent reading of John Borrows’ approach to decolonization, we justify the importance of this concept for politicizing the persistence of unfree forms of interdependence. Finally, just as individual struggles point toward the totality, totality thinking draws attention to the unity-in-separation of different struggles, enabling a politics of “immanent universalism” as an alternative to both abstract universalism and particularism.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-12-13T04:53:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231219935
       
  • Populism, (un-)civil society and constituent power

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      Authors: Paul Blokker
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Andrew Arato and Jean Cohen's Populism and Civil Society: The Challenge to Democratic Constitutionalism is probably the most important contribution to the academic debate on populism in recent years. I will discuss two of the book's core contribution to the delete: (un-)civil society and constitutionalism.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-12-13T02:37:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231219920
       
  • From right to might, and back: Functional legitimacy as a realist value

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      Authors: Carlo Burelli, Chiara Destri
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      For political realists, legitimacy is a central requirement for the desirability of political institutions. Their detractors contend that it is either descriptive, and thus devoid of critical potential, or it relies on some moralist value that realists reject. We defend a functionalist reading of realist legitimacy: descriptive legitimacy, that is, the capacity of a political institution to generate beliefs in its right to rule as opposed to commanding through coercion alone, is desirable in virtue of its functional role. First, descriptive legitimacy plays an evaluative role: Institutions can fail to convince citizens that they have a right to rule and can be ranked by how well they do so. Second, descriptive legitimacy plays a normative role, because if an institution fails to convince subjects of its right to rule, this gives them a reason not to comply with its directives, even if it satisfies philosophers’ standards for possessing such right.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-12-13T01:42:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231215729
       
  • Colonial lessons to learn from Habsburg: Bosnia-Herzegovina,
           1878–1918

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      Authors: Clemens Ruthner
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      In 1878, as a consequence of an international Balkan summit in Berlin, Austria–Hungary was given permission to occupy the troubled Ottoman provinces Bosnia and Hercegovina. A gory invasion campaign ensued, followed by four decades of civil administration. Finally, the territories were annexated by the Habsburg Monarchy in 1908 as an appendix of sorts, which almost caused the premature outbreak of a great war in Europe. This article will sketch the background for this last – and lethal – expansion of the empire and pursue the research questions of (a) whether this constitutes a case of colonialism within Europe and (b) what its repercussions were, critically challenging the alleged ‘civilising mission’ that would legitimise the whole undertaking.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-12-09T05:07:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231219912
       
  • Decentring critical theory with the help of critical theory: Ecocide and
           the challenge of anthropocentricism

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      Authors: Maeve Cooke
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Our present situation of anthropogenic ecological disaster calls on Western philosophy in general, and Frankfurt School critical theory in particular, to reconsider some long-standing, entrenched assumptions concerning what it means to be a human agent and to relate to other agents. In my article, I take up the challenge in dialogue with the idea of critical theory articulated by Max Horkheimer in the 1930s. My overall concern is to contribute to on-going efforts to decentre Frankfurt School critical theory in multiple dimensions. With the help of Horkheimer, I seek to show that this theoretical tradition has itself an important contribution to make to the endeavour. In Section 1, I argue that the methodology he advocates for critique of society offers a view of the relationship between the human mind and reality, as well as of humans with other humans, that avoids dogmatic rigidity and is hospitable towards mutual learning through engagement with other philosophical and cultural traditions. In Section 2, I consider the more specific challenge of anthropocentrism, suggesting the need for a more differentiated account of this. While critical theory is unavoidably anthropocentric in certain respects, it could avoid more pernicious forms of anthropocentrism that establish epistemic and ethical hierarchies between humans and other-than-human entities and that conceive of ethical validity as a purely human construction, with no independence of human needs and concerns.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-12-01T11:36:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231215681
       
  • On Populism and Civil Society: The Challenge to Constitutional Democracy
           by Andrew Arato and Jean L. Cohen

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      Authors: María Pía Lara
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      I will critically explore Arato and Cohen’s work on populism acknowledging areas of agreement while noting gaps in their reasoning particularly regarding the complex relations between capitalism and democracy and the recent erosion of democracy replacing it with authoritarian regimes that are better suited for neoliberal policies.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-12-01T10:05:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231211026
       
  • Jean Améry and the time of resentment

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      Authors: Ilit Ferber
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      The article provides a close reading of Jean Améry’s essay, ‘Resentments’ from the perspective of temporality. Although firmly grounded in a specific historical and political context (Améry, a Holocaust survivor, reflects on the aftermath of his experiences during the war), I argue that this essay offers valuable insights into Améry’s philosophy of temporality. After establishing the context and structure of Améry’s ‘Resentments’, the article delves into a discussion of the temporal aspects found in the text: (1) Delay: the emergence of resentments and their connection to trauma. (2) Eternal Recurrence: Améry’s critique of Nietzsche, along with surprising interconnections between their ideas. (3) Natural Time and Forgiveness: Améry’s critique of the temporal structure of forgiveness and the morally questionable prioritization of the future over the past. (4) Moral Time and the Irreversible: the distorted temporal structure of resentments, and Améry’s thought-provoking exploration of the phantasy of time’s reversibility. (5) The Future: Améry’s direct address to the young Germans and his unexpected suggestion on how they should treat their past and history, emphasizing responsibility rather than blame, as the key their past provides for the possibility of their future.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-11-24T03:26:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231215674
       
  • From totalitarianism to populism: Claude Lefort’s overlooked legacy

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      Authors: William Selinger
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This article recovers Claude Lefort’s engagement with the issue of populism, which was inspired by the emergence of Jean-Marie Le Pen as a major figure in French politics during the late 1980s. I show how Lefort developed both an analysis of populism as a pathology of modern politics and a new vision of representative democracy as the alternative to populism. In doing so, Lefort drew upon his more familiar theory of democracy and totalitarianism, his study of the history of French political thought, and his partnership with Pierre Ronsanvallon, who was also developing an analysis of populism in response to Le Pen. Lefort’s approach to populism has outlived the context in which he first expressed it. Over the last decade, a number of prominent political theorists have drawn on Lefortian themes to formulate their own accounts of populism and democracy. In many cases, their arguments are quite similar to those that Lefort was expressing in the late 1980s and 1990s. A particular version of Lefortianism, which was foreshadowed in the writings of Lefort himself, has become one of the defining democratic theories of our political moment.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-11-23T02:23:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231215725
       
  • Our reply to critics by Andrew Arato and Jean L. Cohen

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      Authors: Andrew Arato, Jean L. Cohen
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-11-22T12:26:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231215690
       
  • MacIntyre and Hegel on the possibility of resolving philosophical
           disagreements

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      Authors: Tony Burns
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the views of Hegel and Alasdair MacIntyre regarding philosophical disagreements, whether or not they can be resolved and if so how. For both thinkers such a disagreement is thought of as taking place between the advocates of two theoretical positions which are opposed to one another. Each party subscribes to a way of thinking about the issue under discussion which appears to be logically incompatible with the views of the other. We seem therefore to have to make an either-or choice between them. In the case of all philosophical disagreements, therefore, the same questions arise. Is the contradiction in question real, or merely apparent' Can it be resolved' If so, what exactly is involved in such a resolution' Is some form of theoretical compromise, between these two extremes possible' Is there a third-way, a both-and approach, which in some way combines the strengths of each and the weaknesses of neither, or which seeks in some way to balance their respective strengths and weaknesses of each against those of the other' The article suggests that MacIntyre differentiates between two types of philosophical disagreement. In the case of the first, the ideas associated with the two opposed positions are incommensurable. We must, therefore make an either-or choice between them. In the case of disagreements of the second type, the ideas in question are not incommensurable. In these cases, therefore, it is possible for them to be combined or synthesised. The article argues that MacIntyre’s approach to this second type of philosophical disagreement has an obvious affinity with what is often thought to be that of Hegel. In the words of Richard J. Bernstein, it is ‘quasi-Hegelian’. It is therefore fruitful to compare and contrast the views of these two thinkers on this issue.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-11-21T12:13:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231215713
       
  • Political Self-Cultivation for Humane Government: Yi I’s Defense of the
           Way of the Hegemon in Neo-Confucian Korea

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      Authors: Sungmoon Kim
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      As ardent followers of Mencius and Zhu Xi, virtually all Korean Neo-Confucians during the Chosŏn dynasty rejected the Way of the Hegemon by understanding it as directly opposed to the Kingly Way, a humane government allegedly conducted by ancient sage-kings. However, Yi I 珥 (1536–1584), a prominent Neo-Confucian scholar-official in sixteenth-century Korea, endorsed the Way of the Hegemon as compatible with the Kingly Way by reconceptualizing it, otherwise predicated on strong consequentialist ethics, in a way consistent with Confucianism’s deepest concern with the well-being of the people. In Confucianizing the Way of the Hegemon through the creative re-reading of the Book of Rites from a Xunzian standpoint, Yi I proposed a new method of moral self-cultivation specifically tailored for a Confucian ruler—called political self-cultivation in this paper—that combined the traditional Neo-Confucian recovery model of self-cultivation with a strong sense of political responsibility.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-11-20T08:08:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231211031
       
  • Hegel’s master-slave dialectic and the Haiti revolt (1791–1804):
           Transatlantic print chronicles of race in an age of colonial market
           exchange

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      Authors: Jonathan Bowman
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This work contributes to recent transdisciplinary efforts to view the Haitian slave revolt (1791–1804) as the historical inspiration for Hegel’s master-slave dialectic. Reconstructions offered by contemporary postcolonial scholars argue that the Haitian revolt was chronicled in Minerva as Hegel raced to finish his Phenomenology. Benhabib recently recognized the Hegel-Haiti thesis as entailing the sort of inclusive dialogical learning process necessary to validate subaltern experiences. The thesis has also drawn its share of sceptical scrutiny as Badiou claims that it risks forcing an unnecessary moral dissymmetry, neglects objectionable features of enslavement and imposes a mismatch between apolitical subject and revolutionary. In reply, we appeal to the pioneering work of Tavares to show that the asymmetrical construction of classification schemes for persons of mixed-racial statuses accords with decades of documented literary exchanges between Hegel and Gregoire. We then turn to the work of James on the role of mixed-race merchants in the testimonial accounts of late 18th century French historians to show that European literate publics were well aware of the extremely coercive forms of commodified labour found in Saint-Dominque. We then invoke the archival work of Du Bois on French, British and American parliamentary proceedings that show the provisional colonial identities ascribed to Caribbean subjects did not hinder their self-conscious exercise of political agency. Viewing Hegel in terms of the historiographic records of the racial ontologies of early modern transatlantic literary exchanges helps explain how he adapted these tropes concerning mixed-race subjects in a manner that better explains many of the anomalous features of the dialectic. However, conferring the Haitian revolution its proper world-historical warrant as inspiration for his infamous master-slave dialectic need not lead us to overlook Hegel’s complicity with many of the epistemic and ontological flaws of colonial tropes held in early modern transatlantic print.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-11-20T06:00:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231211042
       
  • ‘Be your own boss’' Normative concerns of algorithmic management in
           the gig economy: reclaiming agency at work through algorithmic
           counter-tactics

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      Authors: Denise Celentano
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      The article explores the normative concerns raised for gig workers by algorithmic management (AM), by embracing an ethnographically sensitive approach to philosophical inquiry approach to philosophical inquiry. Inspired by Michel de Certeau’s concept of ‘tactics’, the article suggests interpreting workers’ attempts to ‘trick the algorithm’ and escape some of AM’s constraints as ways to reclaim agency, in the absence of suitable organizational conditions for its affirmative exercise. The kind of agency specifically deployed by workers in cooperative settings is referred to as ‘contributive agency’, broadly defined as workers’ control over their contribution in multiple dimensions – epistemic, relational, participatory and protective. Contributive agentic capacities are not mere properties of agents, but organizationally mediated capacities that can be more or less enabled or constrained depending on the contributive context. It is argued that below a certain threshold, AM’s agency-constraining features are objectionable and desirable agency-enabling organizational conditions are identified in the four dimensions.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-11-17T08:31:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231215680
       
  • Book Review: A review of Rocío Zambrana’s Colonial Debts: The
           Case of Puerto Rico

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      Authors: Sabrina Bungash
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-11-15T09:51:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231215720
       
  • Fascist ideas, practices and networks of ‘Empire’: Rethinking Interwar
           Italy as post-Habsburg history (1918–1938)

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      Authors: Marco Bresciani
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This chapter relates post-1918 Italy to the collapse of the Habsburg Empire and the ascent of the successor states, and analyses, from the Trieste’s vantage point, fascist projects, practices and networks of ‘empire’ in the Adriatic Sea, in Mitteleuropa and in the Balkans between 1918 and 1938. It focuses on three connected aspects. Firstly, the northern Adriatic was the first setting of the ascent of squadrismo, a model of violent action against ‘enemies within’ then replicated elsewhere. Secondly, Italian nationalism and imperialism aimed to reconfigure the post-Habsburg economic space and to reconnect the Adriatic with Central and Balkan Europe. Thirdly, Italian nationalist (then Fascist) élites from Trieste played a critical role, by boosting processes of empire-building and defending Austria vis-à-vis the prospects of Anschluss. In sum, the Habsburg legacies kept on shaping the dynamics of Italianization and fascistization in northern Adriatic and on feeding the search for Italy’s informal empire in Central and Southeastern Europe.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-11-14T11:22:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231215704
       
  • Where does philosophy begin when rationality is denied' Tsenay
           Serequeberhan’s concept of a lived existence as a means of decolonizing
           philosophy

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      Authors: Justin Sands
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Tsenay Serequeberhan’s hermeneutics has been crucial to the development of African philosophy. Initially employed as a pathway through the ethno- and professional philosophical debates, scholars have engaged how Serequeberhan’s hermeneutics grapples with one’s own place within a socio-historical world in service of liberation/self-determination. However, this scholarship mainly has focused on his adaptation of Gadamer’s ‘effective-historical consciousness’ for his own concept of heritage. This consequently leaves his concept of a ‘lived existence’ – which is equally crucial – under-examined. This paper probes what a ‘lived existence’ entails and its essentiality when explicating how one even begins to authentically think, which is the groundwork to Serequeberhan’s hermeneutics. This deepens why his concept of heritage matters as a starting point for self-determination. Addressing this lacuna, this article asks, where does philosophy begin and where should it go, particularly when rationality has been historically denied' Serequeberhan’s point of departure to answer this question proposes Heidegger’s concept of thinking itself to arrive at a notion of existence; contrariwise to most African scholars who employ a Sartrean existentialism via Frantz Fanon. As such, this paper gives an in-depth exploration of Serequeberhan’s initial reading of Heidegger, and then unfolds how he appropriates Heidegger to craft his notion of ‘lived existence’. The upshot this is twofold: First, a broader understanding of Serequeberhan’s project, its non-existentialist view of existence; Second, it describes how he specifically tailors his ‘lived existence’ to undergird his hermeneutical approach to heritage as a prescriptive, activist project which dynamically addresses the postcolonial situation.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-11-13T09:31:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231203552
       
  • Bringing gender and religion in: Right-wing networks and “Populism
           and Civil Society”

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      Authors: Ina Kerner
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      In this contribution, Andrew Arato and Jean Cohen’s Populism and Civil Society is confronted with current gender studies research on populism. This research mainly focuses on right-wing populism and highlights strong links between right-wing populists and the religious right, which are to a large degree organized by “anti-gender,” a stance both against social constructivist notions of gender and against basic gender rights, especially in the fields of reproduction and of LGBTIQ concerns. Against the backdrop of this literature, I argue that in Populism and Civil Society, right-wing populist anti-gender politics are not addressed in a way that takes account of their full complexity; and that these politics furthermore suggest to treat right-wing populism and left-wing populism as phenomena that do not only differ in content, but also in form.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-11-10T06:16:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231211025
       
  • Rights and the human condition of non-sovereignty: Rethinking Arendt’s
           critique of human rights with Rancière and Balibar

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      Authors: Omri Shlomov Milson
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      If the instance of human rights cannot ensure the protection of the rightless, as Arendt famously claimed, how can the rightless struggle for freedom and equality' In this essay, I attempt to answer this question by reconsidering Arendt’s influential critique of human rights in light of the two polar responses it evoked from contemporary French philosophers Jacques Rancière and Étienne Balibar. Rancière, who objects to Arendt’s delimiting of the political, finds her argument excluding and dangerous. Balibar, on the other hand, believes that it conveys an immense potential for politics to come, as it points to the dialectical political truth of equaliberty. In the following, I show the problematics of Rancière’s ingenious formulation of rights, and the answer Balibar’s original interpretation of Arendt’s thought might suggest in response. I contend that working through Rancière’s critique of Arendt’s argument and Balibar’s affirmation of it not only highlights the merits of her critical account but also points to the fundamental relation between Arendt’s work on rights and her later discussions of the human condition of non-sovereignty and the power of promises. I believe that such a reading can contribute to our interpretation of Arendt, and pave new routes of action for non-citizens (such as refugees, stateless persons and subjects of military occupation), who cannot employ the authorities’ strength for their protection.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-11-08T10:48:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231211037
       
  • The critical dimension of Brandom’s normative pragmatism

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      Authors: Santiago Rey
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      For all of Brandom’s self-professed allegiance to Hegel, there is something perplexing about his fixation on semantic and epistemological issues at the expense of the type of social and political considerations that are at the heart of Hegel’s system. However, and although Brandom himself concedes that his work is circumscribed to a number of highly specialized and technical issues in the philosophy of mind and language, the truth is that his views often radiate to other philosophical fields, if not always explicitly. My claim in this article is that at the heart of Brandom’s semantic theory, there are elements of a critical project, one that offers a normative standpoint to judge and improve our current practices. Moreover, these progressive features of Brandom’s normative pragmatics should be seen in the light of his adoption of a series of hermeneutic themes, ultimately culminating in his recollective conception of rationality and his edifying view of semantics.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-11-07T07:08:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231211036
       
  • Social norms and social practices

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      Authors: John Lawless
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Theories of social norms frequently define social norms in terms of individuals’ beliefs and preferences, and so afford individual beliefs and preferences conceptual priority over social norms. I argue that this treatment of social norms is unsustainable. Taking Bicchieri’s theory as an exemplar of this approach, I argue, first, that Bicchieri’s framework bears important structural similarities with the command theory of law; and second, that Hart’s arguments against the command theory of law, suitably recast, reveal the fundamental problems with Bicchieri’s framework. I then draw on Hart’s critique to develop and defend an alternative approach, arguing that we should conceive of social norms as the norms internal to a “socially sanctioned representational practice.” This approach makes social norms conceptually independent of individuals’ beliefs and preferences by locating them within social practices that transcend their individual participants, structuring the social landscape even before individuals form their own beliefs and preferences.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-11-04T06:25:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231211033
       
  • Realist legitimacy: What kind of internalism'

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      Authors: Ben Cross
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Most realist theories of legitimacy are internalist theories, meaning that they regard legitimacy as a function of how subjects view their own rulers. However, some realists seek to qualify their internalism by holding that legitimacy is not simply a matter of whether subjects accept their rulers’ exercise of power. According to one such view, legitimacy requires that rulers’ power be ‘acceptable’ to subjects, in the sense that it can be justified on the basis of values that they accept. Call this acceptability internalism. In this article, I argue that realists should reject acceptability internalism. I first argue that acceptability internalism has the disadvantage of separating the concept of legitimacy from the interests of rulers. I then consider two arguments in favour of acceptability internalism, and argue that both should be rejected.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-11-04T01:10:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231211030
       
  • Moses and Aron: Reconsidering holistic politics

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      Authors: Kolja Möller
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on Arnold Schönberg’s seminal opera “Moses and Aron”, the comment focuses on the role of holistic politics in Andrew Arato’s and Jean L. Cohen’s “Populism and Civil Society”. It argues that their anti-populist stance is too quick in dismissing a politics which is driven by representing and re-constituting the whole of the social order. Against this backdrop, a rejuvenation of the political left may not consist in a rejection of holism as such but in a popular politics which relies on functional equivalences.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-11-03T11:37:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231211038
       
  • Two sorts of philosophical therapy: Ordinary language philosophy, social
           criticism and the Frankfurt school

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      Authors: Tom Whyman
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      In a recent article, Fabian Freyenhagen argues that we should understand first-generation Frankfurt School critical theory (in particular, the work of Adorno and Horkheimer) as being defined by a kind of ‘linguistic turn’ analogous to one present in the later Wittgenstein. Here, I elaborate on this hypothesis – initially by calling it into question, by detailing Herbert Marcuse’s extensive criticisms of Wittgenstein (and other analytic philosophers of language) in One-Dimensional Man. While Marcuse is harshly critical of analytic ordinary language philosophy, he is much more sympathetic to a different sort of ordinary language philosophy, which he unpacks with reference to Karl Kraus. I show how, by getting Marcuse’s criticisms of Wittgenstein and other analytic philosophers, and lauding of Kraus, into view, we can better understand the first generation of the Frankfurt School as having practised a sort of ‘non-quietistic’ philosophical therapy (that may or may not have been the sort of thing that Wittgenstein himself had in mind).
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-10-23T10:19:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231203525
       
  • Populism and critical theory: On Arato and Cohen

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      Authors: Patrick O’Mahony
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      The book contains an extraordinary condensation of important themes regarding populism. It brings social and political science together with normative philosophy, something badly needed today in critical theory to advance its theoretical-empirical approach. But it is precisely the kind of interpretation of critical theory presented in the book that is the focus of these brief comments. In particular, I mainly ask about the relation to second-generation critical theory. In this context, the comments particularly address kinds and levels of cultural structure that make possible the form of normative reconstruction offered by critical theory, and examines how these appear – or do not appear – in the book, together with outlining the implications for the approach. Specifically, I will address three main dimensions arising in the book. These are (a) Immanent Critique; (b) The counterfactual status of ideals; (c) The methodology of ideal type analysis. The general conclusion is show in what ways the line of inquiry present in the book can be further elaborated within critical theory.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-10-07T06:55:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231203554
       
  • Gnosticism, political theory and apocalypse: Jacob Taubes and Günther
           Anders, Tracy Strong and Carl Schmitt

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      Authors: Babette Babich
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Beginning with Jacob Taubes and Günther Anders on eschatology, apocalypse and political theology, including Saint Paul and Frankfurt School critical theory along with bombs and power plants (energy/climate), this essay parallels a re-reading of Tracy B. Strong’s political reading of Nietzsche on Jesus (and love) with Taubes, Anders and Carl Schmitt on politics (and technology). Highlighted throughout is the politically charged (and inherently esoteric) context of Gnosticism for philosophy and theory for Taubes but also for Anders.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-10-07T05:41:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231203551
       
  • The politics of drama: How Hegel’s aesthetics inform contemporary
           theories of radical democracy

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      Authors: Leonie Hunter
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      The history of political philosophy is marked by a conception of politics as inherently tragic. As such, it has hardly ever been systematically contrasted with the other model of dramatic art, comedy. In this article, I explore the relation between Hegel's twofold notion of drama as an ordered genre of disorder – what he considers to be the highest form of self-reflective art – and the post-foundational concept of radical democracy. After outlining the interplay between order and disorder in post-foundationalist theories of political difference, I summarize the way in which the steps of Hegel's poetics consecutively build on each other and elaborate the role of the dramatic genres. By means of a genealogical reconstruction of the respective concepts of democracy and drama, I demonstrate the extent to which these two methodologies correspond to poetic and political order formation in a structural homology. This conceptualization concludes with the assertion of a constitutive dramatization of political modernity which does not, however, culminate in the concept of political tragedy but points towards a still-to-be-realized, comically ordered democracy.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-09-23T01:11:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231203519
       
  • Politics and aesthetics: Jacques Rancière and Louis-Gabriel Gauny

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      Authors: Stuart Blaney
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This paper argues that much of Jacques Rancière’s redefinition of emancipation owes a lot to one key character from his archival research on nineteenth-century worker-poets, Louis-Gabriel Gauny, the self-proclaimed plebeian philosopher. This is especially the case in regard to Rancière’s understanding of subjectivation forming a double of the self and a double of social reality as worlds within worlds. The paper puts forward that Gauny’s form of emancipation is valid today as an aesthetic revolution that reveals Rancière’s practices of equality to be an emancipatory way of life. In doing so, it will engage with Gauny’s connection with the contemporary precariat.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-08-17T07:34:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231197447
       
  • Book Review: The ruthless critique of everything existing: Nature and
           revolution in Marcuse’s philosophy of praxis

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      Authors: Carl Cassegård
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-07-25T07:30:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231191559
       
  • The ‘mystical’ foundation of democratic society, mythmaking and truth
           in The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (John Ford 1962)

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      Authors: Camil Ungureanu
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, I combine political philosophy and film to examine the problematic of the ‘mystical’ foundation of authority and democracy as represented in The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance. Ford’s filmic vision is interpretable as a parable of the passage from the state of nature to the modern republic and the deconstruction of American democratic progressivism. To analyse it, I proceed in two steps: first, I defend a middle-way critical Enlightenment perspective between the democratic-progressivist and the deconstructive approach to the question of foundations. Second, in dialogue with this critical Enlightenment perspective, I argue that Ford’s cinematic vision of the foundation remains ambivalent, given that its deconstruction of the mythology of American democratic progressivism is premised on the nostalgic mythologizing of the pre-democratic age. Moreover, I take issue with Robert Pippin’s interpretation of the movie as a cautionary tale against Enlightenment rationalism, and which poses at its center the key psychological role of myths in politics (2011). In contrast, I argue that Ford’s cinematic vision cautions against decoupling the socio-political and personal life from the vital connection to truth and acting upon truth. From this standpoint, a “politics of truth” is, against Pippin’s interpretation of Ford’s vision, compatible with taking into account the constitutive role of narratives in building political legitimacy and authority.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-07-22T03:57:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231187557
       
  • Demobilized democracy: Plebiscitarianism as political theology

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      Authors: Ian Zuckerman
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing from Marx’s 18th Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte and the work of Carl Schmitt, this article proposes a framework that critically diagnoses the plebiscitary, executive-centered conception of democratic representation as a species of political theology. I reconstruct Marx’s comments on plebiscitarianism in The 18th Brumaire through his earlier critique of political theology in ‘On the Jewish Question’, in order to contrast two modes of representation. The first, ‘theological’ representation, is a symbolic incarnation of the unity of the people in the person of the executive. The second, ‘agonistic’ representation, develops only in the legislative assembly as a forum for translating social antagonisms and divisions into political ones. Turning from Marx to the writings of Carl Schmitt on plebiscitarianism, and to more recent analyses of populism, I show how these logics of political-theological versus antagonistic representation can function in different political contexts than the one Marx diagnosed. In conclusion, I argue that plebiscitarian democracy is neither an innocuous feature of institutions, nor a decisionist democratic alternative to liberal parliamentarism. Rather, it is a contemporary expression of political theology, premised upon depoliticization and the exclusion of social antagonisms from the sphere of democratic representation.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-07-10T01:27:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231187547
       
  • Political existentiality in Carl Schmitt; reenchanting the political

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      Authors: Ben Van de Wall
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Carl Schmitt described the political in existential terms. The political consists in the distinction between friend and enemy, a distinction between collectivities that are existentially different. This led Richard Wolin to label Schmitt a “political existentialist” whose work relies on a specific cultural and philosophical climate of “vitalism.” Consequently, Schmitt’s thought is treated as ideology by Wolin. Instead of focusing on Schmitt’s underlying ideological affinity with a particular cultural climate, this paper attempts to conceptualize the notion of “political existentiality” as a crucial element in Schmitt’s understanding of the political and defend it as a notion that reveals something about the political condition itself. In order to understand the meaning of existentiality, we will conceptualize it against the background of Max Weber’s disenchantment thesis and conclude that through the notion of political existentiality Schmitt conceptualizes the political sphere as a locus of meaning and values and thus reenchants the political.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-07-03T06:53:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231184496
       
  • Fugitive freedom and radical care: Towards a standpoint theory of
           normativity

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      Authors: Daniel Loick
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Epistemic standpoint theories have elaborated the effects of social situatedness on epistemic competence: Dominant groups are regularly subject to epistemic blockages that limit the possibility of cognition and knowledge production. Oppressed groups, on the other hand, have access to perceptions and insights that dominant groups lack. This diagnosis can be generalized: Not only our epistemic, but also our normative relation to the world is socially situated, that is, our values, virtues, moral sentiments are shaped by relations of domination. In this article, my goal is to sketch the general outlines of a standpoint theory of normativity. I do so by engaging with two lines of tradition. First, I review conceptions of fugitive freedom in the Black Radical Tradition, before I recapitulate the feminist debate around the concept of care work. The counter-hegemonic norms theorized in these traditions can be brought into dialogue because they are both based on similar presuppositions, namely, political struggle provoked by social contradictions.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-06-29T06:55:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231185954
       
  • Whose idea of socialism' Conflicting conceptions of the family and
           women’s subordination

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      Authors: Lois McNay
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This article compares Honneth’s attempt to revise socialist thinking on women’s subordination in the family with feminist work on the topic. Both identify economism as the reason why socialism has historically failed to come up with an adequate account of women’s oppression in the family. However, their attempts to overcome economism proceed in different directions. Feminists overcome economism by expanding and enriching ideas of the economic and value producing activity and applying these reworked categories to women’s reproductive labour. Honneth overcomes economism by suspending materialist explanation and focussing on emancipatory ethical dynamics implicit in the family. In comparison to feminist work, Honneth’s ethicised account of gender and family is as reductive as the economism it aims to surmount. First, his progressive historiography engenders a Whiggish narrative of the steady expansion of women’s social freedom in the family that downplays ambiguous and negative historical developments related to the changing nature of patriarchy. Second, his reified archetype of the family obscures the systemic causes of persistent gendered asymmetries within households. Finally, his Hegelian endorsement of institutionally expressed normativity leads in a reformist political direction and away from the radical, deep-democratic options that socialist feminists deem necessary to counteract women’s subordination.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-06-27T07:40:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231184488
       
  • Designing for epistemic justice: Epistemic apprenticeship as an
           institutional commitment

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      Authors: Millicent Churcher
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This paper develops the concept of epistemic apprenticeship as a response to failures among privileged social actors to perceive the knowledge bases of unjustly marginalised groups as sources of valuable insight. Inspired by Elizabeth Spelman’s reflections on apprenticeship and intersectional feminism, an epistemic apprenticeship represents an obverse form of apprenticeship; one in which socially privileged knowers become apprentices to those who do not enjoy equivalent power and privilege. This paper critiques and extends Spelman’s account of apprenticeship by focussing on how the institutional sedimentation of dominant social imaginaries works against the volitional and virtuous practice of apprenticeship, and by exploring what a commitment to epistemic apprenticeship demands at the level of institutional practice. As part of this discussion, I scrutinise the conditions under which institutionalised apprenticeships may fall short of their meliorative potential, and may obstruct rather than aid efforts to achieve greater epistemic justice.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-06-27T05:05:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231184493
       
  • Multiaccentual coalitions, dialogic grief and carnivalesque assemblies:
           Judith Butler and Mikhail Bakhtin meet in the world of ethics

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      Authors: John M. Roberts
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This article for the first time seeks to bring together theoretical insights from Judith Butler and Mikhail Bakhtin in order to strengthen their respective understanding of ethics. First, the article suggests that Bakhtin’s theory of dialogic events and the ‘multiaccentuality’ and thematic nature of everyday utterances can help Butler address criticisms that suggest her work concentrates too heavily on invariant meanings in utterances. Second, Butler’s theory of coalitions can usefully politicise Bakhtin’s ideas on utterances, while her ethics of grief is a crucial way to think about how we forge bonds with the ‘Other’. Correspondingly, Bakhtin’s theory of the ethical ‘I’ adds an important moment of ‘empathy’ to Butler’s account of grief and the ‘Other’. Third, Butler’s theory of state hegemony and counter-hegemonic assemblies can provide an important addition to Bakhtin’s theory, while Bakhtin’s theory of carnivalesque democracy strengthens Butler’s insights on equality in assemblies and occupying a liveable life.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-06-26T09:20:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231184495
       
  • Foucault’s anarchaeology of Christianity: Understanding confession as a
           basic form of obedience

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      Authors: Chris Barker
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      In his later lectures, Foucault analyzes confession as a key exercise of the Christian pastoral power. The pastoral power’s creation of a lifelong obligation to speak the truth of oneself is a ‘prelude’ to modern practices of government, and a key facet of modernity. There has been some confusion regarding the scope of Foucault’s study. Is it medieval Christian confessional practices or Christian obedience itself that is his theme' In this article, I revisit all of the later lectures touching on confession and avowal in order to clarify Foucault’s ambivalence about Christian proto-governmentality. Foucault exposes two regimes of truth, belief and confession, and offer a practice-based, confession-centred history of the pre-modern self. Connecting his lectures to his method of anarchaeology clarifies how the force of truth (the ‘you have to’) is, for Foucault, a fundamental if ambivalent historical-cultural problem of government.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-06-23T07:56:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231184489
       
  • The carceral appropriation of communications technology through the
           imaginal

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      Authors: Harrison S Jackson
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the effect that communications technology has on hegemonic power. The first section establishes a theoretical framework combining Foucault’s carceral archipelago theory with Chiara Bottici’s concept of the social imaginal describing the medium through which inter- and trans-subjective imagination occurs. The remainder employs this framework to examine how four technological innovations (print media, radio, television and Internet) impact the (re)production of discursive hegemonic ideology, integrating a variety of historical and contemporary theories on public discourse and ideological dominance. I conclude by arguing that each case demonstrates a dialectic pattern that explains the techno-social evolution of the carceral archipelago.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-06-23T06:56:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231184485
       
  • The disappointment of Rosa Luxemburg: Rethinking revolutionary commitment
           in the face of failure

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      Authors: Maša Mrovlje
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the recent revival of revolutionary commitment in response to left melancholia, I suggest that the contemporary academic left has not adequately addressed the difficulty of responding to failure as an inevitable aspect of revolutionary politics. The dominant tendency has been to try to offset the risk of failure by managing revolutionary action in line with a pre-given model of revolutionary change – only to limit the range of possibilities for revolutionary engagement. To address this problem, I draw on Rosa Luxemburg, a foremost revolutionary thinker, whose experiences of disappointment led her to rethink the notion of revolutionary commitment as a practice of learning from failure. This rethinking of commitment suggests a different way of engaging with failure – one that expands our imagination of political possibilities beyond the confines of the dominant contemporary responses to left melancholia and enriches their visions of revolutionary change.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-06-19T02:57:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231184406
       
  • Work of art in the Age of Its AI Reproduction

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      Authors: Ignas Kalpokas
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      From a Benjaminian point of view, AI-generated art is distinct from both ‘traditional’ art and technologically enabled reproduction, for example, photography and film. Instead of mere mechanical representation of the world as it is presented to a device, AI-generated art involves identification and inventive representation of data patterns. This specific mode of data-based generation exceeds mere surface-level mimicry and enables deeper meaning, namely, an insight into the collective unconscious of the society. In this way, AI-generated art is never detached from society and the predominant social conditions while also reflecting the technology-induced transformations that today’s societies are undergoing. Thus, AI-generated art can be seen as capable of partly reversing the loss of auratic capacities that hand ensued with mechanical reproduction. Still, as a matter of continuity, AI-generated works enable the maximisation of exhibition value and capacity for audience enjoyment, rendering AI-generated art perfect for the age of increasing distraction.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-06-19T02:10:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231184490
       
  • The anatomo-politics of affect: An investigation of affective
           governmentality

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      Authors: Jonathan Harmat
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      The present inquiry concerns ‘affective governmentality’ and is guided by the following question: How did affects become intelligible objects of knowledge and what enabled a scientific conception of affect to turn into a distinctive government of affect' In answering this question, the article first outlines how a lineage of thinkers used the speculative tools of geometry to conceptualize and deduce human affects. Through an analysis of Spinoza’s Political Treatise, the article then investigates how this geometric conception of affect enabled a productive and indirect government of affect. The article’s contribution to the study of affective governmentality is twofold: First, it advances the methodological claim that the proper register to study affects in governmentality is anatomo-political rather than biopolitical. Second, the analysis of the Political Treatise exemplifies, nuances and substantiates our understanding of how desires and affects were reconceptualized geometrically to conceive a government of bodies and souls.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-06-19T01:47:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231184494
       
  • Afropessimism and the Specter of Black Nihilism

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      Authors: Orlando Hawkins
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      In arguing that slavery is not a relic of the past, but a relational dynamic undergirded by an ontology of anti-Blackness that prevents Blacks from ever being considered human beings, the self-described Afropessimist, Frank Wilderson III, argues that Black people occupy the position of social death in the present. Due to this anti-Black condition, Wilderson concludes that no form of redress is possible to assuage, liberate, and redeem Black people from this anti-Black condition other than the “End of the World.” Drawing upon Fredrich Nietzsche’s understanding of the problem of nihilism and its existential consequences, I argue that while Afropessimism is useful for articulating the problem of anti-Blackness, it makes a nihilistic turn through Wilderson’s “End of the World” since there is no world where Blackness is experienced as anything other than social death. As a response to Wilderson, I conclude that the philosopher Jacqueline Scott’s life-affirming Nietzschean philosophy and her anti-racist activism in “Racial Nihilism as Racial Courage” is one adequate response to the nihilistic threat to Black America if Black people are condemned to a life of social death because of the enduring nature of anti-Black racism.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-06-17T08:57:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231184486
       
  • Incompatible sovereigns: Populism, democracy and the two peoples

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      Authors: Leonardo Fiorespino
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      The article aims to investigate the problematic relationship between populism and democracy by comparing the conceptions of ‘the people’ and popular sovereignty which they presuppose. In the first two sections, the populist and the democratic ‘peoples’ are reconstructed, and the unbridgeable gap dividing them is highlighted. The discussion of the democratic people requires a concise analysis of the main contemporary democratic frameworks, including deliberative democracy, ‘neo-Roman’ republicanism, agonistic democracy. The article works out the implications of the incompatibility between the two ‘sovereign peoples’ identified, and concludes that such an incompatibility undercuts the kinship of populism and democracy. While, populism is often said to intertwine with democracy in some way, the article argues that it significantly departs from democratic theory and practice, and belongs to a distinct conceptual space. It cannot be made to overlap with ‘illiberal democracy’, a ‘democratic myth’, a crude electoral majoritarianism, nor does it amount to hiding undemocratic policies into properly democratic justifications. The boundary dividing populism and democracy, therefore, starts unfolding at the level of the conception of the people. While, democratic theory invariably assumes a people intended as simultaneously heterogeneous and united, populism conceives of the people as a moral whole, internally undifferentiated, whose homogeneity and intrinsic righteousness preclude the task of specifying what popular sovereignty ultimately means. Such specification, on the other hand, is inescapable for any democrat assuming the people as a composite unity. The last section addresses four possible objections to the argument, variously formulated by Ernesto Laclau and by scholars approaching populism from a post-Laclauian or discursive-performative perspective.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-06-12T03:51:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231182912
       
  • For a Negative Hermeneutics: Adorno, Gadamer and Critical Consciousness

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      Authors: Vangelis Giannakakis
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      The present social-historical moment is marked by a sharp divide, a harrowing ‘communication breakdown’ between subject and object, between humanity and nature, between humanity and itself. This state of affairs pleads for the (re-)elaboration of a consciousness that resonates critically with the social, political and cultural realities of its time. This paper studies the lessons that can be drawn in this regard from the intersection between, on the one hand, Theodor W. Adorno’s ‘philosophical interpretation’ and his idea of an historically adequate consciousness, and, on the other, Hans-Georg Gadamer’s ‘philosophical hermeneutics’ and his conception of the historically effected consciousness. The paper opens with a concise reconstruction of Adorno’s ‘philosophical interpretation’ as a critical response to instrumental rationality that borrows insights from radical historicism. The focus then shifts to Gadamer’s ‘philosophical hermeneutics’ which is read as a similar type of protest against instrumental reason that privileges dialogical forms of enculturation. Finally, the paper closes with some suggestive yet inconclusive reflections on some important elements of convergence/divergence between the two thinkers, notably, their theorisations of immanent and transcended critique, the role they ascribe to tradition and language vis-à-vis experience, and the special place of ‘mimesis’ in it. Overall, the argument is made that a ‘negative hermeneutics’ may be what is needed to fashion new interpretations of the world, to foster alternative ways of thinking about and being in it, which, pace Marx, go hand in hand with its transformation – or, perhaps more aptly nowadays, the mere feat of sparing it.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-05-24T11:24:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231176460
       
  • The owl of Minerva and the dialectic of human freedom: A heterodox reading

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      Authors: Bernardo Ferro
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      In the preface to the Philosophy of Right, Hegel compares the philosopher’s work to the flight of the owl of Minerva: just as the latter begins only with the fall of dusk, so too is philosophy bound to ‘come on the scene’ too late to teach ‘what the world ought to be’. This well-known passage has been read in many quarters as a heavy, if not fatal blow to philosophy’s critical role. While some interpreters regard Hegel’s metaphor as an outright rejection of critical theory, others see it as a restriction of philosophy’s normative dimension. In this article, I argue against both of these interpretations. In my view, Hegel’s methodological indications are not incompatible with a critical outlook on received reality. What is more, they do not preclude the possibility of a radical critique of received reality. To show why, I argue that the Philosophy of Right is primarily aimed at a normative reconstruction of existing social and political arrangements, which entails both a retrospective and a prospective dimension. Moreover, I claim that this duality is one of the most original features of Hegel’s practical thought, and the key to its enduring political relevance.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-05-06T11:02:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231171418
       
  • A Marxist reading of Ludwig Wittgenstein: Making the case for social and
           political change

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      Authors: Marc James Deegan
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This article offers a Marxist reading of Wittgenstein and juxtaposes his famous dictum that philosophy ‘leaves everything as it is’ with the idea of transformative action. I seek to align the later philosophy of Wittgenstein with Marx’s 11th thesis on Feuerbach. I advance an unorthodox view interpreting Wittgenstein as an advocate for social and political reform. Wittgenstein’s philosophy encourages us to imagine alternatives and contemplate concrete possibilities for changing the world. The debate operates within the philosophy of education and draws inspiration from related inquiries in political thought and, more specifically, from Marxist connections with Wittgenstein.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-05-03T11:15:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231170907
       
  • Three theories of separation: Kelsen, Schmitt and Pashukanis and the
           historical development of the legal form

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      Authors: Matthew Bolton
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the different approaches to the relation between law, state and economy in the works of Hans Kelsen, Carl Schmitt and Evgeny Pashukanis. It begins with Kelsen’s depiction of law as a dynamic and ‘self-regulating’ system of norms, founded on his rejection of ‘dualist’ separations of state and law, before turning to Schmitt and Pashukanis’s respective critiques. For all their differences, both agree Kelsen ignores the historical basis of the law – for Schmitt, the sovereign power of ‘the political’, for Pashukanis, the social relations of commodity exchange. The article responds to these criticisms in a most un-Kelsenian manner, drawing upon historical sociological literature on early modern state formation to cast doubt on both Schmitt and Pashukanis’s historical accounts. It argues that the forms of political power and commodity exchange upon which Schmitt and Pashukanis’s theories rely were historically specific possibilities opened up by the same process of generalisation and depersonalisation of power relations that allowed for an autonomous ‘public’ system of legal norms. Thus, rather than the fixed causal ground for the development of modern law, ‘the political’ and exchange between equals exist in a relation of ‘difference-in-unity’ with the law. The article concludes that Kelsen’s notion of the Grundnorm is best explained as an attempt to capture the new possibilities and responsibilities opened up a normative system whose ultimate justification now lies only within itself.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-04-28T09:56:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231170908
       
  • Does contemporary recognition theory rest on a mistake'

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      Authors: Paul Giladi
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      My aim in this paper is to argue, contra Axel Honneth, that ‘the summons’ (Aufforderung), the central pillar of Fichte’s transcendentalist account of recognition, is best made sense of not as an ‘invitation’, but rather as a second-personal demand, whose illocutionary content draws attention to the demandingness of responsibilities towards vulnerable agents. Because of this, the summons has good explanatory force in terms of disclosing the phenomenological dynamics of psychosocially and politically significant reactive attitudes. Under my reading, then, Fichte’s position, contra Honneth’s ‘negative’ treatment of it, is anything but an empty formalism that ‘fails to refer to subjects of flesh and blood’.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-04-21T11:26:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231170905
       
  • The humanism of critical theory: The Frankfurt School’s
           ‘realer humanismus’

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      Authors: Alice Nilsson
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Theodor Adorno has been quoted as responding to the Humanist Union stating ‘I might possibly be willing to join if your club had been called an inhuman union, but I could not join one that calls itself “humanist”’. Adorno’s opposition to forms of humanism (both liberal and Marxist) which posit the existence of our humanity is reflected in readings of The Frankfurt Institute’s history such as that produced by Martin Jay. While this is the case, one of Adorno’s highly admired students, Alfred Schmidt, commemorated his teacher by proclaiming him a ‘philosopher of Real Humanism’. In categorising Adorno’s work as embodying a ‘Real Humanism’, Schmidt points towards an understanding and orientation towards the human (and our understanding of it) which cannot be accurately characterised through the philosophies of Humanism and Anti-Humanism as oppositional viewpoints. Rather, the Real Humanism of Adorno (as well as some of his fellow travellers) understands the human as the negative image of our currently existing society’s inhumanity, and urges us to take an ethical orientation towards the constitution of the human through the abolition of our inhumanity. If we, like Adorno, are to believe in the new categorical imperative that we must make sure ‘that Auschwitz never repeats itself, so that nothing similar ever happen[s] again’, then we must fundamentally orient ourselves towards the goal of ‘real humanism’ – a society free from the domination of ourselves and the other.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-04-20T10:45:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231170904
       
  • Against insular liberalism: Sayyid Qutb, illiberal Islam and the forceless
           force of the better argument

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      Authors: Marilie Coetsee
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Political liberals claim that liberal polities may legitimately dismiss the objections of ‘unreasonable’ citizens who resist political liberals’ favored principles of justice and political justification. A growing number of other political philosophers, including post-colonialist theorists, have objected to the resulting insularity of political liberalism. However, political liberals’ insularity also often presents them from being sensitive or responsive to these critics’ complaints. In this article, I develop a more efficacious internal critique of political liberalism: I show that political liberals’ own core principles of liberal legitimacy sometimes require liberal polities to engage with the objections of those who hold ‘unreasonable’, and even illiberal, views. First, I draw on the work of Sayyid Qutb, an illiberal Islamic political thinker, to argue that – contrary to what political liberals often imply – even ‘unreasonable’, illiberal citizens may be fair-minded: that is, they may be actively concerned to cooperate with others on fair and mutually endorsable terms. Second, I contend that a liberal state’s own core commitment to treating citizens as free and equal requires it to offer fair-minded illiberal citizens like Qutb deep reasons – that don’t presuppose agreement on liberal principles of justice and so can speak to them in the dialectical position they start from – for why they should accept the liberal laws with which the state coerces them to comply. By showing how political liberals’ own commitments oblige them to address even ‘unreasonable’ political perspectives, I open the door to their more robust engagement with their critics, including not only comparative political theorists but also the growing number of illiberal citizens who challenge democratic regimes.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-03-31T06:50:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537221109904
       
  • Book Review: A glitch in the matrix: Vivek Chibber and the cltural turn

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      Authors: Katie Ebner-Landy
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Chibber’s The Class Matrix and Confronting Capitalism aim to rescue class from the cultural turn. Rather than thinking that mass media mollified the working class, he suggests we re-investigate capitalism itself. We can then see how hard capitalism makes it to take risks for the collective. Chibber’s solution is to shift people from ‘individualistic to solidaristic’ ways of thinking through lived practices, rather than the arts. This review argues, however, that by excluding the culture industry from encouraging solidaristic ways of thinking, Chibber removes a crucial tool in the socialist armory: the way in which artistic representations can help us see ourselves and the world differently.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-03-18T07:31:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231160798
       
  • Supplication as violence: The provision of institutionalized care and the
           essence of giving

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      Authors: Prashan Ranasinghe
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This article casts its attention on acts of supplication in institutional settings. The article focuses upon institutions geared towards the provision of care, that is, sites that are designed to provide services to those in need. The article claims that every act of supplication is an act of violence deployed upon the supplicant by his/her interlocutor and the institution more broadly. This is not violence of an overt type; it is tacit and subtle and takes root at the very essence of the supplicant, that is, his/her being. The article draws on Jacques Derrida’s provocative reading of the impossibility of the gift, an analysis that is indebted to Marcel Mauss’ exposition of the gift as obligatory and, thus, an existential nullity. Drawing upon both theorists, the article theorizes the violence of the gift and proceeds to read the violence in/of care/caring. The article explicates the grounding of this violence and how it is written into each request for care.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-02-23T09:54:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231157381
       
  • History, critique, experience: On the dialectical relationship between art
           and philosophy in Adorno’s aesthetic theory

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      Authors: Justin Neville Kaushall
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      In Aesthetic Theory, Adorno argues that, in modernity, art and philosophy are reciprocally dependent upon each other for legitimation and critical force. This claim has puzzled scholars and provoked controversy. I argue that Adorno’s thesis may be comprehended in the following manner: art requires philosophy because, without the latter, art would lack the power to critique social and historical reality (in particular, the ideological elements that often remain invisible as second nature), and to rationally interpret the material particularity expressed by such reality; and, conversely, philosophy requires art because the latter expresses historical experience to reason. Such material historical experience is necessary in order to prevent philosophy from falling into ideological convention; idle speculation; or abstract and reified instrumentality. Thus, the constellation of history, art, and philosophy is essential to Adorno’s aesthetics.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-02-23T01:12:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231158150
       
  • The symbolic work of political discourse. Populist reason and its
           foundational myth

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      Authors: Javier Toscano
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This article locates Ernesto Laclau’s populist reason as a point of departure to understand the contemporary democratic logic and its so-called ‘excesses’. It argues that, even if resourceful, Laclau’s findings can be supplemented with a theory of the imaginary as developed by Cornelius Castoriadis, as well as with key remarks from a discussion of the theologico-political as this was characterized by Claude Lefort. The aim is to construct an understanding on the political as it is structured by language and the symbolic, presenting thus democracy and populism as two opposing sides of a foundational political myth.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T01:54:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231157375
       
  • Embedded agency: A critique of negative liberty and free markets

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      Authors: Senem Saner
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      The concept of negative liberty as non-interference is operative in the concept of a free market and stipulates that market relations remain outside the purview of social control. As a purported self-regulating system, however, the market functions as a system of necessity that facilitates and rules social life. I argue that Isaiah Berlin’s defense of negative liberty leads to a paradox as it entails subjection to the external necessity of a self-regulating market. The argument for the self-defeating nature of negative liberty relies on two philosophical insights that have their roots in G. W. F. Hegel’s theory of self-determination. First, negative liberty fails to account for the inner and outer conditions of freedom and thus reduces to mere whim or arbitrariness, subject to heteronomous forces but masquerading as license. Second, individual freedom is intersubjectively mediated in its deliberative process and framed by social and political institutions in its exercise; thus, free agency must be theorized as embedded agency. I challenge the association of freedom and the market and the automatic and unchallenged implication of deregulation and freedom. Deregulation, rather, leaves the community’s future development to the whims of economic players using a rhetoric of freedom as both lure and principle.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-02-17T12:42:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231157439
       
  • From agonistic to insurgent democracy

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      Authors: Lorenzo Buti
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This article uncovers an internal tension within theories of agonistic democracy. On the one hand, as radical pluralists, agonistic democrats want to institute a ‘symmetrical’ political scene where different identities can struggle on an equally legitimate basis. On the other hand, they often normatively prioritize the struggles of oppressed groups against domination. In response, this article proposes to collapse any strict distinction between pluralism and social relations of domination. The result is a move from agonistic to insurgent democracy, where insurgent struggles against domination give the central impetus to any democracy. To do so, it turns to the writings of Étienne Balibar, who argues that most, if not all, symmetrical political conflict is built on asymmetrical forms of domination or oppression. This leads us to develop an account of democratic conflict that is incessantly asymmetrical. Finally, this article suggests an alternative way of rescuing the political principle of pluralism cherished by agonistic democrats. Balibar’s writings on the ‘ideology of the dominated’ show that every insurgent struggle expresses itself ideologically, which harbours the risk of obscuring other forms of domination. Therefore, democracy is not only kept alive by insurgent movements, it requires that the latter democratize themselves by maintaining a permanent openness to alternative calls against domination or oppression.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-02-15T11:17:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231157383
       
  • On militant democracy’s institutional conservatism

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      Authors: Patrick Nitzschner
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This article critically reconstructs militant democracy’s ‘institutional conservatism’, a theoretical preference for institutions that restrain transformation. It offers two arguments, one historical and one normative. Firstly, it traces a historical development from a substantive to a procedural version of institutional conservatism from the traditional militant democratic thought of Schmitt, Loewenstein and Popper to the contemporary militant democratic theories of Kirshner and Rijpkema. Substantive institutional conservatisms theorize institutions that hinder transformation of the existing order; procedural conservatisms encourage transformation but contain and limit it within the boundaries of existing institutions. Secondly, the article uses resources internal to this historical reconstruction to make the normative case that even the procedural version of institutional conservatism, which characterizes contemporary theories of militant democracy, is problematic from a democratic perspective. The reason for this is that it unjustifiably restricts fundamental democratic change to existing institutions. In conclusion, the article calls for further engagement with modes of democratic defence that do not limit the possibility of radical democratic change but nevertheless enable the protection of democratic institutions against authoritarian regression.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-02-09T10:11:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537221150462
       
  • Understanding and evaluating populist strategy

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      Authors: David Jenkins
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Populism describes those strategies which actors endorsing populist ideas must use in order to be considered populist. Typical populist strategies include the hijacking of state institutions; the development of clientelistic relationships with constituencies labelled the people, or employing certain rhetorical moves in which enmity between the people and a corrupt elite looms large. In this paper, I argue against tendencies to define populism according to a specific set of tactics that are supposed to flow directly from populist ideas. Instead, populism should be understood in terms of a particular orientation, which grounds and justifies a range of strategies, all of which – nefarious or otherwise – should be considered populist. This orientation posits that enmity between ‘the people’ and an elite is a defining feature of political life, in part because it is responsible for serious failures in a country’s ostensibly democratic institutions. These failures create a degree of ambivalence with respect to these institutions’ claims to authority and obedience, and generate the perception that political actors thereby enjoy an expanded set of moral permissions. Finally, populists argue that elites prosecute revanchist projects aimed at resisting populist pathways to power and undermining them once in office. Populist strategies then are simply whatever range of tactics political actors use who accept the validity of that above orientation.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-02-07T06:03:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537231155171
       
  • Power and normativity: Rainer Forst on noumenal power

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      Authors: Tim Heyssse
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      According to Rainer Forst, a critical theory of power must break with the tendency of political theorists to conceive of power in opposition to normativity. Appropriately, Forst proposes a noumenal definition according to which power is normative: It works through recognition of reasons and is thereby open to critical assessment. In this discussion note, I first clarify the normativity of power in Forst’s noumenal theory by means of Donald Davidson’s theory of action and then explain how theory of action leads to a different understanding of force and violence from Forst’s noumenal theory. In doing this, I find reason to endorse a non-normative definition of power on the lines proposed by Robert Dahl and endorsed by most authors in analytical political theory. This definition nevertheless remains faithful to Forst’s methodological guideline that a theory of power must keep in view the relations between power and normativity.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-01-18T07:17:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537221150460
       
  • Brothers in arms: Adorno and Foucault on resistance

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      Authors: Giovanni Maria Mascaretti
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This article offers a comparative exploration of the practices of resistance Theodor Adorno and Michel Foucault champion against the structures of modern power their enquiries have the merit to illuminate and contest. After a preliminary examination of their views about the relationship between theory and praxis, I shall pursue two goals: first, I shall illustrate the limitations of Adorno’s negativist portrait of an ethics of resistance and contrast it with Foucault’s more promising notion of resistance as strategic counter-conduct, which in his late ethico-political writings becomes the heart of a distinctive politics of the governed. Second, despite their dissimilarities, I shall argue that their ideas can be brought together to elaborate a ‘compounded’ account of resistance, where Adorno’s politics of suffering figures as the necessary pre-condition for the creative practices of freedom Foucault seeks to encourage.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-01-13T12:49:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537221150497
       
  • Whose time is it' Rancière on taking time, unproductive doing and
           democratic emancipation

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      Authors: Michael Räber
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This essay argues that an alternative conception of time to that underlying the ideology of productivism and growth is not only possible, but desirable. The creation of this time requires what I refer to as the practice of refusal via taking time: the self-determined arrangement of the nexus of time, action and utility that begins with the a-synchronous insertion of unproductive time into the synchronous horizontal time of productivism. The essay is divided into three sections. The first offers the reader a discussion of Jacques Rancière’s notion of time as a social and political medium that partitions and distributes actions and utility. The subsequent section of the essay elaborates in aesthetic terms an account of unproductive time that is indifferent to the time of productivism. In the final section, I discuss examples that show how taking time to do ‘nothing’ can elicit an emancipatory politics that seeks to liberate us from the hegemony of productivism. I conclude that political theory should attend to time as a political medium and to the possibilities of its occupation, and that picturing the taking of time in terms of stopping the force of productivism’s normalized horizontal time by entering the unproductive time of reverie and aesthetic experience, provides a promising perspective from which to apprehend a time for thriftless refusals, deliberate dis-identifications, and the forging of cooperation among people(s) and with nature.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-01-13T12:43:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537221150457
       
  • Reconsidering the ethics of cosmopolitan memory: In the name of difference
           and memories to-come

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      Authors: Zlatan Filipovic
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Departing from what Levey and Sznaider (2002) in their seminal work ‘Memory Unbound’ refer to as ‘cosmopolitan memory’ that emerges as one of the fundamental forms ‘collective memories take in the age of globalization’, this article will consider the underlying ethical implications of global memory formation that have yet to be adequately theorized. Since global disseminations of local memory cultures and the implicit canonization of its traumas are intimately related to the concept of archive, I will first focus on what Derrida (1996) in Archive Fever calls ‘archival violence’ and will show its inherent relation to the formation of cosmopolitan memory. Another related concept that I will use and that will problematize the transformation of living, embodied memory into archival, cultural memory upon which the formation of cosmopolitan memory depends is the witness. Using Agamben’s writing (2002) in this context that in Remnants of Auschwitz focuses on the foundational (im)possibilities of bearing witness, I will show that this transformation that determines the very possibility of cosmopolitan memory is far from unproblematic and readily accessible as Levy and Sznaider seem to assume. What will emerge as the most distinctive concern of global memory formation is the ethical material of difference as that which both makes its imperatives historically and politically exigent and that which signifies the difficulties of its unified articulation. Solidarity with the suffering of the other that mobilizes the very formation of cosmopolitan memory is also what should solicit vigilance against the universalistic ritualizations of its prerogatives.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-01-13T11:06:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537221150519
       
  • Beyond emergency politics: Carl Schmitt’s substantive
           constitutionalism

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mariano Croce, Andrea Salvatore
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      This article problematizes the recent comeback of the exceptionalist jargon as it is conjured by both critics and sympathizers. While in the last decades governments across the globe had recourse to emergency measures to cope with far-reaching emergencies, from terrorism to the COVID-19 pandemic, the received view has it that political power takes advantage of states of emergency as they put themselves in the position to circumvent constitutional limitations. Carl Schmitt is claimed to be the major advocate of this conception of emergency politics in that he elaborated on the concept of the state of exception as the heart of the state political power. This article contends that the received view is doubly wrong. First, soon after his espousal of exceptionalism, Schmitt realized that emergency legislation is an ineffective and costly governmental device that should be transitory and is as unstable as the crisis it is meant to overcome. Second, the received view neglects how Schmitt came to his model of ultraconservative substantive constitutionalism as he maintained that the main task of politics is to protect the normative life of a limited set of state-sponsored institutions as well as the substantive contents they produce.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T10:00:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537221150459
       
  • ‘Taking politics seriously: A prudential justification of political
           realism’

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Greta Favara
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Political realists have devoted much effort to clarifying the methodological specificity of realist theorising and defending its consistency as an approach to political reasoning. Yet the question of how to justify the realist approach has not received the same attention. In this article, I offer a prudential justification of political realism. To do so, I first characterise realism as anti-moralism. I then outline three possible arguments for the realist approach by availing myself of recent inquiries into the metatheoretical basis of realism: The metaethical, the ethical and the prudential arguments. I explain that the prudential argument offers the most solid basis for political realism because it relies on the least controversial premises. Still, I delve into the metaethical and ethical arguments for two reasons: The prudential argument takes advantage of the theses defended by the rival arguments and elaborating the other arguments shows the comparative strengths of the prudential argument.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-01-10T09:28:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537221145547
       
  • Understanding the democratic promise of the city

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Verena Frick
      Abstract: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
      Looking at current theoretical approaches to democracy and the city, this article deepens our understanding of the democratic relevance of cities. It suggests four ideals of the democratic city which are labelled the city as a school of democracy, the urban cosmopolis, the city as a commons and the sustainable city. Tracing commonalities between the ideals, while avoiding their pitfalls, the article develops an argument for understanding the democratic promise of the city by linking John Dewey’s concept of democratic action as experimental problem-solving to the spatiality of the city. Building on Dewey, the article introduces the concept of urban experimentalism and points out prospects for a spatialized understanding of democracy and pathways for democratizing urban space.
      Citation: Philosophy & Social Criticism
      PubDate: 2023-01-07T08:04:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01914537221150456
       
 
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  Subjects -> PHILOSOPHY (Total: 762 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted by number of followers
Philosophical Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 79)
Ethics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 75)
Journal of Political Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
European Journal of Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
Mind     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Philosophy & Public Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Australasian Journal of Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Contemporary Political Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Nous     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
International Journal for Philosophy of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Journal of the History of Philosophy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52)
Philosophical Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
British Journal for the History of Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Journal of Applied Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
British Journal for the Philosophy of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
American Journal of Theology & Philosophy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Moral Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Philosophy and Phenomenological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Philosophy of Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Erkenntnis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Medical Ethics     Partially Free   (Followers: 32)
Philosophy and Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Continental Philosophy Review     Partially Free   (Followers: 29)
Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Constellations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Ethics & Social Philosophy     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
British Journal of Aesthetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Canadian Journal of Philosophy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Ethical Theory and Moral Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Linguistics and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Philosophical Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
The Heythrop Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Philosophy Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Philosophy and Rhetoric     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Biology and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
BMC Medical Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Philosophy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Medical Ethics and History of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Mouseion: Journal of the Classical Association of Canada     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Jurisprudence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Studies in the Philosophy of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Episteme     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Philosophers' Imprint     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Assuming Gender     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Pragmatics & Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of the Philosophy of History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Media Ethics : Exploring Questions of Media Morality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Phronesis : A journal for Ancient Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Philosophy East and West     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Philosophy & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Midwest Studies In Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Social Epistemology: A Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Review of Philosophy and Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Reformed Theological Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Ethical Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Chinese Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Global Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Indian Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Pragmatics and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Dao : A Journal of Comparative Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Pacific Philosophical Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Utilitas     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Open Journal of Philosophy     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Film-Philosophy Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Polis : The Journal of the Society for Greek Political Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HTS Theological Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Philosophy of Photography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Diogenes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Philosophical Logic     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Research in Phenomenology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Philosophical Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Philosophia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Philosophical Books     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Philosophical Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Myth & Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Contributions to the History of Concepts     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Critical Realism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Metaphilosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Philosophical Investigations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Philosophical Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Zeitschrift für philosophische Forschung     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Speculative Philosophy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
SubStance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Dialogue Canadian Philosophical Review/Revue canadienne de philosophie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Nordic Journal of Aesthetics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Axiomathes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Contemporary Chinese Thought     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
History and Philosophy of Logic     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Think     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Philosophical Explorations: An International Journal for the Philosophy of Mind and Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Philosophical Magazine Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
The Southern Journal of Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Nietzsche Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Aisthesis     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of the Platonic Tradition     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Endeavour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Zeitschrift für Religions- und Geistesgeschichte     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Review of Contemporary Philosophy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Philosophical Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Studies in Philology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Hume Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Critical Horizons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Estudos Bíblicos     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
The Philosophical Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
South African Journal of Philosophy = Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif vir Wysbegeerte     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Bulletin de Philosophie Medievale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Franciscan Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Theoretical & Philosophical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch für Antike und Mittelalter     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Philosophy in Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Bijdragen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Recherches de Théologie et Philosophie Médiévales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Studia Logica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Topoi     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Grazer Philosophische Studien     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Utopian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
CR : The New Centennial Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Pluralist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Erasmus Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Religion and Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Russell : the Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Kantian Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Husserl Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Kriterion: Revista de Filosofia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue Philosophique de Louvain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sartre Studies International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Scottish Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Quaestio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Poiesis & Praxis : International Journal of Technology Assessment and Ethics of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Aesthetic Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Philosophy & Theory in Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Australian Journal of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Friends of Lutheran Archives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Between the Species     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Empedocles : European Journal for the Philosophy of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cultura : International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Horizonte : Revista de Estudos de Teologia e Ciências da Religião     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Žižek Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for the Study of Skepticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ethische Perspectieven     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Astérion     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Noesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Le Portique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Temporalités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Estudios de Filosofía Práctica e Historia de las Ideas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veritas : Revista de Filosofí­a y Teología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
PAN: Philosophy Activism Nature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Laval théologique et philosophique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revue d’études benthamiennes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hobbes Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Eleutheria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Humanistic Mathematics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Latinoamericana de Filosofía     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nóema     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Éthique publique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Philosophia Scientiæ     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Social Quality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Collingwood and British Idealism Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Grotiana     Hybrid Journal  
Signos Filosóficos     Open Access  
Eidos     Open Access  
Cinta de Moebio     Open Access  
Cuyo Anuario de Filosofía Argentina y Americana     Open Access  
Tópicos. Revista de Filosofía de Santa Fe     Open Access  
Rhuthmos     Open Access  
Philosophiques     Open Access  
Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics     Open Access  
Studia Philosophica Estonica     Open Access  
Synthesis (La Plata)     Open Access  
Revista de Filosofia     Open Access  
Alpha (Osorno)     Open Access  
Circe de clásicos y modernos     Open Access  
Doctor virtualis     Open Access  
Humanidades Médicas     Open Access  
Methodos     Open Access  
Labyrinthe     Open Access  
Trans/Form/Ação - Revista de Filosofia     Open Access  
Russian Studies in Philosophy     Full-text available via subscription  

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School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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