Subjects -> ENGINEERING (Total: 2688 journals)
    - CHEMICAL ENGINEERING (229 journals)
    - CIVIL ENGINEERING (237 journals)
    - ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (176 journals)
    - ENGINEERING (1325 journals)
    - ENGINEERING MECHANICS AND MATERIALS (452 journals)
    - HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING (56 journals)
    - INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING (98 journals)
    - MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (115 journals)

HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING (56 journals)

Showing 1 - 57 of 57 Journals sorted alphabetically
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
altlastenforum Baden-Württemberg e.V., Schriftenreihe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American Journal of Fluid Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
American Water Works Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51)
Annual Review of Marine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Archives of Hydro-Engineering and Environmental Mechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Water, Environment and Pollution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
AWWA Water Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Marine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Computers & Fluids     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Development and Applications of Oceanic Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Discover Water     Open Access  
Drinking Water Engineering and Science (DWES)     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ecohydrology & Hydrobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Experimental Thermal and Fluid Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Hydroécologie Appliquée     Full-text available via subscription  
Hydrology: Current Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Hydrometallurgy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Ingeniería del agua     Open Access  
Ingeniería Hidráulica y Ambiental     Open Access  
International Journal of Fluid Power     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Hydraulic Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Hydrology Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Hydromechatronics     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Soil, Sediment and Water     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
ISH Journal of Hydraulic Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Applied Water Engineering and Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Coastal and Hydraulic Structures (JCHS)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Coastal and Riverine Flood Risk (JCRFR)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ecohydraulics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Hydraulic Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Hydraulic Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Hydrodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Hydrologic Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Hydrology and Hydromechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Marine Science and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Ocean University of China (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the UK     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Water Process Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 65)
Journal of Waterway Port Coastal and Ocean Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
LARHYSS Journal     Open Access  
LHB Hydroscience Journal     Open Access  
Limnology and Oceanography: Fluids and Environments     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Marine Genomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Marine Structures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Maritime Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Navigation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 269)
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Regional Studies in Marine Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista de Ingeniería Hidráulica y Ambiental     Open Access  
Revista Ingeniería Agrícola     Open Access  
Ribagua : Revista Iberoamericana del Agua     Open Access  
Water SA     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the UK
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.548
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 23  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0025-3154 - ISSN (Online) 1469-7769
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [353 journals]
  • MBI volume 101 issue 7 Cover and Front matter

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1 - 2
      PubDate: 2022-04-29
      DOI: 10.1017/S0025315422000200
       
  • MBI volume 101 issue 7 Cover and Back matter

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      Pages: 1 - 4
      PubDate: 2022-04-29
      DOI: 10.1017/S0025315422000212
       
  • Rapid acclimation in sponges: seasonal variation in the organic content of
           two intertidal sponge species

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      Authors: Broadribb; Manon, Bell, James J., Rovellini, Alberto
      Pages: 983 - 989
      Abstract: The ability to acclimate quickly to changing environmental conditions is important for sessile organisms that cannot move to areas with more favourable conditions. Sponges are known to exhibit considerable phenotypic plasticity in response to environmental variability. However, most studies examining differences in sponge morphology have looked at spatial variation in morphological characteristics by comparing sponges at sites with differing environmental conditions. Here we explored the potential of two intertidal sponge species (Halichondria panicea and Hymeniacidon perlevis) to show seasonal acclimation to changing environmental conditions at two sites on the Welsh coast, UK. Both species had a higher proportion of inorganic tissue content in winter months, which correlated with higher levels of wave action and lower temperature, representing either an increase in spicule size/number or a loss of organic material. We also detected rapid decreases in organic content in some months, which corresponded with previously reported reproductive timings for the two species, and likely represent gamete release events. While the increased inorganic content in winter months may be a secondary consequence of reduced food and the sponges having to rely on organic reserves to meet metabolic demand, the higher level of inorganic material in winter likely makes sponges stiffer and stronger, and better able to deal with higher levels of wave action during winter months.
      PubDate: 2022-02-15
      DOI: 10.1017/S0025315421000928
       
  • Limpet larvae (Patella aspera Röding, 1798), obtained by gonad dissection
           and fecundation in vitro, settled and metamorphosed on crustose coralline
           algae

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      Authors: Castejón; Diego, Nogueira, Natacha, Andrade, Carlos A.P.
      Pages: 991 - 1002
      Abstract: The limpet Patella aspera Röding, 1798, is a native species from the Macaronesian region whose fishing is regulated. The early life of limpets, including the settlement process, is poorly known thus far. The current study evaluated different substrates to induce settlement in P. aspera, including microalgae strains (Halamphora coffeaeformis, Navicula incerta and Pavlova sp.) and crustose coralline algae (CCA) obtained from limpet shells. The results showed that gametes obtained by dissection and matured artificially using alkalinized seawater baths can produce viable larvae able to metamorphose to juveniles. Feeding was not required during larval development, suggesting lecithotrophy. Early postlarvae were identified by the shedding of the velum, and juveniles were identified by teleoconch and active grazing behaviour. The presence of CCA shortened the timing for settlement and increased the ratio of juveniles. The type and abundance of CCA can influence settlement success. Moreover, the results suggested that settlement and metamorphosis in true limpets (Patellogastropoda) might be triggered by a two-step mechanism, i.e. a first cue influencing the shift between swimming and crawling activity and a second cue determining settlement and metamorphosis to early postlarvae and juveniles.
      PubDate: 2022-02-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S0025315421000916
       
  • Population dynamics of Arctica islandica at Georges Bank (USA): an
           analysis of sex-based demographics

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      Authors: Hemeon; Kathleen M., Powell, Eric N., Pace, Sara M., Redmond, Theresa E., Mann, Roger
      Pages: 1003 - 1018
      Abstract: The ocean quahog, Arctica islandica, is a commercially important bivalve in the eastern USA but very little is known about the recruitment frequency and rebuilding capacity of this species. As the longest-living bivalve on Earth, A. islandica can achieve lifespans in excess of 200 y; however, age determinations are difficult to estimate and age variability at size is extreme. Objectives for this study included the creation of an extremely large age-composition dataset to constrain age at length variability, development of reliable age-length keys (ALK), and descriptions of sex-based population dynamics for the quasi-virgin A. islandica population at Georges Bank (GB) within the greater US Mid-Atlantic stock. Sexually dimorphic characteristics are clearly present, as females are larger than males within age classes and males tend to dominate the oldest age classes. A male represented the maximum age of 261 years and is older than the maximum age previously documented for this region. Sex-specific ALKs were robust and reliable but not interchangeable. This population had higher estimated natural mortality rates than presumed for other regions in the Mid-Atlantic, and females have the highest mortality rate. However, recruitment expansion was also occurring which would affect the age-frequency data used to derive mortality estimates and result in higher mortality. Age frequencies at GB suggest effective recruitment to the population each year since 1867 CE. Reduced recruitment periods are documented and likely attributed to fluctuating environmental conditions. Sex-based demographics are clearly divergent in regard to growth rate, maximum size, longevity and mortality rates.
      PubDate: 2022-03-18
      DOI: 10.1017/S0025315422000030
       
  • Soft-bottom tidepools within mixed reefs of native mussels and introduced
           oysters – refuge for associated species and parasites'

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      Authors: Weniger; Eric, Cornelius, Annika, Rolff, Jens, Buschbaum, Christian
      Pages: 1019 - 1028
      Abstract: The introduction of Pacific oysters to the sedimentary south-eastern North Sea coast and their establishment on intertidal native blue mussel beds has caused the development of mixed reefs of mussels and oysters with extensive tidepools. Tidepools have been intensively studied at rocky shores where they show community structures, which usually differ from that of the surrounding emerging substrates. Tidepools at sedimentary coasts, however, have received less attention. We compared the community structure and species interactions inside and outside tidepools in oyster reefs by determining densities of snails, barnacles and amphipods. Snail densities were similar in and outside tidepools. Barnacle coverage on bivalve shells, however, was lower inside tidepools, which may be caused by higher predation pressure and increased snail grazing under permanently submerged conditions, as was revealed by field and laboratory experiments. Additionally, we studied the occurrence of copepod and trematode parasites in blue mussels inside and outside tidepools. Prevalence and intensity of parasitic copepods was higher in mussels inside tidepools. Trematode parasites, by contrast, showed a lower intensity in mussels inside tidepools. This can be explained by high amphipod densities found inside tidepools because trematode larvae represent a food source of amphipods. Our study suggests that the community structure of oyster reefs within tidepools is not a submerged equivalent to that of intertidal reefs. As their counterparts at rocky shores, they show their own species distribution patterns with particular species interactions and only provide refuge for specific species such as parasitic copepods.
      PubDate: 2022-04-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S0025315422000091
       
  • First record of the caridean shrimp family Chlorotocellidae (Crustacea:
           Decapoda) from Korea

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      Authors: Park; Jin-Ho, De Grave, Sammy, Park, Taeseo
      Pages: 1029 - 1032
      Abstract: The caridean shrimp family Chlorotocellidae has so far not been reported from Korean waters. One of the four genera in the family is herein reported, based on the species Anachlorocurtis commensalis. Specimens were collected from antipatharian black corals by scuba diving at depths ranging from 20–60 m from three localities: Jejudo Island (33°13′N) between the South Sea of Korea and the north-eastern East China Sea, Namhyeongjedo Islet (34°53′N) in the Korea Strait, and Dokdo Island (37°15′N) in the East Sea. The species had previously been reported in tropical to subtropical latitudes in the western Pacific, with known records from southern Taiwan (up to 21°55′N) to central Japan (down to 34°50′N). The species is thus recorded for the first time from a temperate region in the western Pacific Ocean, postulated to be influenced by a branch of the Kuroshio Warm Current.
      PubDate: 2022-03-17
      DOI: 10.1017/S0025315422000042
       
  • Bayesian occupancy modelling of benthic Crustacea and the recovery of the
           European spiny lobster, Palinurus elephas

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      Authors: Jackson; A.C.
      Pages: 1033 - 1046
      Abstract: There is ever-greater need for information about changing marine biodiversity, but such information is sparse at large spatial or temporal scales. Records about distributions of species collected by volunteers can fill gaps in knowledge that cannot yet be addressed by more structured sampling. Bayesian occupancy models show great promise for estimating trends in occurrence of species through time. This study uses the Sparta occupancy model with records from the Seasearch programme from coastal waters of Britain and Ireland during the period 2000–2020, focussing on three species of Crustacea (Cancer pagurus, Homarus gammarus and Palinurus elephas). Populations of P. elephas crashed in the 1970s, but now appear to be re-establishing in south-west England. The Sparta model provides evidence about recovery that is more robust than anecdotal reports or simple counts of records. Estimates of occupancy are made at different spatial scales and compared among species and areas. Trends in occupancy are compared qualitatively with patterns in fisheries landings data. Occupancy by P. elephas has increased drastically since 2014, a pattern not seen in the other two species. For each species, occupancy varied among areas and in some areas, patterns in estimates of occupancy were similar to trends in landings from fisheries. Citizen science records are increasingly recognized to have value which has not yet been fully exploited. Greater use should be made of the Seasearch dataset in order to provide population trends for benthic marine taxa. Such analyses will broaden our understanding of and taxonomic coverage of changes in biodiversity.
      PubDate: 2022-03-25
      DOI: 10.1017/S002531542200008X
       
  • A critical deliberation of the ‘species complex’ status of the
           globally spread colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri

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      Authors: Reem; Eitan, Douek, Jacob, Rinkevich, Baruch
      Pages: 1047 - 1060
      Abstract: The accurate taxonomic identity for the worldwide-distributed invasive ascidian Botryllus schlosseri has not been resolved. Employing molecular tools, primarily mtDNA, previous studies unveiled five divergent clades (A–E), suggesting a complex of five cryptic species. A recent study allocated clades A and E to different species. Here, worldwide B. schlosseri's COI distribution map has been drawn, based on 2927 specimens, elucidating 160 haplotypes (100 singletons). Clade A emerged as the most abundant and globally widespread, while other clades had more limited distributions (primarily B, C). Inter-clade and intra-clade divergences were similar, with no clear barcoding gaps between the clades, illuminating no more than two putative OTUs. Network analyses for the genetic similarities among the clades' haplotypes identified different groups, depending on threshold values and away from the suggested clades' boundaries. Three additional genetic markers (H3, 18S, 28S) disclosed clade A, segregating from other clades and clades D and E strongly integrating. Allorecognition assays between clades resulted in indifference and rejection outcomes, characteristics of the within-species allorecognition repertoire. The question as to whether Botryllus schlosseri is a single species or a species complex is further discussed, leading to the assertion that while it is a widely variable species, there is not enough evidence for its designation as a species complex.
      PubDate: 2022-02-15
      DOI: 10.1017/S0025315422000029
       
  • Assessing fish communities in a multiple-use marine protected area using
           an underwater drone (Aegean Sea, Greece)

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      Authors: Nalmpanti; Melina, Pardalou, Androniki, Tsikliras, Athanassios C., Dimarchopoulou, Donna
      Pages: 1061 - 1071
      Abstract: Marine protected areas (MPAs) have been demonstrated to positively affect various aspects of their ecosystems and communities. In the present study, the effectiveness of varying protection levels on the coastal fish populations within a multiple-use marine park in Greece was assessed through community-level metrics using a non-destructive underwater recording method (underwater drone/mini remotely operated vehicle). Two factors were examined, i.e. protection level (fully, partially and least protected area) and time period (early and late summer: beginning and towards the end of the fishing and touristic season). Our study demonstrated some first results that protection benefited both the commercial species and the entire fish community as a whole, in terms of diversity, abundance and richness, while non-commercial species did not differ among the studied protection levels. This finding, along with the fact that the prevailing conditions (water temperature, depth, habitat type) were similar in all three studied areas, that corresponded to different protection levels, and in both sampling periods, indicated that the observed results may be attributed to the varying protection levels. The studied fish communities did not seem to be affected by the more intense fishing and touristic period over the summer. In conclusion, protection from fishing seems to positively affect the studied coastal fish community as a whole and particularly the commercially important species that find a refuge within core areas of the Alonissos marine park.
      PubDate: 2022-03-18
      DOI: 10.1017/S0025315421000904
       
  • Insights on the fish assemblages of seamounts and banks in the southern
           Tyrrhenian Sea (western Mediterranean Sea): implications for the
           conservation of deep-sea environments

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      Authors: La Mesa; Gabriele, Consalvo, Ivan, Angiolillo, Michela, Giusti, Michela, Tunesi, Leonardo
      Pages: 1073 - 1083
      Abstract: Fish assemblages inhabiting a complex of south Tyrrhenian seamounts and banks were characterized using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Fish distribution was assessed through surveying 15 ROV transects. Video segments of each transect were split into two bathymetric ranges, above and below 200 m depth. In total 28 fish taxa belonging to 22 families were recorded. The number of species observed at the Marettimo Banks and the Aceste Seamount was higher compared with the Tiberio and Scuso Seamounts. The number of species recorded in the shallow part (200 m). Assemblages were numerically dominated by Anthias anthias, Callanthias ruber and Helicolenus dactylopterus. The occurrence of some elasmobranchs of conservation concern, such as Squatina aculeata, Hexanchus griseus, Squalus blainville and Galeus melastomus, was noteworthy. Differences in fish assemblage composition were observed between the Aceste Seamount and the other sites and especially between the two bathymetric ranges. The fish distribution pattern showed significant relationships with bottom slope and some substrate types. A large occurrence of lost fishing gear characterized the sites closest to the coast (the Marettimo Banks and the Scuso Seamount), providing, along with scanty observations of commercially important fishes, evidence of heavy fishing activities. The adoption of conservation and management actions in the investigated seamounts and banks, such as their inclusion in the Natura 2000 network, would be very helpful to protect some threatened elasmobranchs and restore valuable deep-sea habitats.
      PubDate: 2022-02-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S0025315422000017
       
  • First records of the ornate eagle ray Aetomylaeus vespertilio from the
           Inhambane Province, Mozambique

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      Authors: Venables; Stephanie K., Conradie, Janneman, Marshall, Andrea D.
      Pages: 1085 - 1088
      Abstract: We report two separate sightings of the ornate eagle ray Aetomylaeus vespertilio (Bleeker, 1852) in the Bazaruto Seascape of southern Mozambique. In May 2021, a single individual was encountered at a depth of 30 m during an in-water survey in the Bazaruto Archipelago National Park. Another solitary individual was documented ~55 km away during an aerial survey in the Vilanculos Coastal Wildlife Sanctuary three days later. These represent the first documented sightings of A. vespertilio in the Inhambane Province of Mozambique, confirming the presence of the species in the region and extending the known range northward along the south-east African coastline. Given the rarity of reported sightings, additional records are particularly valuable for these threatened and elusive rays in order to expand current knowledge of their distribution and range.
      PubDate: 2022-03-09
      DOI: 10.1017/S0025315422000054
       
 
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