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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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Journal of Social Work
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.774
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 83  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1468-0173 - ISSN (Online) 1741-296X
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • Book Review: The anti-racist social worker by Tanya Moore and Glory
           Simango

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      Authors: Tanya Shute
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-11-21T05:44:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221140452
       
  • Book Review: Disrupting whiteness in social work by Sonia Tascón and
           Jim Ife

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      Authors: William R. Frey
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-11-17T06:26:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221140455
       
  • Book Review: The end of social work: A defense of the social worker in
           times of transformatin by Steve Burghardt

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      Authors: Cynthia H. Nover
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-11-16T06:25:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221140457
       
  • Book Review: An A-Z of social work skills by Michaela Rogers and Dan Allen

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      Authors: Rosanna Ware
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-11-16T06:24:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221140456
       
  • Book Review: Non-Profit program evaluation made simple: Get your data,
           show your impact and improve your programs by Chari Smith

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      Authors: Heidi Brocius
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-11-16T06:21:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221140454
       
  • Book Review: Rethinking social work practice with multicultural
           communities by Yolanda Padilla, Ruth McRoy and Rocio Calvo

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      Authors: Natalia Phillips
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-11-16T06:19:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221140453
       
  • Book Review: An A-Z of social work theory by Malcom Payne

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      Authors: Philip Heslop
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-11-16T06:18:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221140451
       
  • Book Review: A new history of social work: Values and practice in the
           struggle for social justice by John H. Pierson

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      Authors: Isabel Martin
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-10-31T06:38:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221125539
       
  • Book Review: Mental health in later life: Taking a life course approach by
           Alisoun Milne

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      Authors: Jon Hyslop
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-10-19T06:51:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221132984
       
  • Book Review: Practicing what you preach: Self-care for helping
           professionals by Jeffrey Kottler

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      Authors: Stewart Collins
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-09-27T02:09:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221125547
       
  • Book Review: Using advocacy in social work practice by Peter Scourfield

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      Authors: Martin Kettle
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-09-22T05:41:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221125546
       
  • Book Review: Politics for social workers: A practical guide to effecting
           change by Stephen Pimpare

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      Authors: Nigel Parton
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-09-22T05:41:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221125544
       
  • Book Review: The future of social work: What next for social policy'
           by Bill Jordan

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      Authors: Colin Turbett
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-09-15T06:15:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221125647
       
  • Book Review: Asian social work by Ian Shaw and Rosaleen Ow

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      Authors: Jyoti Prasad Bori
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-09-15T06:15:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221125545
       
  • Asserting the right to care – Birth parents’ arguments in
           newborn care orders

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      Authors: Ida Benedicte Juhasz
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryRemoving a newborn from his or her birth parents’ care is arguably a stark display of state power into the family. This study explores birth parents’ engagement with care proceedings in all (N = 177) newborn care orders in Norway between 2012 and 2016. The study asks which arguments parents use to assert their care rights, their focus, and whether arguments differ depending on the parents’ risks.FindingsApplying the defence dichotomy and seeing arguments as accounts, the analysis revealed parents primarily both justifying and excusing risks, and in two-thirds of cases rationalizing their care rights. Parents primarily denied harm and pinpointed (failed) service provision efforts, as well as excused their situation by claiming sufficient change and placing blame on i.e. child welfare services. Rationalizations did not defend parenting as such, but claimed normalcy and deservingness, as well as echoing concerns raised. Arguments were primarily parent- and service-focused. Parents with substance use risks blamed significantly less than parents with personality risks, and parents with intellectual disability risks demanded significantly more leeway as ‘new parents’ than parents with personality risks.ApplicationsThe study reflects how a marginalized demographic similarly, comprehensively, and most often unsuccessfully, engages with the child welfare system. The arguments reveal both alignment and misalignment in understandings of acceptable state intervention and responsibilities. It points to the dire need for knowledge about parents’ actual understanding of child welfare services, as well as clear communication and feedback between parents, their legal counsel, and social workers in assessments and service provision.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-08-24T11:10:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221109691
       
  • Book Review: The Settlement House Movement Revisited: A Transnational
           History by John Gal, Stefan Kongeter and Sarah Vicary

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      Authors: Cynthia H. Nover
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-08-12T06:18:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221120619
       
  • Child protection investigations by private consultants or municipally
           employed social workers: What are the differences for children'

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      Authors: Ann-Sofie Bergman, Kerstin Arnesson, Ulrika Järkestig Berggren
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryIn Sweden, a practice has developed where the social services have started to hire private consultants in child protection investigations. This article analyses and compares the handling of child protection investigations carried out by private consultants and municipally employed social workers with regard to the reasons for the reports, the investigations, the assessments, and the decisions taken about interventions. The concepts funnel and filtering and children's participation are used in the analysis. The study has a mixed-methods design, where qualitative and quantitative data and analysis are combined and integrated. Data consists of 120 case files regarding the social service's handling of investigations as well as interviews with managers of social service departments.FindingsThe results show several differences in the handling of child protection investigations carried out by social workers and private consultants in the municipalities studied. The private consultants worked to a greater extent with investigations that were initiated due to concerns about violence. Investigations conducted by consultants contained less information and specifically concerning children's perspective. These children also received interventions to a lesser extent than children assessed by the municipal social workers.ApplicationThe study indicates that from a child’s perspective, it matters whether a municipally employed social worker or a private consultant performs an investigation. Consultants generally work temporarily in a workplace, and it may therefore be more difficult to establish a trusting relationship with the children, which can be a barrier to children's participation and the implementation of a child’s perspective.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-07-07T06:53:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221109710
       
  • Working conditions and well-being in UK social care and social work during
           COVID-19

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      Authors: Jermaine Ravalier, Paula McFadden, Patricia Gillen, John Mallett, Patricia Nicholl, Ruth Neill, Jill Manthorpe, John Moriarty, Heike Schroder, Denise Curry
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryStress and mental health are among the biggest causes of sickness absence in the UK, with the Social Work and Social Care sectors having among the highest levels of stress and mental health sickness absence of all professions in the UK. Chronically poor working conditions are known to impact employees' psychological and physiological health. The spread of the COVID-19 pandemic has affected both the mode and method of work in Social Care and Social Work. Through a series of cross-sectional online surveys, completed by a total of 4,950 UK Social Care and Social Workers, this study reports the changing working conditions and well-being of UK Social Care and Social Workers at two time points (phases) during the COVID-19 pandemic.FindingsAll working conditions and well-being measures were found to be significantly worse during Phase 2 (November–January 2021) than Phase 1 (May–July 2020), with worse psychological well-being than the UK average in Phase 2. Furthermore, our findings indicate that in January 2021, feelings about general well-being, control at work, and working conditions predicted worsened psychological well-being.ApplicationsOur findings highlight the importance of understanding and addressing the impact of the pandemic on the Social Care and Social Work workforce, thus highlighting that individuals, organizations, and governments need to develop mechanisms to support these employees during and beyond the pandemic.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-07-07T06:53:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221109483
       
  • Vulnerability among older people ageing with deafblindness

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      Authors: Peter Simcock, Jill Manthorpe, Anthea Tinker
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryVulnerability is an underexamined concept in social work. Scholarly activity principally concentrates on policy analysis and theoretical debate; less attention is given to lived experience of vulnerability from the perspectives of particular groups, impoverishing understanding of the phenomenon. This article presents findings from the first United Kingdom-based study of the lived experience of vulnerability from the perspectives of older deafblind adults. Adopting a qualitative design, data were collected via 18 semistructured interviews with eight participants (aged between 49 and 83), undertaken between October 2014 and July 2016. Data were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis.FindingsParticipants interpret vulnerability as layered, describing what they feel vulnerable about, what they feel vulnerable to, and when they feel vulnerable. The latter layer is predominant: vulnerability experiences are time-limited, and situation and setting specific. Situational and pathogenic sources of vulnerability include the responses of other people, particularly the experience of being misunderstood or perceived as incapable. The layers of vulnerability are not discrete: they can be combined and avoidance of one vulnerability can exacerbate another.ApplicationsFindings strengthen arguments against categorizing particular groups, including deafblind people, as permanently and immutably vulnerable. Such categorization, focused solely on impairment, provides an inadequate understanding of experience. Policymakers should consider adopting a layered approach to defining vulnerability. Assessment of these layers and how they interact may offer social workers an enhanced understanding of deafblind people's experiences and assist in determining what matters to them. Assessment should explore coping strategies, and assumptions of incapability based on impairment be rejected.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-07-06T01:37:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221109447
       
  • Indigenised approaches to addressing elder abuse in Uganda

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      Authors: Charles Kiiza Wamara, Thomas Strandberg, Maria Bennich
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThe social gerontological field has long called for a culturally appropriate framework to understand, prevent, and respond to elder abuse in the Global South. This emphasis is, in part, based on the notion that elder abuse is a cultural and structural concern that cannot be effectively addressed using mainstream social work approaches. Therefore, indigenised approaches are preferred while tackling cultural and structural forms of elder abuse. However, despite several attempts, there is limited research on indigenised approaches and practices within the gerontological social work field. Therefore, we investigated how social work could promote indigenised approaches to better address elder abuse. We explored this through in-depth semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of 21 social workers.FindingsElder abuse is a cultural and structural social problem that requires family- and community-centred approaches premised on the Indigenous values of togetherness, reciprocity, solidarity, responsibility and love for humanity. These approaches must be embedded in people’s cultures and knowledge to address the social structural changes that have contributed to elder abuse in the Global South.ApplicationsSocial workers should strengthen family and community support to achieve social capital and inclusion for older people. This will not only enable families and communities to safeguard their older members, but also enhance community-based solutions to address elder abuse. Social work educators should engage in robust and rigorous research and curriculum change for social work education to enable the integration of post-colonial theories and approaches into social work training.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-07-01T06:42:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221109687
       
  • Securing citizens’ social rights under neoliberal welfare governance:
           the case of Israeli social services

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      Authors: Sigal Bracha-Sadowitz, Guy Feldman, Lia Levin
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryWhile scholars have examined how neoliberal ideas and policies manifest at the front lines of the welfare state, far less is known about how the neoliberal approach prevalent in such states shapes decisions that senior state actors make about social welfare policy. The current study advances the literature by examining the processes and motivations behind the decision to withdraw from enacting a law designed to secure the social rights of all Israeli citizens. The study is rooted in a critical research paradigm, combining both inductive and deductive analyses of in-depth interviews with 15 senior officials and legislators in the field of social services.FindingsDespite their purported support for equality in the provision of social services, their acknowledgment of the shortcomings of current legislation in this respect, and their active role in promoting an alternative thereto, participants were persuaded to act in such a way as to support free-market measures. These findings illustrate an arena of policymaking wherein some state actors “purchase” other actors’ cooperation and compliance with the neoliberal approach.ApplicationsThe “behind-the-scenes” account of the legislative process, set against the backdrop of neoliberal welfare governance, provides insights useful to all those who seek to promote parity-enhancing legislation aimed at supporting marginalized social service recipients, in Israel and beyond.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-06-24T05:49:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221109485
       
  • Social service providers under COVID-19 duress: adaptation, burnout, and
           resilience

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      Authors: Judith LM McCoyd, Laura Curran, Elsa Candelario, Patricia A Findley, Kerry Hennessey
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThis article examines the response of social services organizations and their workers to the COVID-19 pandemic in a northeastern U.S. state. Using an exploratory, cross-sectional survey design with a convenience sample (N = 1472), we ask: (1) how did agencies and social service workers manage service disruptions associated with COVID-19; (2) how did social service workers perceive shifts in clients’ needs; (3) how did social service workers experience the transition to remote interactions with clients; and (4) how did social service workers cope with COVID-related transitions and demands.FindingsOur findings tell a story of unprecedented crises alongside powerful attempts at adaptation, innovation, and resilience. Faced with extraordinary need among their clients, fears for their own health, and a breakdown of organizational and community functioning and guidance, social workers were able to learn and implement new technologies, adapt to increasing demands, manage new work-life boundaries, and find ways to address gaps in service while experiencing symptoms of burnout.ApplicationThe impact of supervisory and administrative fragmentation and communication breakdowns in the face of crisis put social workers in an untenable position despite surprising abilities to adapt, innovate, and manage their professional lives while under duress. Assuring better supervisory/administrative infrastructure to support workers as they deliver services during crises will help in future crises.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T07:08:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221109414
       
  • Book Review: The coronavirus crisis and challenges to social development:
           global perspectives by Maria do Carmo dos Santos Gonçalves, Rebecca
           Gutwald, Tanja Kleibl, Ronald Lutz, Ndangwa Noyoo and Janestic Twikirize

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      Authors: Jing Zhang, Zhipeng Li
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T04:07:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221109417
       
  • Book Review: Practitioner research for social work, nursing and the health
           professions by Payam Sheikhattari, Michael T. Wright, Gillian B. Silver,
           Cyrilla van der Donk, and Bas van Lanen

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      Authors: Irwin Epstein
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T04:07:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221109408
       
  • Book Review: Making their days happen: Paid personal assistance services
           supporting people with disability living in their homes and communities by
           Lisa I. Iezzoni

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      Authors: Sabretta Alford
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T04:06:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221109407
       
  • Parenting coordination, a new role for social workers

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      Authors: Marta Blanco, Jorge Manuel Leitao Ferreira, Andrés Arias Astray
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Summary. The main aim of this article is to assess the attention paid in social work to the role of parenting coordinator (PC). These professionals offer individualised support to high-conflict families in their implementation of parenting plans, normalising the relationship between parents and safeguarding the protection of minors. This form of alternative dispute resolution is being incorporated into the judicial system of various countries in a highly heterogeneous manner, with some countries such as Spain and Portugal experiencing uncertain times. A systematic literature review was performed, incorporating existing international studies in English, Spanish and Portuguese as well as court rulings in Spain, to identify the presence of social work as a discipline in this new professional role.• Findings. The findings show that despite the suitable training background of social workers, the involvement of their professional associations and their contributions to the function performed by PCs, there is no specific social work research focused on this area of knowledge.• Applications. The main contribution of this study is the commitment to a new professional niche for social work, traditionally occupied by psychologists. The emphasis should be placed not so much on the original training of the professional, but rather on his or her complementary training and accredited experience in highly conflictive situations.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T05:38:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221101241
       
  • Parents’ views on improving relationships with their social workers

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      Authors: Mary Baginsky
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Summary: In England, the reason why most families have a social worker is because their children have been identified as having suffered or being at risk of suffering significant harm from abuse or neglect or requiring a statutory service for another need. Research has shown that positive relationships between social workers and families are essential. A study to evaluate Signs of Safety (Sofs) provided the opportunity to explore the quality of this relationship through the perceptions of 270 families who were in contact with children's social care (CSC). Over half were satisfied with the relationship, and many of the remaining families were able to identify what had stood in the way of it developing.Findings: The areas which were of most concern was the high turnover of social workers with the attendant lack of consistency, poor communication, a failure to provide services which families had been promised and the withdrawal of support too soon. Most dissatisfactions stemmed either from parents believing they had not been shown sufficient respect or, that while they had been drawn into a statutory intervention, they had not been provided with sufficient support to address their problems.Application: While some of the difficulties were connected to limited resources and overstretched services, others came about as a result of poor practice. The views expressed by these parents provide the basis for reflection amongst social workers, their managers and strategic leads on how improvements may be achieved and, in doing so, strengthen relationships with parents and potentially reduce future demand.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T05:35:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221101244
       
  • Book Review: Safeguarding children and young people: A guide for
           professionals working together by Nick Frost

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      Authors: Maggie Jackson
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T07:21:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221101442
       
  • Bereaved mothers and widows’ grief and their unfolding relationships:
           Implications for social work

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      Authors: Yael Hochman, Einav Segev, Irit Regev, Yafa Zafrani, Yafa Sharfi, Ayelet Elkayam
      First page: 1323
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThe literature on coping with loss has examined parental loss and widowhood largely independently, pointing to the enduring and developing grief along the lifecycle. Little is known about the relationship between bereaved mothers and widows as it develops over time. This qualitative study explored how bereaved mothers and widows perceived and described the unfolding relationship between mothers-in-law and daughters-in-law, following the loss of a son or husband in the Israeli security forces. Interviews were conducted with ten bereaved mothers and ten non-related widows from Jewish families to explore their developing relationship with their in-laws following the loss.FindingsThematic analysis revealed three main stages in the mother-in-law/daughter-in-law, relationship: disruption of the status quo directly after the loss; testing the relationship; and a process of decision-making, whether to continue cultivating the relationship and establish a new status quo. Participants described key events that challenged the newly created status quo, serving as milestones of difficulty and tension, but also as opportunities for renewal.ApplicationsThe study points to the centrality of the relationship between the bereaved mother and widow in the process of coping with the loss, and reveals that this relationship is not static but rather dynamic and evolving over time. Social workers in the field of bereavement may be able to improve their effectiveness in helping families cope with loss by also considering multigenerational and longitudinal perspectives in their assessment and interventions.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T09:50:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221101272
       
  • The association among neighborhood mutual support, well-being, and social
           work

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      Authors: Hualei Yang, Wenchao Zhang, Yuanyang Wu, Yidan Yao, Mohan Su
      First page: 1345
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryWith the increase in urbanization in China, people's neighborhood has an important influence on their well-being. This study aims to explore the impact of neighborhood mutual support on well-being from the perspective of social work. A total of 13,486 samples from the 2016 China Labor-force Dynamics Survey were utilized. The data were analyzed by the ordered logit model and propensity score matching while controlling for individual, family, and socioeconomic features.Findings(1) The more the neighborhood mutual support, the higher individuals' degree of well-being; this conclusion is robust. 2) Neighborhood mutual support has a larger improvement effect on the well-being of groups with low social status. (3) Neighborhood mutual support improves well-being through two mechanisms: it can grow an individual's support network, helping them obtain more material support, and it enhances individuals' integration into society, improving their well-being through increased feelings of community security. (4) The influence of neighborhood mutual support is weakened when a community has formal social support (full-time social workers) because individuals can resolve their problems through formal social support, reducing their reliance on neighbors.ApplicationsBased on the perspective of community development, understanding the influence of neighborhood mutual support on well-being is important. Social workers should adopt different intervention approaches according to characteristics of different groups to improve residents' level of neighborhood mutual support. Moreover, to promote community development, the government should consider arranging social work for less-developed communities.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-07-06T07:00:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221093511
       
  • Public trust of social workers in Sweden: A repeated cross-sectional study

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      Authors: Kristofer Nilsson, Evelina Landstedt
      First page: 1374
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryPublic trust towards social workers is essential for legitimacy and accessibility of the social services, as well as for help-seeking behaviour. However, research on public trust towards the social services is lacking. The aim of this study was to describe the extent to which Swedish citizens trust social workers who work within the social services, and to explore patterns in level of trust based on demographic factors and history of service use. The analysis draws on survey data from 2010, 2014, and 2018 (total n = 4975). Logistic regressions were conducted to assess associations between predictor variables and trust.FindingsOn average, 40 percent of the general public reported a high level of trust regardless of year. Approximately 20 percent reported a low level of trust. The results indicate a slight decrease in trust between 2010 and 2014 but not between 2014 and 2018. No gender or age differences were identified. Low income level, being related to a service user, and low level of education were all associated with low level of trust.ApplicationsOur findings provide new insights regarding variations in levels of trust in the general population. Economically and educationally disadvantaged groups as well as those related to a service user are more likely to report low trust than their more advantaged counterparts. To strengthen legitimacy and accessibility, these groups should be prioritised in trust-enhancing efforts. Still, reports of high trust were predominant, indicating that social workers are generally perceived as trusted providers of social support.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T07:07:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221094535
       
  • Predictors of service utilization among homeless former foster youth:
           Implications for intervention

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      Authors: Amanda Yoshioka-Maxwell
      First page: 1394
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryA high percentage of homeless youth have a history of foster care placement; this population faces high rates of behavioral health problems. No research has focused on the predictors of service use among homeless former foster youth. This analysis seeks to determine what foster care and homeless experiences are associated with service use among this population. Data were collected via convenience sample from 184 homeless former foster youth at a drop-in center in Hollywood, California. A series of logistic regressions were conducted for network engagement behaviors that may be impacted by foster care experiences. Knowledge from prior empirical results form the basis for this analysis.FindingsNumber of foster care placements and age at first foster care placement, overall time spent homeless, age at first homelessness, and being kicked out of housing as a cause of homelessness were associated with decreased service use. Time spent in foster care and homeless experiences during foster care were associated with increased service use.ApplicationResults can be used to aid in understanding which foster care and homeless experiences aid or hinder service use. From a policy level, findings from this study can aid child welfare agencies in further understanding which foster care experiences present as risk factors after transition from care.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T05:44:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221101254
       
  • Public perception of social workers as a source for providing help during
           the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Maya Kagan, Yahel S Elbaz Kachlon
      First page: 1412
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThe current study examined the contribution of select demographic and psychosocial variables, as well as prior experience with social workers (SWs), to explaining the likelihood of seeking their help by the general public in Israel during the COVID-19 pandemic. For the purpose of the study, an online questionnaire was administered to a sample of 582 respondents older than 20.FindingsThe findings show that the respondents reported a fairly low likelihood of seeking help from SWs. Women, those not in a significant relationship, people who had prior experience with SWs, and those reporting higher levels of loneliness, had a higher likelihood of seeking help from SWs. At the same time, no association was found between age, employment status, depression, and anxiety, and the likelihood of seeking help from SWs.ApplicationsWhen dealing with the mental, health, and social consequences of the COVID-19 crisis, it is important to identify groups with a lower likelihood of seeking help from SWs and to actively offer them help. Furthermore, it is important to develop a policy aimed at promoting knowledge of SW roles and reducing barriers to seeking SW help, while attending to the unique needs of diverse population groups.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-05-25T07:11:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221101255
       
  • Social workers’ experiences in integrated health care during the
           COVID-19 pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Suzie S Weng
      First page: 1431
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThe massive spread of the novel COVID-19 virus across the globe has been disruptive to all providers within integrated healthcare systems, including social workers. The literature on how the pandemic has impacted medical workers are emerging. The present article explored the experiences of social workers. A purposive sample of 40 social workers in integrated healthcare settings was interviewed from September to November 2020 prior to vaccine availability to learn about how they managed the earlier months of the pandemic. A constant comparison approach was used to analyze the data.FindingsThemes identified included: (1) how social workers felt about safety in their work environments; (2) what it was like for social workers to transition to remote work; (3) how the pandemic affected social workers’ workload and mental health; and (4) what were the preparedness issues and lessons learned.ApplicationsThis study adds to the existing literature on provider experiences of the pandemic in integrated health care with social workers’ voices. This additional perspective may contribute to better preparedness of behavioral health services and taking care of social workers in future crises.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T05:36:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221101256
       
  • Book Review: The dynamics of the social worker–client relationship
           by Joseph Walsh

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Fran Wiles
      First page: 1447
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-07-29T07:09:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221116449
       
  • Book Review: Social work, cats and rocket science – stories of making a
           difference in social work with adults by Elaine James, Rob Mitchell and
           Hannah Morgan with Mark Harvey and Ian Burgess

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Joseph Burns
      First page: 1448
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-08-03T03:47:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221116450
       
  • Book Review: Social work with autistic people: Essential knowledge, skills
           and law for working with children and adults by Yo Dunn

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Philip Heslop
      First page: 1450
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-07-29T07:09:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221116451
       
  • Book Review: Microaggressions and social work research, practice and
           education by Michael Spencer

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tanya Shute
      First page: 1451
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-08-12T03:30:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221116456
       
  • Book Review: Ethics and risk management in online and distance social work
           by Frederic Reamer

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Joe Hanley
      First page: 1453
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-07-29T07:09:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221116458
       
  • Book Review: Self-neglect. Learning from life by Shona Britten and Karen
           Whitby

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hilary Brighton
      First page: 1455
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-07-29T07:10:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221116459
       
 
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