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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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Journal of Social Work
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.774
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 85  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1468-0173 - ISSN (Online) 1741-296X
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Family violence content in baccalaureate and master's level social work
           programs

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      Authors: Lynette M. Renner, Molly C. Driessen
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryScholars continue to call for social work students to be better prepared in the areas of family violence. In this study, we gathered information on the inclusion of intimate partner violence (IPV), child maltreatment, and elder abuse content in accredited baccalaureate and master's level social work programs across the United States. A survey invitation was sent to 538 baccalaureate and 306 master's level social work program directors in the summer of 2020. The final sample consisted of program directors representing 177 baccalaureate and 79 master's level social work programs. Survey data were analyzed using descriptive statistics.FindingsData revealed that 12.43% of baccalaureate social work programs had a course on elder abuse, 25.42% had a course specific to IPV, and 60.45% had a course focused on child maltreatment; however, few programs required these courses. Master's program directors reported that 6.33% of their programs had a course on elder abuse, 34.18% on IPV, and 46.84% on child maltreatment; yet only three programs required a course on child maltreatment and none required courses on IPV or elder abuse.ApplicationsSocial workers will likely work with client systems who experience family violence and it is critical that social work programs look for ways to improve the quantity and quality of family violence content into their curricula. It is also important for state licensing boards to require content on family violence at the initial and renewal stages. These educational efforts will enhance the knowledge and abilities of the social work workforce.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2023-01-18T06:44:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221142768
       
  • Integrating an innovative social work practice into a pediatric dental
           residency program

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      Authors: Elisabeth A Purkis, Brittaney Hill, Marcio A da Fonseca, Clark M Stanford
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThis article describes the implementation and outcomes of a social work program in a university pediatric dental clinic serving low-income families. The goal was to decrease barriers to dental care access, decrease appointment failure, and improve interprofessional practice (IPP). Funding was obtained through a foundation to hire a social worker and two interns, and cover program costs. A survey identified barriers families faced to obtain and complete pediatric dental care. Residents, dental students, and faculty make referrals to the social workers who intervene to help families overcome challenges for their children's care.FindingsThe program started in January 2019 and outcomes are reported through June 2021. The largest barriers families identified were lack of a pediatric dentist near home accepting public insurance (91%), the dentist who saw their child only did exams and cleanings but not fillings (84%), and need for specialized dental care (77%). Five hundred and eleven families were referred to the social workers, most commonly for resources, information or other referrals (30.5%), dental insurance lapse (14.9%), caregiver guidance on oral health (10.6%), mental health concerns (10.4%), and poor treatment compliance (9.6%). Social workers provided 424 interventions, mostly about information regarding community resources (26.8%), transportation issues (15.9%), and telephone consults (14.2%). Appointment failure rates decreased from 17% to 13.5%, while the cancelation rate decreased from 19.2% to 14.3% from January 2019 to June 2021, respectively.ApplicationsSocial workers helped decrease barriers to pediatric dental care, improve attendance to dental appointments, and enhance IPP for pediatric dental residents, students, and faculty.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2023-01-11T06:59:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221143647
       
  • Beyond medicalized approaches to violence and trauma: Empowering social
           work practice

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      Authors: Nancy Ross, Catrina Brown, Marjorie Johnstone
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummarySocial workers are positioned to respond to clients with a history of trauma by practicing bio-psycho-social, trauma, and violence-informed care but frequently encounter systemic barriers to providing holistic care. The research presented in this article was initiated by a College of Social Work in Canada in response to concerns raised by social work providers that their practice was constrained by ideological, structural, and system limitations within publicly funded mental health and addiction services. Ideologically trauma-based social work care is defined by five principles of safety, trust, collaboration, choice, and empowerment and recognizes that what has happened to individuals, including early adversity, can influence their bio-psycho-social functioning across the lifespan. Structurally, trauma-based care recognizes the corrosive impact of poverty, systemic discrimination, and exclusion.FindingsOur research included a literature review, an online survey (n = 115 completed surveys), individual interviews (n = 50), and three focus groups (n = 15). The findings consistently highlighted a dissonance between dominant bio-medical approaches and reliance on the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Disorders and social justice–based practice. Primary themes included a recognition by social workers of the pervasive presence of trauma and its effects, including mental health and addiction challenges; intergenerational impacts of trauma; the limitations of the medical model; and the need to reposition social work practice.ApplicationsRepositioning the role of social work within mental health and addiction settings to center social justice responses to trauma presents transformative opportunities to better meet the needs of service users and increase workplace satisfaction.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2023-01-10T05:27:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221144557
       
  • A qualitative interpretive meta-synthesis of social workers’
           experience in end-of-life care

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      Authors: Simone Dewar, Jo Mensinga, Michelle Redman-MacLaren, Lise Johns
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummarySocial workers are an integral part of end-of-life (EOL) care interdisciplinary services and provide comprehensive psychosocial support to dying people. However, despite the rewards, EOL care social work is wrought with challenges. There is currently limited research into the experience of EOL care social workers. Therefore, this qualitative interpretive meta-synthesis (QIMS) study examines the experience of EOL care social workers as revealed in existing literature. The QIMS methodology was used to synthesize and interpret findings from four original qualitative studies to elicit an in-depth response to the research question: What is the experience of social workers who work in EOL care'FindingsThe theme “EOL care social work is a privilege and a struggle” emerged, with six associated contributing factors: Privilege—(1) death is sacrosanct, (2) death is an opportunity for growth and healing, and (3) the religious/spiritual element of EOL care. Struggle—(1) ongoing pain and heightened emotions, (2) conflict of values, and (3) contextual challenges. This QIMS study serves as a preliminary phase to a subsequent, larger study.ApplicationsThis QIMS study provides a foundation for further narrative research into the experience of EOL care social workers. In addition, findings from this QIMS study highlights areas for further attention to foster the well-being of EOL care social workers. Finally, findings from this QIMS study could augment relevant EOL care content in undergraduate social work education.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2023-01-05T07:17:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221144223
       
  • Meeting the nutrition and physical activity needs of young people in
           residential out-of-home care

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      Authors: Rachael Green (nee Cox), Melissa Savaglio, Lauren Bruce, Ruby Tate, Kostas Hatzikiriakidis, Madelaine Smales, Anna Crawford-Parker, Sandra Marshall, Veronica Graham, Helen Skouteris
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryHealth outcomes for young people living in residential out-of-home care are poor. There has been increased emphasis on the need to prioritize preventative support and upskill residential care workers to better meet young people's health needs. The aim of this study was to examine the food quality and physical activity environment in residential care houses in Victoria, Australia prior to staff undertaking Healthy Eating, Active Living Matters (HEAL) training; 102 residential care houses participated. House representatives completed an online survey exploring: (1) physical activity equipment and engagement and (2) weekly food budget and expenditure.FindingsThe average weekly food expenditure per household was $318.98 (SD = $106.51), with variation between different sized households. The majority (61%) of houses’ weekly food expenditure was spent on ultra-processed food products that are ready to eat with no/little preparation, in comparison to 36% spent on unprocessed foods (fresh fruit and vegetables). The majority of houses reported having two types of equipment. Young people were not often engaged in physical and/or recreational activities in their community.ApplicationResidential care houses in Victoria require additional supports to ensure that young people are supported to eat well and be active at home and in the community. HEALing Matters aims to provide this, by offering professional development for residential carers to better facilitate engagement in physical activity and healthy eating among the young people in their care. If successful, HEALing Matters may provide an effective pathway to improved health and wellbeing outcomes for young people in residential care.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2023-01-04T11:37:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221143665
       
  • Paradoxes, contradictions, and dilemmas: Reflections on the contours of a
           pandemic and its implications for social work education

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      Authors: Kerry A Brydon, Fiona McDermott
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThis is a reflective and theoretical article that discusses the impact of COVID-19 on social work practice. The pandemic, which made its presence felt globally from early 2020, continues to have ongoing and significant consequences for lives, livelihoods, public health, and personal freedoms. We argue that, while its specific contours are yet to be comprehensively researched, let alone the final outcomes understood, the pandemic has presented opportunities to develop new ways of thinking about social work and social work education.FindingsThrough a discussion of relevant literature, including a recent work of fiction, we contend that social workers have been able to adapt, to some extent, to the pandemic but in reactive rather than proactive ways. The biopsychosocial and person-in-environment perspectives that characterize social work education, theory, and practice might be greatly enhanced by the introduction of complexity theory in terms of developing new thinking about the theoretical basis of social work, enabling new questions and new strategies to emerge to strengthen social work responses to the challenges posed by COVID-19.ApplicationsArising from this theoretical article, there are many implications for introducing complexity theory within social work education programs. Complexity theory can provide a conceptual frame fit-for-purpose for social work pandemic and post-pandemic theory and practice.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2023-01-04T07:10:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221144441
       
  • Gerontological social workers’ perspectives about the future at the
           start of a COVID-19 vaccination program: A photovoice study

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      Authors: Sofia Fontoura Dias, Lia Araújo, Liliana Sousa
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThe COVID-19 pandemic is a continuing public health crisis, although it has lessened in its intensity since the start of worldwide vaccination programs. In aged care facilities, gerontological social workers have become frontline professionals facing multiple challenges and demands. One year after the first COVID-19 case in Portugal, during the second major lockdown in the country, and with vaccination starting in these facilities, a photovoice program to identify the experiences of these professionals was developed. This study aimed to understand how gerontological social workers foresee the future of practice and intervention with older adults. A thematic analysis was conducted based on the photographs and associated narratives from 10 participants, all female, aged between 22 and 35 years, who attended a program’s session.FindingsThree themes were identified with the thematic analysis: (1) personal and professional growth (with renewed life perspectives and increased resilience), (2) reinvention of intervention (with improved management of emotions, teamwork, and alternative ways of intervening), and (3) hope to use the lessons learned (hope that vaccination will bring conditions to recover the older adults’ well-being and opportunities to use the good lessons learned).ApplicationsThese findings are relevant to inform policymakers and governments about practices in aged care facilities and to improve the training of gerontological social workers in acute action management and intervention. We stress alternative ways of intervening that came up in the response to the pandemic such as emotional management, digital technology, communication strategies, self-care, or the families’ involvement.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2023-01-04T07:09:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221144412
       
  • Does mentoring improve the health of people in the community' A
           realist evaluation

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      Authors: Jeanine Suurmond, Kasper Kruithof, Janneke Harting
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryMentoring is an intervention aimed at strengthening social networks of individuals by providing one-to-one support to develop a social network. While there is a lack of insight into how the social network intervention “mentoring” affects health outcomes, we used a realist evaluation approach to find out for whom and under what circumstances mentoring affects health. The study was conducted in the Netherlands. In phase 1, an initial program theory of mentoring was developed based on a group interview with participants and professionals engaged in mentoring, complemented by documents (previous studies, descriptions of interventions). In phase 2, the program theory was tested using interviews with 23 participants before and 16 after mentoring.FindingsMentoring strengthened the social network when two conditions were met. Firstly, mentoring coaches needed to be trained. Secondly, participants needed to have a pre-existing—albeit small—network and need to have some social skills. If the social network was strengthened, mentoring increased self-esteem and self-confidence and decreased experiences of depression and loneliness of participants through three mechanisms: (1) participants were acknowledged and their individual needs were accepted; (2) individual coping resources were improved; (3) capabilities to initiate the search for a social network and to be involved in a social network were realized.ApplicationsMentoring is a useful intervention to increase self-esteem and self-confidence and decrease experiences of depression and loneliness of participants if the two conditions are met. Therefore, mentors should be carefully trained to acknowledge and respond to participants’ individual needs for social bonds.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2023-01-04T07:08:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221144411
       
  • Eating disorder mental health literacy: A national survey of clinical
           social workers in the United States

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      Authors: Chelsea R. MacCaughelty
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummarySocial workers’ eating disorder mental health literacy (ED-MHL) is essential to the detection, assessment, and treatment of eating disorders (EDs) and disordered eating (DE) in clinical practice. This study explored social workers’ ED-MHL, particularly the assessment practices of EDs on intake forms, and within the first two therapy sessions. Participants in this national survey were N = 316 outpatient masters-level social workers in the United States. Participants completed an online survey measuring ED assessment practices in clinical practice.FindingsResults showed that 42.4% (n = 133) of respondents did not routinely assess for EDs/DE on clinical intake forms, and 53.2% (n = 165) did not assess within the first two therapy sessions. However, those with recent training related to EDs were more likely to assess. Participants reported low to moderate perceived comfort levels with the assessment of EDs, and training and education were identified as needed resources. Social workers reported deficits in their own assessment practices of EDs. Barriers included: lack of training about EDs/DE; uncertainty about process questions to ask; and perceptions that EDs/DE are rarely the client's primary presenting problem.ApplicationsDifficulties with detection and screening practices appeared contingent on gaps in existing education and training related to EDs/DE. These findings suggest that future research may serve to increase social workers’ ED-MHL, as underscored by the noteworthy finding that 86.1% (n = 229) of the sample reported that they would make proactive changes in their clinical practice, as a direct result of participating in this study.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2023-01-04T07:07:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221144217
       
  • Young adults’ protest participation and mental health

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      Authors: Chi Kin Kwan
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThis article explores how political fluctuations can negatively affect young adults’ psychosocial well-being, by using the case of Hong Kong's Anti-Extradition Law Amendment Bill Movement. The study included both individual and focus group interviews to collect the experiences and perspectives of 25 youths, 13 teachers, and 12 social workers within a qualitative paradigm. The data were coded independently by the author and research assistant.FindingsFour major themes related to young adults’ psychosocial well-being: (a) mental health deterioration, (b) tension in family relations, (c) problems in peer relations, and (d) decreasing trust in teachers and social workers. The findings not only reveal the relevance of political issues to contemporary youths’ well-being, but also display a possible vicious circle among negative psychosocial environment, psychosocial strain, and poor environment.ApplicationsThere is a pressing need for social workers to be better prepared for dealing with young adults’ psychosocial issues that arise from political conflicts. This article contributes to the literature by considering the role of psychosocial factors in maintaining or reinforcing youth participation in protests. Unconventional strategies should be developed by social workers to reach youth activists and help relieve emotional and psychological pressures caused by political unrest. Suggestions for fostering post-conflict reconciliation in the community are also offered.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2023-01-04T07:03:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221142771
       
  • Examining the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on social work in health
           care

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      Authors: David B. Nicholas, Patricia Samson, Leeann Hilsen, Janet McFarlane
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThis qualitative study examined the COVID-19 pandemic as experienced by healthcare-based social workers in relation to practice, and personal and professional impacts of providing care in this context, with recommendations for pandemic preparedness and response. A total of 12 focus groups were convened between June 2020 and March 2021, comprising 67 hospital social workers across multiple hospitals and other care facilities in western Canada.FindingsBased on an Interpretive Description approach, themes emerged reflecting practice shifts; increased work and changing roles; imposed restrictions; problems in communication and decision-making; distress, fear, and demoralization; and co-existing silver linings amid challenges.ApplicationsThe COVID-19 pandemic has substantially impacted social workers and their delivery of service. Addressing concerns through proactive responsiveness, both during and beyond the pandemic, are important in nurturing patient-centered care and a supported workforce. Along with that of interdisciplinary colleagues in health care, social workers’ practice has been profoundly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. This article explores the experiences of social workers in healthcare settings during the COVID-19 pandemic.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2023-01-04T07:02:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221142767
       
  • Reconceptualizing protective factors in response to risk with vulnerable
           children

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      Authors: Gavin Heron, Claire Lightowler
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      The quality and robustness of childcare professionals’ thinking about protective factors is crucial to interventions with vulnerable children. Yet, protective factors in childcare are under-conceptualized in policy and practice and have been overshadowed by the concept of risk. This study uses discourse analysis to examine how childcare professionals discuss protective factors in response to risk and in a way that demonstrates critical thinking. Findings Data was collected from 30 consultation meetings, which involve a total of 109 professionals. The consultation meetings focus on the assessment of a child who presents a serious risk of harm to others and who are themselves at risk. The findings suggest that professionals do discuss protective factors in response to risk, however, it occurs on a ratio of approximately one to nine, which suggests a level of separation in the way these terms are conceptualized in practice. Application It is suggested that a professional construct of “protective factors versus risk,” which is applied with critical thinking, will offer a more robust way of conceptualizing the support provided to vulnerable children. While professionals have to analyze risk in terms of what is wrong, it is equally crucial to include protective factors in a strategy for it to work. A starting point is for professionals to re-construct protective factors and risk and apply it with critical thinking to core elements of social work practice, such as assessments, multi-disciplinary meetings and the verbal communications with service users.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2023-01-04T07:01:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221142761
       
  • Evidence informed fatherhood program: An evaluation

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      Authors: Charles C. Daniels
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryBlack fathers with histories of incarceration and trauma have multiple stressors that interfere with their ability to navigate life in the community, parent their children, and develop self-parenting skills that promote the healthy regulation of their emotions. The origins of these stressors are connected to racism, masculine stereotypes, and histories of trauma. Improving these skills has the potential to put fathers in control of their response to life distress instead of feeling controlled by it. This study sought to examine the Evidence Informed Fatherhood Program (EIFP) and its efficacy as defined by the rates of recidivism, parental engagement, life distress, emotional regulation, and basic needs attainment. The sample comprised 551 fathers (N = 551), most of whom were Black (n = 534), drawn from administrative data from Father's UpLift. The study examined the effectiveness of the program by studying the change in scores at three points in time, namely during the baseline entry into the program, and three and six months after entry.FindingsThe baseline findings showed that about 95% of all participants needed assistance with basic needs, including obtaining housing, employment, and bank accounts. The results showed a statistically significant and dramatic decrease in life distress scores and an equally dramatic increase in emotional regulation scores.ApplicationsThe findings show that EIFP is effective in helping Black fathers gain self-parenting skills, address the trauma they experience as Black men in a racialized society, and reduce recidivism among them.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2023-01-04T07:00:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221141668
       
  • Book Review: Photography in social work and social change: Theory and
           applications for practice and research by Matthias J Naleppa, Kristina M
           Hash and Anissa T Rogers

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      Authors: Jill Chonody
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2023-01-03T07:55:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221144418
       
  • Book Review: Social work practice with people with dementia by Peter
           Scourfield

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      Authors: Alisoun Milne
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2023-01-03T07:55:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221144416
       
  • Book Review: The anti-racist social worker by Tanya Moore and Glory
           Simango

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      Authors: Tanya Shute
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-11-21T05:44:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221140452
       
  • Book Review: Disrupting whiteness in social work by Sonia Tascón and
           Jim Ife

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      Authors: William R. Frey
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-11-17T06:26:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221140455
       
  • Book Review: The end of social work: A defense of the social worker in
           times of transformatin by Steve Burghardt

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      Authors: Cynthia H. Nover
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-11-16T06:25:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221140457
       
  • Book Review: An A-Z of social work skills by Michaela Rogers and Dan Allen

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      Authors: Rosanna Ware
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-11-16T06:24:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221140456
       
  • Book Review: Non-Profit program evaluation made simple: Get your data,
           show your impact and improve your programs by Chari Smith

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      Authors: Heidi Brocius
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-11-16T06:21:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221140454
       
  • Book Review: Rethinking social work practice with multicultural
           communities by Yolanda Padilla, Ruth McRoy and Rocio Calvo

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      Authors: Natalia Phillips
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-11-16T06:19:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221140453
       
  • Book Review: An A-Z of social work theory by Malcom Payne

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      Authors: Philip Heslop
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-11-16T06:18:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221140451
       
  • Book Review: A new history of social work: Values and practice in the
           struggle for social justice by John H. Pierson

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      Authors: Isabel Martin
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-10-31T06:38:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221125539
       
  • Book Review: Mental health in later life: Taking a life course approach by
           Alisoun Milne

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      Authors: Jon Hyslop
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-10-19T06:51:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221132984
       
  • Book Review: Practicing what you preach: Self-care for helping
           professionals by Jeffrey Kottler

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      Authors: Stewart Collins
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-09-27T02:09:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221125547
       
  • Book Review: Using advocacy in social work practice by Peter Scourfield

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      Authors: Martin Kettle
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-09-22T05:41:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221125546
       
  • Book Review: The future of social work: What next for social policy'
           by Bill Jordan

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      Authors: Colin Turbett
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-09-15T06:15:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221125647
       
  • Book Review: Asian social work by Ian Shaw and Rosaleen Ow

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      Authors: Jyoti Prasad Bori
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-09-15T06:15:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221125545
       
  • Working conditions and well-being in UK social care and social work during
           COVID-19

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      Authors: Jermaine Ravalier, Paula McFadden, Patricia Gillen, John Mallett, Patricia Nicholl, Ruth Neill, Jill Manthorpe, John Moriarty, Heike Schroder, Denise Curry
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryStress and mental health are among the biggest causes of sickness absence in the UK, with the Social Work and Social Care sectors having among the highest levels of stress and mental health sickness absence of all professions in the UK. Chronically poor working conditions are known to impact employees' psychological and physiological health. The spread of the COVID-19 pandemic has affected both the mode and method of work in Social Care and Social Work. Through a series of cross-sectional online surveys, completed by a total of 4,950 UK Social Care and Social Workers, this study reports the changing working conditions and well-being of UK Social Care and Social Workers at two time points (phases) during the COVID-19 pandemic.FindingsAll working conditions and well-being measures were found to be significantly worse during Phase 2 (November–January 2021) than Phase 1 (May–July 2020), with worse psychological well-being than the UK average in Phase 2. Furthermore, our findings indicate that in January 2021, feelings about general well-being, control at work, and working conditions predicted worsened psychological well-being.ApplicationsOur findings highlight the importance of understanding and addressing the impact of the pandemic on the Social Care and Social Work workforce, thus highlighting that individuals, organizations, and governments need to develop mechanisms to support these employees during and beyond the pandemic.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-07-07T06:53:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221109483
       
  • Securing citizens’ social rights under neoliberal welfare governance:
           the case of Israeli social services

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      Authors: Sigal Bracha-Sadowitz, Guy Feldman, Lia Levin
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryWhile scholars have examined how neoliberal ideas and policies manifest at the front lines of the welfare state, far less is known about how the neoliberal approach prevalent in such states shapes decisions that senior state actors make about social welfare policy. The current study advances the literature by examining the processes and motivations behind the decision to withdraw from enacting a law designed to secure the social rights of all Israeli citizens. The study is rooted in a critical research paradigm, combining both inductive and deductive analyses of in-depth interviews with 15 senior officials and legislators in the field of social services.FindingsDespite their purported support for equality in the provision of social services, their acknowledgment of the shortcomings of current legislation in this respect, and their active role in promoting an alternative thereto, participants were persuaded to act in such a way as to support free-market measures. These findings illustrate an arena of policymaking wherein some state actors “purchase” other actors’ cooperation and compliance with the neoliberal approach.ApplicationsThe “behind-the-scenes” account of the legislative process, set against the backdrop of neoliberal welfare governance, provides insights useful to all those who seek to promote parity-enhancing legislation aimed at supporting marginalized social service recipients, in Israel and beyond.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-06-24T05:49:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221109485
       
  • Book Review: The coronavirus crisis and challenges to social development:
           global perspectives by Maria do Carmo dos Santos Gonçalves, Rebecca
           Gutwald, Tanja Kleibl, Ronald Lutz, Ndangwa Noyoo and Janestic Twikirize

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jing Zhang, Zhipeng Li
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T04:07:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221109417
       
  • Book Review: Practitioner research for social work, nursing and the health
           professions by Payam Sheikhattari, Michael T. Wright, Gillian B. Silver,
           Cyrilla van der Donk, and Bas van Lanen

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Irwin Epstein
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T04:07:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221109408
       
  • Book Review: Making their days happen: Paid personal assistance services
           supporting people with disability living in their homes and communities by
           Lisa I. Iezzoni

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sabretta Alford
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T04:06:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221109407
       
  • Book Review: Safeguarding children and young people: A guide for
           professionals working together by Nick Frost

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      Authors: Maggie Jackson
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T07:21:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221101442
       
  • Parents’ views on improving relationships with their social workers

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      Authors: Mary Baginsky
      First page: 3
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Summary: In England, the reason why most families have a social worker is because their children have been identified as having suffered or being at risk of suffering significant harm from abuse or neglect or requiring a statutory service for another need. Research has shown that positive relationships between social workers and families are essential. A study to evaluate Signs of Safety (Sofs) provided the opportunity to explore the quality of this relationship through the perceptions of 270 families who were in contact with children's social care (CSC). Over half were satisfied with the relationship, and many of the remaining families were able to identify what had stood in the way of it developing.Findings: The areas which were of most concern was the high turnover of social workers with the attendant lack of consistency, poor communication, a failure to provide services which families had been promised and the withdrawal of support too soon. Most dissatisfactions stemmed either from parents believing they had not been shown sufficient respect or, that while they had been drawn into a statutory intervention, they had not been provided with sufficient support to address their problems.Application: While some of the difficulties were connected to limited resources and overstretched services, others came about as a result of poor practice. The views expressed by these parents provide the basis for reflection amongst social workers, their managers and strategic leads on how improvements may be achieved and, in doing so, strengthen relationships with parents and potentially reduce future demand.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T05:35:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221101244
       
  • Indigenised approaches to addressing elder abuse in Uganda

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      Authors: Charles Kiiza Wamara, Thomas Strandberg, Maria Bennich
      First page: 19
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThe social gerontological field has long called for a culturally appropriate framework to understand, prevent, and respond to elder abuse in the Global South. This emphasis is, in part, based on the notion that elder abuse is a cultural and structural concern that cannot be effectively addressed using mainstream social work approaches. Therefore, indigenised approaches are preferred while tackling cultural and structural forms of elder abuse. However, despite several attempts, there is limited research on indigenised approaches and practices within the gerontological social work field. Therefore, we investigated how social work could promote indigenised approaches to better address elder abuse. We explored this through in-depth semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of 21 social workers.FindingsElder abuse is a cultural and structural social problem that requires family- and community-centred approaches premised on the Indigenous values of togetherness, reciprocity, solidarity, responsibility and love for humanity. These approaches must be embedded in people’s cultures and knowledge to address the social structural changes that have contributed to elder abuse in the Global South.ApplicationsSocial workers should strengthen family and community support to achieve social capital and inclusion for older people. This will not only enable families and communities to safeguard their older members, but also enhance community-based solutions to address elder abuse. Social work educators should engage in robust and rigorous research and curriculum change for social work education to enable the integration of post-colonial theories and approaches into social work training.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-07-01T06:42:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221109687
       
  • Asserting the right to care – Birth parents’ arguments in
           newborn care orders

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      Authors: Ida Benedicte Juhasz
      First page: 37
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryRemoving a newborn from his or her birth parents’ care is arguably a stark display of state power into the family. This study explores birth parents’ engagement with care proceedings in all (N = 177) newborn care orders in Norway between 2012 and 2016. The study asks which arguments parents use to assert their care rights, their focus, and whether arguments differ depending on the parents’ risks.FindingsApplying the defence dichotomy and seeing arguments as accounts, the analysis revealed parents primarily both justifying and excusing risks, and in two-thirds of cases rationalizing their care rights. Parents primarily denied harm and pinpointed (failed) service provision efforts, as well as excused their situation by claiming sufficient change and placing blame on i.e. child welfare services. Rationalizations did not defend parenting as such, but claimed normalcy and deservingness, as well as echoing concerns raised. Arguments were primarily parent- and service-focused. Parents with substance use risks blamed significantly less than parents with personality risks, and parents with intellectual disability risks demanded significantly more leeway as ‘new parents’ than parents with personality risks.ApplicationsThe study reflects how a marginalized demographic similarly, comprehensively, and most often unsuccessfully, engages with the child welfare system. The arguments reveal both alignment and misalignment in understandings of acceptable state intervention and responsibilities. It points to the dire need for knowledge about parents’ actual understanding of child welfare services, as well as clear communication and feedback between parents, their legal counsel, and social workers in assessments and service provision.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-08-24T11:10:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221109691
       
  • Vulnerability among older people ageing with deafblindness

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      Authors: Peter Simcock, Jill Manthorpe, Anthea Tinker
      First page: 60
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryVulnerability is an underexamined concept in social work. Scholarly activity principally concentrates on policy analysis and theoretical debate; less attention is given to lived experience of vulnerability from the perspectives of particular groups, impoverishing understanding of the phenomenon. This article presents findings from the first United Kingdom-based study of the lived experience of vulnerability from the perspectives of older deafblind adults. Adopting a qualitative design, data were collected via 18 semistructured interviews with eight participants (aged between 49 and 83), undertaken between October 2014 and July 2016. Data were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis.FindingsParticipants interpret vulnerability as layered, describing what they feel vulnerable about, what they feel vulnerable to, and when they feel vulnerable. The latter layer is predominant: vulnerability experiences are time-limited, and situation and setting specific. Situational and pathogenic sources of vulnerability include the responses of other people, particularly the experience of being misunderstood or perceived as incapable. The layers of vulnerability are not discrete: they can be combined and avoidance of one vulnerability can exacerbate another.ApplicationsFindings strengthen arguments against categorizing particular groups, including deafblind people, as permanently and immutably vulnerable. Such categorization, focused solely on impairment, provides an inadequate understanding of experience. Policymakers should consider adopting a layered approach to defining vulnerability. Assessment of these layers and how they interact may offer social workers an enhanced understanding of deafblind people's experiences and assist in determining what matters to them. Assessment should explore coping strategies, and assumptions of incapability based on impairment be rejected.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-07-06T01:37:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221109447
       
  • Social service providers under COVID-19 duress: adaptation, burnout, and
           resilience

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      Authors: Judith LM McCoyd, Laura Curran, Elsa Candelario, Patricia A Findley, Kerry Hennessey
      First page: 85
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThis article examines the response of social services organizations and their workers to the COVID-19 pandemic in a northeastern U.S. state. Using an exploratory, cross-sectional survey design with a convenience sample (N = 1472), we ask: (1) how did agencies and social service workers manage service disruptions associated with COVID-19; (2) how did social service workers perceive shifts in clients’ needs; (3) how did social service workers experience the transition to remote interactions with clients; and (4) how did social service workers cope with COVID-related transitions and demands.FindingsOur findings tell a story of unprecedented crises alongside powerful attempts at adaptation, innovation, and resilience. Faced with extraordinary need among their clients, fears for their own health, and a breakdown of organizational and community functioning and guidance, social workers were able to learn and implement new technologies, adapt to increasing demands, manage new work-life boundaries, and find ways to address gaps in service while experiencing symptoms of burnout.ApplicationThe impact of supervisory and administrative fragmentation and communication breakdowns in the face of crisis put social workers in an untenable position despite surprising abilities to adapt, innovate, and manage their professional lives while under duress. Assuring better supervisory/administrative infrastructure to support workers as they deliver services during crises will help in future crises.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T07:08:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221109414
       
  • Child protection investigations by private consultants or municipally
           employed social workers: What are the differences for children'

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      Authors: Ann-Sofie Bergman, Kerstin Arnesson, Ulrika Järkestig Berggren
      First page: 103
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryIn Sweden, a practice has developed where the social services have started to hire private consultants in child protection investigations. This article analyses and compares the handling of child protection investigations carried out by private consultants and municipally employed social workers with regard to the reasons for the reports, the investigations, the assessments, and the decisions taken about interventions. The concepts funnel and filtering and children's participation are used in the analysis. The study has a mixed-methods design, where qualitative and quantitative data and analysis are combined and integrated. Data consists of 120 case files regarding the social service's handling of investigations as well as interviews with managers of social service departments.FindingsThe results show several differences in the handling of child protection investigations carried out by social workers and private consultants in the municipalities studied. The private consultants worked to a greater extent with investigations that were initiated due to concerns about violence. Investigations conducted by consultants contained less information and specifically concerning children's perspective. These children also received interventions to a lesser extent than children assessed by the municipal social workers.ApplicationThe study indicates that from a child’s perspective, it matters whether a municipally employed social worker or a private consultant performs an investigation. Consultants generally work temporarily in a workplace, and it may therefore be more difficult to establish a trusting relationship with the children, which can be a barrier to children's participation and the implementation of a child’s perspective.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-07-07T06:53:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221109710
       
  • Parenting coordination, a new role for social workers

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      Authors: Marta Blanco, Jorge Manuel Leitao Ferreira, Andrés Arias Astray
      First page: 143
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Summary. The main aim of this article is to assess the attention paid in social work to the role of parenting coordinator (PC). These professionals offer individualised support to high-conflict families in their implementation of parenting plans, normalising the relationship between parents and safeguarding the protection of minors. This form of alternative dispute resolution is being incorporated into the judicial system of various countries in a highly heterogeneous manner, with some countries such as Spain and Portugal experiencing uncertain times. A systematic literature review was performed, incorporating existing international studies in English, Spanish and Portuguese as well as court rulings in Spain, to identify the presence of social work as a discipline in this new professional role.• Findings. The findings show that despite the suitable training background of social workers, the involvement of their professional associations and their contributions to the function performed by PCs, there is no specific social work research focused on this area of knowledge.• Applications. The main contribution of this study is the commitment to a new professional niche for social work, traditionally occupied by psychologists. The emphasis should be placed not so much on the original training of the professional, but rather on his or her complementary training and accredited experience in highly conflictive situations.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T05:38:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221101241
       
  • Book Review: The Settlement House Movement Revisited: A Transnational
           History by John Gal, Stefan Kongeter and Sarah Vicary

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Cynthia H. Nover
      First page: 160
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-08-12T06:18:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221120619
       
  • Book Review: Politics for social workers: A practical guide to effecting
           change by Stephen Pimpare

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nigel Parton
      First page: 161
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2022-09-22T05:41:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173221125544
       
 
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