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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 243 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACOSS Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
African Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Argumentum     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Australian Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Bakti Budaya     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
British Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 104)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Care Management Journals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Social Work Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Comunitania : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ConCienciaSocial     Open Access  
Contemporary Rural Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Critical and Radical Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Critical Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Critical Social Work : An Interdisciplinary Journal Dedicated to Social Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuadernos de Trabajo Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Developmental Child Welfare     Hybrid Journal  
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
ECI Interdisciplinary Journal for Legal and Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
European Journal of Social Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Families in Society : The Journal of Contemporary Social Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Gambling Research: Journal of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Geopolitical, Social Security and Freedom Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Global Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access  
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Indonesian Journal of Guidance and Counseling     Open Access  
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Care and Caring     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Islamic Counseling : Jurnal Bimbingan Konseling Islam     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Janus Sosiaalipolitiikan ja sosiaalityön tutkimuksen aikakauslehti     Open Access  
Journal for Specialists in Group Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Journal of Baccalaureate Social Work     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Care Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Community Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Comparative Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Family Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Forensic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Rights and Social Work     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 394)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 235)
Journal of Public Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 205)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Jurnal Guidena : Journal of Guidance and counseling, Psychology and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Leidfaden : Fachmagazin für Krisen, Leid, Trauer     Hybrid Journal  
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Migration Action     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access  
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nordisk välfärdsforskning | Nordic Welfare Research     Open Access  
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Partner Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 239)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Policy Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Prospectiva : Revista de Trabajo Social e Intervención Social     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psikopedagogia : Jurnal Bimbingan dan Konseling     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Qualitative Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Qualitative Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Research on Social Work Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revista Brasileira de Tecnologias Sociais     Open Access  
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Katálysis     Open Access  
Revista Serviço Social em Perspectiva     Open Access  
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
SER Social     Open Access  
Service social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Serviço Social & Sociedade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Sexualidad, Salud y Sociedad (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access  
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 2)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Social Care and Neurodisability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)

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Similar Journals
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Journal of Social Work
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.774
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 205  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1468-0173 - ISSN (Online) 1741-296X
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • Book Review: Inequality, Social Protection and Social Justice by James
           Midgley

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sujeet Kumar
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-08T03:41:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211048163
       
  • Book Review: The quest for a divided welfare state: Sweden in the Era of
           privatization by John Lapidus

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Daniel Fredriksson
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-04T05:21:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211048165
       
  • Book Review: Women's Journey to Empowerment in the 21st Century. A
           Transnational Feminist Analysis of Women's Lives in Modern Times by
           Kristen K. Zaleski, Annalisa Enrile, Eugenia Weiss and Xiying Wang

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kim Robinson
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-04T05:20:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211048164
       
  • Book Review: Decision-Making and Judgment in Child Welfare and Protection:
           Theory, Research and Practice by John D. Fluke, Monica Lopez, Rami
           Benbenishty, Erik J. Knorth and Donald J. Bauman

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nigel Parton
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-04T05:20:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211048162
       
  • Social workers’ attitudes toward reparations for African American
           descendants

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: V. Nikki Jones, Cathy G McElderry, Laneshia R Conner
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryReparations for African Americans in its most basic form amounts to a concerted effort to repair damages from hundreds of years of exploitation and mistreatment toward people of African ancestry. The legacy of chattel slavery manifests in ongoing racial injustices, including gross disparities in health and wealth. The injustices resultant from the system of chattel slavery and its sequela have not been formally addressed by the U.S. government. As a profession, social work is dedicated to the empowerment of marginalized communities and upholds a mandate to advocate for social justice. As such, this study examines social workers’ attitudes toward reparations for African American descendants. Descriptive analyses and analyses of association were used to interpret survey data.FindingsA convenience sample of 186 social work professionals and students participated in this exploratory study. Findings of the study suggest that a majority of social workers agree with reparations (73%) as a strategy to redress present-day disparities. Additionally, a majority of the participants agree that reparations can begin to repair racial inequality.ApplicationsThis groundbreaking study lays the foundation for future research about social workers’ perceptions and support of reparations. Furthermore, results of this study should encourage social work organizations to infuse scientific research in formulating position statements and advocacy on the issue of reparations.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-30T11:04:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211037245
       
  • Knowing poverty: Social workers’ perceptions of poverty knowledge

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Roni Strier, Hani Nouman, Nurit Kantarovich
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryGiven the global and local social inequalities and the complex life circumstances of people living in poverty, social workers are called upon to broaden their knowledge with the purpose of developing social services that respond to the needs of this growing population. However, very little research has been done on the kind of knowledge that social workers require in order to care for this population. The present article focuses on the epistemological aspects of service development for people living in poverty and reviews three main issues: What is “poverty knowledge,” where does it come from, and what are the barriers to and opportunities for its development' These questions are investigated through a qualitative paradigm among social workers employed in Israel’s public social services.FindingsFindings reveal a profound epistemological controversy about what poverty knowledge means: Is it objective, consistent, readily available, and transferrable knowledge, or is it a dynamic and reflexive process affected by a great number of fluctuating contexts' Findings stress the dominance of positivist views of poverty knowledge, mostly derived from practice while other sources of knowledge development, such as service users’ local knowledge, theory, and research knowledge were seen as less relevant to their needs.ApplicationsPractical recommendations are offered relating to the need for poverty knowledge development processes in social services as well as in social-work education through collaborative, contextual, and reflective learning with and from service users and other stakeholders.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-22T11:50:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211032132
       
  • A multitheoretical perspective for addressing domestic and family
           violence: Supporting fathers to parent without harm

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Emma Gatfield, Patrick O’Leary, Silke Meyer, Kathleen Baird
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryDomestic and family violence remains a significant challenge to family wellbeing. The risk of serious harm from domestic and family violence is disproportionally carried by women and children, yet often the complex reality of family life means that many families have ongoing contact with their abusers. Responses to this problem are frequently siloed across child protection and specialist domestic violence services, leading to a lack of holistic intervention. More recently, there has been increased attention on addressing the role and behavior of abusive fathers, especially where fathers remain in families or have ongoing contact postseparation through coparenting. This paper offers a systemic approach for understanding and addressing such amilies.FindingsAn integrated theoretical framework is proposed, which draws together key tenets of feminism, family violence, and intersectional theories within a systems-oriented model. It frames families, inclusive of fathers, within their eco-social contexts, highlighting factors that exacerbate domestic and family violence, and those that increase family safety, which has strong applications for social work practice.ApplicationsAn integrated theoretical framework offers an approach for social workers for understanding domestic and family violence in a broad-based and holistic manner, and for developing coordinated family focused interventions while concurrently addressing related child welfare concerns and family safety. A range of considerations for case management of families are explored, which, while relevant to most intact families or those who have continuing contact with perpetrators, holds particular relevance for marginalized families that present with complex needs and experiences of disadvantage.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-22T11:48:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211028562
       
  • Book Review: Assessment, risk and decision making in social work by
           Campbell Killick and Brian J. Taylor

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Osei Domfeh
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-22T06:21:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211048069
       
  • Book Review: Best practices for social work with refugees and immigrants
           by Miriam Potocky and Mitra Naseh

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kim Robinson
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-22T06:21:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211048062
       
  • Triple powerlessness traps and old age: Implications for social work
           practice

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ping Kwong Kam
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryOver the last two decades older people in Hong Kong have experienced increased powerlessness. This article argues that the prevalent use of structural analysis, mainly the political economy approach, provides an inadequate explanation of the strong sense of powerlessness experienced by older people in a Chinese society like Hong Kong. The article extends structural level analysis by embracing two additional levels, cultural and professional practice, to examine old age powerlessness in Hong Kong.Theoretical advancesThis paper contributes to increasing knowledge relating the concept of powerlessness to aging through a new analytical perspective, the “triple powerlessness traps” that include the structural, cultural, and professional practice levels of analysis.ApplicationsThe inclusion of two additional levels—cultural and professional practice—adds a necessary new dimension and depth to the analysis by suggesting that cultural explanations and the disempowering effects of professional practice should be afforded increased weight in the study of old age powerlessness in the Chinese context. The “triple powerlessness traps” help enhance analysis of old age powerlessness in societies facing cultural changes and the erosion of cultural values. They also have the practical value of arousing the awareness of social work professionals of the negative effects of the disempowered professional practice in producing or sustaining old age powerlessness and the need for changing social work practice at the policy, societal, agency, or organizational and personal levels.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-16T02:34:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211029134
       
  • Involvement of parents of children with ADHD in schools: Implications for
           social work practice

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      Authors: Kitty Yuen-han MO, Simon Tak-Mau CHAN
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummarySchool social workers and school counselors play an important role in providing support to the parents of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Issues regarding the barriers to parental involvement have not been well-explored empirically in social work. By means of semistructured interviews, this study explored the perspectives of 20 Mainland Chinese parents about parental involvement in their children’s education and in schools, parent–teacher relationships, the social factors that affect individual families, and the cultural and contextual factors that hinder parental involvement in children’s education.FindingsUsing thematic analysis, the researchers identified major themes: (a) emotional overinvolvement of parents in children’s education; (b) withdrawal of fathers; (c) positive and negative teacher–parent relationships; (d) contextual factors: school culture, system, and policies; and (e) parents’ preferred sources of support.ApplicationsThis research provides insight for school social workers and school counselors to develop supportive measures for parents of children with ADHD. Furthermore, it is recommended that social workers mediate tensions that arise from conflicts between teachers and parents. Social workers need to be sensitive to the power and cultural issues embedded in a parent–teacher relationship to facilitate parental involvement in school mental health services for children with ADHD. In particular, the cultural beliefs that affect parents and teachers relationships should not be ignored.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-07T09:30:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211030029
       
  • Child-focused practice in social services for adults in Norway

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      Authors: Kjersti B Kristensen, Camilla Lauritzen, Charlotte Reedtz
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryChildren of social service users are at risk for developing mental health problems as well as social and behavioral problems. Social service counselors should therefore be aware of service users’ children and provide support for them. In fact, they are obligated by law to consider children's views and their best interests in cases affecting them. Despite this, little is known about social service counselors’ child focus in their practice. In this study, self-reported survey data from 93 counselors working for the Norwegian Labor and Welfare Administration (NAV) were analyzed to explore their child focus.FindingsFindings suggest that a particular focus on children is no part of common practice among NAV counselors; nor is use or knowledge of The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). Knowledge and use of the CRC may be a predictor of child-focused practice. The results showed a significant difference of medium effect size between NAV counselors who ask about children and NAV counselors who do not when it comes to knowledge and use of the CRC.ApplicationsPolicy makers and practitioners should utilize NAV's potential as a preventive arena. For NAV counselors to be aware of and support children of social service users they need a stronger focus on children and hence know and use the laws concerning children's rights. Incorporating children's rights into social workers’ education and internal training may strengthen the focus on children in NAV counselors’ practice.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-08-23T03:05:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211029725
       
  • Foster parent perspectives on necessary supports for youth and their
           families departing foster care

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      Authors: Jacqueline Huscroft-D'Angelo, Daniel Poling, Alexandra Trout
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryMore than 50% of children who depart foster care will experience a permanency placement after being involved in the child welfare system. The struggles faced by children and families during the transition into the home and community setting following foster care are well-known and often result in child welfare re-entry. Presently, little is known about preparation for permanency placements or appropriate supports to aide in this critical transition period. This includes understanding the perspectives of key stakeholders such as foster parents, who are essential to the transition. This descriptive study begins to address this need by examining the perspectives of foster parents (N = 60) on: (a) transition planning, (b) the importance of specific supports and services critical during to transition period, and (c) availability of supports during the transition period.FindingsResults indicate that the most frequently addressed areas during transition planning process were family, medical/physical health, and education. Participants rated mental health and safety as the most important supports for youth. Most respondents indicated being unsure about the availability of nearly all supports. However, of those reported as available, safety and mental health supports were identified most often.ApplicationFindings have practical application for service provision and transition planning for youth and their families departing foster care to permanency placements. Specifically, a continued focus on mental health and an increase in educational supports during the transition process. These are discussed in depth as well as implications for practice. Limitations and future research are also presented.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-07-08T05:57:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211013735
       
  • Native American social work – Including family and community

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      Authors: Shanley Swanson, Reidunn H Nygård, Merete Saus
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThis study investigates family involvement and culturally informed social work in Native American communities. The study was conducted in Native American communities in Montana, USA. Twenty-three Native American social work professionals participated in qualitative interviews. Analyses draw on theory of historical trauma and family involvement in indigenous social. Throughout the study, indigenous methodology has been a central principle.FindingsAmong social workers, there is a common understanding that social work should involve family and community if it is to be culturally informed. Social work professionals talk of family involvement in indigenous social work as “common sense.” For the Native American social work professionals interviewed, the following tenets are all “common sense”: (1) family and community belonging are important aspects of Native American culture; 2) oppression and colonization had a negative impact on family, community, and tribal relations; and (3) social work has an obligation to restore family, community, and tribal relations.ApplicationSocial work has a responsibility to connect culture, trauma, and the resolution of trauma. Furthermore, family and community involvement plays a core part in restoration and resilience processes, healing historical trauma caused by the colonization. Hence, in order to provide culturally competent care, social work practices serving Native American clients should involve family and community. Mainstream social work does not sufficiently build on family involvement as an ideological foundation for qualitatively good social work. We argue that social work curricula impacting Native clients could benefit from the experience and knowledge of these Native American social workers.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-07-06T06:53:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211009177
       
  • Social workers’ approaches to ethical dilemmas

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      Authors: Rogelio Gómez-García, Jezabel Lucas-García, Siro Bayón-Calvo
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThe study objective was the identification of social workers’ ethic profiles in their professional interventions. To conduct this pilot study, we used data from a national survey (N = 1071) carried out in Spain. The information was collected through an online questionnaire.FindingsResults show that social workers face a variety of ethical dilemmas in their professional practice. Through exploratory factor analysis, it was revealed that the underlying structure of the questionnaire consisted of three categories: direct service to individuals and families, design and implementation of social welfare policy and programmes and relationships among professional colleagues. Through latent class analysis, four unique social workers’ ethical profiles were identified: professionals with minimum incidence of experiencing ethical dilemmas, professionals with low incidence of experiencing ethical dilemmas, professionals with a notable incidence of experiencing ethical dilemmas and, finally, professionals with high incidence of experiencing ethical dilemmas. A third of the social workers in the sample showed a very low probability to be conflicted by ethical dilemmas.ApplicationsThe pilot study is expected to serve as a catalyst for discussion of social workers’ ethical conduct and professional practice, to promote professional ethics training and education and to support the development of professional guidelines.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-07-06T06:04:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211010251
       
  • Luhmann's theory of psychic systems and communication in social work
           practice

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      Authors: John J Rodger
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThe aim of the article is to increase interest in the social systems theory of Niklas Luhmann among practicing social workers. The enigmatic statement from Luhmann that only ‘communication can communicate’ is explained with reference to his autopoietic systems theory which identifies three distinct types of systems: systems of communication, systems of life and systems of consciousness. The article proceeds to describe the meaning and nature of autopoietic systems before discussing the place of the individual in Luhmann’s theory and how it is relevant for practicing social workers. The concepts of psychic systems, structural coupling and communicative codes are described and discussed.FindingsThe conceptual framework derived from Luhmann’s systems theory is applied to a description of the social worker/client encounter. Communication in social work practice is polyphonic: it is structured by a hybrid of communicative codes which the practitioner must draw on depending on the auspices of the communicative context. The key conclusion of the article is that Luhmann retains a conception of the individual as an active agent in systems theory aiming ‘noise’ at the function systems with which the individual interacts.ApplicationsThe article suggests that the systems perspective presented provides social workers with a useful and nuanced framework for reflective practice because it makes the components of the practice system explicit and visible.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-07-06T06:03:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211008107
       
  • Differences between adolescents in secure residential care and
           non-residential educational facilities

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      Authors: Pronk Sanne, Van den B Germie, Kuiper Chris, Popma Arne, Jan Stams Geert, Mulder Eva
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryIn this cross-sectional study, we examined differences between 351 adolescents allocated to secure residential youth care and the non-residential alternative educational facility School2Care (12–18 years old, 63% boys). Data were collected by means of the official school registration system and standardized questionnaires.FindingsResults showed that adolescents in both settings had severe problems. Emergency situations, problems in daily functioning in all life domains, and previous out-of-home placements were found to be associated with allocation to secure residential youth care instead of non-residential alternative education. These three factors may be considered risk factors for secure residential placement of adolescents with complex needs.ApplicationsThis study provides input for the prevention of secure residential youth care, because the two dynamic (changeable) risk factors for residential out-of-home placement (i.e., emergency situations and adolescent’s daily life functioning) should be considered as intervention targets in non-residential care, while static factors (i.e., history of out-of-home placement) can be used to improve risk assessment of residential out-of-home placement, with higher risk requiring more intensive treatment according to the risk-need-responsivity model for effective mandated treatment.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-07-05T05:46:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211009712
       
  • Validating a model for indicating the professionalisation of social work
           in China

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      Authors: Jie Lei, Mengsha Luo, Yean Wang
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThe social work profession has developed at an unprecedented rate in the past decade in China. This article addresses the much-debated question of whether the international standards of social work can be applied in the Chinese context. Employing Weiss-Gal and Welbourne’s conceptual framework of the professionalisation of social work, this study aimed to identify validated indicators to define social work professionalisation in China. A questionnaire with 11 indicators was designed, and responses were received from 748 social workers in Guangzhou. Formative measurement was adopted as an analytic strategy.FindingsFive of the 11 indicators were validated: perception of public recognition, perceived adequacy of the knowledge base, involvement in professional organisations, congruence with ethical standards, and perception of professional autonomy. Contrarily, six indicators had no significant impact on social work professionalisation in China: public recognition in terms of qualification levels, professional education, satisfaction with professional organisations, monopoly (self-perception and entrance criteria) and prestige and remuneration.ApplicationsThis study extends the application of Weiss-Gal and Welbourne’s conceptual framework to China. Utilisation of this framework suggests that social work professionalisation in China may diverge from international standards in social work, while the professionalisation measures for social work implemented by the Chinese governments may be ineffective. In particular, this study highlights the continuing challenges for the development of social work in China and provides evidence of the need to strengthen the professional power of Chinese social work.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-07-05T05:46:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211010242
       
  • The Impact of COVID-19 on Social Workers: An Assessment of Peritraumatic
           Distress

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      Authors: J Jay Miller, Erlene Grise-Owens
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThere is broad consensus that COVID-19 has had a pernicious impact on social work, in general, and among social work practitioners, more specifically. However, at present, very few, if any, empirical examinations of this impact exist. This exploratory study examined peritraumatic distress among a sample of social workers (N = 3920) in one southeastern state in the United States.FindingsAnalysis suggests that distress is impacted by several variables. In general, participants identifying as male, married, reporting good physical and mental health, working in microcontexts, and who were finically secure tended to experience less COVID-19 associated distress. In addition, social workers identifying as LGBTQ* and who had been working mostly remotely experienced higher levels of distress.ApplicationsOverall, findings indicate the need to provide adept support to social workers practicing during the pandemic. Data suggest the need for targeted support initiatives, typically for those who are from underrepresented groups (e.g., LGBTQ*) or experiencing financial or mental/physical health issues. Certainly, researchers should continue to examine the impact of COVID-19 on social work practitioners and service delivery.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-07-01T06:58:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211013243
       
  • Social workers’ perceptions of their peers’ unprofessional
           behavior

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      Authors: Michelle Gricus, Lili Wysiekierski
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThis article explores social workers’ perceptions of their colleagues’ professional mistakes, and the influences of those opinions. Vignettes in a factorial survey helped to determine whether certain variables related to the social worker or the situation influenced the perception of others’ professional errors and ethical violations. The changed variables included personal characteristics of the offending social worker such as perceived race, gender, and sexual orientation of the social worker, and characteristics of the situation, such as the length of time involved in unprofessional behavior.FindingsLicensed social workers in six U.S. states (n = 5596) read vignettes based on real cases brought before licensing boards (n = 22,127) and assigned levels of seriousness and importance to discipline. The vignettes rated most highly involved perceived harm to a client or other vulnerable individual. Those on the lower end of seriousness and importance to discipline were those violations against the profession of social work. Analysis of changed variables indicated respondents’ ratings were influenced by several situational factors, but not by personal characteristics of the social worker involved in the vignette.ApplicationsOur findings provide some insight into the decision-making factors important to social workers. The results may be helpful to licensing boards considering the contextual factors of unprofessional behavior and whether to discipline certain actions.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-07-01T06:58:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211012576
       
  • Social workers as state and citizen-agents. How social workers in a
           German, Dutch and Flemish public welfare organisation manage this dual
           responsibility in practice

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      Authors: Michelle van der Tier, Koen Hermans, Marianne Potting
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryProfessional standards state that social workers in public welfare organisations should act as state and citizen-agents. However, the literature provides little insight into how social workers navigate this dual responsibility in their daily work. To address this gap, we used Maynard-Moody and Musheno’s theory on state and citizens-agent narratives to analyse street-level practices of social workers in three local welfare organisations in Germany, the Netherlands and Belgium. This article explores how three specific organisational mechanisms (decision-making authority; the role of the front-line manager and the degree of specialisation) affect the ways social workers navigate both agent narratives in public welfare organisations. The data were gathered by a mixed method design of in-depth interviews and focus groups.FindingsOur study shows that social workers struggle with the tensions that intrude between the state and citizen-agent narrative. We found that the extent to which both narratives are adopted by social workers is affected by a complicated interaction between the beliefs of social workers about social justice and responsiveness and the selected organisational mechanisms. Moreover, we found that critical reflection and a supportive attitude of front-line managers can help social workers to manage their double responsibility in practice.ApplicationOur cross-national study contributes to a deeper understanding of the relationship between organisational mechanisms and the moral deliberations of social workers regarding their dual responsibility. It provides in-depth insights into the tensions and conflicts social workers in different contexts face daily on account of their dual responsibility.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-07-01T06:58:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211009724
       
  • Parenting in migration: Critical aspects and challenges of “doing
           family” of refugee families and social workers

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      Authors: Nadia Rania, Laura Pinna, Ilaria Coppola
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryAlthough migrant families comprise a small number of immigrants, they present a significant challenge for the host community. In the Italian context, social services support migrant families through paths to autonomy and integration in the community. The purpose of this study was to investigate perceptions that families and social workers have of “parenting” and “doing family” (training and management of family identity, roles and daily practices) in the complexity of migration. The study involved 15 immigrant parental couples, using family interview techniques and 12 social workers in 3 mini-focus groups. The collected materials were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using grounded theory.FindingsThe main results are identified and discussed as strengths, critical points and challenges. Some of the themes such as “willingness to work” or “lack of job opportunities” are common to both family members and social workers. Other themes are relevant to one group only. Among these, “availability and support of social workers” only emerged among families, whereas “education and respecting the rules” only emerged among social workers.ApplicationsThe results indicate that it is necessary for social workers to engage in a meaningful helping relationship with families, build networks of inclusion services, and also with the support of mediators overcome linguistic and cultural barriers. Social workers should involve families throughout he integration process. Furthermore, social services must also consider how families experience the difficulty of relating to social workers, which represents an obstacle to support for social integration.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-07-01T06:58:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211014681
       
  • Social work in sport: Playmakers in the athletic arena

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      Authors: Tarkington J Newman, Erica Magier, Katlin Okamoto, Carlyn Kimiecik, Lauren Shute, Lauren Beasley, Anita R Tucker
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryAn emerging area of social work practice is within sport and athletics. Due to the complex nature of sport and the diverse needs of sport participants, social workers are optimally positioned to be critical change agents. However, there is a lack of empirical research dedicated to exploring this unique area of practice. The current study explores the unique values, knowledge, and skills social workers use when working in sport, as well as describes the roles that social workers fulfill.FindingsSemi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 social workers who work in youth sport, collegiate athletics, and professional sports. Their occupations ranged from psychotherapists to athletic counselors to coaches. Findings from the thematic analysis provide insight to the values, knowledge, and skills used in sport that social workers developed from their formal education. For instance, social workers, through their commitment to promoting diversity and inclusion, are trained to take a strength-based, person-centered approach when working with individuals and teams.ApplicationsFindings highlight the dynamic and diverse roles social workers fulfill as change agents who aim to enhance human wellbeing within a variety of sport systems and settings. Social workers not only work in collegiate athletic departments, but they also provide needed services to youth who are socially vulnerable through sport-based programming and strength-based coaching. The current study helps to not only advance the field of social work, but also advocates for social workers in sport settings. Ultimately, social work professionals are optimally positioned to be playmakers in the athletic arena.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-17T07:36:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211009743
       
  • The impact of COVID-19 quarantine measures on the mental health of
           families

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      Authors: Fakir Al Gharaibeh, Laura Gibson
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryCOVID-19 is shaping all aspects of life throughout the world. The unexpected number of people who have been infected with and died from coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is evidence that the pandemic has affected families and societies. The strong shock wave that has resulted in the international response has focused more on medical rather than psychosocial interventions. Little has been written or studied about the impact of COVID-19 on families. This article explores the impact of the COVID-19 quarantine on the mental health of families. We conducted 20 in-depth interviews with Jordanian families through snowball sampling.FindingsThe results show that 20 interviewees described varied and new experiences. Many of the families we interviewed displayed symptoms of mental health problems, including disrupted sleep patterns, changes in eating habits, excessive digital media use, anxiety, depression, excessive smoking, stomach aches, bedwetting among children, and persistent headaches. The study also demonstrated the psychological stress partners felt during the lockdown due to their worries about job security. They also communicated their hope that renewed family commitments might bring more stability to their relationships. During the lockdown, family members spent more time together, and it became harder to conceal any issues from each other.ApplicationsThe findings of this research demonstrate a critical need for social workers, and it is hoped that future legislation will include a role for social workers in various fields of crisis. Moreover, social workers should encourage families to ask for intervention to overcome the long-term effects that may result from COVID-19.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-14T12:10:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211011705
       
  • Using the capability approach in social work with unaccompanied young
           adult refugees

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      Authors: Laura Van Raemdonck, Noel Clycq, Rilke Mahieu
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThis study reviews two different types of frontline social services for unaccompanied young adult refugees participating in an intensive Social Support Programme implemented in 2016–2019 by a local municipality. More specifically, the study took a phenomenological research approach to review the impact of intensive case management and specialised educational/occupational orientation services on young refugees’ capabilities and agency to reach aspired life goals. The capability approach has been applied as a theoretical framework for identifying opportunities and challenges in this regard. The paper covers a mixed-method design that includes qualitative and quantitative data. The qualitative data are drawn from 42 in-depth interviews with 24 young refugees and one interview and three focus group discussions with 10 service providers. The article also includes a limited amount of longitudinal statistics on the aspirations of 31 young refugees upon entering and exiting the support programme.FindingsThis article shows theoretical and empirical evidence for utilising the capability approach to review social services for young refugees. Findings suggest that social workers and refugees face intersecting structural and interpersonal tensions that counteract with the expansion of young refugees’ capabilities and agency to reach their aspired life goals. Specific strategies are suggested to diminish described challenges.ApplicationsSocial work with unaccompanied young adult refugees should shift its attention from integrating these young individuals into the dominant social order, to prioritising their human development.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-06T03:38:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211009744
       
  • Social Workers’ Impact on Policy Through Regulations: A Case Study of
           the U.S. Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program

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      Authors: Susanny J Beltran, Vivian J Miller, Tyrone Hamler
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryInvolvement in the political process in the United States is critical for social work professionals, as social policies dictate funding and programming in social work practice. Yet, there is little to no focus given to the regulation writing process in the social work literature in the United States. This article contributes to the scant body of knowledge that addresses the regulatory process from a social work perspective. A brief overview of the regulation writing process is provided, followed by a case study using the regulations for the U.S. Older Americans Act Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program to illustrate the process.FindingsA total of 85 comments, submitted to the Federal Register docket, were analyzed using content analysis. Findings reveal that comment submissions varied greatly in terms of length, source, and input. Notably, findings indicate low participation from the social work profession.ApplicationThe open comment period of the regulation writing process offers a free, but effortful, window of opportunity for social workers to engage in post-legislative advocacy. There is a need to support the involvement of the social work profession in the regulation writing process, through practice and training enhancements.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-04T07:51:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211010303
       
  • Social workers’ use of critical reflection

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      Authors: Akin Taiwo
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThis article explores critical reflection as practiced by social workers in the context of their personal and professional privilege. It was found that social workers in direct practice were not invested in critical reflection about oppressive discourses in their consciousness when interacting with clients. Rather, critical reflection often happened in times of crises or when social workers encountered difficult client situations. Using the phenomenological methodology of Van Manen and the social constructionist perspective, I present and discuss the findings of a qualitative study of semi-structured interviews with 20 social workers in direct practice.FindingsData analysis indicated that critical reflection is not a priority for direct practice social workers in the context of privilege. Three themes are identified: (1) No time for reflection, (2) Fear of reflection, and (3) Too much reflection. Nevertheless, social workers were still able to reflect alone, with colleagues and with supervisors, and they outlined the benefits of reflection.ApplicationsSocial work agencies should provide infrastructure for reflection, create an atmosphere for workers to freely discuss challenges and difficulties, and reduce their fear of reprisals from management. This article broadens the idea of phenomenological reflection by Van Manen.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-04T07:50:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211010239
       
  • Children in domestic violence shelters: Does the feminist perspective
           collapse'

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      Authors: Isabelle Côté, Dominique Damant, Simon Lapierre
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryEven though an extensive body of literature on children has swept the field of domestic violence in the last 30 years, little is known about how domestic violence shelter workers understand children’s situations and how they intervene with them. This article seeks to address this gap in the literature, and presents the results of a study conducted with 48 advocates in the province of Québec (Canada).FindingsThe data suggest that most of the participants adopt a child-centred perspective and consider the children in their own right during their stay. The accounts of the participants’ practices also reveal that they perceive children as being vulnerable and at-risk. With a moderate emphasis on vulnerability and risk, the participants tend to support the children alongside their mothers, while associating potential risks with the behaviour of the perpetrator of domestic violence. However, with a strong focus on vulnerability and risk, participants tend to cast aside the perpetrators’ behaviour and monitor the women-as-mothers during their stay while associating potential risk with their [in]actions under the circumstances. This can lead to mother-blaming, surveillance and more authoritarian interactions.ApplicationsThe understanding of children living with domestic violence needs to remain rooted in a feminist analysis of violence against women in order to avoid some of the issues highlighted in the article. Furthermore, studies that seek to shed light on best social work practices when working with children in alliance with their mothers from a feminist perspective are crucially needed.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-04T07:50:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211009740
       
  • Social workers and refugee service users (re)constructing their
           relationships in a hostile political climate

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      Authors: Lior Birger, Yochay Nadan
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThis article explores the relationship between social workers and adult Eritrean refugee service users in the context of a hostile political climate and restrictive state policies. It examines the implications of politics and policies on the formation of this relationship based on findings from a qualitative study conducted in Israel and Germany. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 38 participants – 16 Eritrean refugees and 22 social workers who work with refugees.FindingsDespite different political, social and organizational contexts, especially in the asylum policies towards Eritrean refugees, our thematic analysis yielded two main themes common to both countries: First, changing relationship structures, in particular moving away from a ‘traditional’ conceptualization of the social work relationship towards ‘informal’ practices. These included modifications of the setting, of professional boundaries and of the therapeutic language. Second, shifting power relations, characterized by a friend-like dynamic, which enabled more egalitarian relations, and a parent–child dynamic, which included increased power imbalances and dependency.ImplicationsAn increased understanding of the role of restrictive policies, everyday racism and exclusionary political discourse in the reconstruction of the user-worker relationship dynamics could inform social work education and practice. Beyond the refugee arena, establishing informal relationship structures could help to reduce power differentials, increase trust-building and improve therapeutic outcomes with refugees and other service users. The possible risks of informal relations, such as misunderstandings or worker burnout, are also discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-04T07:50:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211009739
       
  • An intersectional theoretical framework for exploring racialized older
           immigrant women’s subjectivities

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      Authors: Manaal Syed
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryToday, racialized older women’s international migration is increasingly accelerated, cyclical and transnational, illustrating the transcendence of lives across time and space. At the same time, immigration regimes regulate and restrict these seemingly unfettered mobilities using neoliberal, gendered and ageist policies that favor (younger) skilled immigration. This article addresses the question of how social work can use intersectionality perspectives to theorize racialized older immigrant women’s lives which are stretched across multiple time(s) and space(s) yet confined within highly regulated multi-tiered immigration systems.FindingsThis article outlines a theoretical framework grounded specifically within intersectional feminist, post-structural, and transnational aging perspectives. The framework embraces the temporality, spatiality, and transnationality of gendered, aging and migrant lives and reconsiders their agency as a performed subjectivity bound by multiple forces of institutionalized regimes.ApplicationsThis theoretical framework moves social work inquiry to a richer understanding of the migratory realities of diverse aging lives that are simultaneously in-motion and regulated within structural constraints.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-04T07:50:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211008426
       
  • Indigenous mothers’ experiences of power and control in child
           welfare: Families being heard

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      Authors: Suzanne C Robertson, Carey Sinclair, Andrew R Hatala
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThere are upward of 11,000 Indigenous children and families in the Manitoba Child and Family Services (CFSs). Many factors coalesce as contributors to these high rates of care, including oppressive histories of Canadian settler colonialism, governmental policies and the Indian Residential Schools, and mass apprehensions of Indigenous children through “the 60’s scoop.” Although a process of “Devolution” began in Manitoba in 1999 to address Indigenous overrepresentation and improve cultural safety for children and families, the voices of women whose children are in care often remain silenced and marginal.FindingsUtilizing an Indigenous Research lens, this qualitative study explored the stories and experiences of 12 Indigenous mothers involved with Manitoba CFS. The mothers’ stories revealed dynamics of power and control outlined in five core themes: (1) Being “set up to fail”; (2) Confronting “normalcy” and navigating case plans; (3) Dealing with tactics of intimidation; (4) Experiencing judgment and being labelled; and (5) Emotional politics. The mothers’ stories suggest that the CFS system continues to reflect colonial structures of oppression and that the “Devolution” did not fully have the intended impact on daily practice.ApplicationsThe womens' shared experiences highlight several areas for change, such as: enhanced family supports and worker relationships; utilization of capacity building frameworks; better institutional collaborations; increased efforts to maintain family relationships and units; and greater access to and quality of Indigenous cultural supports for mothers and children, including ceremony, healing, and access to Elders. Suggestions for more efficient and family-centered service provision are also offered.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-04T07:50:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211009187
       
  • The broker role in societal activation of long-term welfare recipients: A
           jack of all trades'

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      Authors: Lotte Prevo, Maria Jansen, Stef Kremers
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummarySocioeconomic status and health are strongly related to the ability of a person to participate in society. Acting upon activation and employment possibilities is difficult for several groups. One group described as especially hard to activate is long-term welfare recipients. In the current study, the role of an activation broker was studied as a supplementary practice to regular support practices. A qualitative research design using an analysis of the administrative logbook of the activation broker and interviews with professionals (n = 8) and long-term welfare recipients (n = 10) was carried out. To structure the retrieved data, the Activation Broker Wheel was developed.FindingsSeven core behaviours were identified and categorized in three determinants; capabilities, opportunities and motivation. Contextual factors supporting the activation broker approach were selected. The activation broker approach was found to be successful in activating long-term welfare recipients.ApplicationsThe behaviours, determinants and context made visible within the Activation Broker Wheel provided insight into workable elements that may help future activation brokers to optimize their support.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-04T07:49:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211008421
       
  • Critical realism, mimetic theory and social work

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      Authors: Stan Houston, Calvin Swords
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryScapegoating is a ubiquitous, yet pernicious, phenomenon in today’s world. It manifests in innumerable ways. Social work, in line with its emancipatory value-base, seeks to engage with various scapegoated groups to challenge the experience. In this article, the authors draw on critical realism and mimetic theory to elucidate the causative mechanisms fuelling scapegoating. This is done in order to heighten social workers’ insight into the process and empower targeted groups.FindingsMimetic theory highlights that scapegoating is a product of desire, rivalry and deflection. These are deep-seated mechanisms that are compatible with critical realist ontology and its search for causative properties in the social world. It is argued that critical realism augments mimetic theory by setting it within a much wider and deeper context of understanding. As such, it emphasizes intersecting causes and contingencies such as the role of temporal and spatial factors shaping the scapegoating experience.ApplicationsSocial workers can transform these theoretical insights into sensitizing constructs when they facilitate self-directed groupwork with scapegoated groups. Being theoretically informed, they can pose critical questions to group members to assist them to make the link between personal problems and political issues. The aim is to empower these groups so that they can embrace the sociological imagination and act for change.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-04T07:49:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211008806
       
  • Nutritional social work: What it is and why it matters

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      Authors: Arielle Dylan, Jenni Cammaert
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThis article introduces the area of nutritional social work, beyond the scope of food security and food injustice, from a critical, anti-oppressive and ecofeminist lens. The goal was not to present concrete frameworks but to initiate a discussion surrounding the relevance of nutritional social work and point in a number of possible directions for incorporation of this subdiscipline into social work praxis.FindingsNutritional security is an instrumental component of food security, as complete nutrition requires more than just enough energy for every human being. This purposeful combining of food security with nutrition security underscores the need to consider these two issues together, requiring integrated social and health outcomes, as well as cohesive community, policy and development goals aimed at eliminating food insecurity and malnutrition. These considerations need to involve the questions of availability, accessibility (both economically and geographically), cultural practices and sustainability that form the cornerstone of food justice efforts.ApplicationsThe article highlights the potential contribution of nutritional social work to direct practice, community action, policy development, research and social work education, as it illuminates the pivotal role that nutritional security plays in relation to multilevel considerations of food insecurity, all the while ensuring all people, through participatory, democratizing, power-sharing and equity-creating processes, have access to nutritious foods.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-04T07:49:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211008367
       
  • The lived experiences of social workers working with refugees in Lebanon

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      Authors: David P Cecil, Rachel J Hagues, Rania Mansour, Aimee Ghanem, David E Robbins
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Refugee care in LebanonUnderstanding the lived experiences of social workers.SummaryThis mixed methods study examines the status of social work in its response to the refugee crisis within Lebanon, a country with the highest per capita refugee population in the world.FindingsA structured interview guide and brief ordinal instrument were administered through interviews (n = 10) and 10 focus groups (n = 37) (N = 47). Participants were recruited with the help of Lebanese social work colleagues. We explored professional roles, greatest refugee needs, social worker coping, and recommendations for refugee social work trainers and educators. Qualitative results are presented as themes with examples of direct quotations. Culturally specific services accurately targeting needs are among the major themes identified. Quantitative results, primarily using descriptive statistics and one Pearson’s r correlation statistic, report on participants’ overall stress levels, sense of effectiveness in refugee practice, and connection of faith/religion to motivation for refugee work.ApplicationsThis work is applied as best practice recommendations for social work education and for front-line training of those in social work roles working with refugees in Lebanon. This work also raises awareness about one of the most critical humanitarian crises in history.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-04T07:49:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211008372
       
  • The educational journey of former foster youth: A dream deferred

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      Authors: Jessica L Yang, Sarah Bechtold
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThis qualitative study explored the educational needs and experiences of 27 adults who were between the ages of 30 and 50 but emancipated from foster care as youth. This study employed an interpretive phenomenological approach to understanding the narratives of the participants to gain deeper insight into the supports and barriers in obtaining a post-secondary education.FindingsKey findings from this study are that the majority of emancipated youth desire to obtain a post-secondary education but developmental difficulties such as an incomplete transition into emerging adulthood, lack of knowledge about post-secondary education, and lack of financial resources prevent matriculation into higher education. However, later in life, many emancipated youths are able to return to a post-secondary institution and graduate with a bachelor’s degree or higher. The primary supportive factor is a positive relationship and additional developmental maturity afforded by time.ApplicationsImplications of these findings are that those serving emancipating youth need to employ a developmental biopsychosocial perspective in assisting these youth. Both ensuring their healthy development and maturation but also helping to remove logistical barriers to ensure the ability of these youth to obtain a post-secondary education.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-04T07:49:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211008369
       
  • Black social workers: Identity, racism, invisibility/hypervisibility at
           work

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      Authors: Chijioke Obasi
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThis article provides a reflexive account of qualitative research with Black female social workers in the North of England. It uses ‘Africanist Sista-hood in Britain’ as the theoretical framework guiding the research. The data are gathered from six semi-structured interviews and two focus groups. Data were analysed via thematic analysis. Participant data are used to discuss issues of identity, race and racism as they contribute to positions of visibility, invisibility and hypervisibility within the social work spaces discussed. The article challenges Western forms of knowledge production as the dominant discourse in social work research, practice, education and training and links this to wider issues of power, privilege and suppression of marginalised voices.FindingsThe findings section reveals examples of racism, marginality, invisibility and hypervisibility as part of the lived experiences of Black female social workers in the study. It includes discussions of ‘collective strategic projection’ as a consequence of the development of the ‘race taboo’ often present in these work environments.ApplicationsThe article calls for social work educators, practitioners and the wider academic field to do more to centralise anti-racist approaches in an attempt to challenge racism in social work.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-04T07:48:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211008110
       
  • Paper trails: Using letter writing to understand social isolation and
           poverty in a rural community

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      Authors: Jennifer M Frank, Laura Brierton Granruth, Heather Girvin, Brittany Leffler
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryLetter writing was used as a qualitative research strategy to access the narratives of individuals living in rural poverty. Undergraduate social work students in a freshman seminar course were paired with participants of a local agency to engage in a letter writing exchange about life experiences. Community members who volunteered to participate in the letter-writing exchange were identified via their participation in services offered by a local, community-based agency that is situated in a rural community. In the fall of 2018, a sample of 20 community members and 28 students participated in two rounds of letter exchange.FindingsThe letter-writing exchange was an effective way to collect data. The content of the letters enhanced students’ understanding of the daily experiences of individuals living in rural poverty. Data collected demonstrated that social isolation remains a central concern among poor, rural residents. Letter writing supported a sense of personal connection between students and community members; these social connections may have attenuated the pain of social isolation that many community members experience.ApplicationsNarrative inquiry and the use of letter writing as a research methodology allowed us access to greater understanding about the lived experience of rural poverty. People living in rural poverty experience a layered isolation that keeps them separate from resources and each other. Letter writing provided connection and rich data that enhanced our understanding of this community.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-04-28T07:20:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211010399
       
  • Interprofessional dynamics that promote client empowerment in mental
           health practice: A social work perspective

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      Authors: Jialiang Cui, Christy E Newman, Kari Lancaster, Limin Mao
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryInterprofessional practice has been broadly endorsed as a strategy which supports the delivery of high-quality health services. Few studies have addressed the dynamics inherent to interprofessional mental health practice in an era in which client empowerment is prioritised and valued. Social work perspectives are also underexplored in the studies which have been published on interprofessional health care, despite the increasingly important role of this discipline in community mental health contexts. Through a thematic analysis of 26 semi-structured interviews, this study explored the perspectives of mental health social workers located in two geographically and culturally distinctive sites (Hong Kong and Sydney), and identified a strong theme encompassing their concerns about the facilitation of client empowerment in interprofessional settings.FindingsParticipant accounts direct attention to the strategies required to co-constitute the shared territories of the different mental health professions. Findings also highlight the frustration with recent mental health reforms which aim to challenge power differentials in interprofessional decision-making. Strategies were proposed for supporting the construction of shared language among different professions, revealing the creativity and insight of practitioners in managing the conflicts arising from interactions between different professional knowledge systems. The comparison of Hong Kong and Sydney accounts highlights the importance of structural, political and cultural influences in supporting not only interprofessional collaboration but also the independence and effectiveness of distinct professional roles.ApplicationThis article provides unique insights which aim to strengthen the contribution of social work to interprofessional practice in the promotion of empowerment-oriented interprofessional practice and education.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-04-28T07:20:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211009714
       
  • Service user violence against social workers in Italy: Prevalence and
           characteristics of the phenomenon

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      Authors: Alessandro Sicora, Urban Nothdurfter, Barbara Rosina, Mara Sanfelici
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryClient violence in social services is perceived as constantly increasing in Italy, raising deep concern. This article presents the results of the first online survey on the phenomenon. Involving 20,112 social workers, the aim was to determine the prevalence and forms of client violence towards social workers and to identify key factors associated with such events.FindingsThe results suggest that the vast majority of Italian social workers experience client violence during their careers. Verbal aggression and threats were most common forms of violence, followed by physical attacks and property damage. Young and less experienced social workers appeared more likely to be victims of violence, as well as those who more frequently work in isolation or without their colleagues’ support. Social workers in child protection services, services for adults and municipality services accessible to the entire population were found to be at higher risk of client violence. The social workers considered the quality of the client/professional relationship and communication skills to be critical in preventing and dealing with aggression by users. Unfulfilled clients’ expectation was considered to be one of the main factors contributing to frustration and the consequent hostile behaviour.ApplicationsViolence against social workers is a ‘wake-up call’ that makes the weakening of welfare services, and therefore of professional social work, more visible. The first nationwide study on service user violence reported by this paper may significantly contribute to raising awareness about the phenomenon in Italy and to the devising of effective prevention programmes.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-04-23T06:09:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211009188
       
  • Increasing adolescent girls’ social competence through cognitive
           counseling by social workers

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      Authors: Chau-kiu Cheung
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryDespite the common basis of cognitive theory for cognitive counseling and social competence development, no research has charted the effectiveness of the counseling in raising social competence in young female residents of the residential service. To examine the effectiveness, this study analyzed data gleaned from monthly surveys of young female residents and their social workers regarding the latter’s daily life cognitive counseling. The data consisted of 391 cases pairing the female residents and social workers in Hong Kong over 33 months.FindingsThe cases afforded a cross-lagged analysis showing the raising of the girl’s social competence by the worker’s cognitive counseling earlier in the previous month. In substantiating this raising, the analysis also indicated that earlier social competence did not affect the counseling.ApplicationsThe findings imply the worth of promoting the social worker’s daily life cognitive counseling to advance girl residents’ social competence. Such counseling is particularly helpful to girls with lower education, who are lower in social competence.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-04-23T06:09:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211010235
       
  • A review of pro-arrest, pro-charge, and pro-prosecution policies as a
           response to domestic violence

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      Authors: Cary Ryan, Dominic Silvio, Tara Borden, Nancy M Ross
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThe focus of this scoping review was to understand the overall state of research activity related to pro-arrest, pro-charge, and pro-prosecution policies in Canada. The review identified 295 articles, academic (47.5%) and gray literature (52.5%) published between 1983 and 2018 that reported on these policies as a response to domestic violence in Canada.FindingsThe findings acknowledged growing concerns over the ineffectiveness of these policies as a response to domestic violence. In fact, over half of the articles (57.6%) either failed to support these policies or recommended significant revisions; only a small number of articles (1.0%) favored these policies in their current form. Themes related to the effectiveness of these policies included criminalization and public awareness, survivor satisfaction, standardized police response, removal of burden from survivor to charge, and better than nothing. Themes related to the ineffectiveness included disconnect between policy and practice, revictimizes survivors, one-size fits all approach, have not adequately reduced domestic violence in Canada, lack of understanding training and education for all, failure to address structural and systemic factors, lack of trust in the criminal justice system, and success has been difficult to measure.ApplicationsThe deconstruction of these policies in this review points to the need for future research to address identified gaps in the literature and to explore alternatives that serve their intended emancipatory effect.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-01-21T07:36:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468017320979956
       
  • The social worker in community mental health teams: Findings from a
           national survey

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      Authors: Michele Abendstern, Mark Wilberforce, Jane Hughes, Andelijia Arandelovic, Saqba Batool, Jennifer Boland, Rosa Pitts, David Challis
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummarySocial workers have been members of community mental health teams (CMHTs) for many years. However, a combination of factors has resulted in their removal from CMHTs in some areas in recent years. This study presents findings from a 2018 national survey of CMHT team managers (44% response rate), to ascertain the current position of the social worker within CMHTs in England. Analyses focussed on membership, roles and tasks, and change within the previous 12 months. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the quantitative data and content analysis to interpret free text comments.FindingsSocial workers were found to undertake a variety of generic roles and tasks but were reported to do so proportionally less often than nurses. A large minority were involved in non-traditional social work tasks such as monitoring medication. In one-fifth of teams, managers thought they had too few social workers. Free text comments suggested that managers valued social workers for their social perspective and expressed concern regarding their removal or the curtailment of their role, perceiving this as having a negative effect on overall CMHT service delivery.ApplicationsThe findings provide evidence of some instability in the position of social workers within CMHTs in relation to both their membership and their involvement in traditional and non-traditional roles and tasks. Free text comments suggest that if a biopsychosocial model of mental health support, now recognised as essential to long-term wellbeing, is to be achieved, a social work presence in CMHTs is required.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-01-19T06:27:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468017320979932
       
  • Social work indigenization in Mainland China: Towards a state-led
           decolonizing framework

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      Authors: Shen (Lamson) Lin
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      SummaryThe tension between indigenizing versus internationalizing social work knowledge, resulting from local-specific sensitivity, has been a contemporary dispute in the Global South where there are diverse geo-historical backgrounds. This is the case in China, where the mainstream international narrative surrounding social work development has been configured by the normative values and knowledge of a Euromodern origin. Such misrepresentation rarely reflects indigenous voices from the local social work academy. Informed by Foucault’s thesis of power/knowledge, this article first compares the model of state social work in China and the world. Then, as a decolonizing project, a narrative review of 26 Chinese language articles was conducted.FindingsDistinctive service and policy practices in the Chinese traditional helping system were identified to illustrate how western social work was ethnocentrically repositioned in the “post-socialist” China. These initiatives include micro-level “Civil Affairs” services, meso-level “mass work” practice, and macro-level “Minsheng” State and crossregional Pairing Aid Programs, which are rooted in the cultural (Confucianism), economical (socialist market economy), and political (Marxism) ecosystem in China.ApplicationsThrough an indigenized epistemological stance, a state-led anti-colonial framework is presented to unveil the making of social work indigenization and social welfare development that de-centers Eurocentric hegemony. To reorient social work knowledge apart from persistent neo-colonialism in the form of academic imperialism, social work development should be tailored into a locally responsive and geopolitically appropriate models in the non-western world.
      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-01-08T05:42:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468017320981707
       
  • Book Review: Toward a livable life: A 21st century agenda for social work
           by Mark Robert Rank

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      Authors: Lin Jiang
      First page: 1611
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-08-04T01:22:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211032303
       
  • Book Review: Exploring social work: An anthropological perspective by
           Linda Bell

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      Authors: Wulf Livingston
      First page: 1612
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-08-04T01:20:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211032301
       
  • Book Review: How to thrive in professional practice: A self-care handbook
           by Stephen J. Mordue, Lisa Watson, and Steph Hunter

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      Authors: Stewart Collins
      First page: 1614
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-08-04T01:24:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211032746
       
  • Book review: Human growth and development in children and young people:
           Theoretical and practice perspectives by Jonathan Parker and Sara
           Ashencaen Crabtree

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      Authors: Maggie Jackson
      First page: 1615
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-20T10:47:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211032305
       
  • Book Review: Mothers accused and abused: Addressing complex psychological
           needs by Angela Foster

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      Authors: Yohai Hakak
      First page: 1617
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-08-04T01:23:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211032306
       
  • Book Review: Solved! How other countries have cracked the world's biggest
           problems and we can too by Andrew Wear

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      Authors: Allan Borowski
      First page: 1618
      Abstract: Journal of Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-08-04T01:22:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680173211032304
       
 
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