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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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Journal of Social Policy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.063
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 40  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0047-2794 - ISSN (Online) 1469-7823
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [353 journals]
  • JSP volume 51 issue 3 Cover and Front matter

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      Pages: 1 - 2
      PubDate: 2022-06-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422000551
       
  • JSP volume 51 issue 3 Cover and Back matter

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      Pages: 1 - 2
      PubDate: 2022-06-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S004727942200054X
       
  • The Journal of Social Policy Turns 50 – Time for Reflections and
           Looking to the Future

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      Authors: EICHHORN; JAN, HEINS, ELKE, WIGGAN, JAY
      Pages: 469 - 471
      PubDate: 2022-06-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422000459
       
  • Back to the future' What we can learn from the 2nd generation of
           Social Policy academics

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      Authors: HAUX; TINA
      Pages: 472 - 486
      Abstract: Topics such as climate change, diversity and inequality are likely to dominate the future of Social Policy. This is also a time of a generational change in Social Policy.In this paper I will address the questions of the future challenges for Social Policy by mapping the trajectories of the second generation of Social Policy Academics. There is much to learn from this generation such as the importance of epistemic communities, of mentoring and sustained engagement with policy-makers. However, the argument put forward in this paper is that Social Policy as it developed into an academic subject from the 1960s lost the connection to policy-makers due to expanding outside London; focusing on establishing social policy as an academic subject, academic careers and moving into comparative Social Policy. One effect of this is that an explicit focus on policy innovation and design has gone missing. Instead, this space in the policy landscape has been claimed by think tanks that continue to be highly successful in influencing government policy. A re-discovery of policy design as a key part of Social Policy together with the other lessons from this generation will be needed if we want to tackle the big challenges of tomorrow.
      PubDate: 2022-05-20
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422000344
       
  • The contested jurisdiction of Social Policy in UK universities since 1972

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      Authors: HUDSON; JOHN, LUNT, NEIL
      Pages: 487 - 503
      Abstract: Utilising Abbott’s work on professions and disciplines we trace the broad development of Social Policy in UK universities over the past 50 years. As with all subjects, Social Policy is enmeshed in continuous boundary protection, and at the same time may seek to extend jurisdiction by laying claim to areas and activities undertaken by others. We draw on a range of sources to inform our analysis including: overviews of contributions to Journal of Social Policy; reviews of selected available UK Social Policy Association documents such as newsletters; reviews of research quality (Research Assessment Exercise/Research Excellence Framework) submissions; and student numbers data. In conclusion we consider whether reassessment of some of the jurisdictional battles of the past 50 years might provide routes forward for the subject to flourish in the current environment.
      PubDate: 2022-04-13
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422000320
       
  • Building the Future from the Present: Imagining Post-Growth,
           Post-Productivist Ecosocial Policy

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      Authors: DUKELOW; FIONA, MURPHY, MARY P.
      Pages: 504 - 518
      Abstract: The environment remains on the margins of social policy. Bringing degrowth literature into conversation with social policy debates about decommodification, we argue that a re-imagined decommodification remains central to addressing the social-ecological challenges we face and to forging a post-growth, post-productivist ecosocial welfare state. We explore the implications of this for re-imagining and mapping three core areas of an ecosocial welfare state revolving around the work/welfare/care nexus: the redistribution of time across work and care; repurposing of active labour market measures; and reorienting cash transfers and services. In each case we discuss what decommodified social policy in the service of a post-growth, post-productivist future might entail. Acknowledging challenges, we identify how instances of prefiguration of policy programmes and experiments across various countries offer concrete compass points for further transformation and a necessary paradigmatic shift.
      PubDate: 2022-03-30
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422000150
       
  • Can Robots Understand Welfare' Exploring Machine Bureaucracies in
           Welfare-to-Work

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      Authors: CONSIDINE; MARK, MCGANN, MICHAEL, BALL, SARAH, NGUYEN, PHUC
      Pages: 519 - 534
      Abstract: The exercise of administrative discretion by street-level workers plays a key role in shaping citizens’ access to welfare and employment services. Governance reforms of social services delivery, such as performance-based contracting, have often been driven by attempts to discipline this discretion. In several countries, these forms of market governance are now being eclipsed by new modes of digital governance that seek to reshape the delivery of services using algorithms and machine learning. Australia, a pioneer of marketisation, is one example, proposing to deploy digitalisation to fully automate most of its employment services rather than as a supplement to face-to-face case management. We examine the potential and limits of this project to replace human-to-human with ‘machine bureaucracies’. To what extent are welfare and employment services amenable to digitalisation' What trade-offs are involved' In addressing these questions, we consider the purported benefits of machine bureaucracies in achieving higher levels of efficiency, accountability, and consistency in policy delivery. While recognising the potential benefits of machine bureaucracies for both governments and jobseekers, we argue that trade-offs will be faced between enhancing the efficiency and consistency of services and ensuring that services remain accessible and responsive to highly personalised circumstances.
      PubDate: 2022-03-16
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422000174
       
  • Digital Social Policy: Past, Present, Future

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      Authors: HENMAN; PAUL W. FAY
      Pages: 535 - 550
      Abstract: We undoubtably live in a digitally infused world. From government administrative processes to financial transactions and social media posts, digital technologies automatically collect, collate, combine and circulate digital traces of our actions and thoughts, which are in turn used to construct digital personas of us. More significantly, government decisions are increasingly automated with real world effect; companies subvert human workers to automated processes; while social media algorithms prioritise outrage and ‘fake news’ with destabilizing and devastating effects for public trust in social institutions. Accordingly, what it means to be a person, a citizen, and a consumer, and what constitutes society and the economy in the 21st century is profoundly different to that in the 20th century.
      PubDate: 2022-03-17
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422000162
       
  • A Social Policy Case for a Four-Day Week

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      Authors: CHUNG; HEEJUNG
      Pages: 551 - 566
      Abstract: There has been an explosion of interest in the “four-day-week” movement across the globe, especially due to its potential in addressing many of the societal challenges left by the COVID-19 pandemic. Four-day-week is a movement set to shorten the working hours of full-time workers without a reduction in pay. I aim to set out the case for a national move towards a four-day-week explaining why social policy scholars should lead the debate. First, I provide evidence of the societal costs that the current long-hours work culture has on workers’ and their family’s well-being and welfare, social inequality, and social cohesion. Shorter working can help tackle these issues by giving workers right to time, shifting the balance between work and non-work activities in our lives and valuing them both. Social policy scholars need to lead this debate owing to our existing knowledge and expertise in dealing with these social issues and state-level interventions. In addition, without pressing for fundamental changes in our labour market, we cannot adequately address some of the key challenges we face as a society. The paper ends with key research questions social policy scholars should address as a part of this move.
      PubDate: 2022-03-28
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422000186
       
  • Social Movements and Social Policy: New Research Horizons

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      Authors: ISHKANIAN; ARMINE
      Pages: 582 - 595
      Abstract: Across the globe, movements are confronting states and elites, challenging inequalities and mobilising for greater justice, a stronger voice, and progressive policy changes. In this article, I bridge the divide between Social Policy and the interdisciplinary field of Social Movement Studies. I examine how and why social movements, as actors in policy fields and social movement theories, matter for social policy. I argue that research on social movements as actors and engagement with social movement theories can open new horizons in Social Policy research by advancing our understanding of the politics of policy from a global perspective and strengthening our analytical and explanatory frameworks of agency, ideas, and power in the study of continuity and change of policy.
      PubDate: 2022-01-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279421001008
       
  • Social Policy and Queer Lives: Coming Out of the Closet'

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      Authors: GREGORY; LEE, MATTHEWS, PETER
      Pages: 596 - 610
      Abstract: Social Policy as an academic discipline has been at the forefront of many progressive movements in society, exploring problems of poverty, hardship, exclusion and suffering, government intervention, and the critical appraisal of those interventions. Yet it has been strangely silent on issues of sexual identity and gender identity and the inequities faced by the LGBTQ+ community. In this article we draw upon lesbian and gay studies, and queer studies, to, first, unpack how heteronormativity is reinforced in social policy in practice and in its analysis within Social Policy as a discipline. This illustrates how the family, as a core basis for welfare in societies, has meant that, reflexively, the base unit of analysis within Social Policy has been the heterosexual family, without a full interrogation of what this means for different groups. Second, we review the limited evidence available around the inequalities LGBTQ+ people face, primarily in the UK (and wider global North), highlighting how the years of oppression have made “counting” this group of people difficult within our usual survey instruments. Thus, while Social Policy has aimed to achieve a universal social citizenship for all, it has inadvertently remained silent on how to include LGBTQ+ in its analysis.
      PubDate: 2022-03-28
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422000198
       
  • The Impacts of Benefit Sanctions: A Scoping Review of the Quantitative
           Research Evidence

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      Authors: PATTARO; SERENA, BAILEY, NICK, WILLIAMS, EVAN, GIBSON, MARCIA, WELLS, VALERIE, TRANMER, MARK, DIBBEN, CHRIS
      Pages: 611 - 653
      Abstract: In recent decades, the use of conditionality backed by benefit sanctions for those claiming unemployment and related benefits has become widespread in the social security systems of high-income countries. Critics argue that sanctions may be ineffective in bringing people back to employment or indeed harmful in a range of ways. Existing reviews largely assess the labour market impacts of sanctions but our understanding of the wider impacts is more limited. We report results from a scoping review of the international quantitative research evidence on both labour market and wider impacts of benefit sanctions. Following systematic search and screening, we extract data for 94 studies reporting on 253 outcome measures. We provide a narrative summary, paying attention to the ability of the studies to support causal inference. Despite variation in the evidence base and study designs, we found that labour market studies, covering two thirds of our sample, consistently reported positive impacts for employment but negative impacts for job quality and stability in the longer term, along with increased transitions to non-employment or economic inactivity. Although largely relying on non-experimental designs, wider-outcome studies reported significant associations with increased material hardship and health problems. There was also some evidence that sanctions were associated with increased child maltreatment and poorer child well-being. Lastly, the review highlights the generally poor quality of the evidence base in this area, with few studies employing research methods designed to identify the causal impact of sanctions, especially in relation to wider impacts.
      PubDate: 2022-02-14
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279421001069
       
  • Karen Nielsen Breidahl, Troels Fage Hedegaard, Kristian Kongshøj and
           Christian Albrekt Larsen (2021), Immigrants’ Attitudes and the Welfare
           State: The Danish Melting Pot, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, £75.00, pp. 208,
           hbk.

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      Authors: KONING; EDWARD ANTHONY
      Pages: 654 - 656
      PubDate: 2022-06-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422000368
       
  • Lisa Dellmuth (2021), Is Europe Good For You' EU Spending and
           Well-Being, Bristol University Press, £47.99, pp. 202, hbk.

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      Authors: MORPHET; JANICE
      Pages: 656 - 658
      PubDate: 2022-06-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S004727942200037X
       
  • Will Bartlett , Vassilis Monastiriotis and Panagiotis Koutrumpis (eds)
           (2020), Social Exclusion and Labour Market Challenges in the Western
           Balkans, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, £64.99, pp. 309, hbk.

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      Authors: BOJICIC-DZELILOVIC; VESNA
      Pages: 658 - 660
      PubDate: 2022-06-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422000381
       
  • Dennie Oude Nijhuis (ed) (2021), Business Interests and the Development of
           the Modern Welfare State, Abingdon & New York: Routledge, £36.99, pp.
           376, pbk.

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      Authors: DORLACH; TIM
      Pages: 660 - 661
      PubDate: 2022-06-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422000393
       
  • Malcolm Torry (2021) Basic Income: A History, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar,
           £100.00, pp. 336, hbk.

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      Authors: THANE; PAT
      Pages: 662 - 667
      PubDate: 2022-06-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S004727942200040X
       
  • Moving Social Policy from Mental Illness to Public Wellbeing

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      Authors: FISHER; MATTHEW
      Pages: 567 - 581
      Abstract: In the face of global epidemics of mental ill-health, the future of social policy lies with promotion of public wellbeing. This article aims to provide an explanatory rationale and methods for a fundamental shift in social policy; away from a remedial focus on mental ill-health defined in terms of disease or aberrant behaviour and toward a focus on universal access to social conditions favourable to psychological wellbeing. The paper begins with prefacing argument about the urgent need for such a shift, noting the high rates of mental ill-health globally and the failure of current biomedical responses to reduce these. Building on recent theoretical work on public wellbeing and evidence on social determinants of mental health, the paper then proposes nine domains for social policy and broader public policy action, to create conditions supportive of wellbeing abilities. Finally, the paper presents several conceptual issues relating to the challenge of putting such action into practice and concludes that contemporary understanding of wellbeing offers a theory of change to shift social policy from mental illness to public wellbeing.
      PubDate: 2021-12-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279421000866
       
 
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