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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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Journal of Social Policy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.063
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 42  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0047-2794 - ISSN (Online) 1469-7823
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [352 journals]
  • Tobias Schulze-Cleven and Sidney A. Rothstein (eds) (2021) Imbalance:
           Germany’s Political Economy after the Social Democratic Century, New
           York: Routledge, £120.00, pp. 274, hbk.

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      Authors: GRAGES; CHRISTOPHER
      Pages: 1 - 4
      PubDate: 2023-01-23
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422000812
       
  • JSP volume 52 issue 1 Cover and Front matter

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      Pages: 1 - 2
      PubDate: 2023-01-23
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422001039
       
  • JSP volume 52 issue 1 Cover and Back matter

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      Pages: 1 - 3
      PubDate: 2023-01-23
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422001040
       
  • Social Policy in a Climate Emergency Context: Towards an Ecosocial
           Research Agenda

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      Authors: Hirvilammi; Tuuli, Häikiö, Liisa, Johansson, Håkan, Koch, Max, Perkiö, Johanna
      Pages: 1 - 23
      Abstract: Social policy developed as a research field and academic discipline to ensure protection from social risks in the era of emerging capitalism and industrialization. While welfare states have successfully increased their citizens’ wellbeing, they have also contributed to the ecological crisis, while the shared scientific understanding of exceeded planetary boundaries and worsening climate change scenarios has not (yet) reshaped mainstream social policy research. In this article, we suggest that the established traditions in social policy research can nevertheless provide a solid ground for responding to the climate emergency and facilitating the sustainable transformation of society and the economy. With a focus on four of the research fields that are central in social policy scholarship – risks, citizenship, welfare regimes, and wellbeing – we develop an ecosocial research agenda. By discussing the classic and climate-adjusted understandings of these fields, we open future pathways for social policy research and invite scholars to engage with our proposed research agenda.
      PubDate: 2023-01-12
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422000721
       
  • Ute Klammer, Simone Leiber and Sigrid Leitner (eds) (2020), Social Work
           and the Making of Social Policy, Bristol: Policy Press, £26.99, pp. 256,
           pbk.

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      Authors: PRATIWI; AYU
      Pages: 4 - 6
      PubDate: 2023-01-23
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422000824
       
  • Paul Spicker (2022), How to Fix the Welfare State: Some Ideas for Better
           Social Services, Bristol: Policy Press, £27.99, pp. 168, pbk.

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      Authors: GLENNERSTER; HOWARD
      Pages: 6 - 7
      PubDate: 2023-01-23
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422000836
       
  • The Lived Experience of Financialization at the UK Financial Fringe

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      Authors: APPLEYARD; LINDSEY, PACKMAN, CARL, LAZELL, JORDON, ASLAM, HUSSAN
      Pages: 24 - 45
      Abstract: The financialization of everyday life has received considerable attention since the 2008 global financial crisis. Financialization is thought to have created active financial subjects through the ability to participate in mainstream financial services. While the lived experience of these mainstream financial subjects has been the subject of close scrutiny, the experiences of financial subjects at the financial fringe have been rarely considered. In the UK, for example, the introduction of High-Cost, Short-Term Credit [HCSTC] or payday loan regulation was designed to protect vulnerable people from accessing unaffordable credit. Exploring the impact of HCSTC regulation is important due to the dramatic decline of the high-cost credit market which helped meet essential needs in an era of austerity. As such, the paper examines the impact of the HCSTC regulation on sixty-four financially marginalized individuals in the UK that are unable to access payday loans. First, we identify the range of socioeconomic strategies that individuals employ to manage their finances to create a typology of financial subjectivity at the financial fringe. Second, we demonstrate how the temporal and precarious nature of financial inclusion at the financial fringe adds nuance to existing debates of the everyday lived experience of financialization.
      PubDate: 2021-04-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S004727942100026X
       
  • Working Less, Not More in a Workfare Programme: Group Solidarity, Informal
           Norms and Alternative Value Systems Amongst Activated Participants

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      Authors: HANSEN; LASSE SCHMIDT, NIELSEN, MATHIAS HERUP
      Pages: 46 - 62
      Abstract: This article uses extensive ethnographic methods to explore the lived reality of a Danish workfare programme. The programme requires social assistance recipients to perform manual labour for their benefits at municipal work sites. The contrast between the political rhetoric that justifies the workfare programme and the lived reality of it is striking. While the programme is justified as a means to put the passive unemployed to work, there is a norm of working less, not more at the site. The participants spend most of their time waiting or conducting seemingly meaningless work assignments. However, over time, the majority of the participants begin to embrace this modus operandi at the site. This article answers this apparent paradox by turning to concepts from the anthropology of industrial work. Such concepts allow us to analyse how camaraderie exists amongst participants as well as work supervisors at the site. Particularly, the camaraderie is based on group solidarity, an informal regulation of work efficiency and an alternative system of value. Hereby, the article adds to previous findings on the ‘lived experiences’ of welfare recipients.
      PubDate: 2021-04-05
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279421000301
       
  • The Taxation of Families: How Gendered (De)Familialization Tax Policies
           Modify Horizontal Income Inequality

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      Authors: SCHECHTL; MANUEL
      Pages: 63 - 84
      Abstract: A welfare state’s tax system does not solely redistribute from rich to poor (vertical) but also between family types (horizontal). Different types of families are treated differently due to gendered (de)familialization policies in the tax code, such as joint filing for spouses or single-parent relief. In this study I aim to examine the tax system’s modification of horizontal income inequality between the six most prevalent family types of non-retiree households. To answer my research aim I draw on harmonized data from 30 countries provided by the Luxembourg Income Study (LIS). I estimate pre- and post-fiscal income inequality measured as between-family-type Theil indices. Using multivariate linear regression, I examine the association of the percentage change in inequality and the prevalence of family type-related tax characteristics. The results show that welfare states with familialization tax policies reduce less horizontal income inequality compared to welfare states without familialization tax policies. As familialization tax policies provide additional benefits for breadwinners with dependents, they discourage labour market participation of secondary earners and might exacerbate gender inequalities.
      PubDate: 2021-05-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279421000404
       
  • Subsidized Household Services and Informal Employment: The Belgian Service
           Voucher Policy

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      Authors: ADRIAENSSENS; STEF, THEYS, TOBIAS, VERHAEST, DIETER, DESCHACHT, NICK
      Pages: 85 - 106
      Abstract: Labour markets for personal and household services (PHS) are rife with informal employment. Some policies aim to combat informality in PHS with subsidized service vouchers, but their effects are poorly documented. This contribution evaluates the Belgian service vouchers (1) documenting their formalization effectiveness, and (2) accounting for the persistence of informal employment. To this end, we exploit several types of data and methods.A first analysis, based on Eurobarometer data, brings in evidence that informal PHS purchased were approximately halved under the policy introduced in 2001. Second, a discrete choice experiment shows that households prefer formal employment, including those that currently employ informally. Third, a survey in the Brussels metropolitan area shows that the persistence of informal employment lies in the relationship of informal employers with their domestic, from whom they are not willing to part. They nevertheless intend to switch to formal employment in the case of turnover. One thus expects partially delayed effects of formalization policies in general, and of the service voucher system in particular. Overall, these results are in line with Portes’ claim that informality is facilitated by strong social relationships, and by differences in price and transaction costs.
      PubDate: 2021-06-28
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279421000428
       
  • Next to Nothing: The Impact of the Norwegian Introduction Programme on
           Female Immigrants’ Labour Market Inclusion

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      Authors: UGRENINOV; ELISABETH, TURNER, LENA MAGNUSSON
      Pages: 107 - 128
      Abstract: In 2003, Norway implemented an ‘Introduction Programme’ that aimed to increase labour market inclusion among newly arrived immigrants. Its main objectives were to facilitate free courses in Norwegian language training and social studies, and education or on-the-job training. The participants were given an allowance to attend the programme. This paper uses administrative register data to evaluate the effect of the Norwegian introduction programme on female immigrants’ employment and earnings prospects. The sample consists of female immigrants from Asia or Africa who immigrated to Norway 18 months before or after the implementation of the introduction programme. The study measures their probability of being employed and their mean earnings 4–6 and 7–9 years after immigration. The results show that the Norwegian introduction programme had a small but significant effect on women’s employment, but not on their earnings. This article suggests that the small effect of the programme on employment and non-effect on earnings may imply a displacement effect rather than an improvement in language skills and labour market skills.
      PubDate: 2021-06-30
      DOI: 10.1017/S004727942100043X
       
  • The effects of an old-age allowance programme on intergenerational
           interactions in Taiwan: Heterogeneous effects by adult children’s
           motives for giving

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      Authors: PENG; CHENHONG, WANG, JULIA SHU-HUAH, ZHU, YIWEN, ZENG, YUE
      Pages: 129 - 156
      Abstract: This study examines the effects of an old-age allowance programme in Taiwan, the Senior Citizens Welfare Living Allowance (SCWLA), on intergenerational financial transfers, living arrangements and contact, as well as the heterogeneity of its effects by adult children’s five types of motives for giving: altruism, exchange, reciprocity, affection, and sense of responsibility. Using 2002, 2004, 2005 and 2006 data from the Panel Study of Family Dynamics, we employed a difference-in-difference individual fixed effect model to compare the outcomes across the treatment (aged 65 and older) and comparison groups (aged 55 to 64) before and after the introduction of SCWLA. Our results indicate that SCWLA crowds in intergenerational contact but does not significantly change financial transfers and co-residence patterns. The increase in intergenerational contact is primarily driven by adult children having lower motives for giving. This suggests that old-age allowances may reduce financial entanglement between adult children and older parents and change the social norm by raising “low motivators’” awareness, respect and concern for elderly. Providing public transfer to the elderly should not be hampered by the fear of distorting family support functions.
      PubDate: 2021-06-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279421000453
       
  • Voluntary Action, Territory and Timing: The Council of Social Service for
           Wales, Periodisation and the New Historiography of the ‘British Welfare
           State’

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      Authors: WINCOTT; DANIEL, CHANEY, PAUL, SOPHOCLEOUS, CHRISTALA
      Pages: 157 - 175
      Abstract: This article analyses the development of the Council of Social Service for Wales during what is often called the Golden Age of the Welfare State. Recovering the neglected history of the peak organisation for voluntary social service in Wales adds to our understanding of the histories of social policy and postwar Wales. The article addresses social policy from a doubly peripheral perspective – it attends to a territorial periphery of the UK State while voluntary action can be left at the margins of Welfare State analysis. From this perspective we hope to cast new light on the historiography of the ‘British Welfare State’
      PubDate: 2021-07-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279421000489
       
  • The role of social enterprises in facilitating labour market integration
           for people with disabilities: A convenient deflection from policy
           mainstreaming'

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      Authors: CHUI; CHERYL HIU-KWAN, CHAN, CHEE HON, CHANDRA, YANTO
      Pages: 176 - 196
      Abstract: Policymakers have increasingly embraced social enterprises as a vehicle to create job opportunities for the disadvantaged. However, there is limited research on social enterprises in the context of disability in relation to labour market integration. Drawing on the perspectives of representatives of work integration social enterprises and people with disabilities employed in these enterprises (n=21), this study examines whether and how work integration social enterprises promote inclusion for people with disabilities, and also explores the role of WISEs in enabling people with disabilities to transition into open employment. Thematic analysis revealed three key emergent themes: Cocooned inclusion but not transition; Reinforced normative demarcation; and WISEs as a deflection from institutionalizing proactive disability policy measures. This article argues that, although WISEs were able to provide job opportunities for people with disabilities, their purported function in enabling disabled people to transition into open employment remains constrained by factors beyond their control including prevailing norms and the absence of proactive disability employment measures. This article cautions against the over-romanticisation of WISEs as the primary means to ensure the rights of people with disabilities to participate in the labour market. Implications on disability employment policies in relation to social enterprises are discussed.
      PubDate: 2021-07-27
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279421000490
       
  • ‘Rising demand and decreasing resources’: Theorising the ‘cost of
           austerity’ as a barrier to social worker discretion

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      Authors: MURPHY; CIARÁN
      Pages: 197 - 214
      Abstract: The Munro Review of Child Protection asserted that the English child protection system had become overly ‘defensive’, ‘bureaucratised’ and ‘standardised’, meaning that social workers were not employing their discretion in the interests of the individual child. This paper reports on the results of an ethnographic case study of one of England’s statutory child protection teams. The research sought to explore the extent of social worker discretion relative to Munro’s call for ‘radical reform’ and a move towards a more ‘child-centred’ system. Employing an iterative mixed methods design – encompassing documentary analysis, observation, focus group, questionnaire, interview and ‘Critical Realist Grounded Theory’ – the study positioned the UK Government’s prolonged policy of ‘austerity’ as a barrier to social worker discretion. This was because the policy was seen to be contributing to an increased demand for child protection services; and a related sense amongst practitioners that they were afforded insufficient time with the child to garner the requisite knowledge, necessary for discretionary behaviour. Ultimately, despite evidence of progress relative to assertions that social worker discretion had been eroded, the paper concludes that there may still be ‘more to do’ if we are to achieve the ‘child-centred’ and ‘effective’ system that Munro advocated.
      PubDate: 2021-06-30
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279421000507
       
 
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