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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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Journal of Social Policy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.063
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 41  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0047-2794 - ISSN (Online) 1469-7823
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [353 journals]
  • JSP volume 51 issue 2 Cover and Front matter

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      Pages: 1 - 2
      PubDate: 2022-03-21
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422000307
       
  • JSP volume 51 issue 2 Cover and Back matter

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      Pages: 1 - 2
      PubDate: 2022-03-21
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422000319
       
  • Stijn Oosterlynck , Andreas Novy and Yuri Kazepov (eds) (2019) Local
           Social Innovation to Combat Poverty and Exclusion: A Critical Appraisal,
           Bristol: Policy Press, £75.00, pp. 276, hbk.

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      Authors: BAINES; SUE
      Pages: 460 - 462
      PubDate: 2022-03-07
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422000071
       
  • Sheila Shaver (ed) (2020) Handbook on Gender and Social Policy,
           Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, £42.00, pp. 480, pbk.

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      Authors: GAWEDA; BARBARA
      Pages: 462 - 463
      PubDate: 2022-03-07
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422000083
       
  • Christopher Ellis and Christopher Faricy (2021) The Other Side of the
           Coin: Public Opinion Toward Social Tax Expenditures, New York: Russell
           Sage Foundation, $29.95, pp. 170, pbk.

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      Authors: HOWARD; CHRISTOPHER
      Pages: 463 - 465
      PubDate: 2022-03-03
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422000095
       
  • Keith Kintrea and Rebecca Madgin (2019) Transforming Glasgow: Beyond the
           Post-Industrial City, Bristol: Policy Press, £75.00, pp. 322, hbk.

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      Authors: ROGERSON; ROBERT J
      Pages: 465 - 466
      PubDate: 2022-03-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422000101
       
  • Anja Eleveld , Thomas Kampen and Josien Arts (eds) (2020) Welfare to Work
           in Contemporary European Welfare States: Legal, Sociological and
           Philosophical Perspectives on Justice and Domination, Bristol: Policy
           Press, pp. 364, £80.00, hbk.

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      Authors: GROVER; CHRIS
      Pages: 466 - 468
      PubDate: 2022-03-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279422000113
       
  • Does Student Loan Debt Structure Young People’s Housing Tenure'
           Evidence from England

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      Authors: DE GAYARDON; ARIANE, CALLENDER, CLAIRE, DESJARDINS, STEPHEN L.
      Pages: 221 - 241
      Abstract: This article analyses the interaction between two policy areas affecting young people in England – housing and student funding. It is the first of its kind exploring a range of dynamics in the relationship between housing and student loan debt. Young people today are far less likely to own their home and are more likely to live with their parents than earlier generations. In parallel, higher education tuition fee increases have led to a growing share of students taking out loans and graduating with higher debt, which they will be repaying for most of their working lives. This research examines the relationship between student loans – having borrowed for higher education and attitudes towards debt – and housing tenure at age 25, using the Next Steps dataset. We find that young graduates who did not borrow for higher education are more likely to own their home and less likely to rent or live with their parents than graduates who borrowed for their studies or young people who never attended higher education. These results suggest that higher education funding policies and student loan debt play important roles in structuring young people’s housing in England.
      PubDate: 2021-01-26
      DOI: 10.1017/S004727942000077X
       
  • The Relevance of Job-Related Concessions for Unemployment Duration Among
           Recipients of Means-Tested Benefits in Germany

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      Authors: CHRISTOPH; BERNHARD, LIETZMANN, TORSTEN
      Pages: 242 - 267
      Abstract: Unemployment strongly influences a person’s economic resources and life chances. Especially for unemployed individuals who have to rely on means-tested benefits, episodes of unemployment often go along with substantial material restrictions. Therefore, from a policy perspective, measures or regulations that might shorten unemployment episodes and reduce overall unemployment are particularly important.In this paper, we analyse whether concessions regarding the characteristics of the job searched for influence an individual’s unemployment duration. In doing so, we focus on a particular aspect of availability requirements in Germany. This is the fact that for unemployed recipients of means-tested benefits almost all types of jobs count as suitable employment and, therefore, recipients are obliged to make job-related concessions if offered a job requiring such concessions.The results indicate that there is no positive effect of making concessions regarding qualification requirements or status on employment chances. In contrast, there are positive effects of wage concessions. However, searching for a job in a different occupation (that does not necessarily imply a concession) has a comparable, positive effect on finding employment. Thus, it appears that being generally flexible regarding one’s future occupation might be at least as important for employment chances as making concessions.
      PubDate: 2021-03-11
      DOI: 10.1017/S004727942100009X
       
  • Governing Researchers through Public Involvement

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      Authors: KOMPOROZOS-ATHANASIOU; ARIS, PAYLOR, JONATHAN, MCKEVITT, CHRISTOPHER
      Pages: 268 - 283
      Abstract: This paper focuses on recent developments in UK health research policy, which place new pressures on researchers to address issues of accountability and impact through the implementation of patient and public involvement (PPI). We draw on an in-depth interview study with 20 professional researchers, and we analyse their experiences of competing for research funding, focusing on PPI as a process of professional research governance. We unearth dominant professional narratives of scepticism and alternative identifications in their enactment of PPI policy. We argue that such narratives and identifications evidence a resistance to ways in which patient involvement has been institutionalised and to the resulting subject-positions researchers are summoned to take up. We show that the new subjectivities emerging in this landscape of research governance as increasingly disempowered, contradictory and fraught with unresolved tensions over the ethical dimensions of the researchers’ own professional identities.
      PubDate: 2021-04-16
      DOI: 10.1017/S004727942100012X
       
  • Market-Oriented Policies on Care for Older People in Urban China:
           Examining the Experiment-Based Policy Implementation Process

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      Authors: ZHANG; WENJING
      Pages: 284 - 302
      Abstract: The rapidly ageing population and increasing care needs provide the rationale for care systems progressively shaped by a growing market in a global context. In China the approach to policy making, which has been largely experimental, has involved market-oriented reforms since the 1980s. While marketisation processes have been well studied in various European care systems, very little is known about their implementation in the Chinese context. Based on qualitative interviews with local government officials and care providers in Shanghai, this article discusses the Chinese policy process in the field of care for older people and the barriers to effective implementation. It investigates the experiment-based marketisation policy process, the power hierarchy and the lines of accountability of the state in the care field. Multi-layered barriers are identified in the market-oriented policy process. These include (1) inherent bureaucratic obstacles at practice level: reluctance to exercise discretionary power, administrative inefficiency, incoherence of care schemes and poor inter-department communication; and (2) complexities and failures at policy-making level: the infeasibility of policies, underestimation of operational capacity and inadequate involvement of practice knowledge. These findings have implications for balancing the efficiency, effectiveness and sustainability of care policies in an era of public service austerity.
      PubDate: 2021-03-19
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279421000131
       
  • European Youth Work Policy and Young People’s Experience of Open
           Access Youth Work

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      Authors: ORD; JON, CARLETTI, MARC, MORCIANO, DANIELE, SIURALA, LASSE, DANSAC, CHRISTOPHE, COOPER, SUE, FYFE, IAN, KÖTSI, KAUR, SINISALO-JUHA, EEVA, TARU, MARTI, ZENTNER, MANFRED
      Pages: 303 - 323
      Abstract: This article examines young people’s experiences of open access youth work in settings in the UK, Finland, Estonia, Italy and France. It analyses 844 individual narratives from young people, which communicate the impact of youthwork on their lives. These accounts are then analysed in the light of the European youth work policy goals. It concludes that it is encouraging that what young people identify as the positive impact of youth work are broadly consistent with many of these goals. There are however some disparities which require attention. These include the importance young people place on the social context of youth work, such as friendship, which is largely absent in EU youth work policy; as well as the importance placed on experiential learning. The paper also highlights a tension between ‘top down’ policy formulation and the ‘youth centric’ practices of youth work. It concludes with a reminder to policy makers that for youth work to remain successful the spaces and places for young people must remain meaningful to them ‘on their terms’.
      PubDate: 2021-03-15
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279421000143
       
  • European Youth Work Policy and Young People’s Experience of Open Access
           Youth Work – CORRIGENDUM

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      Authors: ORD; JON, CARLETTI, MARC, MORCIANO, DANIELE, SIURALA, LASSE, DANSAC, CHRISTOPHE, COOPER, SUE, FYFE, IAN, KÖTSI, KAUR, SINISALO-JUHA, EEVA, TARU, MARTI, ZENTNER, MANFRED
      Pages: 324 - 324
      PubDate: 2021-12-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279421000611
       
  • An analysis of the Dutch-style pension plans proposed by UK policy-makers

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      Authors: OWADALLY; IQBAL, RAM, RAHIL, REGIS, LUCA
      Pages: 325 - 345
      Abstract: Collective Defined Contribution (CDC) pension schemes are a variant of collective pension plans that are present in many countries and especially common in the Netherlands. CDC schemes are based on the pooled management of the retirement savings of all members, thereby incorporating inter-generational risk-sharing features. Employers are not subject to investment and longevity risks as these are transferred to plan members collectively. In this paper, we discuss policy related to the proposed introduction of CDC schemes to the UK. By means of a simulation-based study, we compare the performance of CDC schemes vis-à-vis typical Defined Contribution schemes under different investment strategies. We find that CDC schemes may provide retirees with a higher income replacement rate on average, together with less uncertainty.
      PubDate: 2021-04-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279421000155
       
  • The role of social innovation policy in social service sector reform:
           Evidence from Hong Kong

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      Authors: CHAN; CHEE HON, CHUI, CHERYL HIU-KWAN, CHANDRA, YANTO
      Pages: 346 - 364
      Abstract: This article illustrates how the term “social innovation” is used in the public policy domain in Hong Kong in relation to the new public management (NPM) reform of the social service sector, which originated in the early 2000s. Through document reviews and interviews, the role that social innovation policy has played in instigating changes in the contemporary social service field in the post-NPM era is identified. This includes facilitating emergence of “new” forms of social entrepreneurial activities to fill unmet social needs, empowering new actors in entering the social service sector, and reinforcing the government’s position in the NPM reform. Adopting historical institutionalism as the analytical framework, multiple path-dependent characteristics arising from the historical legacies of the incumbent social service environment – such as the longstanding partnership between the state and non-profits – are highlighted. These historical factors have weakened the efficacy of the policy efforts aimed at enacting institutional change. Overall, this article demonstrates how historical context matters in the emergence and framing of social innovation policy. It contributes to the theorisation of the role of social innovation in social service sector development in East Asia.
      PubDate: 2021-03-29
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279421000167
       
  • Short-Term Health Policy Responses to Crisis and Uncertainty

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      Authors: HORNUNG; JOHANNA, BANDELOW, NILS C.
      Pages: 365 - 384
      Abstract: The onset of the economic crisis more than a decade ago posed extreme challenges to health care systems that may now be repeated with the COVID-19 pandemic. The resulting policies produced a wide range of (in some cases, even opposite) outcomes: increased or decreased public expenditures for health care. Curiously, however, countries that were considered particularly hard hit by the economic crisis showed different extremes of policy outcomes. Investigating these developments requires a dynamic view and identifying explanations for government action in one direction or the other. Using the lenses of several theoretical perspectives in public policy research, this article analyses the conditions under which public health expenditures changed in European Union member states after the financial crisis. Why did certain countries, at first sight similarly affected, show opposite outcomes' A Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) confirms that left-wing governments and coordinated market economies, in combination and alone, tended to increase public health expenditures in the short term, whereas countries where neither of these conditions was present decreased public health expenditures.
      PubDate: 2021-03-15
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279421000179
       
  • Plumbing the Depths: The Changing (Socio-Demographic) Profile of UK
           Poverty

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      Authors: EDMISTON; DANIEL
      Pages: 385 - 411
      Abstract: Official statistics tend to rely on a headcount approach to poverty measurement, distinguishing ‘the poor’ from the ‘non-poor’ on the basis of an anchored threshold. Invariably, this does little to engage with the gradations of material hardship affecting those living, to varying degrees, below the poverty line. In response, this paper interrogates an apparent flatlining in UK poverty to establish the changing profile of poverty, as well as those most affected by it. Drawing on the Family Resources survey, this paper reveals an increasing depth of poverty in the UK since 2010, with bifurcation observable in the living standards of different percentile groups below the poverty line. In addition, this paper demonstrates substantial compositional changes in the socio-demographic profile of (deep) poverty. Since 2010, the likelihood of falling into deep poverty has increased for women, children, larger families, Black people and those in full-time work. Within the context of COVID-19, I argue there is a need to re-think how we currently conceptualise poverty by better attending to internal heterogeneity within the broader analytical and methodological category of ‘the poor’. Doing so raises pressing questions about the prevailing modes of poverty measurement that tend to frame and delimit the social scientific analysis of poverty, as well as the policies deemed appropriate in tackling it.
      PubDate: 2021-04-14
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279421000180
       
  • First step and last resort: One-Euro-Jobs after the reform

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      Authors: HARRER; TAMARA, STOCKINGER, BASTIAN
      Pages: 412 - 434
      Abstract: Job creation programmes aim at increasing the employability of hard-to-place unemployed, and eventually integrating them into employment. Yet, previous evaluation studies have been pessimistic about their efficacy. For One-Euro-Jobs, a job creation programme for welfare benefit recipients in Germany, previous evaluations found unfavourable effects particularly for easier-to-place participants. Thus, in 2012 the legislator reformed the programme in order to target the hard-to-place more accurately. This study is the first post-reform evaluation of One-Euro-Jobs. We find that, although the programme is indeed better targeted than before, One-Euro-Jobs decrease participants’ employment chances within three years after programme entry. These outcomes are worse than those found for pre-reform participants. We cannot conclude with certainty whether the reform decreased the programme’s efficacy, but we identify channels through which the reform and other contemporaneous changes may have done so. These channels include changes in programme design features, changes in business-cycle conditions, and prolonged lock-in effects due to “programme careers”. To substantiate the latter explanation, we also provide novel evidence that One-Euro-Jobs seem to initiate programme careers.
      PubDate: 2021-05-21
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279421000313
       
  • Educational Inequalities in Labor Market Exit of Older Workers in 15
           European Countries

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      Authors: MÄCKEN; JANA, PRÄG, PATRICK, HESS, MORITZ, ELLWARDT, LEA
      Pages: 435 - 459
      Abstract: This article examines country differences in the association between education and voluntary or involuntary labor market exit and whether these country differences map onto institutional characteristics of the countries. Work exit is defined as involuntary or voluntary based on the reasons of exit. Four different types of institutional factors, push and pull, aiming for an earlier work exit and need and maintain factors to retain older workers in employment are considered. Using data from 15 European countries from the longitudinal Survey of Health, Aging and Retirement in Europe (SHARE), discrete-time event history models with a categorical outcome are estimated for each country separately. In a second step, we add macro-level indicators and conduct meta-analyses to analyze country differences. Results show that in almost all countries a social gradient in involuntary work exit exists but not in voluntary exit. Lower-educated workers are more likely to involuntarily exit the labor market. Institutional factors, especially those supporting older workers’ retention in employment, are associated with a smaller social gradient in work exit. Our findings suggest that investments in active labor market expenditures, especially in lifelong learning and rehabilitation for lower educated workers, may help to reduce the social gradient in involuntary work exit.
      PubDate: 2021-04-20
      DOI: 10.1017/S0047279421000258
       
 
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