A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
The end of the list has been reached or no journals were found for your choice.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Language and Social Psychology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.679
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 17  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0261-927X - ISSN (Online) 1552-6526
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Deceptive (De)humanization: How Lying About Perceived Outgroups is
           Revealed in Language

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: David M. Markowitz
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper introduces the concept of deceptive (de)humanization, the internal belief that an outgroup is less-than-human while dishonestly acknowledging aspects of their humanity for impression management purposes. In a large online experiment (N = 1,169), participants wrote about their false or truthful opinions on an outgroup they perceived as more evolved or less evolved. Following several automated text analyses, the data indicated psychological differences in attention through word patterns. Consistent with prior work, deceptive texts contained fewer self-references and more negative emotion terms than truthful texts, and dehumanizers used more negative emotions than humanizers. New evidence suggests those who wrote deceptively about evolved groups focused the most on negative emotions compared to other participants. This work extends deception and dehumanization theory by investigating how such psychological constructs interact, and how they are reflected linguistically as communicators attempt to manage impressions and maintain a positive self-image.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-08-03T04:21:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221117497
       
  • Psycholinguistic Properties of Informational Support Seeking Posts in
           Online Health Communities and Predictors of Community Responsiveness

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Stephen A. Rains, Shelby N. Carter
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Although informational support can be a valuable resource for coping with illness, our understanding of how it is solicited remains incomplete. We examine the language properties of more than 20,000 posts made to an online health community to better understand the perspective of people seeking informational support and identify properties that predict community responsiveness. Compared to posts in which informational support was not requested, posts soliciting informational support were more likely to use language reflecting efforts to make meaning from uncertainty related to a poster's ongoing illness experience. Among posts in which informational support was solicited, posts that discussed life-with-illness and used language indicating specific negative emotions like anger, anxiety, and sadness yielded a greater number of responses from online community members.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-07-25T11:47:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221115443
       
  • Mapping Linguistic Shifts During Psychological Coping With the COVID-19
           Pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Xun Zhu
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      How does language change reveal the psychological trajectories of people coping with a COVID-19 infection' This study examined writings on social media over 12 weeks from people who self-reported having tested positive for COVID-19. People used fewer words reflecting anxiety and distancing but more words indicating reinterpretation over time. The language patterns for describing the experience of COVID-19 infections differed from those for describing other unrelated topics. The findings reveal the temporal dynamics of psychological adjustment to an unfolding crisis.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-07-22T06:44:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221116335
       
  • Who Does Discriminate Against gay-Sounding Speakers' The Role of
           Prejudice on Voice-Based Hiring Decisions in Brazil

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ana Beatriz Gomes Fontenele, Luana Elayne Cunha de Souza, Fabio Fasoli
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Vocal cues are used to categorize speakers’ sexual orientation. Hearing a gay-sounding speaker can elicit discrimination. This study investigated whether gay-sounding speakers were discriminated against when applying for a job in Brazil and whether prejudice moderated such an effect. Heterosexual participants listened to a gay- or heterosexual-sounding applicant, rating him in terms of personality traits and employability. The results showed that gay-sounding candidates were discriminated against compared to heterosexual-sounding candidates, but this was true only among highly prejudiced participants.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-07-01T06:42:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221077243
       
  • Effects of Task Performance Expectancy Violations on Processing Fluency
           and Speaker Evaluations

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Marko Dragojevic, Jessica Gasiorek
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      We examined how task performance expectancy violations influence speaker evaluations. Americans listened to a Japanese-accented speaker reading a story; completed a memory test on the story's content; indicated their expected performance on the test; and then received positive, negative, or no performance feedback. Positive feedback positively violated listeners’ performance expectancies and elicited higher fluency, a more positive affective reaction, and more positive speaker evaluations, compared to no feedback. Fluency and affect mediated the effect of positive feedback on speaker evaluations.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-06-30T06:21:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221111574
       
  • When Fluency Matters: The Interplay between Categorization Fluency and
           Gender Atypicality on Gaydar Judgments

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Matteo Masi, Fabio Fasoli
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Perceiving a male speaker as gender atypical increases the chances of categorizing him as gay. The perception of how fluent the categorization process is can also play a role. Listeners categorized gay and straight speakers’ sexual orientation, reported their perceived categorization fluency, and rated speakers’ gender atypicality. When categorization fluency was high, gay speakers perceived as gender atypical were more likely categorized as gay. When categorization fluency was low, gender atypicality increased the likelihood of categorizing straight speakers as gay.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T05:24:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221111382
       
  • Shaping Attributions of Crisis Responsibility in the Case of an
           Accusation: The Role of Active and Passive Voice in Crisis Response
           Strategies

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gijs Fannes, An-Sofie Claeys
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines how both the content (i.e., denial vs. apology) and the verb voice (i.e., active voice vs. passive voice) of a crisis response affect the public's perception of crisis responsibility and, subsequently, the reputation of an organization accused of wrongdoing. The results of two experiments first show that an apology results in higher responsibility attributions than denial, which, in turn, adversely affects an organization's reputation. When we consider the verb voice of the message, a crisis response that is constructed in the passive voice reduces responsibility perceptions more than the active voice, leading to less reputational damage. An interaction effect shows, however, that this result only holds true for a passive denial strategy and not for apologies. As such, when an organization needs to deny an accusation, it seems wise to construct the message in the passive voice in order to strengthen the denial and effectively protect the organizational reputation.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-06-17T06:09:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221108120
       
  • Implications of Older Adults’ Attributions for Young Adults’ Attitudes
           to Aging: A Vignette Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Craig Fowler, Quinten Bernhold
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The present study was grounded in the revised communicative ecology model of successful aging (CEMSA) and examined whether brief, passing remarks made by older adults about aging influence both young adults’ aging efficacy and their expectations regarding aging. Young adult participants (n = 322) were randomly assigned to read a single vignette. In the vignette an older adult invoked either a negative age-based reason, a non-age-based reason, or a positive age-based reason to account for behavior that could be taken to reflect age-related stereotypes pertaining to physical decline, cognitive decline, or aversion to technology. Analyzes revealed that participants who read the positive age-based accounts perceived the aging process to have been portrayed more favorably. Consequently, they reported higher levels of positive affect about aging which translated into their feeling more efficacious about managing their own aging, and into having more positive expectations regarding aging in general.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T08:06:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221105096
       
  • A BERT's Eye View: A Big Data Framework for Assessing Language Convergence
           and Accommodation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zachary P Rosen
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The current paper details a novel quantitative framework leveraging recent advances in AI and Natural Language Processing to quantitatively assess language convergence and accommodation. This new framework is computationally cheap and straightforward to implement. The framework is then applied to a case study of immigration rhetoric in the lead up to the 2016 general election in the USA. Major results from the case study show that (1) Democrats and Republicans exhibited significant language convergence with members of their own parties, (2) President Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton converged with Senate Democrats’ immigration rhetoric, (3) Democrats accommodated the immigration rhetoric of both President Barack Obama and (candidate) Hillary Clinton, (4) contrary to initial hypotheses, Donald Trump's vitriolic immigration rhetoric did not show signs of language convergence with Republicans in the Senate, and (5) equally surprising, Senate Republicans showed significant non-accommodation to Donald Trump despite potential political costs for having done so.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T06:27:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221095865
       
  • Willingness to Communicate and its High-Evidence Factors: A Meta-Analytic
           Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Seonghan Jin, Hansol Lee
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to synthesize the structural relationships among willingness to communicate (WTC) and its high-evidence factors in second language (L2) learning contexts by adopting meta-analytic structural equation modeling (MASEM). The MASEM approach is designed to construct a structural equation model (SEM) to explain correlations between variables by pooling correlation coefficients reported in previous literature. This study integrated 44 independent samples (N = 12,094) and built a MASEM model to investigate the structural relations of WTC, its three high-evidence factors (learners’ perceived L2 competence, L2 motivation, and L2 anxiety), and frequency of learners’ L2 use. The results of meta-analysis successfully supported our proposed model of L2 WTC. Furthermore, among the three high-evidence factors, it was found that learners’ perceived L2 competence influenced L2 WTC the most. In addition, the results of the moderator analyses indicated that learners’ L2 proficiency and WTC contexts (inside vs. outside classrooms) significantly influenced the relationships between L2 WTC and its high-evidence factors. The implications of these results are discussed in further depth and detail.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T06:05:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221092098
       
  • How the Linguistic Styles of Donald Trump and Joe Biden Reflect Different
           Forms of Power

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Robert Körner, Jennifer R. Overbeck, Erik Körner, Astrid Schütz
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Can theories of power be used to explain differences in the linguistic styles of Donald Trump and Joe Biden' We argue that the two candidates possess and use different forms of power—and that this is associated with typical language patterns. Based on their personal history, news reports, and empirical studies, we expect that Trump’s approach to power is characterized by coercive power forms and Biden’s by collaborative power forms. Using several LIWC categories and the moral foundations dictionary, we analyzed over 500 speeches and 15,000 tweets made during the 2020 election battle. Biden’s speeches can be described as analytical and frequently relating to moral values, whereas Trump’s speeches were characterized by a positive emotional tone. In tweets, Biden used more social words and words related to virtue, honesty, and achievement than Trump did. Trump’s coercive power and Biden’s collaborative power were more observable in tweets than speeches, which may reflect the fact that tweets are more spontaneous than speeches.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T07:47:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221085309
       
  • Shelving Issues: Patrolling the Boundaries of Democratic Discussion in
           Public Meetings

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lotte van Burgsteden, Hedwig te Molder
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Democratic participation is widely viewed as a crucial underpinning of legitimate governance; however, little is known about how this participation is practically accomplished. This study contributes to a better understanding of what democratic citizenship encompasses in actual practices of public engagement. Using conversation analysis and discursive psychology, we analyze interactions between government officials and citizens in Dutch public meetings on the effects of livestock farming. We examine situations where citizens treat officials’ closing-implicative moves as “wanting to shelve” issues. We demonstrate how this uptake is preceded by officials treating citizens as not understanding what is within the scope of discussion, thereby challenging their democratic competence. Citizens subsequently turn the tables on the officials, treating them as not wanting to fulfill their democratic duties. We argue that these practices point to broader relational issues between government and citizens, transforming what seem mere agenda issues into negotiations about what constitutes good democracy.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-04-06T06:07:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221079615
       
  • How Fair is Gender-Fair Language' Insights from Gender Ratio
           Estimations in French

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hualin Xiao, Brent Strickland, Sharon Peperkamp
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Heated societal debates in various countries concern the use of gender-fair language, meant to replace the generic use of grammatically masculine forms. Advocates and opponents of gender-fair language disagree on – among other things – the question of whether masculine forms leave women underrepresented in people's minds. We investigated the influence of linguistic form on the mental representations of gender in French. Participants read a short text about a professional gathering and estimated the percentages of men and women present at the gathering. Results showed higher estimates of the percentage of women in response to two gender-fair forms relative to the masculine form. Comparisons with normed data on people's perception of real-world gender ratios additionally showed that the gender-fair forms removed or reduced a male bias for neutral- and female-stereotyped professions, respectively, yet induced a female bias for male-stereotyped professions. Thus, gender-fair language increases the prominence of women in the mind, but has varying effects on consistency, i.e., the match with default perceptions of real-world gender ratios.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-03-02T05:13:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221084643
       
  • Gender Representations Elicited by the Gender Star Form

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Anita Körner, Bleen Abraham, Ralf Rummer, Fritz Strack
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      In many languages, masculine language forms are not only used to designate the male gender but also to operate in a generic fashion. This dual function has been found to lead to male biased representations when people encounter the generic masculine. In German, the now predominant substitute is the gender star form (e.g., Athlet*innen). In two experiments, we examined gender representations elicited when reading the gender star form (vs. generic masculine vs. pair forms). We found that, following the generic masculine, continuations about men (vs. women) were more frequently and more quickly judged to be compatible, replicating the male bias, even though participants were informed about the generic intention. Following the gender star form, a female bias in judgments (both Studies) and speed (only Study 2) occurred, which was somewhat smaller. Representations were most balanced when both male and female forms were mentioned.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T12:37:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221080181
       
  • The Expressive Balance Effect: Perception and Physiological Responses of
           Prosody and Gestures

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Emma Rodero, Olatz Larrea, Isabel Rodríguez-de-Dios, Ignacio Lucas
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The ability to deliver a speech effectively and persuade the audience is fundamental in the professional landscape. Nonverbal features, such as voice and gestures, are crucial to improving listeners’ perception and information processing in a public presentation. In nonverbal communication research, most studies have mainly examined the individual effects of these features and not their combined influence. Therefore, this study analyzes the direct and interaction effects of intonation, speech rate, and hand gestures on the speakers’ credibility and effectiveness and the participants’ psychophysiological response (attention and arousal). Results showed that the best combination was a moderate intonation at a medium speech rate with a moderate number of hand gestures. These results supported the so-called Expressive Balance Effect. Speakers must maintain the expressive load of the different nonverbal cues in balance to be more effective and credible and enhance the listeners’ cognitive processing. These findings are helpful recommendations for public speakers.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-02-25T05:34:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221078317
       
  • Are U.S. Presidents Becoming Less Rhetorically Complex' Evaluating the
           Integrative Complexity of Joe Biden and Donald Trump in Historical Context
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lucian G. Conway, Alivia Zubrod
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Are U.S. political leaders becoming simpler in their rhetoric' To evaluate, we place the two most recent Presidents’ integrative complexity against a historical context for three different types of comparable materials. Results reveal that both Biden and Trump are simple when compared to the typical President. Further, segmented regression analyses reveal Biden's and Trump's low complexity is partially the continuation of an ongoing historical decline in complexity among Presidents. Importantly, this complexity decline is occurring for both Republicans and Democrats.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T05:50:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221081126
       
  • Processing Fluency and Inferred Motive: L1 English Users’ Evaluations of
           Non-Standard Accented Speech

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gretchen Montgomery, Doris Acheme
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Guided by communication accommodation theory and the fluency principle of language attitudes, this experimental study examined the serial mediation effects of processing fluency and inferred motives on language attitudes toward standard- and non-standard-accented speech. Using the matched guise technique, participants were randomly assigned to listen to an audio recording read in either a Standard American English (SAE) or Indian Tamil English (ITE) accent. Compared to the ITE accent, participants who listened to the SAE accent reported significantly higher processing fluency of the speaker's talk, more positive inferred cognitive motive from the speaker, and attributed higher solidarity to the speaker. However, the experimental conditions yielded no differences in inferred affective motive or status evaluations. Mediation analysis indicated significant indirect effects on status and solidarity through processing fluency and inferred cognitive motives as serial mediators. The indirect effects through inferred affective motive were not significant. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T05:08:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221081010
       
  • Quebec-based Parents’ Attitudes Towards Childhood Multilingualism:
           Evaluative Dimensions and Potential Predictors

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ruth Kircher, Erin Quirk, Melanie Brouillard, Alexa Ahooja, Susan Ballinger, Linda Polka, Krista Byers-Heinlein
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This is the first large-scale, quantitative study of the evaluative dimensions and potential predictors of Quebec-based parents’ attitudes towards childhood multilingualism. Such attitudes are assumed to constitute a determinant of parental language choices, and thereby influence children's multilingual development. The newly-developed Attitudes towards Childhood Multilingualism Questionnaire was used to gather data from 825 participants raising an infant/toddler aged 0–4 years with multiple languages in the home. The results revealed three separate dimensions: status and solidarity (the same dimensions found in attitudes towards individual languages) as well as cognitive development (not previously attested as a separate dimension). Participants’ approach to promoting multilingualism (specifically, whether they used the one-person-one-language-approach) and the combination of languages transmitted (specifically, whether this included a heritage language) correlated significantly with parental attitudes towards childhood multilingualism. Parents’ linguistic background and location within Quebec were not significant predictors of attitudes. The paper discusses implications and directions for further research.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T04:31:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221078853
       
  • “Immersed in World of Warcraft”: A Discursive Study of Identity
           Management Talk About Excessive Online Gaming

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Vasiliki Kokkini, Eleftheria Tseliou, Georgios Abakoumkin, Nikos Bozatzis
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Online excessive gaming has been associated with negative player identity constructions depicting an abnormal life-style. Up-to-date, there is limited insight into player identity management talk about excessive online gaming. To address this gap, drawing from discursive and rhetorical psychology, we investigated naturally occurring talk of 134 players of World of Warcraft (WoW) -a Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game (MMORPG)- from three publicly available websites and of five players from one focus group. The analysis illuminated participants’ dilemmatic and contradictory ways of constructing the player identity, while displaying immersion in the game. Participants invoke identity constructions like ‘nolifer’, ‘hardcore’ or ‘clean’ player, which they disavow or assign to themselves and to each other depending on the conversational context, while attending to concerns about (ab)normalcy. The study’s findings highlight a dynamic process of player identity construction in talk, occasioned by and exemplifying the contingencies of the discursive context.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-01-10T01:22:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X211067820
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.197.230.180
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-