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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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Journal of Language and Social Psychology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.679
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 20  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0261-927X - ISSN (Online) 1552-6526
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • “Your English is Good for an Immigrant”: Examining Mixed Effects of
           Mindset Messages on Perceived Linguistic Potential of and Blame
           Attributions Towards ESL Migrants

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      Authors: Nigel Mantou Lou, Kimberly A. Noels
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Social exclusion can exacerbate newcomers’ language difficulties and undermine their social integration. We examined whether language mindsets induce mixed attitudes towards migrants with limited proficiency in the target language, and indirectly affect willingness to interact with migrants and attitudes toward migrants’ language education. Across two pre-registered experiments (N = 531) conducted in Canada, we found that people who were primed with fixed (vs. growth or control) mindsets tended to believe migrants have less potential to improve their English, but were less likely to blame them for their lack of improvement (“not their fault if they can't improve”), suggesting fixed mindsets contribute to mixed attitudes toward migrants. Furthermore, perceived linguistic potential was negatively and blame was positively correlated with contact avoidance and opposition to publicly funded language education for newcomers. These effects held after controlling for political orientations and perceived fluency of the target speaker, suggesting that language mindsets contribute to language judgments that could impact migrants’ acculturation experiences.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2023-02-01T06:50:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X231153949
       
  • The Effects of Large-Scale Social Movements on Language Attitudes:
           Cantonese and Mandarin in Hong Kong

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      Authors: Priscilla Lok-chee Shum, Chi-Shing Tse, Takeshi Hamamura, Stephen C. Wright
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Speakers with standard accents are typically judged more favorably than non-standard speakers, but this may shift in response to perceived intergroup conflict with ethnolinguistic outgroups. Three studies were conducted to examine how large-scale social movements may impact language attitudes in Hong Kong. Attitudes toward standard-accented and non-standard-accented Cantonese and Mandarin were collected across four instances in 2013 and 2015 (pre- and post-Umbrella Movement), 2018 and 2019 (pre- and post-Anti-Extradition Bill Movement), respectively. Compared to Study 1 (2013), Hong Kong participants judged standard speakers of Cantonese (the ingroup variety), and ingroup, non-standard speakers of Mandarin (the outgroup variety) significantly more favorably in Study 2 (2015). Study 3 showed that the retrospective endorsement of the Umbrella Movement moderated preferences for standard Cantonese and Mandarin speakers. Comparison of 2018 and 2019 data partially replicated the findings in Studies 1 and 2, though the current endorsement of the Anti-Extradition Bill Movement did not moderate preferences for standard speakers.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2023-01-18T07:49:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221150502
       
  • Bonding Through Language Imitation: Influence of Social Ostracism on
           Structural Priming

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      Authors: Heng Li
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This research investigated whether being excluded can increase language imitation and thus lead to a stronger structural priming effect. In Study 1, student participants recalling an experience of social exclusion showed a larger priming effect than those recalling an experience of social inclusion. Employing a larger, more diverse sample, Study 2 set out to conceptually replicate Study 1 by creating a concurrent experience of social exclusion through a computerized ball-toss game. It was found that excluded individuals demonstrated a stronger tendency to mimic the syntactic structure used by their interactional partner than included individuals. Taken together, these findings enrich an emergent stream of research that finds structural priming is not an independent cognitive process, but conditioned by various socio-cognitive factors.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2023-01-13T10:38:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X231151408
       
  • The Digital Chameleon: Factors Affecting Perceptions of Convergence in
           Computer-Mediated Communication

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      Authors: Brooke Nixon, Nicole R. Guajardo
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Communication Accommodation Theory (CAT) is a framework used to analyze and predict linguistic and behavioral adjustments within interpersonal communication. As computer-mediated communication (CMC) becomes more prevalent, applying this framework provides insight into interpersonal communication via a screen. Two studies explored CAT applied to CMC with participants observing linguistic adjustments in text-message screenshots. Results indicated that likability, empathy, gender, and textisms each play a role in how we perceive and interact with others during digital communications. Implications are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-12-26T07:15:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221146143
       
  • The Effect of Anticipatory Apology and Appreciation in Online
           Support-Seeking Messages on Support Provision in the U.S. and Korea

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      Authors: JooYoung Jang, Bo Feng
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This experiment examined how online support-seeking messages containing anticipatory apology and/or appreciation influence support provision in the U.S. and Korea. The mediating role of regard for face was also assessed. A total of 983 participants (568 in the U.S. sample, 415 in the Korean sample) read and responded to support-seeking messages posted on an interactive online platform. Results showed that support-seeking messages with anticipatory apology and/or appreciation elicited higher quality (in terms of person-centeredness) supportive messages than support-seeking messages without anticipatory apology or appreciation. Participants’ perceptions of support-seeker's regard for face mediated the effect of anticipatory apology in support-seeking messages on level of person-centeredness in received support messages. This pattern of findings was observed in both the American and Korean samples.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-12-23T08:08:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221147274
       
  • Are Gender-Neutral Pronouns Really Neutral' Testing a Male Bias in the
           Grammatical Genderless Languages Turkish and Finnish

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      Authors: Emma A Renström, Anna Lindqvist, Gulcin Akbas, Laura Hekanaho, Marie Gustafsson Sendén
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Languages differ in how grammatically salient gender is. We explored if grammatically gender-neutral pronouns in Finnish and Turkish, two grammatically genderless languages, are gender neutral or male biased, thereby activating male, rather than female, exemplars. We also tested whether differences in national level gender equality influence the male bias. Results indicated a male bias in both languages, whereas national level gender equality had no influence. Implications for gender-fair language reforms in grammatically genderless languages are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-12-20T06:55:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221146229
       
  • Couples’ We-Ness and Separateness During the COVID-19 Pandemic and
           Lockdown: A Longitudinal Perspective

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      Authors: Sarah Galdiolo, Anthony Mauroy, Lesley Liliane Verhofstadt
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This 5-wave longitudinal study aimed to monitor the feeling of we-ness and separateness over one year of the COVID-19 pandemic by examining partners’ natural pronoun usage when reporting couple interactions. Compared to the start of the pandemic, a general decline of we-ness was found after one year. Moreover, the changes in couple we-ness were non-linear, resulting in an increase at the end of the strict lockdown, followed by a decrease. No change in couple separateness was found.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-12-20T03:34:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221138116
       
  • Deceptive (De)humanization: How Lying About Perceived Outgroups is
           Revealed in Language

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      Authors: David M. Markowitz
      First page: 135
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper introduces the concept of deceptive (de)humanization, the internal belief that an outgroup is less-than-human while dishonestly acknowledging aspects of their humanity for impression management purposes. In a large online experiment (N = 1,169), participants wrote about their false or truthful opinions on an outgroup they perceived as more evolved or less evolved. Following several automated text analyses, the data indicated psychological differences in attention through word patterns. Consistent with prior work, deceptive texts contained fewer self-references and more negative emotion terms than truthful texts, and dehumanizers used more negative emotions than humanizers. New evidence suggests those who wrote deceptively about evolved groups focused the most on negative emotions compared to other participants. This work extends deception and dehumanization theory by investigating how such psychological constructs interact, and how they are reflected linguistically as communicators attempt to manage impressions and maintain a positive self-image.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-08-03T04:21:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221117497
       
  • Psycholinguistic Properties of Informational Support Seeking Posts in
           Online Health Communities and Predictors of Community Responsiveness

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      Authors: Stephen A. Rains, Shelby N. Carter
      First page: 160
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Although informational support can be a valuable resource for coping with illness, our understanding of how it is solicited remains incomplete. We examine the language properties of more than 20,000 posts made to an online health community to better understand the perspective of people seeking informational support and identify properties that predict community responsiveness. Compared to posts in which informational support was not requested, posts soliciting informational support were more likely to use language reflecting efforts to make meaning from uncertainty related to a poster's ongoing illness experience. Among posts in which informational support was solicited, posts that discussed life-with-illness and used language indicating specific negative emotions like anger, anxiety, and sadness yielded a greater number of responses from online community members.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-07-25T11:47:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221115443
       
  • The Language of Adolescents in Depicting Migrants

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      Authors: Flavia Albarello, Elisabetta Crocetti, Francesca Golfieri, Monica Rubini
      First page: 183
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This study (N = 161 Italian adolescents attending 11th and 12th grade of secondary school) investigated how adolescents linguistically portray migrants. Over a year and a half, the study considered whether positive factors known to reduce social discrimination – i.e., multiple categorization of migrants and/or respondent's identification with the human group – are associated with relatively unbiased linguistic descriptions of migrants. The coding system included three categories of terms referring to the outgroup: generalized/categorical definitions, individuating piecemeal information or membership in the human group. We found that adolescents who used multiple categorizations to describe migrants and self-identified with the human group (at T1) linguistically described migrants in human and individuating terms (at T2) to a higher extent. The findings are discussed underlying the implications of defining the self and outgroups in multiple complex ways through language, as an ecological means used by adolescents to communicate their views of others.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-11-17T06:25:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221139882
       
  • Mapping Linguistic Shifts During Psychological Coping With the COVID-19
           Pandemic

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      Authors: Xun Zhu
      First page: 203
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      How does language change reveal the psychological trajectories of people coping with a COVID-19 infection' This study examined writings on social media over 12 weeks from people who self-reported having tested positive for COVID-19. People used fewer words reflecting anxiety and distancing but more words indicating reinterpretation over time. The language patterns for describing the experience of COVID-19 infections differed from those for describing other unrelated topics. The findings reveal the temporal dynamics of psychological adjustment to an unfolding crisis.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-07-22T06:44:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221116335
       
  • Younger Supervisors’ Perceptions of Intergenerational Communication in
           the Sri Lankan Workplace

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      Authors: Grace Ashna Jeevaratnam, Elizabeth Jones
      First page: 217
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Workplaces are increasingly seeing younger supervisors supervise older subordinates, reversing traditional norms. Using Communication Accommodation Theory, we investigated younger supervisors’ perceptions of communication with same-aged and older subordinates in Sri Lanka. Eighty young supervisors rated four vignettes describing formal and informal interactions with same-aged and older subordinates. Participants rated older subordinates’ communication as less accommodative and more nonaccommodative than same-aged subordinates, particularly in formal interactions. They rated their own communication as more polite and respectful with older than same-aged subordinates.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-10-31T06:34:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221128991
       
  • A Cognitive Look at the “Invisibility” of Older Gay Men Within the
           Categories ‘Gay Man’ and ‘Elderly Man’

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      Authors: Rosandra Coladonato, Andrea Carnaghi, Mary Ann Ciosk, Mauro Bianchi, Valentina Piccoli
      First page: 231
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Two studies analyzed whether, at the cognitive level, ‘Elderly gay man’ is “invisible” both when processing the labels ‘Gay man’ and ‘Elderly man’. We suggest that ‘Gay man’ is conflated with ‘Young man’, and that ‘Elderly man’ is conflated with ‘Heterosexual man’. Contact with elderly gay men did not alter the perception of ‘Gay man’ as prevalently young but weakened the perception of ‘Elderly man’ as heterosexual by default.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-11-08T06:45:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X221137581
       
 
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