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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACOSS Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
African Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
African Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Argumentum     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Australian Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Bakti Budaya     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
British Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 104)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Care Management Journals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Social Work Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Comunitania : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ConCienciaSocial     Open Access  
Contemporary Rural Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Critical and Radical Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Critical Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Critical Social Work : An Interdisciplinary Journal Dedicated to Social Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuadernos de Trabajo Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Developmental Child Welfare     Hybrid Journal  
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
European Journal of Social Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Families in Society : The Journal of Contemporary Social Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Geopolitical, Social Security and Freedom Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Global Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access  
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Indonesian Journal of Guidance and Counseling     Open Access  
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Care and Caring     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Islamic Counseling : Jurnal Bimbingan Konseling Islam     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Janus Sosiaalipolitiikan ja sosiaalityön tutkimuksen aikakauslehti     Open Access  
Journal for Specialists in Group Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Journal of Baccalaureate Social Work     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Care Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Community Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Comparative Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Family Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Forensic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Rights and Social Work     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 401)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 241)
Journal of Public Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 212)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Jurnal Guidena : Journal of Guidance and counseling, Psychology and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Leidfaden : Fachmagazin für Krisen, Leid, Trauer     Hybrid Journal  
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access  
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nordisk välfärdsforskning | Nordic Welfare Research     Open Access  
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Partner Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 243)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Policy Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Prospectiva : Revista de Trabajo Social e Intervención Social     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psikopedagogia : Jurnal Bimbingan dan Konseling     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Qualitative Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Qualitative Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Research on Social Work Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revista Brasileira de Tecnologias Sociais     Open Access  
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Katálysis     Open Access  
Revista Serviço Social em Perspectiva     Open Access  
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
SER Social     Open Access  
Service social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Serviço Social & Sociedade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access  
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 2)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 219)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Social Work & Social Sciences Review     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Social Work / Maatskaplike Werk     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
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Journal of Language and Social Psychology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.679
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 17  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0261-927X - ISSN (Online) 1552-6526
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1164 journals]
  • Obituary: W. Peter Robinson (May 8, 1933 – February 18, 2021)

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      Pages: 431 - 433
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Volume 40, Issue 4, Page 431-433, September 2021.

      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2021-05-19T02:51:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X211018166
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • The 17th ICLASP, June 2022, Hong Kong

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      Pages: 434 - 435
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Volume 40, Issue 4, Page 434-435, September 2021.

      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2021-06-19T11:07:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X211018174
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • New iteration of the journal Psychology of Language and Communication

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      Pages: 436 - 437
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Volume 40, Issue 4, Page 436-437, September 2021.

      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2021-06-02T10:12:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X211018173
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Twitter & the JLSP

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      Pages: 438 - 438
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Volume 40, Issue 4, Page 438-438, September 2021.

      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2021-08-12T05:16:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X211039029
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Referencing Race = Racist' Examining Perceptions of References to
           a Target’s Race as Offensive

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      Authors: Conor J. O’Dea, Bayleigh N. Smith, Donald A. Saucier
      Pages: 459 - 481
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Volume 40, Issue 4, Page 459-481, September 2021.
      We examined majority group members’ perceptions of racial slurs, compared to what we have labeled as combination terms. These combination terms possess the same semantic and pragmatic linguistic functions as racial slurs, functioning to express negative emotion toward, and to describe, a target. Across three studies (total N = 943) racial slurs were not perceived as significantly different from combination terms. We then examined whether participants higher in social dominance beliefs reported greater perceived justification for using combination terms over racial slurs because of their lack of historical denigration of marginalized groups that racial slurs have. Participants, even those higher in socially dominant attitudes, did not perceive greater justification for the use of combination terms than racial slurs. Indeed, an important implication is that race-marking, an understudied area of social psychology, paired with general derogative terms produces terms which may function similarly to racial slurs, but, fortunately, are also similarly vilified in modern society.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2021-08-12T05:16:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X20969744
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Entrepreneurial Social Identity Management Through Language Use

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      Authors: Christopher Hajek
      Pages: 524 - 534
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Volume 40, Issue 4, Page 524-534, September 2021.
      This study draws upon interview data and a grounded theoretical methodology to explore entrepreneurial social identity management. Interviews were conducted with forty-three entrepreneurs in several U.S. cities. The women and men discussed past conversations with (non)entrepreneurs, with foci on self- and other stereotyping, associated language use, prototypicality, and motivation. Open and axial coding of the interview content revealed a new model of entrepreneurial social identity management. The model’s implications for understanding entrepreneurs’ social identity and motivation were discussed.
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      PubDate: 2021-05-27T10:13:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X211019079
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Recent New Book Alerts, 2020-21

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      Authors: Howie Giles
      Pages: 535 - 536
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Volume 40, Issue 4, Page 535-536, September 2021.

      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2021-08-12T05:15:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X211039030
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • (In)Sincere Demeanor and (In)Sincere Language in Crisis Communication

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      Authors: David E. Clementson, Tyler G. Page
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Perceptions of a crisis communicator’s sincerity drive reactions to an organization’s response amidst a scandal. However, a spokesperson can nonverbally appear sincere while deceptively evading questions and can appear insincere while actually speaking sincere truths. Applying truth-default theory to crisis communication, we assess people’s reactions to a spokesperson varying in sincerity through demeanor and language. In an experiment (N  =  801), adults from across the United States were randomly assigned to view one of four versions of a news interview. The stimuli present the spokesperson replying to questions with sincere or insincere demeanor and sincere language (conveying relevance and clarity) or insincere language (evasion and obfuscation). Results indicate that sincerity in demeanor and language interact to affect (a) account acceptance, (b) negative word-of-mouth intention, and (c) attribution of responsibility. But sincerity in language largely overrides behavioral impressions. Discussion concerns considering evasion and obfuscation as demeanor cues, when violations of relevance and clarity in language undercut a spokesperson’s believability.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2021-10-19T12:53:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X211045724
       
  • Petty in Pink: Clothing Color Moderates Audience Perceptions of a Female
           Politician’s Verbal Aggression

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      Authors: Adam S. Richards, Patrick Rice, Loni Covington
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This research assessed whether the color of a female politician’s clothing affected perceptions of her verbal aggression. In the context of Kamala Harris attacking Donald Trump, a 2 (color: pink vs. gray) × 2 (verbal aggression: low vs. high) experiment was conducted. While wearing pink, participants perceived Harris as more competent and reported more message-consistent perceptions if she used low rather than high verbal aggression. While wearing gray, high rather than low verbal aggression was perceived more favorably.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2021-10-19T12:52:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X211045372
       
  • “We” are in This Pandemic, but “You” can get Through This: The
           Effects of Pronouns on Likelihood to Stay-at-Home During COVID-19

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      Authors: Ke C. Tu, Shirley S. Chen, Rhiannon M. Mesler
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      We examine how first-person plural and second-person singular pronouns used in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) communications impact people's likelihood to follow stay-at-home recommendations. A 2 (first-person plural [“we”] vs. second-person singular [“you”]) by continuous trait self-control between-subjects experiment (N = 223) was used to examine individuals’ adherence to stay-at-home recommendations. Results suggest that “you”-based appeals may be more broadly effective in garnering stay-at-home adherence, whereas low self-control individuals are less responsive to “we” appeals. Implications for research and practice are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2021-10-19T12:50:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X211044799
       
  • Does the Linguistic Expectancy Bias Extend to a Second Language'

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      Authors: Margarida V. Garrido, Magda Saraiva, Gün R. Semin
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The linguistic expectancy bias (LEB) reflects the tendency to describe expectancy-consistent behavior more abstractly than expectancy-inconsistent. The current studies replicate the LEB in Portuguese and examine it in a second language (English). Earlier studies found differences in processing a first language (L1) and a second language (L2) shaping affective and cognitive processes. We did not expect these differences to shape the LEB because controlled lexical decisions (e.g., use of verbs and adjectives) are unlikely, even when using L2. Participants wrote stereotypically male or female behavioral descriptions for male and female targets. A new group of participants read those descriptions and was asked about their causes. Expectancy-consistent behavior was described more abstractly and shaped more dispositional inferences in L1 and L2. Aside from replicating the LEB in a different language, these studies indicate that structural features of language preserve a linguistic bias with implications for social perception even when using a second language.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2021-10-19T12:50:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X211044769
       
  • Does Regional Variation in Pathogen Prevalence Predict the Moralization of
           Language in COVID-19 News'

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      Authors: Musa Malik, Frederic R. Hopp, Yibei Chen, René Weber
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      While there is substantial research on COVID-19’s general framing in the news, little is known about the antecedents and moderators of using moral language in communicating the disease to audiences. In this study, we rely on the Model of Intuitive Morality and Exemplars to explore how news media’s attention on COVID-19 and moralizing language in COVID-19 news vary with respect to ultimate (historical pathogen prevalence) and proximate (spread of COVID-19) socio-psychological factors. Specifically, we analyzed 1,024,800 news headlines from 28 countries published throughout 2020 and applied automated content analysis for moral language extraction. Our results provide support for increased media attention and higher levels of moralizing language in COVID-19 news for regions with high historical pathogen prevalence and COVID-19 spread. We discuss the theoretical impact of these findings in view of the socio-psychological relevance of moralizing language for disease-related news and point towards future research directions.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2021-10-19T02:51:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X211044194
       
  • The Interplay of Jargon, Motivation, and Fatigue While Processing COVID-19
           Crisis Communication Over Time

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      Authors: Hillary C. Shulman, Olivia M. Bullock, Elizabeth E. Riggs
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Using the backdrop of the COVID-19 pandemic, this three-wave experiment (N = 1,830) examined whether a public health crisis motivates people to engage with complicated information about the virus in the form of jargon. Results revealed that although the presence of jargon negatively impacted message acceptance for topics that were not particularly urgent (flood risk and federal risk policy), the presence of jargon within the COVID-19 topic condition did not affect message perceptions—at first. In subsequent waves of data collection, however, it was found that the influence of jargon strengthened over time within the COVID-19 topic condition. Specifically, jargon began to exert a stronger influence on processing fluency despite the continued urgency of the topic. This finding suggests that motivation to process COVID-19 related information declined over time. Theoretical contributions for language, processing fluency, and persuasion are offered and practical implications for health, risk, science, and crisis communicators are advanced.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2021-10-16T11:03:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X211043100
       
  • Discussion: Making Sense of Public Sensemaking Relative to the COVID-19
           Crisis

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      Authors: Adrian Bangerter
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Disease outbreaks motivate human groups to engage in sensemaking efforts to give meaning to the event. These sensemaking processes often involve narratives framing where a disease comes from, how it spreads, and how to prevent and cure infections. At least four generic narratives are typically used as symbolic resources make sense of disease outbreaks: A medical science narrative and three lay narratives, i.e., (1) infectious disease as divine punishment, (2) infectious disease as caused by actions of outgroups (3) infectious disease as caused by evil elites. The contributions to this Special Issue are discussed in relation to this narrative sensemaking perspective.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2021-10-16T07:24:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X211045774
       
  • Face Masks Might Protect You From COVID-19: The Communication of
           Scientific Uncertainty by Scientists Versus Politicians in the Context of
           Policy in the Making

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      Authors: Inse Janssen, Friederike Hendriks, Regina Jucks
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Scientific knowledge is intrinsically uncertain; hence, it can only provide a tentative orientation for political decisions. One illustrative example is the discussion that has taken place on introducing mandatory mask-wearing to contain the coronavirus. In this context, this study investigates how the communication of uncertainty regarding the effectiveness of mandatory mask-wearing affects the perceived trustworthiness of communicators. Participants (N = 398) read a fictitious but evidence-based text supporting mandatory mask-wearing. First, epistemic uncertainty was communicated by including a high (vs. low) amount of lexical hedges (LHs) to the text (e.g., “maybe”). Second, we varied whether the source of information was a scientist or a politician. Thereafter, participants rated the source's trustworthiness. Results show that the scientist was perceived as more competent and as having more integrity but not as more benevolent than the politician. The use of LHs did not impact trustworthiness ratings.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2021-09-24T03:44:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X211044512
       
  • Subtle Linguistic Cues Affecting Gender In(Equality)

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      Authors: Magdalena Formanowicz, Karolina Hansen
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Gender stereotypes and related gender discrimination are encoded in and transmitted through language, contributing to gender inequality. In this article, we review research findings on subtle linguistic means of communicating gender stereotypes and gender hierarchies. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive repository of various instances of subtle linguistic biases potentially useful in creating a text analysis toolbox to quantify gender bias in language. Our focus is predominantly on those areas that have received less attention both in research and in policy making. As gender inequalities are communicated through linguistic practices, attempts to change social reality include changes in language. Therefore, we suggest possible interventions for practices of gender equality in language.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2021-09-13T01:39:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X211035170
       
  • Suicide Risk Factors: A Language Analysis Approach in Social Media

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      Authors: Gerardo Sierra, Patricia Andrade-Palos, Gemma Bel-Enguix, Alejandro Osornio-Arteaga, Adriana Cabrera-Mora, Luis García-Nieto, Tamara Sierra-Aparicio
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Suicide represents a public health issue that requires new preventive strategies. Therefore, this study analyzes differences in language use between a themed posts group (suicide and depression) and a random posts group (non-specific topics) from different social media platforms. In addition, the similarity of the texts of themed posts group with the set of phrases linked to suicide risk factors is analyzed. Texts were processed using the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC) software. A 95% bootstrap confidence interval (CI) was built for the difference in means for the resulting values per word category across groups. Significant differences in the use of language were observed between the themed post group and the random post group, whereas no differences were found between the themed post group and the set of phrases linked to suicide risk factors. These results can contribute to the development of risk-detection tools, which identify users at risk based on the analysis of language use embedded in social media. Such opportune detection would significantly increase the suicide prevention work. However, there is still a latent need for doing more research in this field, especially for the Mexican culture.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2021-08-06T05:43:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X211036171
       
  • Social Categorization Based on Language and Facial Recognition

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      Authors: Marie-France Champoux-Larsson, Frida Ramström, Albert Costa, Cristina Baus
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Two experimental studies were conducted to replicate the effect found by Baus et al. where language as a marker of social categories affected recognition of faces in an old/new paradigm. In Study 1, we presented faces along with utterances in Swedish and in English to native Swedish speakers. Faces presented along with Swedish utterances were not recognized better than faces presented along with English utterances. In Study 2, we used another language pair and presented faces along with utterances in Swedish and in Spanish to native Swedish speakers. Faces presented along with Swedish utterances were recognized better than faces presented along with Spanish utterances. Our results suggest that language functions as a marker of social categories and that, similarly to other markers of social categories, it can be modulated by various factors and is not unconditional.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2021-07-29T11:03:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X211035159
       
  • The Content of Gender Stereotypes Embedded in Language Use

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      Authors: Stephanie C. Goodhew, Katherine Reynolds, Mark Edwards, Evan Kidd
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Gender stereotypes have endured despite substantial change in gender roles. Previous work has assessed how gender stereotypes affect language production in particular interactional contexts. Here, we assessed communication biases where context was less specified: written texts to diffuse audiences. We used Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) to computationally quantify the similarity in meaning between gendered names and stereotype-linked terms in these communications. This revealed that female names were more similar in meaning to the proscriptive (undesirable) masculine terms, such as emotional.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2021-07-22T12:20:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X211033930
       
  • STEM Identities: A Communication Theory of Identity Approach

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      Authors: Craig O. Stewart
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Education and psychology research has established STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) identities as an important factor in explaining student persistence in STEM fields. Few studies in social psychology of language or communication have investigated STEM identities, despite the fundamentally communicative nature of identity. Identity talk produced in semi-structured interviews with undergraduate engineering majors (N = 16) at three U.S. universities was analyzed qualitatively using the Communication Theory of Identity (CTI) as a sensitizing framework. The analysis showed that these students’ STEM identities emphasized personal attributes such as work ethic and a desire to make a positive difference in the world as well as relationships with peers in engineering. A number of potential identity gaps which might present barriers to forming a STEM identity were also evident in the data. These results underscore the importance of a communicative (interactive and relational) perspective in understanding students’ development and expression of STEM identities.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2021-07-07T09:12:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X211030674
       
  • How Experts React: The World Health Organization’s Appraisal of COVID-19
           via Communication Patterns

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      Authors: David M. Markowitz
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      How do COVID-19 experts psychologically manage the pandemic and its effects' Using a full year of press briefings (January 2020–January 2021) from the World Health Organization (N = 126), this paper evaluated the relationship between communication patterns and COVID-19 cases and deaths. The data suggest as COVID-19 cases and deaths increased, health experts tended to think about the virus in a more formal and analytic manner. Experts also communicated with fewer cognitive processing terms, which typically indicate people “working through” a crisis. This report offers a lens into the internal states of COVID-19 experts and their organization as they gradually learned about the virus and its daily impact.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2021-06-21T09:52:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X211026346
       
  • Accentism on Trial: Categorization/Stereotyping and Implicit Biases
           Predict Harsher Sentences for Foreign-Accented Defendants

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      Authors: Carlos Romero-Rivas, Charlotte Morgan, Thomas Collier
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, participants were presented with two tasks: the Implicit Association Test (IAT), and a mock trial task. In both tasks, the auditory stimuli were produced by native or foreign-accented speakers, and presented either free of noise or mixed with background white noise, to estimate the role of processing fluency on jurors’ appraisals. In the IAT, participants showed positive implicit biases toward native speech, and negative implicit biases toward foreign-accented speech. In the mock trial task, participants gave much harsher sentences to the foreign-accented than native defendant, but only when defendants’ statements were free of noise. Moreover, we found that participants’ implicit biases were a relevant predictor of the sentences they gave to the defendants. Our results suggest that categorization/stereotyping is the main mechanism responsible for the effect of defendants’ accents on jurors’ appraisals, and that members of an estimated group who violate social norms are punished more severely.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2021-06-08T07:53:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X211022785
       
  • Implicit and Explicit Attitudes toward Hearing Aids: The Role of Media
           Language

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      Authors: Claudia Manzi, Roberta Adorni, Gabriele Di Cicco, Valeria Milano, Efisio Manunta, Fabio Montermini, Maja Becker, Patrizia Steca
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Despite widespread hearing problems among older adults, only a minority uses hearing aids. The stigma associated with such aids represents a key factor modulated by language. The purpose of this study is to analyze the impact of different forms of media communication on both implicit and explicit attitudes toward hearing aids. A preliminary analysis highlighted an over-representation of “technical” and “medical” terms in the corpus linguistic commonly used by the press. These results were used to design an online experimental study. The results suggested that the exposure to a language that includes informal words—as opposed to the technical terms commonly used by the press—favors positive implicit and explicit attitudes toward hearing aids, particularly among people who have direct contact with older adults. Overall, the use of an informal language in the press could generate a style of communication that positively influences people’s attitudes toward hearing aids.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2021-04-15T12:47:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X211009292
       
  • Is Group-Directed Praise Always Welcome' Reactions to Ingroup and
           Outgroup Praise Depend on Linguistic Abstraction

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      Authors: Silvia Moscatelli, Monica Rubini
      First page: 439
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This research examined how recipients reacted to group-directed praise formulated by ingroup or outgroup members and varying in linguistic abstraction. Study 1 (N = 81) showed that ingroup praise was perceived as more sincere when formulated in abstract (vs. concrete) terms, whereas outgroup praise formulated in abstract terms was seen as less sincere than concrete praise. In Study 2 (N = 89), recipients of outgroup praise formulated in abstract versus concrete terms attributed more hidden agenda and prejudice to the speaker, and perceived lower congruency between the speaker’s words and beliefs; the opposite pattern occurred for ingroup praise. Perceptions of congruency and hidden agenda mediated the effects of speaker group membership and linguistic abstraction on recipients’ perception of the praising message. This research points out that linguistic abstraction influences the appraisal of group-directed praise as it works as a cue of speakers’ motives. It also suggests important implications for developing successful communications between groups.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2021-04-07T11:01:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X211000838
       
  • You Liar! Attributions of Lying

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      Authors: Drew A. Curtis
      First page: 504
      Abstract: Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Language is vastly important in shaping cognitions. The word “liar” is used in a variety of social contexts and deception literature, eliciting numerous images, and is rarely the object of research. Two studies explored how people think of the social cognitive label of “liar.” In Study 1, the actor-observer difference in the liar attribution was examined, in how people view their own lying compared to others’ lies. Additionally, attitudes and acceptability of self and others’ lies were investigated. In Study 2, the liar attribution was examined across various types of lies. Results indicated that people judge others to be more deserving of the liar label than one’s self and others lie based on their disposition. Additionally, people held more negative attitudes toward others who lie but were more accepting of others who lie.
      Citation: Journal of Language and Social Psychology
      PubDate: 2021-03-11T11:23:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261927X21999692
       
 
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