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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 277)
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 139)
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 127)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 110)
Violence and Victims     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
British Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Qualitative Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Advances in Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Research on Social Work Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Clinical Social Work Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Family Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
The Milbank Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Qualitative Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Social Work & Social Sciences Review     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Critical and Radical Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Asian Journal of Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Public Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Critical Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Policy Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 13)
Social Work Education: The International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Contemporary Rural Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Community Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Families in Society : The Journal of Contemporary Social Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Forensic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Partner Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Service social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Care Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Social Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Work With Groups     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Global Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
African Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australian Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Care Management Journals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
ACOSS Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Comparative Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Third Sector Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sociedade e Estado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 2)
African Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Social Work and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geopolitical, Social Security and Freedom Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Human Rights and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal for Specialists in Group Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Groupwork     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Islamic Counseling : Jurnal Bimbingan Konseling Islam     Open Access  
Tidsskriftet Norges Barnevern     Full-text available via subscription  
Tidsskrift for velferdsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for omsorgsforskning     Open Access  
Nordisk välfärdsforskning | Nordic Welfare Research     Open Access  
Socialinė teorija, empirija, politika ir praktika     Open Access  
Revista Serviço Social em Perspectiva     Open Access  
ConCienciaSocial     Open Access  
Bakti Budaya     Open Access  
Voces desde el Trabajo Social     Open Access  
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access  
Janus Sosiaalipolitiikan ja sosiaalityön tutkimuksen aikakauslehti     Open Access  
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Leidfaden : Fachmagazin für Krisen, Leid, Trauer     Hybrid Journal  
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Prospectiva : Revista de Trabajo Social e Intervención Social     Open Access  
International Journal of Care and Caring     Hybrid Journal  
Volunteer Management Report     Full-text available via subscription  
Social Work / Maatskaplike Werk     Open Access  
Argumentum     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Guidance and Counseling     Open Access  
Trabajo Social Global - Global Social Work     Open Access  
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
unsere jugend     Full-text available via subscription  
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Trabajo Social     Open Access  
Developmental Child Welfare     Hybrid Journal  
Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri     Open Access  
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access  
Soziale Passagen     Hybrid Journal  
Tempo Social     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Family Issues
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.86
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 19  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0192-513X - ISSN (Online) 1552-5481
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Children’s Experiences of Lockdown and Social Distancing in the
           Covid-19 Pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gustavo González-Calvo, Valeria Varea, Alfonso García-Monge
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Covid-19 was declared a pandemic in March 2020, and the world has witnessed significant changes since then. Spain has been forced to go into extreme lockdown, cancelling all school classes and outdoor activities for children, which may have significant consequences on young people. This paper explores how young children have experienced lockdown as a consequence of the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and what they think about their future lives after Covid-19. Data were collected from 73 students aged from 7 to 9 years old, using participant-produced drawings and short questions with children’s and parents’ descriptive comments. We used a children’s rights perspective and the Freirean approach of a pedagogy of love and hope to analyse the data. Results suggest that participants have been through significant changes in their routines, and that what they miss most from their lives before Covid-19 is playing outdoors with their friends and visiting their grandparents. To our knowledge, this paper is the first of its kind in investigating how the Covid-19 pandemic has influenced the ways that children lived during pandemic and its possible implications for their futures.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T09:29:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221094038
       
  • ‘I Am on a Family Planning Program, but I Have Not Told My Husband’:
           Contraceptive Decision-Making of Child Brides in Ghana

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sylvia E Gyan, George Domfe, Antoinette Tsiboe-Darko
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores the factors that influence child bride’s decision making, either independently or jointly on modern contraceptive use in Ghana. The findings of this study are based on qualitative data collected through in-depth interviews with 15 child brides aged 15–24 years from four administrative regions in Ghana. It was observed that knowing about contraceptives, quality of the knowledge, attitude and sociocultural influences affected child brides’ decision to use contraception. Thus, autonomy in decision making requires first, making the decision to access contraceptives and secondly, whether the decision can be implemented alone or with permission or in consultation with their spouses. It can be concluded from this study that child brides are not always as vulnerable and unable to exercise agency as is sometimes suggested because they sometimes used contraceptives without informing their partners although there is the possibility of a negative backlash from their partners when it is known.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T10:15:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221093297
       
  • The Remarriage Belief Inventory: A Validation Study in the Remarried
           Portuguese Population

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Carina Santos, Brian J. Higginbotham, Maria Emília Costa, Mariana Veloso Martins
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Dysfunctional beliefs from previous experiences and unrealistic expectations can lead to low remarital quality. This study assessed the factor structure of the Portuguese version of the Remarriage Belief Inventory (RMBI). Data were analyzed with 741 remarried individuals. Participants were recruited through a web-based survey (LimeSurvey software) between January 2019 and July 2020. Two independent researchers translated the RMBI, and retroversion was performed by an independent bilingual research. The Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) revealed seven dimensions (Adjustment, Finances, Priority, Partner, Success, Stepfamily, and Past) confirming the original seven-factor structure. Confirmatory Factor Analysis confirmed good fit of data (CFA) fit (χ2 (130) = 363.588, χ2/df = 2.79, p = .000; CFI = .93; GFI = .95; RMSEA = .05). Results revealed good internal consistency (α = 0.72). The RMBI also revealed good psychometric properties for construct validity, with measures of dyadic adjustment, stress, and social support. Implications and future research were discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T10:15:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221092052
       
  • The Well-Being of Parents in the Year After Childbirth

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Andreja Brajša-Žganec, Marija Džida, Tihana Brkljačić, Ljiljana Kaliterna Lipovčan, Lana Lučić
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study is to analyze the well-being of individuals who had a newborn child during the previous year and to compare their well-being with that of individuals who had children previously and with childless individuals. The sample consisted of 2008 respondents (81% women) who participated in an online survey. Respondents rated their life satisfaction, positive and negative affect, and flourishing in two time points spanning one year. 102 respondents experienced childbirth between the two time points, 673 had children before, and 1233 did not have children. The results show that life satisfaction increased between two time points in the subsample of individuals who had a child during the previous year; they also had higher life satisfaction compared to other parents and non-parents. There was no difference between the groups in affective well-being and flourishing. However, parents who had a newborn child showed a decrease in flourishing.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T03:33:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221096799
       
  • College Student Persistence: A Focus on Relationships With Parents

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Suzanne Bartle-Haring, Alessandra Bryant, Stephen M. Gavazzi
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to investigate persistence to degree in a nationally representative sample of college students. The sample included first-generation and/or underrepresented minority students who had ever been enrolled in a 4-year degree program, and specifically focused on relationships with parents to examine if relationship quality had any impact on persistence to degree using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) 1997 dataset. We conducted logistic regression analyses to predict persistence. Predictors included first-generation status, ethnic minority status, sex, family income, family structure, geographic location of home, and relationship with parents. Our most significant finding was that the relationship students had with their parents was more predictive of non-persistence than first-generation status. These results are discussed in terms of their implications for family-based programming for students struggling to persist in college, and the necessity to involve the family in an intentional way throughout the college experience.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-03-27T04:35:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211068920
       
  • Whiteness in the COVID-19 Pandemic: Who is Talking About Racism With Their
           Kids'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Keira B. Leneman, Sydney Levasseur-Puhach, Sarah Gillespie, Irlanda Gomez, Gordon C. Nagayama Hall, Leslie E. Roos
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The present study investigated factors associated with parent awareness and socialization surrounding COVID-19-related racial disparities among White parents of children ages 1.5–8 living in Canada and the United States (N = 423, 88% mothers). Participants responded to an online survey about parenting during the pandemic between mid to late-April 2020. Participants reported on their level of awareness of COVID-19-related racial disparities as well as how often they discussed these with their children. Although 52% reported some level of awareness, only 34% reported any amount of discussion with their child about it. Regression models were used to further examine stress-related, socioeconomic, parenting, and news-watching associations with awareness and socialization. This study provides unique insight into which White parents are aware of racial inequities exposed by the pandemic and which are choosing to speak to their children about them. Current summary recommendations for White racial socialization and related research are also presented.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-03-27T04:25:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221079328
       
  • Chinese Lesbian and Gay Adults’ Self-Reported Experiences of Negative
           Treatment and Violence From Family of Origin: Evidence From a Larger-Scale
           Study in China

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yiu Tung Suen, Eliz Miu Yin Wong, Randolph C. H. Chan
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Lesbian and gay adults’ self-reported experiences of violence from family of origin in adulthood have been less examined in previous research on interpersonal violence from intimate others. In China, while it has been understood that lesbians and gay men face mounting pressure to marry and have children, there is little empirical evidence on their experiences of violence from family of origin. This paper analyzes self-reported experiences of negative treatment and violence from a larger-scale study in China of 11,048 Chinese lesbian and gay cisgender adults. The majority of Chinese lesbians and gay men felt pressure to get married and have children (70.4%), and experienced different forms of negative treatment and violence from their family members based on sexual orientation (54.2%). A significant gender difference was observed. This paper provides novel empirical evidence for the lived experiences of lesbians and gay men in China and bears implications for China’s Anti-domestic Violence Law.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-03-14T01:20:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211064874
       
  • Adolescents’ Perceptions of Sibling Caregiving

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gabrielle C. Kline, Sarah E. Killoren
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of the current study is to examine adolescents’ perspectives of sibling caregiving and how sibling caregiving is associated with adolescent development and family relationships. Using role theory as a framework, focus group data were collected from 13 primarily white (n = 10) female (n = 9) adolescents in a suburban midwestern city and inductive thematic analysis was conducted. Overall, our findings revealed that sibling caregiving is an important part of adolescents’ lives and may have important links to adolescent development and family relationships. It is important to note, however, that while these findings are not without limitations (i.e., lack generalizability) due to sample size and characteristic (predominately female and white), the examination of adolescent’s perspectives is an important avenue as we highlight the multidimensional nature of sibling caregiving, and the influence that sibling caregiving may have on adolescents’ development and family relationships within this sample.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-03-13T07:05:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221079330
       
  • Estrangement Between Siblings in Adulthood: A Qualitative Exploration

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lucy Blake, Becca Bland, Alison Rouncefield-Swales
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Relationships between siblings have been described as the longest lasting an individual can have, yet siblings both can and do become estranged from one another in adulthood. An online survey was disseminated to individuals who had sought support from the charity Stand Alone, which supports individuals who are experiencing family estrangement. Individuals estranged from one full genetic sister and/or brother were asked to describe the relationship in their own words. Open-text responses were thematically analysed from 291 respondents. Family systems were described as being characterised by estrangements, alliances and conflicts; there was variation in the participant’s preferences regarding reconciliation; and most respondents focused on describing their sibling’s challenging or disappointing characteristics and behaviour. The fact that siblings both can and do become estranged challenges commonly held assumptions about family relationships, confirming that they are not necessarily or always life-long, significant or supportive.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-03-11T10:09:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211064876
       
  • Perceptions of Nonreligious Parents

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      Authors: Heather H. Kelley, Loren D. Marks, David C. Dollahite
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Although religious intolerance and marginalization still exist today, research suggests that perhaps one of the most marginalized groups is those who report no religion. Through interviews with 31 nonreligious couples (N = 62 individuals), we investigated what nonreligious parents want religious people to understand about them and their families. Using a team-based approach to qualitative data analysis, we identified three themes related to what our participants wanted religious people to know: (1) we are good people, good parents, and not that different from you; (2) religion does not equate with morality; and (3) do not judge beliefs, actions are what matter. We identified an additional theme regarding how they would like to convey these and other matters to religious people, that we termed as (4) I do/do not want to talk about religion and here is why. Implications include suggestions and recommendations to increase understanding, tolerance, and respect between religious and nonreligious individuals, family members, and groups.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-03-04T10:59:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221079332
       
  • Intergenerational Attitudes Toward Child Maltreatment: A Mixed Methods
           Study of Parents and Their Late Adolescents Following a Canadian
           Two-Generation Preschool Program

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Carla Ginn, Robert Perry, Karen Benzies
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      For Canadian families experiencing social vulnerability, challenges of living with low income, parental mental illness, addiction, and/or lack of social support are frequently intergenerational. US two-generation programs demonstrate positive effects on child and parent well-being; Canadian two-generation programs are rare, with CUPS (formerly Calgary Urban Project Society) the Canadian exemplar. In this cross-sectional, concurrent, triangulation mixed methods study, we used Maslow’s Hierarchy as a framework. We explored experiences of parents and adolescents at CUPS through written answers on questionnaires (39 parents and 55 adolescents), measuring attitudes toward child maltreatment (44 parent/adolescent dyads), and ACE scores (48 parent/adolescent dyads). Experiences encompassed movement toward resiliency and intergenerational shifts in risk for child maltreatment, including use of corporal punishment, and lower ACE scores in adolescents than parents. Effective early childhood interventions for families experiencing vulnerability must focus on intergenerational approaches, emphasize social support systems, breaking cycles of adversity, and lifelong movement toward resiliency.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-03-04T06:39:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211054459
       
  • Coupling with COVID: The Role of Dyadic Coping in Relationship
           Satisfaction and Psychological Distress during the COVID-19 Pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Michelle T. Leonard, Charles Giraud, Christen Abraham
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Models of dyadic coping suggest that facing a stressful situation, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, with one’s partner to meet their needs is associated with positive outcomes. This study explored dyadic coping and its association with relationship satisfaction and distress in the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. Data were collected online from 564 participants. Participants completed measures of dyadic coping, relationship satisfaction, COVID anxiety, and OCD, and asked to describe their experience in an open-ended question. Results showed that experiences were quite polarized. Significant gender differences and differences for couples with/without children were noted for distress and relationship satisfaction. There was a significant interaction between dyadic coping and relationship satisfaction for women when predicting COVID OCD; however, post-hoc analysis showed that this interaction was only significant for women with children. The potential exponential burden that female couple members may face during COVID-19 as well as implications for intervention, are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-03-02T08:21:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030028
       
  • COVID-19 and Family Distancing Efforts: Contextual Demographic and Family
           Conflict Correlates

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      Authors: Sesong Jeon, Daeyong Lee, Carl F. Weems
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Since the COVID-19 outbreak, family members have spent more time together at home. This study introduces the concept of “family distancing”—the efforts to prevent the spread of the coronavirus to family members. We explore which demographic characteristics are associated with family distancing efforts and how the family distancing efforts are associated with family conflicts. Survey data were collected from adults (N = 324, M = 37 years; SD = 10.5 years; 65.1% female) in Korea. We found that gender, education, marital status, physical health status, and number of family members who live together were significantly associated with family distancing efforts. In addition, lower compliance with the request for family distancing was significantly associated with a higher degree of negative emotions (i.e., anger), which in turn was associated with more family conflict. The findings highlight the potential importance of family distancing efforts to maintain health but also their potential to increase family conflict.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-02-25T10:14:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211055123
       
  • Changes in Perceived Fairness of Division of Household Labor Across
           Parenthood Transitions: Whose Relationship Satisfaction Is Impacted'

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      Authors: Nicole Hiekel, Katya Ivanova
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Using a nationally representative, prospective study of young German adults, we address two research questions: First, are changes in the perceptions of the fairness of (un)paid labor division associated with changes in men’s and women’s partnership satisfaction across fertility transitions' Second, is this association moderated by men and women’s pre-birth gender role attitudes' Our results indicate that differences between respondents in changes in relationship satisfaction after fertility transitions could be observed across perceptions of the fairness of the division of labor, rather than across differing actual divisions of household labor. That effect was found for women, but not men. Across gender role attitudes, the perception of a stable fair arrangement was detrimental to traditional men’s relationship satisfaction, whereas the perception of increased fairness protected against declines in relationship satisfaction only for egalitarian women. We discuss how the mismatch between imagined and lived realities might affect relationship dynamics across fertility transitions.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T12:50:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211055119
       
  • “We Can’t Say This Won’t Happen to Me”: Parent-Child Communication
           About Anti-Latino Discrimination

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      Authors: Keren Eyal, Krista Perreira, Samantha Schilling
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      In recent years, discrimination toward Hispanic/Latino Americans has escalated, threatening the health of Hispanic/Latino families and children. Previous research in African American families demonstrates the importance of parent–child communication in interrupting the pathway between childhood discrimination and poor health outcomes, but parent–child communication regarding discrimination has not been well-studied in Hispanic/Latino families. This study uses the minority child development model to explore how Hispanic/Latino parents discuss anti-Latino and anti-immigrant discrimination, bias, and unfair treatment with their children. In-depth interviews were performed with Hispanic/Latino immigrant parents (N = 14) of 25 children ages 5–17 years. Interviews were analyzed using phenomenological thematic analysis. Seven major strategies utilized by Hispanic/Latino parents emerged: (1) champion success; (2) comfort and encourage; (3) advocate, appeal, and defend; (4) understand, ignore, and accept; (5) learn from it; (6) teach tolerance; and (7) prepare for bias. The development of resources to enhance parent skills in this area is discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-02-16T01:34:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211069585
       
  • Network Financial Transfers and Psychological Distress Among Unmarried
           Mothers

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      Authors: Melissa Radey
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Almost 50% of single-mother households live below 200% of the poverty line. In addition to material needs, mothers living in poverty have higher levels of psychological distress. Although some forms of network support (e.g., perceived support, welcomed support) promote well-being, how do financial transfers relate to unmarried mothers’ levels of distress' Drawing from support mobilization, social inequity, and reciprocity theories, this study used The Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (FFCWS) (n = 3,117 mothers and 10,676 observations) and longitudinal mixed-effects models to examine financial transfer behavior stability and its relationship to maternal psychological distress. Results indicate that, net of extensive controls, mothers commonly participated in giving or receiving money despite their disadvantaged, volatile circumstances, and engagement, regardless of direction, related to more symptoms of distress. This connection is problematic given the weakening public cash safety net and U.S. economic uncertainty.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-02-12T06:56:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211071051
       
  • Mental Health Across the Life Course for Men and Women in Married,
           Cohabiting, and Living Apart Together Relationships

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      Authors: Deniz Yucel, Beth A. Latshaw
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the underexplored relationship between union type and mental health for married, cohabiting, and living apart together (“LAT”) individuals. Further, we assess whether gender and age moderate (separately and jointly) this relationship. Using data from Wave 1 of the Generations and Gender Survey (N = 34,833), results suggest that cohabitors and LATs have worse mental health than married individuals. The negative effects of cohabiting or living apart on mental health are stronger for women than men. Young and middle-aged female LATs (to an equal magnitude) have worse mental health than married women of the same ages, while there are no such differences among older women. Middle-aged and older male LATs have worse mental health than married men of the same ages (with the larger effect found for middle-aged men), but there are no such differences among younger men. Thus, we highlight previously undocumented gender and life course dynamics of union type and mental health.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-02-04T01:02:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211068038
       
  • The Double-Edged Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Chinese Family
           Relationships

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      Authors: Yongqiang Jiang, Yuxin Tan, Dazhou Wu, Jinxiu Yin, Xiuyun Lin
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      To comprehensively understand the Chinese family relationships (i.e., marital relationship, parent–child relationship, sibling relationship, and grandparent–grandchild relationship) during the COVID-19 pandemic, this study investigated the changes of family relationships and the individual differences related to knowledge of the COVID-19, personality traits (i.e., neuroticism and optimism), and emotional characteristics (i.e., emotion regulation and negative emotional reactions). From March 1 to April 5, 2020, 8821 participants were involved, including 3995 teenagers, 1146 unmarried young adults, 3571 married adults, and 109 grandparents. Results revealed a double-edged pattern that people experienced both positive changes and negative changes during the pandemic. Teenagers reported significant negative changes in the relationships with their parents. Peoples’ knowledge of the COVID-19, neuroticism, optimism, emotion regulation, and negative emotional reactions were in varying extents to which accounted for the individual differences in the changes of family relationships. These findings help recognize the overall Chinese family relationships during the hard period.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-02-03T07:11:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211041990
       
  • ‘I Have to be the Mum and Dad for 4 Weeks Straight’. Exploring the
           Experiences and Support Needs of Australian Parents and Partners Engaged
           in Fly-In/Fly-Out Work Practices

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      Authors: Cassandra K. Dittman, Joanne A. Rathbone
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Fly-in/fly-out (FIFO) work practices have become common place in Australia over the past two decades. Research has documented the personal impact of these work practices, but little peer-reviewed research is available on the family impact of this work. The study aimed to better understand (1) the impact of FIFO work arrangements on children, parents and relationships; (2) strategies parents use to manage the home-away cycle; and (3) preferences for parenting support. Interviews were conducted with six FIFO workers and 15 partners of FIFO workers with at least one child aged 2–12 years. Inductive thematic analysis revealed six themes: effects on children; effects on family relationships; effects on parenting; managing transitions; managing separations; and the need for flexible, tailored parenting support. The findings provided important insight into the experiences of working FIFO with a family and can inform the development of parenting support targeted at FIFO families.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-29T06:43:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211071061
       
  • Coping With Parental Pressure to Get Married: Perspectives From Chinese
           “Leftover Women”

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      Authors: Tianhan Gui
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Postponed marriage has become a trend in China’s major cities over the last decade. However, due to persistent traditional gender role expectations, women who remain single in their late 20s and beyond still face significant parental pressure to get married and are the subjects of negative societal discourse. Through semi-structured interviews with 30 never-married Chinese professional women who are white-collar workers based in Beijing, this research explored the parental pressure these women faced, their response to the pressure, and their own perceptions on marriage and romantic relationships. The results demonstrate the two generations’ different viewpoints on marriage, romantic relationships, and gender roles, as well as young women’s aspirations for autonomy and independence.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-29T05:37:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211071053
       
  • The Relationships of Divorced Grandparents with Their Grandchildren

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      Authors: Ahuva Even-Zohar
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      In recent years, divorce at a later age has increased in Israel as well as in other developed countries, and there are more grandparents who go through a divorce. The purpose of this study was to examine the meaning of divorced grandparents’ relationship with their grandchildren. Employing a qualitative methodology, in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 22 divorced Israeli grandparents aged 54–81. Analysis of the interviews identified several themes: Informing the grandchildren about the divorce and their response; the effect of the relationships between the divorced grandparents on the grandchildren’s perception of the divorce; the effect of the relationship with the parents' generation on relations between grandparents and grandchildren; the relationship with the grandchildren. The results show that grandparents who experience divorce continue to be involved in their grandchildren's life, although some changes can be seen following the divorce process.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-19T11:57:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211055110
       
  • Mate Selection Behavior of GED Recipients

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      Authors: Kate H. Choi, Brandon G. Wagner
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The General Educational Development (GED) degree is designed to be a credential equivalent to the high school diploma. However, growing evidence indicates that GED recipients have worse outcomes than high school graduates. Such findings raise the question: is the GED socially equivalent to the high school diploma' Although educational assortative mating patterns have long been used as a barometer of the social distance across educational groups, there has not been a study that has addressed this question by examining the marital sorting patterns of GED recipients. Using log-linear models, our study shows that the odds of intermarriage between GED recipients and high school graduates resemble those between GED recipients and those without a secondary degree. Racial/ethnic minorities had greater difficulty crossing the GED/high school graduate boundary when they married. Our findings detract from the purported view that the GED degree is equivalent to a traditional high school diploma.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-10T07:51:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211059825
       
  • Student Parents or Parent Students in Lockdown Pandemic' A Third Space
           approach

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      Authors: Zoi Nikiforidou, Sarah Holmes
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The pandemic has affected families in many ways. Parents, who at the same time are studying, tend to be an under-represented cohort of adult learners, and in this study, their experiences and reflections, on how they navigated through their dual identities during lockdown, are explored. Through an online survey, 91 student parents from 20 different higher education institutions in the United Kingdom shared their views as to how they balanced their parenting and studying responsibilities during lockdown in early 2021. Findings indicate how student parents felt both their roles were impacted rather negatively, but also how the pandemic provided them opportunities for bridging and resisting binaries, through the emergence of a Third Space (Bhabha, H. K. (1994). The location of culture. New York, NY: Routledge; Soja, E. W. (1996). Third space: Journeys to Los Angeles and other real-and-imagined places. Malden, MA: Blackwell). The study shows how student parents re-positioned their identities, identified ways to manage disruptions caused by the lockdown and acknowledged family time and family relationships as very important.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-08T11:29:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211067524
       
  • Socio-economic Correlates of Marital Status and Marriage Timing Among
           Adult Men in Nigeria

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      Authors: David A. Okunlola, Olusesan A. Makinde, Stella Babalola
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      There is a gradual tendency towards prolonged bachelorhood among men in Nigeria. Studies have linked this to socio-economic factors, but this evidence is sparsely explored in the context of Nigeria. Hence, this study fills the knowledge gap. The 2016/17 Nigeria Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey data of 7803 adult men (aged 18–34 years) was analysed by using descriptive and fitting binary logitic regression and Cox regression models. Results show that slightly more than one-third of adult men in Nigeria (35%) had a marriage history and their median age at first marriage was about 24 years. Educated men (than the uneducated) and those in middle wealth group (than the poor men) were less likely to have ever been married and to delay marriage, respectively. Wealthy men were more likely to delay marriage. Employed men were more likely to have a marriage history and to delay marriage.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T07:18:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211059828
       
  • Parental Mediation of Cell Phone Use and Adolescent Autonomy

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      Authors: Ron Warren, Lindsey Aloia
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Adolescents’ cell phone use occurs during significant developmental shifts in parent–adolescent relationships, as adolescents’ drives for independence can conflict with parents’ desires for connection. This study examines parental mediation of cell phone use within an interpersonal and family communication framework. Previous mediation research has not examined connections with social penetration theory, uncertainty reduction theory, relational dialectics theory, and communication privacy management, each of which has conceptual links to parental mediation. Cell phone mediation reflects the broader phenomenon of disclosure in interpersonal relationships. The extent to which individuals disclose information is influenced by personal desires for autonomy and connection, privacy and intimacy, which are components of interpersonal and family communication theories. This study explores the notion that families develop norms and expectations about cell phones that might influence parental mediation. Results indicate that perceptions of parent–child relationships and family expectations for cell phone use both significantly influence mediation.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T06:13:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211066955
       
  • Parenting During a Pandemic: Predictors of Parental Burnout

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      Authors: Cara S. Swit, Rose Breen
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The global pandemic, COVID-19, has resulted in significant changes in many aspects of our lives. For parents, the impact has been great as they combine work, family, and homeschooling while maintaining the wellbeing of themselves and their family. COVID-19 has brought about challenges that many parents have not faced before, putting them at risk for parental burnout. The goal of this study was to investigate risk and protective factors that predict parental burnout during COVID-19. Eighty-six parents (75 mothers; Mage = 40.73; SD = 7.88) living in New Zealand during COVID-19 lockdown participated in the survey. Results showed parental violence, parental constellation, unemployment, major decreases in finances, and living in a disadvantaged neighborhood were the strongest predictors of parental burnout. Child independence and parental emotional regulation were the strongest protective predictors of parental burnout. COVID-19 restrictions did not predict parental burnout. Findings highlight that promoting protective factors may support parental equilibrium during future crises.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T06:02:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211064858
       
  • Familial Predictors of Alcohol and Drug Use-Related Problems Among
           Middle-Aged and Older Adults

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      Authors: Sara E. Miller, Jennifer L. Maggs, Rina D. Eiden, David M. Almeida
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study evaluated whether recent family member alcohol and substance use problems (ASP) and density of family ASP (i.e., number of members with ASP) predict alcohol-related problems and drug use-related problems among middle-aged and older adults. Data were drawn from participants (age 42–93 years, n = 2168) in the longitudinal Midlife in the United States Study (MIDUS). Poisson regression models revealed that adults’ alcohol- and drug use-related problems were predicted by similar problems among family members. In particular, parent and partner ASP, but not child ASP, predicted alcohol-related problems in the middle-aged and combined samples, while only partner ASP predicted participants’ drug use-related problems. In addition, density of family ASP predicted alcohol-related problems, but not drug use-related problems. There were no gender interactions. Study findings highlight that understanding how adult children, spouses, and aging parents impact each other’s substance use should be a priority of future aging and family research.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T01:21:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211064877
       
  • We Are Family: Effects of a Relationship-Strengthening Prevention
           Intervention on Parenting Behaviors Among Black and Latino Adolescent
           Couples

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      Authors: Valen R. Diaz, Tashuna Albritton, Marina Katague, Victoria Dancy, Jean M. Breny, Trace Kershaw
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Relationship strain or dissolution between new parents can affect the co-parenting relationship and parenting engagement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a relationship-strengthening intervention on parenting behaviors among adolescent couples. Data from a pilot randomized control trial conducted with predominantly Black and Latino couples were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance. Observed intervention * time effects and intervention * time * gender effects were not statistically significant, but had small to moderate effect sizes. Intervention couples demonstrated increased parenting sense of competence compared to control couples. Gender differences in intervention effects were observed for both parenting experiences and parenting engagement. Given the pilot nature of the study, these findings provide preliminary evidence of the effectiveness of this couple-based intervention for improving parenting outcomes. Future research should assess the intervention in a larger sample and leverage technology-based approaches as methods for content delivery.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-05T05:11:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211064860
       
  • Consensus on Constraints in Marital Satisfaction Among Married People in
           African Context

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      Authors: Tumbwene E. Mwansisya, Ipyana H. Mwampagatwa
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Marriage is considered as the most important social institution and symbol of adulthood in Africa. However, the trend of divorce has increased alarmingly in recent years. We explored the constraints towards marital satisfaction by using the Delphi technique with assumptions that couples are the experts on their marriages. Participant’s panel included married heterosexual couples divided into two groups: men and women couple’s panels. The group of women’s panel included 31 participants and men’s panel contained 25 males. Then in the final stage, both groups provided their views and discussed on the possible solutions to the identified constraints. Five major themes emerged: satisfaction in sexuality among couples, difficulties in communication, economic and financial conflicts, the role of extended families, and opportunity for behavioural change to achieve marital satisfaction. Our findings support the hypothesis that satisfaction with sexual intercourse, respectful communication, financial stability and careful handling of relatives influence marital satisfaction.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-04T11:35:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211056939
       
  • Facilitators and Barriers of Mother Engagement in a Home-based Parenting
           Program Following Concerns of Child Maltreatment

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      Authors: Alison Fogarty, Holly Rominov, Monique Seymour, Kirsty Evans, Catherine Fisher, Andi Jones, Jacquie O’Brien, Rebecca Giallo
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The current study aimed to explore mothers’ perceptions of facilitators and barriers to engagement in the HoPES program, an intensive home-visiting intervention for families with young children identified as having child maltreatment concerns. Seven mothers who had participated in the program participated in semi-structured interviews about their experiences. Thematic analysis was conducted using NVivo Version 12. Themes relating to facilitators of engagement included the following: (1) clinician behaviours; (2) treatment relevance/acceptability; (3) strong therapeutic relationship; (4) mothers’ cognitions and beliefs about treatment and (5) program delivery. Themes relating to barriers to engagement included the following: (1) contextual/external barriers to treatment; (2) treatment relevance/acceptability; (3) mothers’ cognitions and beliefs about treatment and (4) program processes. This study highlights the important role which services and clinicians have in engaging parents at risk of child maltreatment. Specifically, the prioritisation of the therapeutic relationship through all intervention processes, and the utilisation of strength-based approaches, may facilitate engagement.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-04T08:04:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211067525
       
  • “It’s More Us Helping Them Instead of Them Helping Us”: How Class
           Disadvantage Motivates Asian American College Students to Help Their
           Parents

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      Authors: Blair Harrington
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      While considerable attention has been given to the ways that parents contribute to undergraduates’ success, far less attention has been given to what these students do for their families, variation in students’ provision of help, or the consequences of giving. Drawing on 61 interviews with Asian American college students from diverse ethnic and class backgrounds, this paper extends conventional understanding of families and college by analyzing the financial assistance and translation support Asian American undergraduates give their parents. Using a trichotomous model of class—comparing disadvantaged, advantaged, and ambiguous students—I show that class disadvantage motivated students’ helping, advantage deterred it, while the ambiguous fell in between. Culture (i.e., filial piety) and a broad view of family (i.e., siblings’ contributions) also influenced students’ help. Finally, based on interview data combined with partial support from analysis of participants' grade point averages data, I demonstrate that helping had positive and negative implications for students’ college experience.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-03T10:54:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211064867
       
  • Does Gender Difference Exist in Typologies of Intergenerational
           Relations' Adult Son–Parent and Daughter–Parent Relations in Hong
           Kong

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      Authors: Chenhong Peng, Qijin Cheng, Paul S. F. Yip
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the typologies of adult son–parent and daughter–parent relations in Hong Kong, a place where East meets West. Data were drawn from a survey of 834 adult children (381 sons and 453 daughters) aged between 18 and 60 with at least one living parent. Latent class analysis identified four types of relations for both son-parent and daughter-parent relations: tight-knit, distant ascending ties, obligatory, and detached. Sons were more likely to engage in obligatory and tight-knit relations with parents, whereas daughters were more likely to engage in distant ascending ties relations. Multinomial logistic regression found that adult children who were young, single, or co-residing with their own child aged above 18 were more likely to have tight-knit relations with their elderly parents. Our findings suggest that although the male-dominated norm remains influential in Hong Kong, daughters are increasingly maintaining close interactions with their parents.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-03T10:43:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211066954
       
  • The Struggle to Balance Work and Family Life During the COVID-19 Pandemic:
           Insights Based on the Situations of Working Women in Delhi

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      Authors: Deeksha Tayal, Aasha Kapur Mehta
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic generated economic contraction across the world. In India, the stringent lockdown led to extreme distress. The unprecedented situation adversely affected the women’s efforts to balance professional life with family life because of a disproportionate increase in their domestic work burden and a shift in their workstation to home. Since every job cannot be performed remotely, women employed in healthcare services, banks and media witnessed additional risks of commuting and physical interaction at the workplace. Based on personal interviews of women in the Delhi-NCR region, the study aims to explore the commonalities and variances in the challenges experienced by the women engaged in diverse occupations. Using the qualitative methodology of flexible coding, the study finds that a relatively larger section of women travelling to their office during the pandemic, rather than those working from home, had an effective familial support system that helped them navigate this tough time.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-03T05:56:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211058817
       
  • Marital Quality as a Mechanism Linking Childhood Abuse to Mental Health

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      Authors: Michael Fitzgerald, Jacob A. Esplin
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Childhood abuse has been widely associated with mental health problems in adulthood and marital quality may be one possible mediator. We examine marital quality as a mediator linking childhood abuse to positive affect, negative affect, emotionally reactivity, and aggression. Using data from Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS), results of structural equation modeling indicate that the indirect effects from childhood abuse to each of the mental health outcomes were significant. Marital quality may be a source of resilience among adults who were abused in childhood and could be a point of intervention for clinicians.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-03T05:03:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211059831
       
  • Difficulties Imposed on the Parent–Child Relationship Due to the
           COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Iraklis Grigoropoulos
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The present study tested whether emotionally burdened parents due to the COVID-19 pandemic might appraise their relationship with their children more negatively. The current cross-sectional study was circulated through social media. A total of 265 respondents took part in the study. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to examine the association between predictor variables and the parent–child relationship. This study’s results report that older fathers with higher levels of COVID-19 related fear are more likely to appraise negatively their relationship with their children. Therefore, this study suggests the need for family-level strategies to address better the psychological aspects related to the pandemic outbreak.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-31T09:38:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211067527
       
  • Grandparent Caregiver Wellbeing: A Strengths-Based Approach Utilizing the
           Positive Emotions, Engagement, Relationships, Meaning, and Accomplishment
           (PERMA) Framework

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      Authors: Abigail T. Stephan
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Grandparent caregivers experience a complex web of rewards and challenges as the primary source of support for their grandchildren. Consistent with the trend towards a more positive framing of grandparent caregiving, this paper explores the grandparent caregiver experience through a strengths-based approach and makes the case for Seligman's Wellbeing Theory, or PERMA model, being used to support research, programming, and policy. A scoping review of 16 current empirical articles relevant to grandparent caregiver wellbeing revealed the experience of grandparent caregivers aligns well with the five components of Seligman’s PERMA model: positive emotions, engagement, relationships, meaning, and accomplishment. Using this framework with grandparent caregivers, both in theory and in practice, can provide relevant stakeholders with a more comprehensive picture of the needs of this population, enabling them to more effectively support wellbeing for grandparent caregivers and positive developmental outcomes for the growing number of children in their care.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-31T06:02:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211058818
       
  • Symptoms of Anxiety in Mothers During the COVID-19 Lockdown: A Structural
           Equation Model Approach

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      Authors: Borja Romero-Gonzalez, Alvaro Lozano-Ruiz, Jose A. Puertas-Gonzalez, Carolina Mariño-Narvaez, Maria Isabel Peralta-Ramirez
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 global pandemic has forced millions of people to stay confined at home, increasing symptoms of anxiety and stress levels. Women who are also mothers, for their part, not only face the demands of motherhood but must combine working life with family life locked down in their homes. Main objective was to develop an explanatory model of the psychological consequences of COVID-19 and parental and perceived stress in mothers. A total of 261 mothers were evaluated coinciding with the lockdown imposed by the Spanish Government. The model displayed adequate indices and it was found that symptoms of anxiety in mothers increased the levels of perceived stress. The model allows to understand the close relationships between the psychological consequences of lockdown and stress in mothers. Understanding these relationships will help to prepare and direct psychological interventions in this population in the case of a possible new surge.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-30T09:55:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211064861
       
  • ‘Hitting to Teach is One Thing, but to Hurt is a Different Thing,
           isn’t it'’: Understanding Cycles of Intergenerational Violence
           within Families

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      Authors: Jaqueline K. Medeiros, Alex S. G. Pessoa, Amanda F. Barbosa, Linda Liebenberg
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Using a qualitative case study approach, this study aimed to investigate the family context in the childhood of adults who themselves have been violent toward their own children. The study, conducted in Brazil, included the participation of three adults, of both genders, who were neglectful as well as physically and psychologically violent toward their children. Data collection was carried out using the Interview About the Past of Parents (IAPP) and family genograms. Findings demonstrate factors that contribute to the perpetuation of violence across generations, and explain the difficulties in breaking cycles of violence. Importantly, findings highlight how the discipline practices used with their own children were reproductions of the models of parenting and related manifestations of violence that the participants themselves were exposed to in childhood. From these findings, the importance of psychosocial interventions that assist family members in replacing coercive parenting practices with healthier strategies is reiterated.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-29T08:56:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211058824
       
  • Relationship Beliefs and Communication Skills in Turkish Married
           Individuals: Examining the Mediating Role of Partner Accommodation
           Behavior and Emotional Dependency

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      Authors: Yelda Yıldız-Önal, Semra Uçar
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, the mediating role of partner accommodation behavior and emotional dependency in the relationship between relationship beliefs and communication skills was investigated. The study was carried out with 400 married participants. The results of the multiple analysis revealed that relationship belief, emotional dependency, and partner accommodation behavior had an 11.20% variance in communication skills. Relationship belief was associated with lower partner accommodation behavior and greater emotional dependency. Further analysis revealed that communication skills were significantly predicted by partner accommodation behavior but not predicted by emotional dependency. Additionally, the indirect effect of relationship belief on communication skills through partner accommodation behavior was significant. As a result, it has been achieved that partner accommodation behavior has a partial mediating role between the relationship beliefs and communication skills of married individuals. Possible explanations and the implications and limitations of the study were discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-28T11:08:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211064868
       
  • From Piggy Banks to Significant Others: Associations Between Financial
           

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      Authors: Ashley B. LeBaron-Black, Matthew T. Saxey, Toby M. Driggs, Melissa A. Curran
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      While a plethora of research has found that parent financial socialization during childhood and adolescence is linked with financial outcomes in emerging adulthood, recent literature suggests that financial socialization may also impact romantic relationship outcomes in emerging adulthood. Utilizing a sample of 1,950 U.S. emerging adults, we test whether retrospectively recalled parent financial socialization is associated with romantic relationship flourishing and whether this association is mediated by financial behaviors and financial distress. We found that financial socialization was positively associated with financial behaviors and relationship flourishing and was negatively associated with financial distress. Further, financial behaviors partially mediated the association between financial socialization and relationship flourishing, while financial distress did not mediate the association. Together with previous literature, these findings provide useful information for therapists and educators in their pursuit to promote robust parent financial socialization in childhood and adolescence and both financial and relational well-being in emerging adulthood.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-28T10:23:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211057536
       
  • “I didn’t Even Realize I Agreed to Meet the Child so Rarely.”
           Negotiations and Parental Desires in LGBTQ Family Forming Processes

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      Authors: Sonja Anttila, Päivi Palojoki, Jaana Vuori, Hille Janhonen-Abruquah
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores the negotiations taking place in LGBTQ families before a child is born or added to the family. It asks who takes part in the negotiations and what issues are negotiated about. An online questionnaire answered by LGBTQ parents (n = 74) was analyzed with qualitative content analysis. The chain of phases leading to having a child can be referred to as a family forming process with various negotiation topics. The four phases are identified as parental desires, consideration of practices, reflecting on the decision, and concrete actions toward having a child. Besides the LGBTQ parents-to-be, significant others such as friends and the family of origin and external others such as donors and fertility clinics took part in the negotiations. Future parents needed to think about their desires in advance to enable fair and equal negotiations.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-28T06:26:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211064862
       
  • Child–Parent Relationships and Older Adults’ Health: A Cross-Cultural
           Comparison Between China and the United States

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      Authors: Peiyi Lu, Dexia Kong, Mack Shelley
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study compared the associations of child–parent relationships with older adults’ multidimensional health in the United States and China. Two waves of data from the US Health and Retirement Study and its sister study in China (2012–2015) were used (2174 non-Hispanic [NH] White Americans and 4467 Chinese). Linear regression models were conducted for cross-sectional and longitudinal comparisons. Results showed most child–parent relationships had nonsignificant associations with NH White Americans’ health. In contrast, closer child–parent relationships were linked to fewer depressive symptoms and better cognitive function among Chinese. Co-residence was associated with poorer health among older Chinese. Over a 2-year period, living nearby was linked to poorer cognitive function among NH White Americans and fewer depressive symptoms among Chinese. Having weekly contact was predictive of better cognition among Chinese. This study revealed cross-cultural differences in the associations between child–parent relationships and older adults’ health. Family relationships in accordance with Chinese culture could improve health.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-28T04:55:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211064866
       
  • Parents’ Perceptions of Education and Culture as a Context of Parental
           Stress: A Study of Parents of Preschool Children in Hong Kong

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      Authors: Hua Guo, Stephen Wing Kai Chiu
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines how cultural context mediates the association between parents’ perceptions of education and parental stress under the ABC-X model. The analysis was based on a sample of 6454 parents of preschool children in Hong Kong. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis detected two major dimensions of parents’ perceptions of children’s education. Ordinary least squares regression models with interaction terms were used to analyze the identified dimensions’ associations with parental stress. The study found preschool parents with an assertive perception of children’s cognitive skills, discipline, coercion, and competition were more stressed than parents with a responsive perception of children’s non-cognitive skills, self-management, autonomy, and cooperation in education. Parents paradoxically caught between these two types of perceptions were the most stressed. Native residents and earlier immigrant parents also had a higher level of stress than recent immigrants.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-28T04:35:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211064859
       
  • Family Strength During the COVID-19 Pandemic in Indonesia

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      Authors: Tience D. Valentina, Firmanto A. Nurcahyo
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Research on family strength is growing. Limited work has been studied about family strength during the COVID-19 pandemic in Indonesia. This qualitative online survey studied on 65 participants, aged 27–57 years (M = 40.85, SD = 6.8), to explore the characters of Indonesian family strength during the COVID-19 pandemic. Qualitative data were analyzed thematically. This research discovered eight characters of Indonesian family strength, namely:(1) intense and open communication, (2) intimacy and time together, (3) cooperation and division of roles, (4) finding solutions to problems, (5) implementing health protocols, (6) financial stability, (7) religiosity/spiritual well-being, and (8) grateful and optimistic. These eight characters coupled with two other areas, (9) self-development, and (10) concern for the needs of others, become 10 areas that growing up in families during the pandemic. These findings highlight the importance of focusing on characters of family strength when facing crises and uncertainties.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-28T04:25:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211068921
       
  • Family Context Surrounding the Use of Technologies and Their Impact in
           Adolescents’ Media Multitasking

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      Authors: Modesta Pousada, Sara Malo, Ferran Viñas, Mercedes Martín-Perpiñá, Beni Gómez-Zúñiga
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Recent studies pointed out that practically all adolescents are regular users of information and communications technology (ICT). Since the most usual context for the use of technology is the home, our aim is, on the one hand, to characterize the family technology context among adolescents aged between 11 and 18 years and, on the other hand, to analyse the relationship between multitasking and the different variables found within this family context. Participants were 977 adolescents. Significant relationship between the number of devices in the home and the frequency with which these are used are showed. Although a 60% of the adolescents have no parental rules over this use, there does not appear to be any relationship between the existence, or lack thereof, of rules over the use of ICT and multitasking. To reduce adolescents amount of media multitasking, we would recommend having fewer devices in the home rather than imposing rules about their use.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-28T02:00:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211064865
       
  • Women Caregivers Under the Spanish Autonomy and Dependence System: A New
           Social Underclass'

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      Authors: José Ángel Martínez-López, Juan Carlos Solano Lucas, Lola Frutos Balibrea, Marcos Bote Díaz
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Long-term care in Spain has traditionally been provided by women as consequence of a family welfare system based historically on familism and sexual division of labour. The Autonomy and Dependence Law, passed in 2006, involved the regulation by the State of informal care. However, the economic crisis is maintaining and stressing gender differences in relation to care since a new profile of women is being built: poor caregivers, as a specific group responsible for the provision of care, becoming an ‘internal market’ linked to the application of the so called Dependence Law. This study presents an analysis of key secondary sources from the System of Autonomy and Attention to Dependency, the Unemployment System and the most relevant indicators of poverty and social exclusion. In addition, an ad hoc survey and semi-structured interviews were conducted. 55.2% of caregivers are poor women, inactive or unemployed and use the cash-for-care as basic income.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-28T01:31:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211067528
       
  • The Role of Food and Food Behaviors in Intimate Partner Violence

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      Authors: Rei Shimizu, Briana Barocas, Jessamin Cipollina, Michaela Cotner, Nancy Murakami, Yangjin Park, Sejung Yang, Michelle R. Munson
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      There is a paucity of research that systematically examines how food behaviors play a role in intimate partner violence (IPV). Therefore, this qualitative study aims to answer the broad question, what role do food behaviors play in intimate relationships' Food behavior narratives emerging from participants of court-mandated domestic violence (DV) offender treatment programs were analyzed using grounded theory methods. Five themes emerged. Two described inflammatory/harmful roles: (1) food as a trigger for anger and violence and (2) food as a mechanism of “othering.” One theme described the role of food behaviors in promoting unequal and equal relationships: (3) food as an embodiment of gender roles. Two themes described reconciliatory/beneficial roles: (4) food as a mechanism of recognition and (5) and food as a representation of group rapport. Food behaviors can escalate into conflicts but can also be used as a tool to resolve conflicts. Limitations and the need for future research are further discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-24T10:42:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211064863
       
  • Academia and Motherhood: A Narrative Inquiry of Ontario Academic
           Mothers’ Experiences in University Graduate Programs

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      Authors: Kimberly M. Hillier
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This research provides a qualitative narrative inquiry into the experiences of academic mothers from a Southwestern Ontario university campus. Analysis of the semi-structured interviews and focus groups reveal six key themes regarding the nexus between motherhood and academia: (1) intersection of work and family; (2) embodied experiences of pregnancy; (3) mentoring and networking opportunities; (4) inconsistencies between institutional and program policies; (5) departmental support; and (6) an overall level of satisfaction in being a mother during graduate studies. These key findings are discussed and highlight some of the challenges associated with balancing motherhood, graduate studies, and family life. Issues related to maternal well-being, gender equity, diversity, and inclusion within academia are also discussed and shed light on the experiences of this increasing, yet largely overlooked demographic on Canadian university campuses.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-24T04:56:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211064864
       
  • Experiences of Autonomy in Marriage and Divorce Within the Chinese
           Traditional System

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      Authors: Wenhua Yan, Chengshi Huang, Lan Chen, Fengran Dong, Xuan Wu, Ting Hu, Xingyue Zhou, Ruoshui Jin
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The Chinese traditional system features a hierarchical familial culture. When confronted with individualization and autonomy in choices of marriage and divorce, the system remains resilient and intervenes in the lives of young families. To analyze the discourses of divorced urban young adults, 46 participants (23 women and 23 men) aged 24–39 years were recruited from various regions in China. Through an analysis of the stressors involved in marriage and divorce, the concrete values and the conceptions shared in a unitary system of traditions were elicited. The promise of stability in a marriage was the appeal of this system while the focus on offspring was the general interest with evolutionary elements that justify this system. The concept of the individual autonomy of divorce grew from marital experiences and would be confined to the traditional system if its appeal remains unchallenged.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-23T09:07:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211060049
       
  • Parenting Behavior and Adolescent Affect: Bidirectionality and the Role of
           Gender

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      Authors: Hayley D. Seely, Patrick Pössel
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Parents play an important role in adolescent mental health. Yet, research is inconclusive regarding the influence of adolescent affect on parenting behavior. This study examined the bidirectionality between five parenting behaviors and adolescent depressive symptoms—conceptualized by the tripartite model as low positive affect and high negative affect—while investigating gender differences. Adolescents (N = 193) from a Southern United States high school reported their parent’s parenting behavior and their affect twice over a year. Linear regression results revealed relations between parenting behaviors and adolescent affect in both directions. However, when examining the relation between specific parenting behaviors (e.g., involvement) and adolescent affect (e.g., negative affect), results showed unidirectional effects only. Furthermore, significant gender differences emerged. These findings underline the importance of considering the relation between parenting behavior and adolescent affect as bidirectional and with differential associations depending on the parenting behavior and adolescent affect and gender.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-06T11:45:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211058840
       
  • Gender Socialization, Family Leadership, and the Invisible Father in
           Children’s Literature

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      Authors: David A. Anderson, Mykol C. Hamilton, Gabrielle M. Gilkison, Skyler K. Palmer
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: This study examines the portrayals of mothers and fathers in children’s picture books read by millions of parents and children in their formative years. We investigate the extent to which these books present rigid parental stereotypes that misrepresent the potential of family leaders. Method: We performed a content analysis of 203 prominent children’s picture books from recent years to assess the appearances, activities, and emotions of mothers and fathers. Results: Rather than transcending narrow gender stereotypes, fathers in the most-read books continue to be underrepresented, relatively hands-off parents. Mothers are generally portrayed as emotional parents who complete traditional chores and nurture children. Conclusion: The gender socialization of children and parents via children’s books contributes to the notion that mothers and fathers cannot perform as equals in homes or workplaces. Representations of mothers and fathers differ substantially, with fathers playing a secondary role in parenting if they appear at all.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-06T08:36:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211058820
       
  • The Impact of Physical Health, Race, and Financial Status on Relational
           Satisfaction

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      Authors: Eman Tadros, Melanie Barbini, Katherine A. Durante, Michelle Cappetto
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Relationship satisfaction is a subjective and global evaluation of a romantic relationship based on a sense of happiness, contentment, and fulfillment felt by a partner. Prior research demonstrates that relationship satisfaction can help mediate difficult life situations and stress and may contribute to a partner’s well-being and health. However, the literature examining partner-specific sources of relational satisfaction are lacking. Through a medical family therapy lens, this study examined women’s reported physical health’s impact on relational satisfaction. A total of 555 women in romantic relationships completed a survey with questions from the Medical Outcomes Study 20-Item Short-Form Health Survey and the Relationship Assessment Scale. A hierarchical linear regression indicated that physical health, race, and financial status were significant predictors of relational satisfaction. Findings highlight the importance of physical health’s impacts on relational satisfaction and provide clinical implications and future directions on strengthening couples’ relational satisfaction.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-06T02:03:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211058830
       
  • All in the (Definition of) Family: Transnational Parent–Child
           Relationships, Rights to Family Life, and Canadian Immigration Law

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      Authors: Melissa Redmond, Beth Martin
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      International human rights conventions, Canadian law and academic research all support the right to family life. Internationally and domestically, multiple definitions of family are recognized, acknowledging that long-term interpersonal commitments can be based on biological relationships as well as co-residential, legal, and emotional ties. Yet, the Canadian immigration system’s limited and exclusionary understanding of parent–child relationships complicates migrant family reunification. Drawing on qualitative interview and survey data from separated families and key informants who support them, we analyze national status and class assumptions embedded in Canadian immigration standards. We argue that Canadian immigration policies disproportionately deny the right to family life to transnational Canadians and their children who hail from the Global South and/or who are socio-economically disadvantaged. Immigration policies neither recognize the globally accepted “best interests of the child” welfare standard nor the human right to family life. We offer suggestions for addressing these inequities in practice and policy.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-05T09:52:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211054461
       
  • Perceived Mother–Father Dyad Parenting Typologies Across Four
           Regions in the United States

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      Authors: Melanie Stearns, Erica Szkody, Cliff McKinney
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Although much research has investigated parenting styles, few studies have examined parenting across regions of the United States. The current study used a nationwide sample to examine perceived maternal and paternal parenting in four regions of the United States: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West. Participants included 1080 emerging adults who answered questionnaires regarding their perceptions of maternal and paternal parenting styles using an online survey. In all regions, the largest profile indicated a parenting style of High Authoritative/Authoritarian and Moderate Permissive mothers and fathers. Similarly, all regions indicated profiles that were High or Very High Authoritarian mothers and fathers. All regions except the West had a profile with High Authoritative mothers and High or Very High Authoritarian fathers. The Northeast, South, and West also had unique profiles found only in those regions. Thus, results indicate similarities as well as distinct differences in parenting style across regions of the United States.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-05T09:43:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211055114
       
  • A Mixed Methods Study of Relationship Satisfaction in Parents of Children
           With Down Syndrome

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      Authors: Kristen Krueger, Paige Alexander, Meghan Dyster, Robert Steele, Briana S. Nelson Goff, Jessica D. Cless, Mollie Reves, Morgan Wedekind
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Much of the research on parents of children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) has focused on the negative effects on the couple relationship. The current study contributes to the understanding of parental relationship satisfaction in a sample of parents of children with Down syndrome (DS), through a mixed methods study that included data from a large national sample. Parents of children with DS were divided into two groups based on high and low relationship satisfaction scores, with quantitative and qualitative data analyses comparing these two groups. Results indicated differences between high relationship satisfaction and low relationship satisfaction groups on measures of hope, life satisfaction, and coping scores. Qualitative results also indicated group differences. Future research and implications for professionals working with parents of children with DS and other IDD diagnoses should include understanding the unique factors that affect interpersonal functioning.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-05T09:36:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211059827
       
  • COVID-19: Financial Stress and Well-Being in Families

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      Authors: Margarida Rodrigues, Rui Silva, Mário Franco
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      In all areas of knowledge, research has shown the devastating effects of COVID-19, and the impact on families’ financial stress and well-being is one of them. Crises are predictors of families’ financial stress as they produce changes in their income and negative feelings, such as fear and demotivation, which affect well-being. This study analyses the financial and social impact of COVID-19 on families, supported by the ABCE-WB model, with data collection being the result of snowball sampling. The results obtained allow the conclusion that the current pandemic crisis has caused financial stress in families, to a greater or lesser degree, and caused feelings of fear and demotivation as consequences of the general lockdown. The empirical evidence also shows that these effects are positively associated with the perception of their level of well-being. The contribution of the study lies in corroborating the model used. Final considerations are presented together with the limitations and suggestions for future research.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-05T04:21:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211057009
       
  • Preliminary Analysis of the Past and Planned Investments Measure in
           Turkish Dual-Career Married Individuals

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      Authors: Sıdıka Burcu Özgülük Üçok, Zeynep Hatipoğlu- Sümer
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study documents the basic psychometrics of the Past and Planned Investments Measure (PPIM; Goodfriend & Agnew, 2008) in a Turkish sample. Two hundred and sixty-four dual-career married individuals participated and completed the Turkish version of the PPIM (PPIM-TR) along with the Investment Model Scale (IMS; Rusbult, Martz, & Agnew, 1998) and a demographic information form. A four-factor structure of PPIM was confirmed via confirmatory factor analysis albeit with an item deletion due to its irrelevance to Turkish culture. Adequate criterion validity and satisfactory internal consistency results were obtained as a result of the confirmatory factor analysis. Based on the preliminary investigation, the Turkish PPIM proved to be a promising and psychometrically sound measure of the past and planned investments dual-career married individuals make in their relationships. Consequently, the findings were discussed in relation to the relevant literature, implications for counselors were mentioned, and recommendations for future research were presented.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-03T11:08:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211055113
       
  • Migration and Dynamics in Men’s and Women’s Domestic Work

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      Authors: Magdalena Krieger, Zerrin Salikutluk
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      International migration of couples is rising. Still, there is little evidence on men’s and women’s domestic work hours before and after migration. This is despite the fact that domestic work provides deep insights into family life and, for migrants, is directly linked to integration. Therefore, this study examines how immigrant men and women change their domestic work hours following migration, using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP). Our results show that domestic work hours increase for both genders after immigration. However, men are more responsible for running errands than women in the first years after migration. In the long term, the gender gaps return to the pre-migration state, with women shouldering a greater load than men. Accordingly, this study shows that migration only has a short-term impact on couples’ division of domestic work.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-03T03:05:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211055117
       
  • Influences of Maternal Parenting Stress on Child Behavior Problems:
           Examining Harsh and Positive Parenting as Mediators

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      Authors: Andrew J. Flannery, Samantha R. Awada, Elizabeth C. Shelleby
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Extant research demonstrates associations between parenting stress and child internalizing and externalizing problems, with evidence that parenting behaviors may mediate these associations; however, few studies have been longitudinal. The current study tested whether harsh and positive parenting mediated associations between maternal parenting stress and child internalizing and externalizing problems. Data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study were utilized, with 2,606 families who completed the year nine wave included (37% less than high school; 60.2% married/cohabitating; 50% Black, non-Hispanic; 24% Hispanic; and 26% White, non-Hispanic). Analyses revealed parenting stress at age three was significantly associated with higher child internalizing and externalizing problems at age nine. Further, positive but not harsh parenting mediated the link between parenting stress and externalizing problems. Parenting did not mediate the association between parenting stress and internalizing problems. Findings suggest harsh and positive parenting differentially explains associations between parenting stress and child internalizing and externalizing problems.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-02T06:17:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211056207
       
  • Ownership Versus Partnership Parenting: Parenting Styles Within the
           Homeschooling Movement

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      Authors: Kate Henley Averett, Griffin Lacy
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Scholars of the family agree on four main parenting styles, varying along two axes: responsiveness and control. Parental involvement and child autonomy fall under the control axis and are assumed to have an inverse relationship; where parental involvement is high, child autonomy is assumed to be low, and vice versa. Drawing on 22 in-depth interviews and participant observation at five homeschooling conferences, we examine the dominant parenting philosophies and practices of conservative Christian homeschoolers (which we call “ownership parenting”) and secular unschoolers (which we call “partnership parenting”). We demonstrate that the inverse relationship between parental involvement and child autonomy is not present in partnership parenting, which is marked by both high parental involvement and high child autonomy. Unschooling thus represents an empirical case against the theoretical conflation of parental involvement and child autonomy; a new expanded typology is thus posited that divides the control axis into two distinct axes.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-02T04:49:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211055125
       
  • Active Fathers in the United States: Caught Between De-Gendering Care and
           Caring Masculinities

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      Authors: Marina A. Adler
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The United States occupies a unique position among OECD countries because the US provides little policy support for working parents. Despite the resulting extreme time scarcity, US fathers perform similar amounts of child care as European fathers under more family-friendly policy conditions. Using recent national time use survey data, this paper examines whether time scarcity among American working parents, coupled with limited access to affordable child care and traditional masculine identity ideas, is associated with American fathers’ involvement in the daily care of their young children. Results show that fathers do one third of all care activities, contribute one third of the care time, and perform over one half of the 10 activities analyzed here daily. Multivariate analysis indicates that time scarcity, lack of alternative child care options, and traditional masculine identity affect the degree of fathers’ involvement in daily care activities with their under five year olds. Implications for the development of caring masculinities are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-12-02T03:24:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211055510
       
  • Mothers’ Post-separation Experiences of Male Partner Abuse: An
           Exploratory Study

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      Authors: Charisse Hay, Madalena Grobbelaar, Marika Guggisberg
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) involves physical and sexual violence and coercive controlling behaviours to maximise power inequality in abusive relationships. Many women make the decision to exit abusive relationships due to the detrimental impact of IPV on their children. In a qualitative exploration, semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 10 women recruited by purposive and snowballing sampling techniques. Two overarching themes of single mothers’ unique experiences of co-parenting with IPV were revealed through interpretative phenomenological analysis. The first theme was Continuous Victimisation, which indicated that post-separation victimisation was an extension of existing IPV whereby fathers used intimidation, threatening behaviours such as stalking and other monitoring tactics and the deliberate undermining of the mother–child relationship. The second theme identified was Systemic Challenges, indicating how court officials applied a ‘pro-contact’ approach and either minimised or denied mothers’ allegations of IPV and the impact on them and the children. The analysis found a persistent bias against mothers. Implications of the study are discussed before the article concludes that attitudinal change regarding IPV is required by decision makers in court processes with a recognition that abusive men may be unwilling to engage in cooperative parenting that focuses on the children’s developmental, social, emotional, psychological and physical needs.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-11-30T03:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211057541
       
  • Korean Immigrant Fathers’ Perceptions and Attitudes Toward Their
           Parenting Involvement

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      Authors: Kyung-Mee Choi, Caleb Kim, Brady Jones
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This paper examines Korean immigrant fathers’ lived experiences of their parenting involvement by using interpretative phenomenological analysis of seven participants who were recruited through Korean ethnic churches in a Midwestern city. In semi-structured interviews, we explored five main areas affecting Korean immigrant fathers’ perceptions and attitudes toward parenting involvement and found the following issues to be especially salient for participants: limited acculturation progress, economic difficulties, low self-esteem, experiences of intergenerational conflict, and involvement in religious faith and church activities. This study contributes to the field’s understanding of Korean immigrant fathers’ perceptions of intergenerational and intercultural conflicts when raising their Americanized children and underlines for mental health providers the importance of providing culturally competent parenting education on the topic of positive fathering.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-11-29T03:03:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211055512
       
  • Couples’ Communication Behaviour and the Gender Division of Family Work
           Across the Transition to Parenthood

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      Authors: Silke Büchau, Pia S. Schober, Dominik Becker
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates the conceptual argument that constructive and explicit couple communication may reduce gender inequalities in couples’ division of family work. We focus on the transition to parenthood which for most couples in Germany results in a shift towards a more traditional division of labour. Using 314 first-time parents from the German Family Panel, we apply growth curve models to assess whether partners’ prenatal characteristics explain the division of housework and childcare around the time of childbirth and in the following years. After controlling for gender ideologies and economic resources, male partners’ frequency of positive communication is associated with greater father involvement in housework and childcare from the start. However, neither men’s nor women’s communication behaviours dampen the shift towards a more traditional division of housework and childcare in the first years after childbirth. The frequency of negative communication does not correlate with the division of family work.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-11-25T11:32:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211055111
       
  • Men in Mixed-Orientation Marriages in Contemporary China: Unpacking the
           Role of Heteronormativity and Patriarchy

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      Authors: Changhui Song, Joyee Shairee Chatterjee, Donna L. Doane, Philippe Doneys
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This qualitative study based on 34 in-depth interviews (IDIs) with cis-gendered tongzhi (men who are attracted to men) critically explores the factors influencing their decisions to enter mixed-orientation marriages (MOMs) in China. Theoretically, the study weaves together insights from queer and feminist theorizing and analyzes the role of heteronormativity and patriarchy, especially in relation to hegemonic masculine ideals, in the context of marriage norms in contemporary China. Our examination showcases the contradictory role heteronormativity and patriarchy play in simultaneously marginalizing and privileging these groups of men along the axes of sexual, gender, and lineage (inter-generational) hierarchies. It also underscores the continued role of filial piety norms. Overall, the study contributes to deepening our understanding of the complex nature of MOMs and discussions of MOMs as marriage fraud. We argue that examining these non-normative marriages furthers explication of the social structures underpinning gender and sexuality in a context of patriarchal marriage-normative societies.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-11-25T08:15:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211055790
       
  • Children First' Intra-Household Inequality in Reconstituted Couple
           Households

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      Authors: Alba Lanau
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      An increasing number of children are growing up in reconstituted households, formed by a couple and a non-common child. Reconstituted households tend to be poorer, which is associated with worse behavioural and developmental outcomes. Additionally, there is evidence that non-common children receive less economic support from their parents upon leaving the parental home. Using age-specific deprivation data collected in the 2014 European Survey on Income and Living Conditions this article compares the allocation of resources in reconstituted and intact couple households. It shows that indeed, children in reconstituted households are more likely to be deprived compared to those in intact households. However, it finds no evidence that reconstituted households are less likely to prioritise children. The findings hold across welfare regimes. Women are more likely to go without compared with men, although differences are small.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-11-25T07:59:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211055112
       
  • Grandchild Caring and Late-Life Depression: A Comparative Longitudinal
           Study in China and Europe

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      Authors: Yazhen Yang
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The impact of grandparenting on the grandparents’ health has been relatively under-studied. This study examined country differences in the effects of grandchild care provision on the grandparents’ depression in Italy, Spain, China, Denmark and Sweden using the longitudinal Harmonised CHARLS and SHARE data collected between 2010–2015. Controlling for the grandparents’ depression in 2011, grandmothers providing non-intensive grandparental care in Sweden in 2013 reported lower depression score in 2015 compared to those who did not provide any care in 2013. Chinese grandfathers, Italian and Swedish grandmothers who provided intensive grandchild care reported lower depression score compared to their counterparts who did not provide any grandchild care. This study indicates that the Structural Ambivalence Theory can only partially explain the findings, suggesting further theoretical development in this area. Future research can focus on identifying the causal pathways between grandparenting and wellbeing, and the implications of such pathways for older persons’ wellbeing worldwide.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-11-25T07:55:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211050327
       
  • Bullying Victimization Among Ukrainian College Students: The Role of
           Family Communication and Satisfaction, Corporal Punishment and Child Abuse
           

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      Authors: Viktor Burlaka, Jun Sung Hong, Andrea Roberts, Sandra A. Graham-Bermann, Oleksii Serdiuk, Iuliia Churakova
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Bullying involves aggression that is proactive, intentional, and repeated in a relationship with unequal power. We assessed the association of recent bullying victimization with family processes during childhood using standardized measures in a sample of 1008 young adults attending 10 Ukrainian universities in Ukraine. Structural equation modeling was utilized to examine the associations between family communication and satisfaction, childhood corporal punishment and abuse, and adulthood bullying victimization. The majority of participants had been bullied by a peer or teacher (62.38%) and had a history of corporal punishment (63.46%). There were direct effects of child abuse and corporal punishment and family communication style on bullying victimization during young adulthood. The extent of satisfaction with students’ families of origin showed indirect effects. The results highlight the present needs of many students, as well as the risk factors associated with bullying victimization during their post-secondary education years.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-11-24T03:24:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211055514
       
  • Maternal Informal Learning Experiences that Shape Parenting Practices

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      Authors: Frances L. Coolman, Khara L. P. Turnbull, Jennifer LoCasale-Crouch, Rachel Y. Moon, Fern R. Hauck, Ann Kellams, Eve Colson
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: Current understanding of the linkage between maternal education and parenting practices has largely been informed using a narrow definition of educational attainment—the highest level of education an individual has completed. However, the proximal processes that shape parenting, including informal learning experiences, are also important to understand. Less is known about the informal learning experiences that shape parenting decisions and practices. To this end, we conducted a qualitative inquiry about the informal learning experiences of mothers of children ages 3–4 years with the specific goal of understanding how maternal informal learning experiences shape parenting decisions and practices. Design: We conducted interviews with 53 mothers from across the United States who had previously participated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of an intervention targeting infant care practices. We recruited a purposive sample of mothers chosen to maximize diversity across educational attainment and adherence to infant care practices targeted in the RCT. Using a grounded theory approach, data were analyzed using an iterative process for organizing codes and themes that mothers identified as informal learning experiences. Results: We identified seven themes representing distinct types of maternal informal learning experiences that impact parenting practices, including: (1) experiential learning during childhood; (2) experiential learning during adulthood; (3) interpersonal interactions including via social media; (4) experiences with non-interactive media sources; (5) informal trainings; (6) beliefs; and (7) current circumstances. Conclusions: Multiple informal learning experiences inform the parenting decisions and practices of mothers with varying levels of formal educational attainment.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-11-19T02:58:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211055122
       
  • Examining the Relationships Between Fear of Coronavirus, State Anxiety,
           and Relationship Happiness Among Married Turkish Individuals During
           COVID-19

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      Authors: Bülent Dilmaç, Ali Karababa, Tolga Seki, Zeynep Şimşir, M. Furkan Kurnaz
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The present study aimed to investigate the mediating role of state anxiety in the relationship between the fear of COVID-19 and relationship happiness among married individuals. An additional aim of the study also tested the moderating role of joint family activities between state anxiety and relationship happiness. The study sample consisted of 1713 married individuals (1031 women and 682 men). The study findings showed both the significant direct associations among the studied variables and the mediating role of state anxiety in the relationship between fear of COVID-19 and relationship happiness. It also found that the path of state anxiety to relationship happiness among married individuals having family activities was significantly lower than those who did not. Directions for future research and application were discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-11-19T02:36:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211055513
       
  • Title: New Parents’ Idealistic Expectations of Parenthood: The
           Impact of Preconceived Ideas

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      Authors: Rachael E. Sanders, Jennifer Lehmann, Fiona Gardner
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Parenthood is a significant life transition with considerable impacts on parent, child and family wellbeing. While life-enhancing, it is also stressful. New parents’ often hold unrealistic expectations and do not prepare adequately for the new role. Applying a critical exploratory Grounded Theory approach, this study explores the reasons for expectant parents’ unrealistic expectations. Thirty parents were interviewed about their preconceptions of parenthood, how they impacted on early parenting experiences and what, if anything, might help better prepare parents for this role. Participants reported unrealistic expectations, a lack of preparation, and recommended that parenting information be provided by professionals prenatally to help prevent adverse effects. In addition, we advocate promoting critical thinking to help parents identify and grapple with facets of social life that support and impede the way they experience and cope with parenthood, leading to the capacity to challenge cultural pressures that may make parenting even more difficult.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-11-18T12:26:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211055124
       
  • Firefighters and Spouses: Hostility, Satisfaction, and Conflict

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      Authors: Romana Pasca, Shannon L. Wagner
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The present project contributes to the literature on firefighters and spousal relationships through consideration of life satisfaction, marital satisfaction, and couple conflict for a sample of Canadian firefighters. Thirty four firefighter/spouse dyads completed measures of satisfaction, mental health, and conflict. Our results showed that firefighters self-reported more hostility than their spouses, but that there was no significant difference between firefighters and spouses with respect to life of marital satisfaction. Firefighters and spouses also differed in expression of dissatisfaction, in that firefighters were more likely to express dissatisfaction through physical or indirect expressions of aggression, and spouses were more likely to express dissatisfaction through anger. Understanding alternative presentations of dissatisfaction may be helpful to both the spousal couple, in terms of understanding one another, and also in therapeutic relationships where emotional expression may be interpreted.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-11-18T04:02:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211055116
       
  • Help-Seeking Behaviors of Male Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence in
           Kenya

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      Authors: Eric Y. Tenkorang, Mariama Zaami, Sitawa Kimuna, Adobea Y. Owusu, Emmanuel Rohn
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Very few studies examine the help-seeking behaviors of male survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV) in Kenya or sub-Saharan Africa more generally. Using nationally representative cross-sectional data from 1,458 male survivors and multinomial logit models, we examined what influences men’s decision to seek help after experiencing IPV. Results show the majority of male survivors did not seek help. Those who did so turned to informal rather than formal sources. The severity of physical violence was the most robust and consistent predictor of help-seeking. Male survivors of severe physical abuse had higher odds of seeking help from informal support networks than not seeking help. Compared to the uneducated, highly educated men were significantly more likely to seek help from formal support networks than to not seek help at all. Sensitization programs are required to educate male survivors of IPV on available sources of support. In particular, barriers to help-seeking must be removed to encourage male survivors to find support.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-11-18T03:57:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211042847
       
  • Caregivers’ Experiences During the COVID-19 Pandemic and Their
           Children’s Behavior

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      Authors: Stephanie M. Reich, Melissa Dahlin, Nestor Tulagan, Marina Kerlow, Natasha Cabrera, Mary Jane Piroutek, Theodore Heyming
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic has financial and emotional impacts on families. We explored how caregivers’ financial strain and mental health are associated with changes in their young children’s behavior during the pandemic. We additionally considered whether having a sense of purpose moderated these associations. Caregivers (n = 300) in the emergency department of a children’s hospital were surveyed anonymously about changes to their employment (e.g., reduced/increased hours and job loss), ability to pay for expenses and whether their child’s behavior had changed. Aligned with the Family Stress Model, caregivers’ financial strain was associated with poor mental health, inconsistent sleep routines, and changes in children’s problematic and prosocial behaviors. A sense of purpose buffered some of these relationships. Families are differently affected by the pandemic and our findings underscore the need for supporting caregivers’ mental health and connecting them with resources.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-11-17T08:08:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211055511
       
  • Parental Mediation and Use of Mobile Devices-Smartphones and Tablets- in
           Spanish Families

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      Authors: Antonia Ramírez-García, Natalia González-Fernández, Irina Salcines-Talledo
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Mobile devices are changing society in different areas, including the family. This study analyses different types of parental mediation implemented in Spanish households in relation to Smartphones and Tablets. The participants in this study were 1082 parents from all the Spanish Autonomous Communities. The methodology used is quantitative (descriptive and inferential). The results show that the type of mediation most used by Spanish families is active mediation, followed by technical control, restrictive mediation and co-viewing. The application of one or another modality of mediation is conditioned by variables such as gender and age of the parents, number of children and educational stage of schooling or educational level of the mothers, among others. In conclusion, the research provides significant data on parental mediation for mobile devices in Spain.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-11-13T02:44:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211055126
       
  • Re-thinking Stepfathers’ Contributions: Fathers, Stepfathers, and
           Child Wellbeing

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      Authors: Sarah Gold, Kathryn J. Edin
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Using data from a contemporary cohort of children, we revisit the question of whether children benefit from being close to and engaging in activities with a stepfather. We deploy the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, a birth cohort study of nearly 5000 children born in US cities in 1998–2000, with a large oversample of nonmarital births. We explore the relationships between stepfathers’ closeness and active engagement and youth’s internalizing and externalizing behaviors and school connectedness at ages 9 and 15 for between 550 and 740 children (depending on the wave) with stepfathers. We find that the emotional tenor of the relationship and level of active engagement between youth and their stepfathers are associated with reduced internalizing behaviors and higher school connectedness. Our findings suggest that stepfathers’ roles seem to have evolved in ways that are more beneficial to their adolescent stepchildren than was previously the case.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-11-11T03:46:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211054471
       
  • Actual and Perceived Parental Knowledge and Child Delinquency: Does the
           Sex of the Parent, the Sex of the Child, and the Child’s Age Make a
           Difference'

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      Authors: Glenn D. Walters
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Parental knowledge was tested as a possible deterrent to future delinquency in 3914 (51% male) early to mid-adolescent school children from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. Using three waves of data, parent-rated mother and father knowledge were tested as correlates of future delinquency, controlling for age, perceived parental knowledge, and the willingness of children to share their thoughts and feelings with parents. Variables from Wave 5 (age 12/13) were used to predict delinquency at Wave 6 (age 14/15), and variables from Wave 6 were used to predict delinquency at Wave 7 (age 16/17). Results showed that mother- but not father-reported knowledge effectively deterred future child delinquency. A significant sex x mother knowledge interaction was found in both analyses, indicating that boys experienced a stronger deterrent effect than girls. It was further demonstrated that the deterrent effect of parental knowledge on child delinquency was stronger in early adolescence than in middle adolescence.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-11-04T04:47:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211055115
       
  • Emotion Work and Gender Inequality in Transnational Family Life

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      Authors: Sergio Chávez, Robin Paige, Heather Edelblute
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the emotion work of non-migrant women as they seek to sustain family life across borders. We draw on in-depth interviews with 59 non-migrant women in Guanajuato, Mexico who had immigrant spouses in the USA to assess emotion work dynamics between partners. Our analysis reveals that non-migrant women do emotion work that entails imagining lives abroad and then tailoring emotional support that addresses the needs of spouses. We also discuss how the difficulties associated with prolonged separation leads women to suppress their own needs and feelings, which can lead to emotional burnout and marital conflict. Putting non-migrant women and their activities at the center of our analysis highlights the emotional costs of migration for those who remain behind and the ways in which emotion work is a highly gendered activity that reinforces inequality through communication. We highlight how women’s subordinated status in transnational Mexican families and the need to keep the remittances flowing help explain why emotion work falls largely on women.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-11-03T10:56:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211054472
       
  • Parents’ Perceptions of Children’s Behavioral Difficulties and the
           Parent–Child Interaction During the COVID-19 Lockdown

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      Authors: Avital Laufer, Mally Shechory Bitton
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The study examined parents’ perceptions of their children’s behavioral difficulties (CBD) and positive parent–child interaction (PCI) during the first COVID-19 lockdown in Israel, as well as the associations among parents’ psychological distress, parents’ COVID-19–related worries, parents’ coping, and parents’ resilience. Participants were 437 parents of minor children. Parents reported more behavioral and emotional difficulties alongside with more quality time with their children. Parents’ distress and COVID-19–related worries were positively related to CBD. Emotion-focused coping mediated the association between psychological distress and CBD, while resilience mediated the association between distress and PCI. The study results indicated that parents perceived their children as having greater difficulties, but they also perceived more positive parent–child interactions, during the lockdown. Parents’ distress appears to have been a significant variable in perceived child’s difficulties during the lockdown.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-11-03T10:36:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211054460
       
  • Psychometric Analyses of the Challenges and Needs Survey for Family
           Caregivers of Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Implications for
           Practice

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      Authors: Gloria K. Lee, Carolyn M. Shivers
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Understanding the needs and stressors of caregivers of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) informs targeted support strategies. However, most caregiver needs measures lack the breadth of experiences relevant to these families. This study examined the underlying factor structure of the Challenges and Needs Survey (CANS), a caregiving needs measure designed for family caregivers of individuals with ASD. The sample consisted of 286 family caregivers. Participants completed the CANS either online or in the paper form. Exploratory factor analysis was used to examine the underlying structure of the measure. T-tests and correlations were used to compare results by age and gender of the participants. Exploratory factor analysis resulted in 39 items of four factors: autism-related challenges (child), functional challenges, psychological challenges (parent), and aggressive behaviors (child). Parents with both high stress and high needs reported the lowest levels of mental health functioning.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-11-03T08:48:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211054465
       
  • Locking Down Gender Roles' A Time-Use Perspective on Gender Division
           of Household Labour during the COVID-19 Pandemic Lockdown in Belgium

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      Authors: Theun Pieter van Tienoven, Joeri Minnen, Anaïs Glorieux, Ilse Laurijssen, Petrus te Braak, Ignace Glorieux
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the division of household labour could continue to lock down or start to break gender roles. Using time-use data of n = 473 individuals collected during the lockdown restrictions in Belgium from March to May 2020, we analyse the gendered division of routine and non-routine household labour in absolute time use and relative shares. We compare against the Belgian time-use data of 2013 for the same time period (n = 678 individuals). A time-demanding work and living situation associate with an increase in men’s time spent on household labour during the lockdown but not with a change in women’s time use. The gender gap closes in absolute time but not in relative shares of routine and non-routine household labour. The limited impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the gender division of household labour indicates a temporal rather than a substantial change in gender roles.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-11-02T05:10:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211054463
       
  • The Impact of Paternity Leave Compared to Unemployment on Child Care and
           Housework Distribution in Spain

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      Authors: Gerardo Meil, Jesús Rogero-García, Pedro Romero-Balsas, Vicente Díaz-Gandasegui
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Paternity leave has been introduced in many countries as a way to foster father´s co-responsibility in family obligations. This study aims \to analyse, for the Spanish case, if (1) the positive effects of the paternity leave are not only limited to the short term, but are maintained at medium and long term; (2) if a similar effect applies in the case of unemployment periods. Based on a subsample of 3388 cases derived from the Spanish Fertility Survey 2018, we perform OLS regression analysis of father´s involvement in childcare and housework. Our analysis shows that longer leaves are related to a greater involvement in care and housework activities, although only in the former, the effect is maintained in the long term. Regarding unemployed fathers, these individuals show more involvement in childcare during the first year, but the effect vanishes later and there is no significant relationship with housework.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-11-02T04:53:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211054469
       
  • Intergenerational Value Similarity and Subjective Well-Being

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      Authors: Christian Hoellger, Sabrina Sommer, Heike M. Buhl
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This investigation concentrates on the association of intergenerational value similarity and adult children’s and parents’ subjective well-being, on the linkage between relationship quality and subjective well-being. Mediation effects of the relationship quality on the associations between value similarity and subjective well-being were focused. The sample consisted of 600 adult German children (53.8% women) and their parents. Dyadic correlations were constructed to determine the value similarity. In this study, the general value orientation and the family values were objects of research. We measured the subjective well-being with the Satisfaction with Life Scale and we used the Network of Relationships Inventory (NRI) to measure the relationship quality. Associations between subjective well-being and value similarity, and between subjective well-being and relationship quality, as well as mediation effects, were found. All effects depend on gender and perspective.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-11-02T02:58:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211054470
       
  • Family Communication and Psychological Distress in the Era of COVID-19
           Pandemic: Mediating Role of Coping

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      Authors: Ekmel Geçer, Murat Yıldırım
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to examine the association between family communication and psychological distress with coping as a potential mediator. The study also developed and validated the Family Communication Scale (FCS) in the context of COVID-19 pandemic. Participants (n = 658; 74.9% female) were general public ranged in age between 18 and 58 years (mean age = 26.38, SD = 10.01). The results showed that family communication directly influenced psychological distress and indirectly influenced through approach coping. However, avoidant coping was not directly associated with psychological distress, nor did it mediate the association between family communication and psychological distress. The findings suggest that people, who have better family communication, highly engage in approach coping which in turn leads to better psychological health in face of adversity. The findings have important empirical and theoretical implications.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-10-31T11:33:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211044489
       
  • Association Between Parental Divorce and Anger, Aggression, and Hostility
           in Adolescents: Results of a National Lebanese Study

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      Authors: Maha Zakhour, Chadia Haddad, Pascale Salameh, Layal Al Hanna, Hala Sacre, Rabih Hallit, Michel Soufia, Sahar Obeid, Souheil Hallit
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      To evaluate the association between divorce and aggression patterns (physical and verbal aggression and hostility) in Lebanese adolescents. This cross-sectional study enrolled 1810 (90.5%) students (January–May 2019) using a proportionate random sample of participants aged 12–17 years, drawn from private schools of all Lebanese districts. Parental divorce was significantly associated with more physical and verbal aggression and anger and hostility in adolescents. Significantly higher adjusted means of physical aggression (32.53 vs. 31.32; p = .013), verbal aggression (19.00 vs. 17.73; p < .001), anger (26.10 vs. 23.43; p < .001), and hostility (29.68 vs. 26.73; p < .001) were found among adolescents whose parents are divorced. Verbal and physical aggression, anger, and hostility were more shown in adolescents whose parents were divorced compared to adolescents whose parents are non-separated. Therefore, divorced parents must be motivated to provide their children with social, economic, and psychological needs to overcome these negative behaviors.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-10-30T07:17:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211054468
       
  • Remarriage After Divorce and Health in Later Life: Findings From CHARLS in
           China

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      Authors: Xiaomin Li, Quanbao Jiang, Xinfeng Cheng, Tingshuai Ge
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Marriage has a positive effect on health. After the dissolution of a marriage, the health of divorcees worsens. This study focuses on whether remarriage can help a person regain the health benefits that comes with marriage. Using national baseline data from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS), which conducted from 2011 to 2012, this article applies instrumental variables (IV) method to investigate the association between remarriage after divorce and late-life health. We found that, compared with divorcees who had not remarried, those who remarried suffered less from depression and had better self-rated health. There were gender differences in the relationship between remarriage after divorce and mental health. Remarriage can improve the mental health of men, but there is no significant correlation between remarriage and the mental health of women.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-10-29T11:38:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211054464
       
  • A Cohort Comparison of Midlife Marital Quality: A Quarter Century of
           Change

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      Authors: Matthew R. Wright, Susan L. Brown, Wendy D. Manning
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Marital quality has been declining among recent cohorts, but whether this pattern characterizes middle-aged and older married adults is largely unknown. The doubling of the divorce rate among persons over the age of 50 years foretells poorer quality marriages for today’s midlife adults than a generation ago. Combining data on married individuals aged 50–65 years from the 1987-88 National Survey of Families and Households (NSFH) and the 2013 Families and Relationships Study, we conduct a cohort comparison of five dimensions of midlife marital quality. Today’s older adults report more marital disagreement and instability as well as less fairness and interaction with their spouses than their counterparts did a generation ago. The two cohorts report comparable levels of marital happiness. Consistent with the upward trend in divorce during the second half of life, the quality of midlife marriages appears to have declined over the past quarter century.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-10-28T01:42:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211054466
       
  • The Mediating Effects of Social Self-Concept on Gender, Sexual
           Orientation, and Parenting Intentions

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      Authors: Jeffrey A. Miles, Stefanie E. Naumann
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      College students’ parenting intentions have received increased attention by scholars around the world in recent years, but little is known about potential demographic differences affecting the decision, such as gender and sexual orientation. The study proposed and empirically examined a model of the relationships between gender, sexual orientation, social self-concept, and parenting intentions in a large sample of university students on the west coast of the United States. The study found that social self-concept mediated the relationship between gender and parenting intentions for heterosexual students, but not for non-heterosexual students.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-10-27T02:59:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211054467
       
  • Age and Gender Differences in Perceived Parenting Styles and Emotional
           Outcomes in Early Adolescents

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      Authors: Beatriz Ortega, Alonso Mateo, María V. Jimeno, Jorge J. Ricarte
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Early adolescents’ perception of parenting styles is crucial to their present and future physical and mental well-being. The main aim of the present study was to analyze differences in parenting styles between mothers and fathers and differences on emotional state scales (anxiety, depression, and purpose in life) depending on gender, age, and family structure in 744 girls (54%) and boys (45.7%) aged between 10 and 12 years. The results showed that the early adolescents perceived greater levels of affect than criticism, with mothers being considered more affectionate than fathers. The greater the perceived affect and communication, the greater was the perception of purpose in life and the lower the levels of anxiety and depression in early adolescents. Boys showed higher levels of perceived criticism and rejection. Family affect and communication play a key role in purpose in life and emotional well-being of children, with parenting styles being a determining factor.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-10-20T07:23:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211051391
       
  • Understanding Physical and Emotional Sibling Violence: Perspectives From
           Group Facilitators of Parent Intervention Groups for Child Maltreatment

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      Authors: Jennifer A. Shadik, Nathan H. Perkins, Ruri Kim
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Physical and emotional sibling violence is a common form of family violence with negative repercussions. Research on the experiences and perceptions of practitioners regarding sibling violence is scant. The researchers interviewed facilitators of parent intervention groups for child maltreatment to understand how sibling violence impacts the families they work with. This exploratory qualitative study examines the perspectives on sibling violence of five group facilitators. An inductive thematic analysis process was used to code the data and develop themes. Five themes emerged from the analysis including Parents lack of knowledge and awareness regarding sibling violence, Stress in parents and the family system, Crossing the line, Individual and developmental aspects, and Mechanisms to help parents address sibling violence. Facilitators identified challenges with definition and assessment of sibling violence, potential contributing factors for the occurrence of sibling violence, as well as strategies to help these families. Implications and future directions are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T09:08:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211051392
       
  • The Influence of Depressive Symptoms on Parenting: Examining Longitudinal
           Dyadic Spillover and Crossover Processes During the Transition to
           Parenthood

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      Authors: Hanne N. Fentz, Kenneth Nygaard, Marianne Simonsen, Tea Trillingsgaard
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Limited research exists on dyadic spillover and crossover processes in parenting when depressive symptoms occur. This study examined both direct actor and partner effects from parents’ prenatal depressive symptoms to parenting 19 months postpartum and effects mediated via the parent’s own depressive symptoms 10 months postpartum. The Actor–Partner Interdependence Mediation Model was applied to a sample of 534 couples participating in a randomized controlled trial of a universal parenting support program. For both parents, direct and mediated actor effects were found from depressive symptoms to own parental stress and attachment at 19 months postpartum. For fathers, but not mothers, direct and mediated actor effects were also seen for own postnatal childcare involvement although in mixed directions. Direct partner effects were not indicated across gender, however mediated partner effects appeared from mothers’ depressive symptoms to fathers’ later parental stress and attachment-related feelings, but not vice versa. Findings highlight the importance of a dyadic approach to examine depressive symptoms and parenting processes during the transition to parenthood.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-10-15T03:58:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211051387
       
  • Sexual Identity in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer or
           Questioning Emerging Adults: The Role of Parental Rejection, and Sexuality
           Specific Family Support

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      Authors: Ashley B. Taylor, Tricia K. Neppl
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The present study provides critical contributions to the study of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer or questioning (LGBTQ) emerging adults by examining the role of family and sexuality specific family support, as well as the moderating effect of gender, on sexual identity development. Specifically, the role of mother and father rejection and sexuality specific family support on both affirmed identity and identity struggles of students were assessed. Using a sample of 338 LGBTQ emerging adults at a midwestern University, findings illustrate that for sexual identity development, mother and father parental rejection positively influenced identity struggles while sexuality specific family support positively influenced affirmed identity. Also, moderation by participant gender was not supported. Limitations and future directions are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-10-15T03:10:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211050063
       
  • Internalizing Symptoms in Children Being Reared by Grandparents in Rural
           Appalachia: Risk and Protective Factors

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      Authors: Peggy S. Keller, Shuang Bi, Nancy Schoenberg
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The present study investigates factors associated with anxiety, depression, and stress in children being reared by their grandparents in rural Appalachia. Grandparent-headed households, in which grandparents have primary responsibility for care of children, are increasing in number. However, research is needed on child risk for internalizing symptoms in this context. Participants included 35 children aged 5–18 years and one of their custodial grandparents. Interviewers read questionnaires to grandparents and children assessing family functioning and child mental health and participants indicated their answers. Mean scores for child internalizing symptoms and stress were on the higher end of the scale of measurement. Lower grandparent positive parenting, grandparent not having formal custody of children, greater grandparent mental health issues, lower grandparent education, and lower financial status were correlated with greater child anxiety, depression, and stress. Results also indicated that correlates of children’s internalizing symptoms differed based on child sex and age.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-10-12T05:04:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211048477
       
  • Parental Stress Provoked by Short-Term School Closures During the Second
           COVID-19 Lockdown

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      Authors: Isabelle May, Sarah Awad, Matthias S. May, Albert Ziegler
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Governments of numerous countries implemented school closures to contain the COVID-19 pandemic. Several investigations have shown the negative impact of social-distancing policies and school closures on children worldwide. Recently, research also demonstrated adverse effects on adults’ well-being. The development of children is strongly affected by their parent’s emotional state. The present study aimed to examine parental stress levels caused by a short period of homeschooling in December 2020 in Germany. A structured survey was set up and distributed randomly via social media and parent associations. We observed a significant increase in stress and concerns. Family conflicts significantly increased, social isolation was feared, and powerlessness and helplessness ascended. Risk factors were parental education levels, parental working time, and teaching features like the frequency of feedback, correction, and accessibility.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-10-12T03:56:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211041987
       
  • Mothers’ Well-Being in Families and Family Structure: Examining
           Constellations of Stressors Across Life Domains

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      Authors: Claudia Recksiedler, Janine Bernhardt, Valerie Heintz-Martin
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Identifying conditions under which parents thrive is a key concern of family research. Prior research often focused on mothers’ well-being in single life domains, yet it is more likely to be shaped by stressors that stem directly from the parenting role and related stressors emerging from spillover processes into other domains. We therefore examine how stressors concerning mothers’ subjective, relational, and financial well-being accumulate and combine within subgroups of mothers and whether the likelihood to belong to these multidimensional subgroups varies by family structure. Using representative German data (N = 11,242), latent class analysis revealed four distinct subgroups of maternal well-being with varying exposure to financial, psychological, and relational stressors. Regression models showed that particularly single mothers were at risk to belong to the most vulnerable group with exposure to multiple stressors. Findings are discussed in light of persisting disparities among post-separation families despite demographic trends toward growing family diversity.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-10-11T04:36:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211048479
       
  • Home, but Left Alone: Time at Home and Child Abuse and Neglect During
           COVID-19

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      Authors: Lindsey Rose Bullinger, Angela Boy, Megan Feely, Stephen Messner, Kerri Raissian, William Schneider, Shannon Self-Brown
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      We use high-frequency mobile phone movement data and quick-release administrative data from Georgia to examine how time at home during the COVID-19 pandemic is related to child maltreatment referrals. Findings show that referrals plummeted by 58% relative to previous years, driven by fewer referrals from education personnel. After this initial decline, however, each 15 minutes at home was associated with an increase in referrals of material neglect by 3.5% and supervisory neglect by 1%. Our results describe how children have fared during the initial wave of the pandemic, and the results have long-term implications for child development and well-being.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-10-09T10:03:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211048474
       
  • Alternative Constructions of Partner Relationships in Chronic Illness: A
           Qualitative Study Exploring Concurrent Relationships

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      Authors: Michaela Sorber, Christiane Knecht, Michael Meng, Andreas Büscher, Wilfried Schnepp
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Chronic illness can have a profound impact on couples’ relationships. In dealing with relational changes, new constructions and forms of relationships may arise. In the context of a larger grounded theory study on relational processes and practices in couples faced with chronic illness, this article focuses on concurrent relationships as an alternative form of relationship construction which embodies an additional relationship existing parallel to that of the couple confronted with chronic illness. Based on qualitative interviews with a subsample of five persons within the larger study, conditions for the development and characteristics of concurrent relationships are presented. From an individual and shared life questioned by chronic illness, concurrent relationships are formed in the attempt to be able to live on together in a new partner relationship and a continued care relationship. This can lead to new constructions of relationships, family life, and social relations in everyday life.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-10-08T01:17:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030729
       
  • He’s Working from Home and I’m at Home Trying to Work: Experiences of
           Childcare and the Work–Family Balance Among Mothers During COVID-19

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      Authors: Sara Martucci
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This article captures mothers’ experiences of the work–family balance and division of household labor during the initial COVID-19 lockdown. Interviews were conducted with twenty-five academics and twenty professionals in other fields. Mothers who split childcare with their partners had a more positive experience of the work–family balance during lockdown, compared with mothers who did the majority of the childcare. The present study adds a new wrinkle into the literature on flexibility and work–family balance: the perception of flexibility and its impact on the division of labor. Academic mothers, who had always had highly “flexible” jobs, were less likely to split childcare with their partners pre-pandemic and thus less likely to have positive experiences of work–family balance during the Spring 2020 lockdown. I argue that perceived flexibility of a partner’s job affected allocation of childcare during the initial stages of the pandemic, a moment that wreaked significant harm on women’s careers.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-10-01T10:02:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211048476
       
  • The Effects of Intermarriage on Wages for Immigrant Women in Italy

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      Authors: Adda C. Justiniano Medina, Marie Valentova
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      In the current article, we analyze the impact of intermarriage on the wages of immigrant women in Italy. Using a sample of married immigrant women from a randomly selected sample, representative of families with foreigners in Italy, we estimate Ordinary Least Squares and we address self-selection into employment, while simultaneously accounting for intermarriage endogeneity with the combined method. The results reveal 9 percentage points higher earnings for intermarried immigrant women. However, this vanishes once we add other characteristics, as well as when we account for endogeneity and selection into employment, separately and simultaneously. We conclude that although immigrant women who marry natives have higher wages, this is due to their observable and unobservable characteristics.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-10-01T09:52:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211046262
       
  • Consistency and Transformation of Filial Responsibility Attitudes in
           China: Evidence from Panel Study of Family Dynamics of 2004 and 2017

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      Authors: Yongjie Wang, Guowei Wan, Yao Gu
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: This study analyzes the trend of change and influencing factors of filial responsibility attitudes in China. Method: The study uses data of Panel Study of Family Dynamics (PSFD) conducted in three Southeast regions in China in the year 2004 and 2017. Results: This study has two major findings. First, there was no significant decline in filial responsibility attitudes over the decade in spite of aging tendency. Both Reciprocal Filial Piety (RFP) and Authoritative Filial Piety (AFP) have not declined, with similar trend to men and women. Second, factors affecting filial responsibility attitudes have changed over the 13 years, with the impact of educational attainment and employment declining, while the effect of marital status increasing. Gender heterogeneity in the process was obvious. Conclusion: This study adds to literature on filial piety in Confucian society and provides empirical evidence on the future of cross-cultural filial responsibility attitudes.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-10-01T09:47:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211048475
       
  • Blessing or Burden: Transitions Into Eldercare and Caregiver Mental Health

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      Authors: Jeremy Reynolds, Katie James
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Caring for one’s parents can be good or bad for mental health. Guided by theories suggesting that caregiving work brings both demands and benefits, we examine if mental health outcomes depend on variations in caregiving arrangements. Using waves 5–17 from the Household Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia Survey (16,802 respondents; 115,176 person-years), we divide men and women caregivers into four groups based on their responsibility (main vs. secondary caregiver) and the location of the care recipient (inside or outside the caregiver’s household). We also examine how caregivers’ experiences are moderated by the social support they have. On average, caregivers experience no change in mental health. However, women with low social support who become main caregivers for resident parents experience declines in mental health. Men with low social support who become main caregivers for non-resident parents experience improved mental health. These results suggest that caregiver outcomes reflect different caregiving arrangements.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-25T12:49:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211042842
       
  • Toward a Better Understanding of the Associations Among Different Measures
           of Father Involvement and Parenting Alliance

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      Authors: Célia Matte-Gagné, Nicolas R.- Turgeon, Annie Bernier, Chantal Cyr
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The variety of measurement methods used in fathering research to assess fathers’ involvement makes it difficult to summarize what we know about paternal involvement and its correlates and antecedents. Aiming to shed light on the potential consequences of using different measures of paternal involvement, this study examined: (a) the associations among three measures of father participation in parental activities, namely self- and mother-reported questionnaires and a father-completed time diary, and (b) their respective associations with a well-documented predictor of father involvement, i.e., parenting alliance. The sample included 80 parental couples with a 6-month-old child. Although moderate associations were found among measures of father involvement, only the maternal and paternal questionnaires were associated with parenting alliance. These results suggest that time diaries and questionnaires tap into different aspects of father involvement that can have distinct correlates and determinants. Better acknowledgment of the diverging results attributable to the use of different measurement approaches of father involvement is needed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-25T01:24:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211044735
       
  • Interparental Conflict and Chinese Children’s Social Development

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      Authors: Fengjiao Xu, Xinyi Chen, Haiyan Xing, Hongmei Wang
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Interparental relationship is one of the substantial factors that affect children’s mental well-being and emotional development in a family. Interparental conflicts are pervasive in most families, which may have adverse effects on children. However, interparental conflict in China received restricted attention, and social research about marital conflict has limited focus on children. A cross-sectional survey of 846 students was conducted to explore the correlations between interparental conflict and Chinese children’s social anxiety and life adjustment. The results showed that more perceived threat, persistent and unresolved conflicts, older age, and lower coping efficacy were associated with increased social anxiety in children while paternal education of high school was related to lower social anxiety. Child-related and unresolved conflicts, greater intensity of the conflict, frequent conflict, and paternal education of college and above were associated with impaired children’s life adjustment development. Perception of interparental conflicts was closely associated with children’s social development.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-25T01:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211042843
       
  • Living-Apart-Together (LAT) in Contemporary Sweden: (How) Does It Relate
           to Vulnerability'

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      Authors: Livia Sz. Oláh, Lena Karlsson, Glenn Sandström
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Sweden is among the countries with the highest share of single households in Europe, but not all are truly partnerless. We examine the potential vulnerability of individuals in living-apart-together relationships at age 30 and above, analyzing data from the Swedish GGS. We apply multinomial logistic regression. The results show that individuals engaging in LAT occupy an intermediate position in terms of socioeconomic resources (homeownership and economic situation), being less advantaged than co-residents but better-off than singles, especially men. We find no association between ill-health and living in a LAT arrangement. Having previous family experiences (unions with or without children) is positively associated with LAT, but childhood family composition does not matter. The majority of LAT individuals claim to be constrained to living-apart-together rather than LAT being their preferred alternative. Women and the elderly (aged 70+) are, however, more likely to engage in LAT by choice and appreciate their non-residential partnerships.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-24T08:03:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211041988
       
  • Family Disruption and Parenting During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Kammi K. Schmeer, Britt Singletary, Kelly M. Purtell, Laura M. Justice
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Using unique data from an economically and racially diverse sample of 448 caregivers with young children (ages 4–9 years) in Ohio, we assess multiple sources of family social and economic disruptions and their associations with parenting activities during the COVID-19 stay-at-home order. Caregivers reported extensive social and economic challenges during this time, while also increasing (on average) their time spent in play/learning activities. Time spent in discipline was less likely to increase during this period. We found significant associations among disadvantaged social conditions/experiences and parenting, and that some effects were moderated by 2019 household income status. Unexpectedly, changes in economic conditions, particularly caregiver job loss, were associated with higher odds of increases in reading/telling stories time across household income groups. Overall, findings indicate that social conditions associated with the stay-at-home period of COVID-19 might have been more disruptive to parenting for caregivers with young children than the short-term economic changes.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-23T04:28:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211042852
       
  • “If I Hadn’t Had that Support System, I Think I Would Have Dropped Out
           by Now”: Parental Support in College and its Implications for Student
           Adjustment

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      Authors: Marta Benito-Gomez, Grace Y. Lee, Amy L. McCurdy, Anne C. Fletcher
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Understanding college students’ perceptions of parental support and its impact on student adjustment have important implications for maximizing retention rates within higher education institutions. College students (N = 53) participated in qualitative interviews focused on students’ perceptions of mothers’ and fathers’ support during college and its impact on college adjustment. Holistic coding interviews indicated three different classifications of parents based on levels of support: supportive, ambivalent, and unsupportive. Students indicated that their parents continued to be the main source of support and a key factor that supports their adjustment during the college years. In contrast, students who did not receive such support expressed having difficulties continuing working toward their degree. Students’ narratives also indicated that mothers and fathers provided support in different ways. These findings have important implications for practice, and in particular how high education institutions can promote adjustment and retention rates by encouraging parental engagement.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-22T09:41:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211044490
       
  • Engaged Women’s Relationships, Weddings, and Mental Health During
           Covid-19

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      Authors: Allison M. Scott, Laura Stafford
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      We examined the association between mental health and relationship and wedding factors among engaged women planning their weddings before and during Covid-19. Survey data from 715 non-Covid-19 and 427 Covid-19 participants revealed that Covid-19 participants experienced depression in greater proportion than non-Covid-19 participants. Wedding satisfaction and financial strain were stronger predictors of depression for Covid-19 than non-Covid-19 participants. Other significant predictors of Covid-19 participants’ depression included social isolation, relational satisfaction and turbulence, and wedding disillusionment. Additionally, 22.0% of Covid-19 participants reported severe levels of anxiety, which was significantly predicted by social isolation, relational turbulence, wedding financial strain, wedding disillusionment, and wedding satisfaction. According to Covid-19 participants’ open-ended responses, less depressed participants liked something better about their revised wedding plans, more anxious participants could not identify positive aspects of their revised plans, and less anxious participants appreciated the perspective that came with revising wedding plans due to Covid-19.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-21T08:26:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211041986
       
  • Mothers’ Preferences for Their Children’s Format for Return to School
           During the Coronavirus Disease-2019 Pandemic: Are There Differences
           Between Full-Time Employed Mothers and Mothers Who are Not Employed'

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      Authors: Christine A. Limbers, Christina L. Pavlov
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The present study assessed factors associated with maternal preferences for their children’s educational format (i.e., completely in-person, completely online/remote, or hybrid of in-person and online/remote) for return to school during the COVID-19 pandemic and whether these associations differed between full-time employed mothers and mothers who were not employed. Participants were 911 mothers of school-aged children from the United States (full-time employed, n = 650; not employed, n = 261). Recruitment took place online via social media during Summer 2020. Questionnaires on school modality preference, maternal work status, and demographic characteristics were filled out online through Qualtrics. Compared to mothers who were not employed, full-time employed mothers were more likely to endorse a preference for a hybrid in-person and online/remote educational format for their children and less likely to endorse a preference for a completely online/remote educational format for their children. The factor most strongly associated with maternal preferences for their children’s educational format for return to school in both groups of mothers was being worried about my child getting COVID-19 and their health being severely impacted (rs’s ranged from −56 to −58; p < .01). Regardless of maternal employment status, this factor continued to have the strongest association with a maternal preference for a completely online educational format in the polynomial regression analysis after controlling for relevant demographic variables (Odds Ratios ranged from 3.63 to 37.64; p < .01). These findings highlight that concerns about child health during the COVID-19 pandemic influence maternal preferences for their children’s educational format, regardless of maternal employment status.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-21T03:13:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211044486
       
  • Parent/Caregiver Narratives of Challenges Related to Raising Transgender
           and/or Nonbinary Youth

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      Authors: Sabra L. Katz-Wise, Sally Campbell Galman, Lauren E. Friedman, Kacie M. Kidd
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Parents/caregivers of transgender and/or nonbinary (TNB) youth (those who identify with a different gender than the gender typically associated with their assigned sex) may experience secondary stigma related to their child’s TNB identity. However, parent/caregiver support is critical for TNB youth’s mental health. This study explored attitudes and challenges faced by parents/caregivers of TNB youth. Data were from 27 parents/caregivers of TNB youth who completed an anonymous online survey with qualitative and quantitative measures. Qualitative data were analyzed using immersion/crystallization and thematic analysis approaches. Six themes were developed from the data: TNB youth individual characteristics/experiences, societal and other external factors affecting parent/caregivers’ future outlook, TNB identity development and transition, TNB-related social and institutional interactions, parent/caregivers’ supportive cognitions and behaviors, and parent/caregivers’ challenging cognitions. Findings from this study can inform efforts to support parents/caregivers of TNB youth, which can ultimately support the well-being of TNB youth themselves.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-21T03:04:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211044484
       
  • Parental Race/Ethnicity and Children’s Summer Activities: A Critical
           Race Approach

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      Authors: Kei Nomaguchi, Amira Allen, Lindsey Aldrich, Leanne Confer
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010–2011 (N = 3,748), we examine how children’s summer activities vary across White, Black, Latino, and Asian American families, net of socioeconomic and other characteristics. Overall, a majority of children play outside and use screen media daily, do learning activities three days or more per week, and take family trips. Attending summer school or camps is less common. As predicted from critical race perspectives, Black parents have children spend more time attending camps than other parents. Compared with White parents, Black and Asian parents have their children engaged in academic activities more and play outside less; Latino parents do learning activities with their children less, but are more likely to have them tutored. All the three non-White groups allow children to spend more time using screen media. More quantitative research using critical race perspectives in conceptualizing racial/ethnic differences in parenting is warranted.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-20T11:27:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211044483
       
  • A Multilevel Investigation of the Effects of Daily Work–Family
           Interaction on Daily Affect During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Mehmet Çetin, Bayram Dede, Özgür Kökalan, Ezgi Dede
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This research aimed to examine the effects of daily work–family conflict and work–family enrichment on daily positive and negative affect levels of employees during the first phases of the COVID-19 pandemic in Turkey. The multilevel structure of the research design makes this study original. 730 day-level data were collected from 146 respondents during five consecutive workdays. One week later, a larger survey was delivered for assessing the person-level variables. The results indicated that both forms of work–family conflict significantly decreased positive affect and increased negative affect. Both types of work–family enrichment significantly increased positive affect; but only daily work to family enrichment significantly decreased daily negative affect. Findings also revealed that positive affect levels of respondents increase while negative affect levels decrease with time. On the days employees worked from distance, lower levels of positive and negative affect were experienced.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-20T02:06:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211044487
       
  • Doing Gender with Class: Gender Division of Unpaid Work in Russian
           Middle-Class Dual Earner Heterosexual Households

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      Authors: Daria Ukhova
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This article is concerned with examining the relation between gender division of unpaid work and class. Drawing on in-depth interviews with middle-class dual earner heterosexual couples conducted in Russia, I show how the gender division of housework and care could be shaped by processes of accountability not only to sex category (“doing gender”) but also to class category (“doing class”). I discuss how my interviewees perceived various gender contracts that have evolved in post-socialist Russia as profoundly classed. I further show how their resulting understandings of middle-class (in)appropriate ways of doing masculinity and femininity influenced the division of work in their families. Men were not only accountable as breadwinners but also as carers; while women, in addition to their caring roles, were accountable for their career and sex appeal. In several couples, this double gender and class accountability underpinned their comparatively more equal—although not necessarily more egalitarian—gender division of housework and care.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-16T10:53:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211042846
       
  • The Cost of “A Better Life”: Children Left Behind—Beyond
           Ambiguous Loss

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      Authors: Mirna Carranza
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Aim: The aim of the study is to learn how children left behind in El Salvador and Nicaragua, due to parental migration, experience care across borders. Demographics: 80 participants: adolescents (n = 21; age 13–18 years; 11 females and 10 males); emerging adults (n = 10; age 19–30 years; whose parents had migrated when they were children); grandparents and guardians caring for children whose parents had migrated (n = 14; 12 females and 2 males); professionals (social workers, nurses, lawyers, and teachers); and community leaders involved and/or working directly with children and youth whose parents had immigrated (n = 35). Methodology: Using grounded theory, the study began with one sensitizing concept: parental migration. Analysis: Modified grounded theory principles centered the exploratory nature of the study. Findings: The reconfiguration of the family after parental migration did not meet the emotional needs of children, challenging notions of a “better life.” Implications: These experiences are redefining notions of the transnational family through new geographies of care.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-16T10:38:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211044482
       
  • Managing More than Poverty When Living With Addiction: Parents’
           Emotion and Identity Work

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      Authors: Amber Gazso
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, I qualitatively explore the emotion and identity work of parents living with addiction to drugs or alcohol and accessing social assistance, specifically Ontario Works, in Toronto, Canada. Through narrative and discourse analysis of in-depth interviews, I show how parents (re-) produce or (re-) negotiate their identities as mothers and fathers in relation to feeling rules constituted in three broader, cultural discourses about family relations, addiction, and poverty: welfare dependency; intensive mothering; and families as a safe haven. I argue that this emotion and identity work is necessitated by how these feeling rules collude or clash with parents master status of addict entrenched in their relationships with social assistance policy and caseworkers and perceived by others too. I conclude with a consideration of the social policy and justice implications of my findings, including the need to overturn the stigmatization of addiction and poverty.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-14T11:55:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211041981
       
  • Impact of Positive and Negative Socioemotional Behaviors on Remarital
           Instability

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      Authors: Olena Kopystynska, Kay Bradford, Brian Higginbotham, Shawn D. Whiteman
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      We examined the trajectories of remarried couples’ (N = 1161) positive and negative socioemotional behaviors, which reflect the expression of love versus hostility, in relation to remarital instability across the first 3 years of remarriage. The measures of behaviors included both self and partner reports. Guided by the Vulnerability-Stress-Adaptation model of marriage, we used multi-level modeling framework to test the proposed processes at between- and within-individual levels. Whereas self- and partner-reported positive behaviors predicted less remarital instability, self- and partner-reported negative behaviors predicted greater levels of remarital instability. Individual changes in self- and partner-reported positive behaviors related to less remarital instability and only changes in partner-reported negative behaviors were associated with increased remarital instability. Findings did not vary by gender or remarital profiles. The results provide support for the emergent distress model, suggesting that the path to remarital instability is rooted in gradually increasing negativity. Implications for practitioners are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-08T08:56:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211042851
       
  • Effects of Migration on the Language and Literacy Practices of Turkish
           Parents in England

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      Authors: Pinar Kolancali, Edward Melhuish
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      A survey study of the language and literacy practices of first-generation Turkish immigrant families with 3- to 6-year-old children was conducted in England. Information on family socioeconomic background, migration history and language skills of 168 first-generation Turkish parents was collected through structured interviews in Greater London and Northwest England. The study findings suggest that early childhood experiences that are important for the educational attainment of immigrant children may be affected by the family characteristics and the integration experiences of parents. Regression analyses demonstrated that parents from disadvantaged backgrounds engaged in language and literacy activities less often and preferred Turkish as the interaction language at home. Parent’s social integration, measured via parent’s length of residence and English skills, significantly predicted their language use with their children. Low social integration was associated with increased Turkish use, whereas high social integration was associated with more frequent language and literacy activities at home.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-07T09:32:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211041985
       
  • Adverse Childhood Experiences, Family Social Capital, and Externalizing
           Behavior Problems: An Analysis Across Multiple Ecological Levels

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      Authors: Ashleigh Kysar-Moon
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Some research on childhood adversity is critiqued for emphasizing the experiences of white, middle/upper-middle-class people and not accounting for adversities faced by more diverse populations. Adversities are also often summed up in ways that are unhelpful for targeting interventions to reduce risk of poor outcomes. I examine adversities across ecological levels—child, parent, family, and neighborhood—to determine the risk of externalizing behavior problems (EBP) using a racially diverse sample from the Longitudinal Studies of Child Abuse and Neglect (N = 1058). I consider whether family social capital can offset the effects of adversity across ecological levels. Longitudinal models indicate that adversities across multiple levels and those at the child, parent, and neighborhood levels increase risk of EBP throughout childhood. Cross-sectional models yield that early family social capital is associated with fewer EBP for children with multiple levels of adversity and at the child, parent, family, and neighborhood levels.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-07T08:34:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211042849
       
  • “I Would Like to Have a Normal Brother but I’m Happy With the Brother
           That I Have”: A Pilot Study About Intellectual Disabilities and Family
           Quality of Life From the Perspective of Siblings

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      Authors: Raquel A. Correia, Maria João Seabra-Santos
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The relationships between siblings are the most long-lasting in families. When one of the siblings is a person with intellectual disabilities (ID), this relationship assumes an even more important role since this brother/sister will most likely become the disabled individual’s main caregiver. This pilot study had two aims: to explore the experience as an adolescent or adult sibling of a person with ID and to understand the perceptions of these siblings about quality of life as a sibling and about family quality of life. In-depth interviews were conducted with six siblings. The results showed that the experience of a sibling is positive and the acceptance process is of extreme importance. The domains which, from the sibling perspective, contribute to family quality of life are as follows: Family relationships, Acceptance, Health, Influence of values, Financial well-being, Support from others, and Leisure activities. The implications of these findings for intervention are pointed out.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-06T02:45:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211042845
       
  • Loneliness Among Chinese Older Adults: The Role of Grandparenthood and
           Grandparental Childcare by Gender

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      Authors: Jing Zhang, Tineke Fokkema, Bruno Arpino
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the influence of grandparenthood and grandparental childcare on loneliness among Chinese older adults. Using longitudinal data from a nationally representative sample of 9240 individuals from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS), we applied logistic regression to examine the relationship between various grandparental statuses and loneliness with a focus on gender. The grandparental role is a protective factor for loneliness. Providing care to grandchildren was associated with a lower likelihood of feeling lonely for both genders. Among grandmothers, the benefit of providing childcare is less when it is occasional. Among grandfathers, the benefit is less when it is regular and intensive. Regarding transitions in grandparental status, gender differences were only observed among those who recently entered the caregiving role. Given the increasing reliance on grandparents for childcare in China, this engagement in active aging is beneficial for older adults in reducing loneliness.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-06T01:46:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211041992
       
  • Bonding Family Social Capital and Agency Among Native-Born and Immigrant
           College Women With Low Parental Financial Support

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      Authors: Ashley L. Ostroot, Laura Backstrom
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Using in-depth interviews with 23 immigrant and native-born college women who receive little to no financial support from their parents, this study finds that variation in bonding family social capital shapes how college students perceive financial constraints in their past, present, and future, and how they enact their future plans. Among native-born and immigrant women alike, those with high family social capital tied their motivation to family support and centered their own sense of agency. Students with low family social capital aimed to distance themselves from their families of origin and expressed uncertainty about their ability to reach their future goals. By focusing on students facing similar financial constraints, we provide insight into factors that reproduce inequality among disadvantaged students.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-06T01:00:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211042840
       
  • “She Took Care of Us and She Went Through a Lot”: Emotional
           Availability, Emotional Support, and Millennials’ Gendered
           Understandings of Parenting

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      Authors: Cristen Dalessandro
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      In the United States, parenting pressures are growing for both mothers and fathers. Thus, it is important to investigate how younger generations may make sense of parenting in ways that could either reduce, or exacerbate, gender inequalities. In this article, interviews with 60 millennials discussing their experiences with their parents reveal that emotional support and emotional availability are key normative parenting expectations. However, disparate gender norms also factor into millennials’ stories about their parents’ efforts. These millennials often criticize fathers for sometimes being too absent, authoritarian, or ego-driven while they understand mothers as constrained by fathers’ bad behaviors yet still bound by expectations to be emotionally available and supportive in appropriately gendered ways. In millennials’ stories, emotional support and availability are seemingly gender neutral and millennials expect both fathers and mothers to live up to these expectations. However, broader structural gender norms challenge the apparent neutrality of parenting expectations.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-04T01:32:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211041984
       
  • What Makes Families Healthy' Examining Correlates of Family Health in
           a Nationally Representative Sample of Adults in the United States

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      Authors: Quenla Haehnel, Caitlin Whitehead, Eliza Broadbent, Carl L. Hanson, AliceAnn Crandall
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Conceptually, family health is crucial for individual health across the lifespan, yet previous research has lacked a validated family health measure. The current study examines the relationships between individual physical (physical activity) and mental health (depressive symptoms and executive functioning) and social determinants of health (socioeconomic status) with four domains of family health using a recently validated family health measure. The sample included 1050 US adults (40.30 years; 53.78% female) that completed a survey. The results of the structural equation model revealed that depression was associated with reduced family health across all domains. Executive functioning was associated with better family social and emotional processes and family healthy lifestyle. Physical activity was associated with improved family healthy lifestyle only. Income was positively associated with each domain, but subjective SES was not associated with any domain. The findings indicate the interconnectedness of family health and individual factors, particularly with depression and wealth.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-04T01:17:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211042841
       
  • Outsourcing for How Long' Factors and Duration of Employing Foreign
           Live-in Domestic Helpers

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      Authors: Adam K. L. Cheung
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      A remarkable rise in outsourcing domestic labor has been well documented, but the scope of the existing studies is limited. This study aims at investigating the factors and duration of using live-in domestic help in Hong Kong. The study also aims at disentangling the cross-sectional patterns in using paid domestic help into two different patterns: differential risks in the transition into the practice and the differential risks in the transition out from the practice. This study analyzes retrospective life-history data from a representative household survey (N = 2003). Discrete-time logit models were employed. The results show that employing live-in helpers is a stable practice that could last for more than a decade. Yet, the factors for using and ending the practice are different. The results show that the flexible outsourcing framework could satisfactorily explain the families employing live-in helpers but is less applicable in explaining the duration of the practice.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-03T05:15:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211041982
       
  • Partners’ Educational Pairings and Subjective Well-Being in China: An
           Analysis Using the Diagonal Mobility Model

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      Authors: Xiaohang Zhao, Skylar Biyang Sun
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Using pooled data from the Chinese General Social Survey in 2010, 2012, 2013, and 2015, this study investigated the relationship between partners’ educational pairings and subjective well-being among Chinese. Diagonal mobility models were employed to avoid conflating the effect of each partner’s education and the effect of the difference in education between partners. The findings reveal that regarding the well-being consequences of partners’ educational pairings, the hypothesis of satisfaction with marrying up outweighs the hypothesis of educational homogamy advantages and the hypothesis of sex roles. Specifically, for both women and men, persons marrying up in education are more likely to feel happy than their educationally homogamous counterparts. Moreover, educational hypergamy confers more psychological benefits to women in high-income communities than those in low-income communities. In addition, the earnings difference between partners plays a part in men’s SWB. Husbands who earn less than their wives are more likely to be unhappy than those whose earnings are 1–1.5 times those of their wives, suggesting that sex-role norms are at work. Our study contributes to a deeper understanding of the well-being consequences of educational heterogamy.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-01T08:25:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211038068
       
  • Patterns and Predictors of Taiwanese Adult Children’s Intergenerational
           Exchanges Before and After Economic Stagnation

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      Authors: Fang-Hua Jhang
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores whether cultural norms and economic performance shape the differences in the patterns of intergenerational exchanges, and analyzes whether structural, normative, or emotional dimensions of intergenerational solidarity predict the derived typology of intergenerational exchange in Taiwan before and after economic stagnation. Data derives from nationally representative samples of adult children with at least one parent alive in 2006 and 2016. Latent class analysis (LCA), measurement invariance with LCA, and multinomial logistic regression analysis are applied to analyze data. The results demonstrate how filial norms and economic stagnation influence the intergenerational exchange patterns. The study identifies five classes of intergenerational exchanges. There was a higher proportion of the high-exchange membership in the period of salary growth, while there was a higher proportion of the memberships of emotion-oriented exchanges during the wage stagnation period. Results reveal that geographic distance exerts a stronger and more consistent association with various exchange patterns.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-09-01T08:14:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211041991
       
  • Supporting Children and Kinship Caregivers in the Context of Substance Use
           Disorder: Perspectives of Key Professionals

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      Authors: Jessica E. Tye, Sonja J. Meiers, Gayle Olsen, Mitchell J. Moore, Martha J. Aleman, Vijay Chawla
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      One in eight children in the United States grows up in a household with parental substance use disorder (SUD). The purpose of this study was to explore the needs of children and kinship caregivers affected by SUD, as perceived by 23 professionals who interact with these families. A community-based participatory research approach with exploratory and descriptive qualitative methods was utilized. Results indicated that (a) children need relationships and connections, stability, emotional and health care support, and protection from risks associated with SUD; (b) caregivers need community resource and navigation supports, skills development, and understanding of the caregiver’s role; and (c) there is a lack of existing comprehensive resources and services to support families affected by SUD. This study adds to existing literature by identifying key professionals’ perceptions and examining various types of kin relationships. Future research and practice implications are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-08-18T09:57:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211038067
       
  • The Role of Family Communication in the Family Resilience of Deaf
           Children’s Families

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      Authors: Maulana Rezi Ramadhana, Ravik Karsidi, Prahastiwi Utari, Drajat Tri Kartono
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the family resilience of deaf children through the perspective of family communication. We examine the relationship between family communication patterns (including conformity and conversation orientation) with family resilience and compare differences in processes in family resilience of family types. Parents of deaf children (n = 129) in Indonesia completed a survey of family communication patterns and family resilience. Our findings show that there is a significant positive relationship between family communication patterns and family resilience, with preference to conversation orientations. All family types were identified as having a relationship with family resilience with different uniqueness in their resilience processes. With the relationship between these two concepts, perhaps the concept of communication patterns in the family can become a theoretical framework that binds the literature on family resilience in a sample of families with deaf children. Implications and direction for future research are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-08-16T12:50:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211038074
       
  • Relationship Between Mobile Penetration Rate and Divorce Rate in Iran
           During 1995–2019: A Time-Series Study

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      Authors: Siroos Ahmadi
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Mobile media, which comprise the main features of other media, can potentially influence many social issues. This time-series study aims to investigate the relationship between the mobile penetration rate and the growing divorce rate in Iran from 1995 to 2019. To specify the relationship, women’s participation in the labor force as a powerful social variable affecting the divorce rate was considered and modeled in the analysis. More specifically, the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) method was employed to measure the short and long-term relationships. The results indicated a significant positive relationship between the mobile penetration rate and the divorce rate in both short- and long-term periods; however, women’s participation in the labor force was not associated with the divorce rate.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-08-13T04:16:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211038066
       
  • How Do Caregiving Responsibilities Affect Women’s Work–Family
           Spillovers Over the Life Course'

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      Authors: Haoshu Duan
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Using three waves of data from the Midlife in the United States Study (MIDUS 1995–2014, N =1,123), this study investigates the linkage between caregiving and women’s positive and negative work–family spillovers over the life course. Results show that women’s work–family experiences are not only shaped by caregiving itself but also depend on the timing when they take these roles: the effect of raising school-aged children on negative family-to-work spillover (FWS) is the highest in the 40s, and the effect of raising adolescent children on positive work-to-family spillover (WFS) is the lowest in the 50s. Providing financial support to parents increases both negative FWS and negative WFS, and the effects are highest in their 20s and 65+, respectively. Providing emotional care and unpaid assistance to parents can enhance women’s positive FWS in their 40s. This study’s findings suggest that timing and linked-lives both play strong roles in shaping women’s work–family experiences.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-08-12T04:18:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030032
       
  • Gendered Housework Among Adolescents in India

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      Authors: Ashley Larsen Gibby
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Although an in-depth body of literature has explored the gendered lives of children in India, little is known about adolescents. Utilizing 24-hour time diary data from South India, this study examined how girls’ (n = 554) and boys’ (n = 577) engagement in housework varied by parents’ gender ideology. Findings show that adolescent girls with egalitarian parents do significantly less housework than girls with less egalitarian parents. At first glance, these findings support socialization theory—that what parents think translates into what adolescents do. However, boys do very little housework, regardless of parents’ gender attitudes. These differing findings are consistent with the idea of a stalled gender revolution and illustrate that socialization theory is not gender neutral.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-08-12T04:11:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211038071
       
  • Young Carers and Parentification–Between Support and Responsibility:
           Involving the Child in the Functioning of the Family

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      Authors: Barbara Chojnacka, Rafał Iwański
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-08-10T11:52:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211038072
       
  • Gender Inequality in Housework: Persistence and Change by Partnership and
           Parenthood Status in the Early 2000s

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      Authors: Shih-Yi Chao
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Heterosexual unions and parenthood are key contributors to gender inequality in housework. Over the last two decades, the social meaning of partnership and parenthood has changed. This study investigated whether this change in the narrative of partnership and parenthood status influenced changes in the housework gender gap. Using the American Time Use Survey 2003–2005 and 2013–2015, the findings show that housework gender gap was larger for people in a couple relationship than for singles. For nonparents, the gender gap in housework was no difference between those married and those cohabiting. Gender inequality in housework persisted among married parents but decreased among cohabiting parents, mainly because of the increase in cohabiting fathers’ housework time. These findings suggest a heterosexual union, particularly marriage, reproduces conventional gender roles. Men’s gendered behaviors were not uniform but diverse across partnership and parenthood status.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-08-09T07:27:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211031757
       
  • Patterns of Stepsibling Relationship Development

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      Authors: Lawrence Ganong, Caroline Sanner, Olivia Landon, Marilyn Coleman
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      In this grounded theory study, we examined the processes through which 25 young adult stepchildren developed relationships with 71 stepsiblings. We also examined the interpersonal and familial contexts within which stepsibling relationships were formed. We identified six distinct types of stepsibling connections: (a) strangers, (b) distant acquaintances, (c) rivals, (d) ambivalent friends or frenemies, (e) friends, and (f) siblings. These relationship types varied in emotional closeness and quality and were qualitatively different in how they developed and were maintained. These stepsibling types also differed in their interpersonal contexts, particularly in interactions and relationships with parents and stepparents.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-08-09T01:35:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211033924
       
  • African American Women’s Marital Attitudes: A Qualitative Study on
           Never Married Women

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      Authors: Kendra P. DeLoach McCutcheon, Karen Y. Watkins, Eboni V. Burton, Arlaina C. Harris
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Over the past few decades, marriage rates in the United States among African Americans continue to decline, yet African American women continue to express a desire to be married. Using a grounded theory qualitative approach with semi-structured interviews (N = 23), we explored marital attitudes among never married African American women. Participants identified both negative and positive exposures to marriage during childhood and messaging from family and faith communities as major sources influencing their desire to marry. Other themes, such as respectability and child behavioral benefits emerged that influenced women’s attitudes toward marriage. We present a discussion of the findings, limitations of this study, and next steps in the research.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-08-06T10:03:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211035582
       
  • Longitudinal Associations Between Early Risk, Father Engagement, and
           Coparenting and Low-Income Fathers’ Engagement With Children in Middle
           Childhood

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      Authors: Jay Fagan
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The current investigation examined the longitudinal associations among low-income, urban fathers’ risk factors, engagement with children, and coparenting support during early childhood and paternal engagement with children at age 9 years. Using Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing data (N = 2104), the results showed that additive individual and family risk when children were infants and preschool-age negatively predicted father engagement at age 9. Father engagement with toddlers and preschoolers positively predicted later paternal involvement with children, but coparenting support during early childhood did not predict father engagement at age 9. There was one significant moderation effect: fathers who were highly engaged with toddlers reported lower levels of engagement during middle childhood when they experienced a higher level of risk factors at age 5. Implications for researchers, practitioners, and policy makers are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-08-05T09:54:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211033926
       
  • Investigating the Psychometric Properties of the Arabic Version of the
           Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale IV (FACES IV) in Saudi
           Arabia

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      Authors: Enas O. A. Sarour, Mogeda E. S. El Keshky
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale IV (FACES IV) has been widely used to assess family functioning and to implement family therapeutic interventions. Cross-cultural adaptation is needed given the high sensitivity of family norms with culture. This study investigates the psychometric properties of the FACES IV in the context of Saudi culture. The sample consisted of 369 participants (270 females and 99 males) aged between 13 and 70. The results of the confirmatory factor analysis supported the FACES IV model, after some adjustments. The findings indicated that FACES IV was a reliable and valid measure that can be used in the context of Saudi Arabia. The study showed some particularities with the rigid and enmeshed dimensions and concurred with previous validation studies in suggesting that these dimensions must be investigated further with respect to different cultures.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-08-05T09:47:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211033936
       
  • Sexual Division in Parenting: A Normative Context That Hinders
           Co-Responsibility

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      Authors: José María García-de-Diego, Livia García-Faroldi
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Recent decades have seen an increase in women’s employment rates and an expansion of egalitarian values. Previous studies document the so-called “motherhood penalty,” which makes women’s employment more difficult. Demands for greater shared child-rearing between parents are hindered by a normative climate that supports differentiated gender roles in the family. Using data from the Center for Sociological Research [Centro de Investigaciones Sociológicas] (2018), this study shows that the Spanish population perceives that differentiated social images of motherhood and fatherhood still persist. The “sexual division in parenting” index is proposed and the profile of the individuals who most perceive this sexual division is analyzed. The results show that women and younger people are the most aware of this social normativity that unequally distributes child care, making co-responsibility difficult. The political implications of these results are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-08-04T08:15:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211038073
       
  • Partner–Child Relationship Satisfaction and Marital Satisfaction: Do
           Impressions Spill Over'

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      Authors: Reilly Kincaid
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Whereas childcare responsibilities are temporary, relationships with children are lifelong. This study examines how parents’ satisfaction with their partners’ relationships with offspring (i.e., “partner–child relationship satisfaction”) influences marital satisfaction, how this compares to the influence of satisfaction with the division of childcare, and how these processes work differently by gender. The author theorizes that partner–child relationship satisfaction shapes marital satisfaction through “impression spillover,” whereby one’s feelings about a relationship between other individuals transfer into feelings about one’s own relationship with one of those individuals. Hypotheses are tested with fixed effects regression using matched-partner data from four waves of the HILDA Survey (N=3804 person-years). Findings suggest that partner–child relationship satisfaction is associated with marital satisfaction, especially among women. Women’s marital satisfaction is influenced more by partner–child relationship satisfaction than by division of childcare satisfaction; conversely, for men, there is little distinction between the two associations. Findings offer support for impression spillover.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-08-04T04:43:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211033932
       
  • Physical and Mental Health of Mothers and Fathers Caring for Children with
           Special Health Care Needs: The Influence of Community Resources

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      Authors: Claudia Sellmaier
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Research has demonstrated that caring for children with special health care needs (SHCN) affects parental health and well-being. The current study examines effects of community resources on physical and mental health of mothers and fathers caring for a child with SHCN. Analysis of the 2016 National Survey of Children’s Health found that fathers rated their physical and mental health higher than mothers. Greater neighborhood safety and fewer days missed school were significant community resources for both mothers’ and fathers’ physical and mental health. Health care resources were only significant predictors for mothers’ health but not for fathers’. The analysis found significant moderating relationships between days missed school and child symptomology and days missed school and maternal employment on mothers’ mental health. The importance of economic security and community resources for parental health when caring for a child with special health care needs is discussed, and practice and policy implications are developed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-08-02T06:52:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211035580
       
  • Power Relations in Reproductive Decisions Under the Transforming Family
           Planning Policy in China

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      Authors: Yang Shen, Lai Jiang
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      China’s family planning policy has had a profound influence on individuals and families for the past 30 years. The universal two-child policy implemented in 2016 is its most relaxed form. The consequences of the policy transitions are worthwhile to explore. By interviewing 26 middle class mothers who gave birth to a second child during the policy transformation, we consider women’s accounts of their reproductive decisions-making processes. We found that the participants exerted strong agency in their reproductive decisions, but meanwhile they were reproducers and embodiments of traditional culture, population policies and patriarchal power. They internalised various modes of power that dictate how women should regulate their bodies, reflecting the mechanisms of self-governance. Self-governance functions as a subtle technique of conflict avoidance through which explicit conflicts are dissolved and transformed into intrapersonal self-adjustment and personal struggle. Our research broadens the conceptualisation of self-governance by incorporating relational dynamics using evidence from China.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-08-02T06:46:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211035584
       
  • Social Support and Quality of Life Among People Living With HIV/AIDS
           (PLWHA) in Ghana

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      Authors: Charles MS. Birore, Liyun Wu, Tina Abrefa-Gyan, Marilyn W. Lewis
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Utilization of antiretroviral therapies (ART) prolongs life and heightens ability to engage in productive activities among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). This study implemented a 6-week long Social Care Intervention (SCI) Program in Ghana and identified protective factors associated with Quality of Life (QoL) among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). We discovered that SCI model in the form of social support associated positively with differences in the QoL among PLWHA. Logistic regression revealed that social support, especially affectionate support, was positively associated with a higher level of QoL. People who were older and healthier tended to have higher levels of QoL compared with their counterparts who were younger and sicker. These findings suggest that building social support system can serve as an empowerment approach to promote quality of life among PLWHA in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) where resources are limited.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-29T12:49:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030046
       
  • Dyadic Experiences of Love in Late-Life Repartnering Relationships

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      Authors: Chaya Koren
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Love is desired at any age and has many meanings. Formulating new partner relationships later in life includes love as a motivation. However, experiences of love as a concept within such relationships have yet to be examined. Such an investigation could contribute to further understanding the meaning of love within new relationships formulated later in life. Thirty-eight semi-structured, qualitative interviews with older adults (19 couples) who entered a new relationship at old age after widowhood or divorce following a long-term marriage were conducted and transcribed verbatim. Dyadic interview analysis methodology was used. Unique experiences of love were identified: (1) Kinds of love: (a) pleasant love—not heated, (b) parental love—deep and quiet, and (c) sibling love; (2) phases of love: (a) being in love, (b) partial love, and (c) falling out of love yet caring. The discussion addresses late-life repartnering love as exclusive and as shifting from passion to compassion.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-19T03:34:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211031520
       
  • Exchange and Communal Strengths’ Associations With Relational
           Characteristics and Forgiveness

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      Authors: Laura Stafford, Kimberly Kuiper
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Clark and Mills (2012) proposed that communal norms characterize “healthy marriages,” whereas exchange norms indicate “troubled” ones. Using the actor–partner interdependence model, we consider this proposal. Heterosexual married partners’ exchange and communal strength are examined with several relational features including trust, commitment, relational satisfaction, and control mutuality, as well as partner-specific tendencies toward forgiveness. The findings indicate that one’s communal strength is associated with positive relational features for both oneself and one’s spouse, as well as a greater propensity to forgive and lesser tendencies toward negative forgiveness (retaliation). Exchange strength was generally associated with negative forgiveness. However, the relationship between exchange strength and relational features is more complicated. Lesser communal strength was generally associated with lower levels of the relational characteristics. Yet, exchange and communal strength interacted, indicating exchange may play a protective function by buffering against the ill effects of a lack of communal strength for some relational characteristics.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-17T11:21:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211032684
       
  • Foster Caregivers’ Parenting Stress as a Moderator of Change in
           Coparenting Following Relationship Education

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      Authors: Evin Winkelman Richardson, Jacquelyn K. Mallette, Ted G. Futris, Yiyi Dai, Karen DeMeester
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Foster caregivers provide care to some of our most vulnerable children and often experience challenges that can interfere with family functioning, including the interparental relationship. Recent efforts have been made to provide couple relationship education (CRE) to foster caregivers to support their interparental relationship and enhance the quality of the foster home. Guided by family systems theory and adult learning theory, and using an actor–partner interdependence model, the present quasi-experimental descriptive study -examined foster caregivers’ parenting stress at baseline as a moderator of change in perceptions of coparenting support from pre-program (baseline) to post-program (4–6 weeks following CRE) to determine if higher levels of stress prior to CRE inhibits positive changes in coparenting support. While both men and women experience positive change in their perceptions of coparenting support, higher levels of parenting stress moderated positive change for men.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-17T03:25:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211031521
       
  • Ten Key Findings on Targeted Parents’ Experiences: Towards a Broader
           Definition of Parental Alienation

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      Authors: Saulyn Lee-Maturana, Mandy Matthewson, Corinna Dwan
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The Top 10 Key Findings is the result of a 4-year research study on the targeted parents’ experiences of parental alienation. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted on 54 targeted parents alienated from their children. The data were analysed thematically following a qualitative descriptive design. This article contributes to a greater understanding of the targeted parents’ experiences and needs. The Top 10 Key Findings are based on the own perspective of targeted parents and are created with the aim to assist in the development of future appropriate support services and intervention programmes for them.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-16T01:26:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211032664
       
  • The Emotional Impact of Unfulfilled Career Aspirations for Stay-at-Home
           Mothers in Australia

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      Authors: Melissa Johnstone, Jayne Lucke
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Australia has a relatively high proportion of stay-at-home mothers, despite most young women aspiring to combine motherhood with paid work. Using two waves of quantitative data from the 1973–1978 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health, and interviews with a subsample of stay-at-home mothers, we aimed to understand the role of agency in women’s work–family outcomes and the impact upon their well-being. More than four out of five stay-at-home mothers (83%) had previously aspired to combine motherhood with paid work. There were no differences in mental health scores of stay-at-home mothers according to prior work aspirations. However, stay-at-home mothers had marginally lower life satisfaction, and were more dissatisfied with the progress of their career when they had previously aspired to paid work, compared with unpaid work. Although women described their current situation as a ‘choice’, their choices were deeply embedded within gendered, social and economic contexts.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-15T02:43:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030730
       
  • Patterns of Paternal Involvement of Korean Fathers: A Person-Centered
           Approach

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      Authors: Kwangman Ko, Youngjin Kang, Jieun Choi
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Given roles and expectations of father involvement in South Korea are in transition from traditional breadwinner to an involved caregiver to children, it is plausible that Korean fathers show diverse involvement behaviors in the contexts of work, family, and parenting. Using a person-centered approach, we explored if there were groupings of Korean fathers who could be identified from their involvement with their children. We also examined if those subgroup memberships were related to various factors in work, family, and parenting domains. With a sample of 212 married working fathers and the 12 items of involvement behaviors, we found four heterogeneous subgroups of people: low-involved, accessibility-focused, involved-but-less-accessible, and highly involved fathers. Significant differences among the four profiles were also found regarding various factors such as job stress, work and family conflict, work schedule, maternal employment, parenting satisfaction, and perceived level of involvement. Suggestions for future research, practitioners, and policymakers were discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-14T02:02:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030936
       
  • Physical Activity Among Parents of Children With Disabilities: A
           Systematic Review

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      Authors: Byungmo Ku, Ming-Chih Sung
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of the present systematic review was to synthesize the existing research on physical activity behaviors in parents of children with disabilities. For the systematic search, search terms were entered into three electronic databases. After systematic evaluations, 12 studies were included in the present systematic review. Using the physical activity guidelines (i.e., 150 minutes of moderate physical activity per week or 75 minutes of vigorous physical activity per week), the 12 studies were divided into three categories: active, not active, and unknown. The active category included two studies (16.7%) indicating that parents of children with disabilities meet the physical activity guidelines. The not active category included seven studies (50%) indicating that parents of children with disabilities do not meet the physical activity guidelines. More research is needed to determine physical activity behaviors in parents of children with disabilities.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-13T10:11:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030034
       
  • What is Parental Stress Connected to in Families of Children With Autism
           Spectrum Disorder' Implications for Parents’ Interventions

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      Authors: Magda Di Renzo, Viviana Guerriero, Massimiliano Petrillo, Federico Bianchi di Castelbianco
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Raising a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can be a very stressful experience, impacting parents and their ability to take care of their child. We examined the relationship between parenting stress and child, and parent and contextual factors in a sample of 61 families of children with ASD recruited in a centre for ASD assessment and treatment. Results showed that mothers had a higher level of stress related to their parental role when compared to fathers. Data also showed the importance of considering the specific role of parental emotion regulation, family functioning and educational level in influencing maternal stress and the specific role of couple adjustment in influencing fathers’ parental distress. This study pointed out the importance of employing a vision that embraces different domains of family life in cases of children with ASD and in parents’ intervention programmes because these factors may contribute to parental stress.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-12T02:55:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030735
       
  • Adverse Childhood Experiences, Intimate Partner Violence, and
           Communication Quality in a College-Aged Sample

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      Authors: Stephanie L. Baller, Kelby Lewis
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Previous adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) research focused on the future effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) among adult men, as well as victimization patterns. Continuing evidence is needed informing how ACEs, communication, and IPV may emerge within the intimate partnerships of 18–24 year olds. The present study addresses a literature gap by investigating ACEs in relation to relationship communication quality and IPV, considering not only victimization but also perpetration. An online survey was distributed through social media outlets targeting college-aged adults (n = 228). Men were more likely to perpetrate and be victimized by IPV than women in the sample. However, both sexes had moderate associations between ACES and victimization as well as perpetration of physical, emotional, sexual, and cyber abuse. Poor communication quality was associated with ACEs and most forms of abuse experienced in the last year. Continued investigation of this topic is warranted to understand mechanisms for effective treatment and skill development.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-10T02:39:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030928
       
  • Union Formation Expectations Among Older Adults Who Live Apart Together in
           the USA

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      Authors: Huijing Wu, Susan L. Brown
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      There is an ongoing debate over whether living apart together (LAT) relationships are simply long-term relationships or alternatives to cohabitation or marriage. This study examined cohabitation and marriage expectations among older adults who LAT in the United States to address the debate. The analyses also compared the marriage expectations of older adults who LAT and cohabitors. Using data from the 2011 Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (WLS), we examined the union expectations of 250 individuals who LAT and 234 cohabitors. After providing a demographic portrait of older adults who LAT, we used ordered logistic regression models to predict their cohabitation and marriage expectations. Additional models predicted marriage expectations for older adults who LAT versus cohabitors. Older adults who LAT were unlikely to expect to formalize their unions. Adults who LAT were less likely to expect marriage than cohabitors. LAT relationships appear to be long-term partnerships in the United States.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-10T02:09:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211031518
       
  • Parenting Desire Among Childless Lesbian and Gay Individuals in China: The
           Influence of Traditional Family Values, Minority Stress, and Parenting
           Motivation

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      Authors: Jian Wang, Lijun Zheng
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The current study aimed to explore the roles of traditional family values (specifically, filial piety and traditional gender stereotypes), minority stress, and parenting motivation in parenting desire among Chinese lesbian women and gay men. 1042 childless lesbian women and gay men between the ages of 18 and 46 were recruited to respond to an online survey, which covered measures assessing parenting desire, traditional family values, minority stress, and parenting motivation. The results indicated that traditional family values, minority stress, and parenting motivation each showed positive correlations with parenting desire. Additionally, minority stress alone mediated the relationship between filial piety/traditional gender stereotypes and parenting desire. However, minority stress was not significantly associated with parenting desire when controlling for parenting motivation. Parenting motivation mediated the associations between filial piety/traditional gender stereotypes, and parenting desire controlling for minority stress. The findings indicated that traditional family values, minority stress, and parenting motivation can be considered predictors of the desire to become a parent among Chinese lesbian women and gay men.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-10T01:13:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030921
       
  • From First-Union Separation to Stepfamily in Italian Context: Building a
           Stepcouple Identity

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      Authors: Silvia Scotto di Luzio, Fortuna Procentese
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The present work aimed to explore the building process of couple identity for stepcouples’ partners. Fifteen Italian women and fifteen Italian men, engaged in a new couple’s relationship after first-union separation or divorce, were interviewed. Semi-structured interviews were analyzed through a Grounded Theory approach. Results showed that the first-union separation experience plays an important role in the process of stepcouple identity building, as it influences the priorities in individual organization of life, qualities, and expectations about new relationships, the importance attributed to individual, couple, and family boundaries, and the choice of the new partner. New functional stepcouple relationships are characterized by a strong sense of shared projects and purposes. This generative dimension, clearly perceived by interviewees as a fundamental characteristic of stepcouple identity, is a resource, in spite of complexity and challenges of stepcouples’ life cycle.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-09T12:52:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030930
       
  • Relationship Between Family Functioning, Parents’ Psychosocial Factors,
           and Children’s Well-Being

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      Authors: Tania Gaspar, Diego Gomez-Baya, Joana S. Trindade, Fábio Botelho Guedes, Ana Cerqueira, Margarida G. de Matos
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The main objective of this study is to explore the impact of the psychosocial factors (social support, resilience, and mental health) on the family functioning and on the parent’s perception of their children’s well-being. Participants were 1757 parents of children aged 6 to 16 years, 77.3% female (N = 1359), and 22.7% male (N = 398), aged between 20 and 80 years (M = 41.61 and SD = 5.71). A path analyses model indicated that social support and resilience, which were positively associated, presented positive effects on parental mental health and on family functioning. No effect was observed on family functioning by parental mental health after including the effects by social support and resilience. Finally, this model pointed out that better family functioning, more social support, and more resilience skills were related to better child well-being. Implications to research and to prevention and psychological intervention in relation to parental skills and family functioning are presented in order to promote children well-being and healthy development.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-09T11:48:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030722
       
  • Sibling Social Comparison in Mid- to Later Life: Links with Well-Being and
           Relationship Quality

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      Authors: Alexander C. Jensen, Hannah B. Apsley, Laura E. Thackeray, Breanna T. Shoaf
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Social comparison processes between siblings play an important role in the ways siblings influence one another at younger ages, but to our knowledge, no studies have examined social comparison processes between siblings in mid- to later life. The current study examined (1) factors associated with the propensity for social comparisons with a sibling and (2) how social comparison is linked to well-being and sibling relationship quality. Data came from 491 adults from across the United States (M age = 58.96, SD = 6.25; 68% female). Results indicated that adults who are the same sex as their sibling are more likely to engage in social comparison with their sibling. Additionally, an inclination for social comparison with a sibling was linked to more depressive symptoms, more sibling conflict, and greater sibling closeness. Overall, comparison with a sibling in adulthood may be linked to both positive and negative outcomes.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-09T11:11:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030726
       
  • Determinants of Paternal Engagement: Investigating Low-Income Fathers’
           Caregiving, Play, and Verbal Engagement With Infants

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      Authors: Jessica L. McCaig, Heidi E. Stolz, Siera J. Reimnitz, Megan Baumgardner, Rebecca G. Renegar
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Extant research highlights the importance of early paternal engagement for children and families. Thus, there is strong support for the exploration of predictors of low-income father engagement. Informed by Belsky’s process model of parenting, this study explores contextual determinants of father–infant engagement (i.e., verbal engagement, physical play, and caregiving) including the unique contributions of the child, the father, and the broader social context. We utilized survey data from a sample of 183 non-residential, cohabitating, and married low-income fathers of infants participating in a home-visiting intervention. Results demonstrated that infant age was associated with increased caregiving and verbal engagement, fathers’ total work hours were negatively correlated with verbal engagement, fathers’ depressive symptoms were linked to increased physical play, and the quality of the coparenting alliance was related to physical play and caregiving. Findings may inform programs designed to promote paternal engagement during infancy.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-09T03:15:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211031515
       
  • Sibling Relationships and Social Development in Youth and Emerging Adults:
           A Self-Determination Theory Approach

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      Authors: Nadia Barberis, Valeria Verrastro, Sebastiano Costa, Maria Cristina Gugliandolo
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to examine an integrated model of the mediation role of need satisfaction and frustration in the association between the sibling relationship and interpersonal competence and social anxiety in young adults and their siblings. In a sample of 1621 pairs of siblings with a range age between 16 and 30 years old, the actor-partner interdependence mediation model showed that (a) a positive sibling relationship promotes need satisfaction, while a negative relationship promotes need frustration; (b) need satisfaction to promote interpersonal competence, while need frustration promote social anxiety; and (c) a mediation role of basic need in the association between sibling relationship and social anxiety and interpersonal competence. The need satisfaction perceived by the older siblings is negatively related to social anxiety and positively related to the interpersonal competence of younger siblings. These results showed the importance of focusing on sibling dynamics in the family context using a SDT approach.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-09T01:44:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030933
       
  • Parenting an Adolescent Who is Using a Mental Health Service: A
           Qualitative Study on Perceptions and Management of Stigma

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      Authors: Lynn McKeague, Eilis Hennessy, Claire O’Driscoll-Lawrie, Caroline Heary
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Supporting an adolescent who has an emotional or behavioural disorder is challenging for parents. This article reports the findings of a qualitative study of parents’ perceptions of stigma associated with parenting an adolescent with a diagnosis of ADHD or depression. 40 parents (28 mothers and 12 fathers) took part in semi-structured interviews. The interview guide focussed on their parenting experience in social contexts such as interactions with friends, family and the wider community, and perceptions of their own parenting abilities and experiences. Thematic analysis was used to code and interpret the data. Parents felt that other people held ill-informed or dismissive views of what their child’s disorder entailed; they experienced parental self-blame; they engaged in efforts to normalize their child’s experiences and they reported being selective in deciding whether to talk to others about their child’s diagnosis. The implications of the findings for addressing stigma are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-08T10:18:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030924
       
  • “When You Come Together and Do Everything, It’ll be Better for
           Everybody”: Exploring Gender Relations Among Two Southeastern Native
           American Tribes

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      Authors: Jenn Lilly, Catherine E. McKinley, Hannah Knipp, Jessica L. Liddell
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Prior to the imposition of patriarchal colonial norms, Native American (NA) gender relations were characterized as complementary and egalitarian; however, little research has explored gender relations within NA communities today. This study used a community-based critical ethnography to explore contemporary NA gender relations with a purposive sample of 208 individuals from the “Coastal Tribe” and 228 participants from the “Inland Tribe.” After participant observation, interviews, and focus groups were conducted, a collaborative approach to reconstructive analysis was used to identify themes in the data. Within these communities, gender relations tended to reflect egalitarian and cooperative but gendered norms, and participants provided examples of how tribal members are transcending patriarchal colonialism. Through the lens of the Framework of Historical Oppression, Resilience, and Transcendence, we theorize how these gender norms may protect families from risks associated with historical oppression and promote family resilience with implications for research, practice, and policy.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-08T10:10:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030059
       
  • A Study on Moderating Role of Family-Friendly Policies in Work–Life
           Balance

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      Authors: Anuradha Nayak, Mrinalini Pandey
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The present study aims to explore the relationship between work demand and work–family conflict, and family demand and family–work conflict. This study also tries to find out the moderating effect of family-friendly policies between the proposed relationships. The data for this study were collected from 217 women employees working in steel manufacturing companies of Jharkhand. The results of the study indicate that there is positive correlation between work demand and work–family conflict, and family demand and family–work conflict. Moreover, family-friendly policies are observed to significantly moderate the relationship of work demand and work–family conflict, but they do not significantly moderate the relationship of family demand and family–work conflict. This article gives insights into understanding the role of family-friendly policies to reduce the work–family conflict among women employees. A few measures are suggested, and employers should adopt such policies to minimize the work–family conflict, which can lead to better work–life balance
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-07T11:34:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030037
       
  • Do Relative Status of Women and Marriage Characteristics Matter for the
           Intimate Partner Violence'

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      Authors: Aysegul Kayaoglu
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyzes intimate partner violence (IPV) in a developing country context, namely, Turkey, which faces an enormous increase in femicide cases over the last decade. Analyzing a very rich nationwide representative survey on IPV, we show that it is not only the absolute status of women but also their relative status in terms of income and education that affects different types of domestic violence, ranging from emotional abuse to physical and sexual violence. Besides, factors related to marriage setting are found to have a significant role in the effect of women’s superior status on IPV. Overall, we provide evidence to support the relative resource theory and invalidate the intra-household bargaining model in the Turkish case.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-07T09:47:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030030
       
  • Educational Challenges of School-Age Children in Skipped Generation
           Households in Nigeria

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      Authors: Bayode I. Popoola, Funmi Togonu-Bickersteth, Joshua Aransiola, Akinjide Akintomide, Opeyemi Ekundayo
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The article investigated educational challenges of Nigerian children raised in an unusual family context, the skipped generation households (SGHs). Specifically, it determined the proportion of school-age children in SGHs enrolled in schools and investigated children’s perception of the effect of SGHs on their education. The study adopted a descriptive survey design. Data were collected from 2144 indexed children from the three major ethnic groups in Nigeria. The results showed that 88.2% of children in SGHs were enrolled in schools, and that significant regional variations existed in school attendance by the children. Specific educational challenges of the children in SGHs included having to do assignment alone, not getting enough time to study, difficulty in paying school fees, and late coming to school. The article brought to the fore the need for government to improve the welfare of children raised in SGHs in order to mitigate the educational challenges confronting them.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-07T06:23:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030738
       
  • Antecedents of Pregnancy Intention and Prenatal Father Engagement: A
           Dyadic and Typological Approach

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      Authors: Kristina Sayler, Sarah Hartman, Jay Belsky
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Prior research indicates that unintended pregnancy is associated with poorer maternal well-being, decreased relationship stability, and compromised child health and development, whereas prenatal father engagement is linked to lower maternal stress and enhanced infant health. Here we extend such research, considering unintended pregnancy and prenatal father engagement in typological perspective to (1) identify different types of (prenatal) families; (2) explore whether problematic antecedent factors predict family type; and (3) whether family type forecasts postnatal parenting attitudes, father involvement, and marital conflict. Latent-class analysis using a subsample of participants from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (n = 6100) revealed four types of families: High Pregnancy Intention/High Father Engagement (22.6%), Low Pregnancy Intention/High Father Engagement (14%), Average Pregnancy Intention/Average Father Engagement (58.2%), and Low Pregnancy Intention/Low Father Engagement (5.2%). Associational findings indicated having a highly involved father prenatally mitigates potential risks associated with an unintended pregnancy vis-à-vis family functioning.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-06T11:05:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030036
       
  • Does Family Decision-Making Power Improve Women’s Happiness'

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      Authors: Zhongwu Li
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      It is almost a consensus that the stronger family decision-making power a woman has, the happier she will be. While using the China Family Panel Studies, this study reveals a long-overlooked fact that women’s control over more family decision-making power does not necessarily improve their happiness. The results of the ordinary least squares and ordinal logit model confirm this finding, and the propensity score matching method corroborates the conclusion. Heterogeneity analysis shows that among those women with less education and lower social status, the negative happiness effect of women’s family decision-making power is particularly significant. Women’s traditional attitudes and self-esteem are two important factors which hinder women’s family decision-making power from enhancing their happiness.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-06T10:49:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030025
       
  • Sources of Intergenerational Conflict in Chinese Immigrant Families in the
           United States

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      Authors: Man Guo, Amy Lemke, Xinqi Dong
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Studies of family relations have not kept pace with the acceleration of international migration. To address this gap, this study relied on a survey of 545 Chinese immigrants in Chicago who reported information of 869 older parents to examine the sources of intergenerational conflict in five domains: norms/values, relationship itself, money, health, and parenting. The results of logistic regression showed that maintaining one’s traditional culture, in the form of endorsing a sense of filial obligation, was a significant protective factor against all types of conflict. Immigrants with a higher level of acculturation were more likely to report conflict regarding norms/values and relationship itself, but not more so regarding practical issues such as health, money, and parenting. Helping parents with ADLs, not IADLs, was associated with more conflict regarding monetary and health issues. Immigrants’ greater sense of mastery was associated with a lower chance of reporting norm/value-related intergenerational conflict.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-06T10:42:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030724
       
  • Measurement Invariance in the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire:
           Implications for Culturally Inclusive Parenting Research

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      Authors: Anne Shaffer, Violeta J. Rodriguez, David J. Kolko, Paul A. Pilkonis, Oliver Lindhiem
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Questions persist in the parenting literature regarding how best to define positive and negative parenting behaviors. Are there optimal parenting behaviors shared by mothers and fathers, or among different racial and ethnic groups' This study draws from a nationally representative sample of US parents of school-age children, testing aspects of measurement invariance in the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire (APQ) full and short forms. Our goal was to highlight psychometric approaches to enhancing cultural sensitivity and inclusivity in parenting research, by assessing whether self-reported parenting behaviors have similar conceptual structure across groups. Tests of measurement invariance revealed that the factor structure of the APQ was the same across parent gender, race, and ethnicity. While partial invariance was found in some instances, we did not find metric and scalar invariance in comparisons among these groups. We conclude with research- and practice-based implications, and provide recommendations for future measurement development and use.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-06T10:34:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030022
       
  • The Effects of Family Income and Parents’ Educational Status on Child
           Health Status: Examining the Mediation Effects of Material Deprivation and
           Parents’ Health

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      Authors: Yichao Wu, Di Qi
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Using the Chinese Family Panel Studies database in the wave of 2012, 2014, and 2016 with a sample of 25,663 children from 0 to 15 years old, this article examines the direct and indirect effects of family income and parents’ educational status on child health outcome. Two mediators include material living conditions and parents’ health. The results show that material living conditions and parents’ health have the greatest influences on children’s health, and parents’ education and family income are the secondary importance. Parents’ education has significant effects on child health through parents’ health and living conditions.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-06T04:53:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030733
       
  • Families in Poverty and Noncitizenship: An Intersectional Perspective on
           Economic Exclusion

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      Authors: Einat Lavee, Edline Dallal, Roni Strier
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Recent scholarship on families living in poverty has focused on immigrant and migrant families, legal and illegal. The element of citizenship has received relatively broad attention, as legal status has profound influence on the individual’s life chances. However, studies exploring relations between noncitizenship and poverty have not provided a comprehensive explanation of the mechanisms that deprive noncitizens of the possibility of accumulating sufficient material resources. The study offers a nuanced, comprehensive account of the process of economic deprivation, focusing on four main survival strategies with respect to noncitizen Palestinian families residing in Israel. Drawing on 24 qualitative in-depth interviews with adult family members, we apply the intersectionality approach to decipher mechanisms of exclusion at work in the everyday lives of illegal migrants, shaping their ability to attain material resources. Findings point to a need to adopt a transnational protection framework in order to allow economic and social inclusion of noncitizens.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-06T01:36:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030020
       
  • A Qualitative Exploration of Fathers’ Antenatal and Postnatal
           Challenges

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      Authors: Daisy J. Gemayel, Karl K. K. Wiener, Bróna Nic Giolla Easpaig, Anthony J. Saliba
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores and identifies the different challenges for both antenatal and postnatal fathers that might act as precursors for poor paternal perinatal emotional well-being. Twelve fathers living in Sydney, aged over 18 years, identified as either an antenatal or postnatal father were interviewed concerning their experiences. Interview data were thematically analysed to identify challenges faced by expectant and new fathers. Five main challenges were identified – father–mother relationship, father–child relationship, life changes, lack of support and birth event. The results of this study indicate possible differences between antenatal and postnatal challenges, with postnatal fathers being confronted by additional challenges. These findings provide valuable insight for health professionals to better target treatment interventions by considering the actual precursors for poor emotional well-being in fathers.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-05T11:51:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030060
       
  • Getting to the Pink Picket Fence: How LGB Migrants Negotiate Same-Sex
           Marriage

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      Authors: Tanja Vuckovic Juros
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the increasing legalization trend, same-sex marriage remains inaccessible to couples in most countries. Such exclusions, however, can be circumvented by migrants who, in the process, also negotiate diverse and even divergent meanings of marriage embedded in different socio-institutional contexts. This study examines such diverse meanings of marriage among LGB transnational migrants based on biographic narrative interviews with nine individuals married to same-sex partners in Belgium and the Netherlands and coming from Central and Eastern European countries with constitutional protection of heterosexual marriage. The study highlights the negotiations of intimate relationships in the context of the new institutional opportunity of marriage and stresses how the similarities between migrants and non-migrants testify to the strengthening of same-sex marriage as a social institution. Focusing further on migrants' unique experiences of marriage in divergent socio-institutional contexts, this study also shows how same-sex marriage empowers LGB migrants even where it is (still) not available.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-05T10:45:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030035
       
  • Parents’ Emotional Responses to Early Parenthood

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      Authors: Rachael Sanders, Jennifer Lehmann, Fiona Gardner
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Early parenthood is a significant developmental stage that involves abrupt and dramatic changes to a new parent’s life. It is thought to be both a stressful and rewarding period, requiring significant adjustment to pre-parenthood lifestyles and routines. This study explores the emotional journey that new parents experience during the early phases of parenthood, examining these with a critical lens and giving consideration to the impacts of social constructions on early parenthood. Thirty parents were interviewed as part of a grounded theory study which uncovered parents’ experiences of significant emotional disturbance including self-doubt, isolation and loneliness. Both the role (lack of sleep, frustration) and social expectations and demands contributed to emotional disturbance. Many parents experienced a culture of comparison, competition and judgement that impacted on their emotional well-being, which we believe can be resisted with professional and social supports and the application of critical reflection.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-05T10:38:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030024
       
  • Parental Child-Invested Contingent Self-Esteem as a Source of
           Acculturation-Related Parent–Child Conflicts Among Latino Families

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      Authors: Terese Glatz, Sevgi Bayram Özdemir, Katja Boersma
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Most parents want their children to succeed well. For some parents, however, children’s successes are strongly related to beliefs about their own self-worth; a concept known as parental child-invested contingent self-esteem, which has shown links to negative parenting practices (e.g., psychological control). Less is known about associations with aspects of the parent–child relationship that are particularly relevant among families with immigrant backgrounds. We examine the associations with acculturation-related conflicts in a sample of 180 Latino parents of children in 6th to 12th grade. Results showed that higher levels of parental child-invested contingent self-esteem was significantly linked to higher levels of acculturation conflicts, but this link was especially strong if the parent reported that their child was unresponsive to their corrections. When parents base their self-worth on their child’s successes and the child acts in ways that are not in line with parents’ expectations, parents report more acculturation-related conflicts.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-05T08:34:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030044
       
  • Search and Communication About Origins in Internationally Adopted Young
           Adults in Spain: A Phenomenological Perspective

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      Authors: Nerea Martín, Susana Corral
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Adoption is considered a lifelong process for those involved in it. In this vein, adoptees’ lives seem to be impacted by their origins and every experience that occurred before their adoption. The aim of this study is to explore adult adoptees’ experience with respect to their adoptive condition, communication about origins, and search for their origins. In this study, 11 adult adoptees took part, 10 women and one man aged between 18 and 26 years. Interviews were conducted to examine participants’ experiences, which were subsequently analyzed following interpretative phenomenological analysis. Results showed that most of the participants experience an open communication about origins and adoption with their parents and their environment. However, participants pointed to the existence of some limits in such communication. Participants noted a similar experience with respect to search. Based on the results, future studies should focus on the study of adoption in different stages of adulthood.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-03T09:50:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211029257
       
  • “My Whole Family Is Not Really My Family”—Secure Care Shadows on
           Family and Family Practices Among Young Adults and Their Family Members

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      Authors: Sofia Enell, Monika Wilińska
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study based in Sweden explores family practices and family displays among young adults with a history of secure care, which limits and restricts contacts and therefore causes fundamental changes in relationships. Almost 10 years after institutional placement, narrations of 11 young adults and 11 nominated family members reveal ongoing struggles between imagined and lived realities of family. These struggles are revealed by memories and emotions evoked by the context of secure care and show how deeply the secure care penetrated their family lives. By using the metaphor of shadows, shadows of recalled horror of secure care (reflecting family displacement) and the pressure to make family work (reflecting restricting practices in secure care where only (birth) family were considered as family and relations of (natural) importance) are discerned. We call for more attention to the perversity of secure care arrangements, at both policy and institutional levels.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-03T09:23:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030026
       
  • Keeping the Flame Alive: Describing Marriage and Divorce Among
           Professional Firefighters

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      Authors: Michelle L. Pennington, Elizabeth Coe, Fatima Dobani, Marc I. Kruse, Keith Sanford, Eric C. Meyer, Suzy B. Gulliver
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      There is a common belief, but little empirical evidence, that firefighters are uniquely vulnerable to divorce. The present study aimed to examine key demographic and occupational factors related to divorce among firefighters. Online survey data (relationship status, relationship history, demographics, and occupational history) were collected from 163 firefighters in an urban city of the Southern United States. Divorced firefighters were older, in fire service longer, and younger at the age of their first marriage compared to non-divorced firefighters. Firefighters who married before joining fire service were more likely to experience divorce than firefighters who married after joining fire service; however, after controlling for age and age at first marriage, this effect became nonsignificant. Divorce was reported by firefighters at greater rates than the general population, and most divorces occurred after entry into fire service. However, non-occupational factors may better explain this trend.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-03T01:50:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211029256
       
  • Transitioning From Victim to Perpetrator: Testing Direct and Mediation
           Effects

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      Authors: Francis D. Boateng, Christina Campbell
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Some criminologists have focused on understanding the role of childhood experiences on an individual’s likelihood of offending during adulthood. Although research has consistently linked these two phenomena, little is known about the extent to which childhood victimization influences later criminal behavior. The current study analyzed self-reported data to examine the abused–abuser relationship in the context of intimate relationships. Specifically, the study examined the direct effects of victimization across three types of offending, and whether or not individual characteristics in such a relationship were significant mediators. Using a multivariate OLS regression, a significant relationship was observed between childhood victimization and adulthood offending. Likewise, results revealed that individual characteristics significantly mediated this relationship. Policy implications of these observations are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-03T01:44:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030045
       
  • Quality of Life, Family Climate, and Sense of Family Coherence During the
           COVID-19 Pandemic: Modeling of Triple-Serial Mediators

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      Authors: Nilay Neyişci, Şefika Ş. Erçetin, Şuay N. Açıkalın, Nilüfer Koçtürk, Nihan Potas
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study explored the association of quality of life (QOL) during the pandemic with family climate and family integrity. Participants were 1085 parents from Turkey. According to the findings, the participants’ QOL, which demonstrated their judgments regarding their physical health, mental well-being, social relations, and general happiness, was greatly influenced by the COVID-19 pandemic. Women were seen to have lower perceptions in relatedness in the family and cognitive cohesion than male participants. While there was a positive, but low, association between the variables, there were positive and high correlations between cognitive cohesion and relatedness in the family. When the mediation analyses were evaluated, it was concluded that QOL predicted the sense of family coherence alone, while intergenerational authority influenced other variables. The results highlighted the importance of family climate–based prevention and intervention targeting the promotion of family coherence.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-03T01:10:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030041
       
  • Interparental Conflict Across the Early Parenting Period: Evidence From
           Fathers Participating in an Australian Population-Based Study

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      Authors: Rebecca Giallo, Monique Seymour, Karli Treyvaud, Daniel Christensen, Fallon Cook, Mark Feinberg, Stephanie Brown, Amanda Cooklin
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Current evidence about the prevalence of interparental conflict (IPC) during early parenthood is primarily based on mothers’ reports. Drawing upon Australian longitudinal data from 4136 fathers, the aims of the study were to: (a) report on the extent to which fathers report IPC across six biennial time intervals when their children were aged 6–12 months to 10–11 years, (b) identify trajectories of IPC over time and (c) identify postnatal factors (at the initial time point) associated with high risk trajectories of IPC. One in 10 fathers reported high IPC at each time interval. A high and increasing pattern of IPC was observed for 6% of fathers. Factors associated with this trajectory were fathers being from a non-English speaking background and high postnatal psychological distress reported by mothers and fathers. These findings underscore the importance of early intervention for some families experiencing IPC in the early years of their children’s lives.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-02T10:21:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030042
       
  • Postdivorce Coparenting Patterns and Relations With Adolescent Adjustment

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      Authors: Zoë Rejaän, Inge E. van der Valk, Susan Branje
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the association between postdivorce coparenting patterns and adolescent internalizing and externalizing behavior. Children after parental divorce increasingly grow up in shared residence arrangements, making postdivorce coparenting much more pertinent. The Coparenting Behavior Questionnaire was used to investigate the perceptions of 251 Dutch adolescents regarding postdivorce coparenting behaviors. Latent class analysis was used to identify coparenting patterns, and associations with adolescent outcomes were examined. Four distinct postdivorce coparenting patterns were identified: cooperative, negatively engaged, negatively disengaged, and average. Adolescents of parents with a cooperative pattern reported the least amount of internalizing and externalizing problems, whereas adolescents with negatively engaged parents reported the most internalizing problems. In line with family systems theory, interactions in the coparental subsystem are associated with adolescent adjustment and can therefore be viewed as both a risk and protective factor.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-02T07:27:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030027
       
  • How Does Law Prescribe Circulation of Children' Understanding
           Different Kinds of Movement Within the Adoption Law in India

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      Authors: Chandan Bose
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This article looks at how adoption law prescribes correct contexts for the legitimate movement of children. It is specifically an analysis of the Adoption Regulation of India, 2017, and the Juvenile Justice Act 2015, and the way in which they warrant three kinds of movement of children through adoption: ‘abandonment’/’surrender’, ‘return’ and ‘giving and taking’. By investigating the precise way in which law formulates definition of these terms, this article attempts to understand how legal terminology comes to affect the kind of sites that the biological family, the state and the adoptive family end up becoming.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-02T05:14:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030058
       
  • COVID-19 and Parental Burnout: Parents Locked Down but Not More Exhausted

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      Authors: Sarah Le Vigouroux, Astrid Lebert-Charron, Jaqueline Wendland, Emilie Boujut, Céline Scola, Géraldine Dorard
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Lockdowns put in place in response to the COVID-19 health crisis have changed daily functioning for families and potentially the emotional experience of individuals in their parenting role. Our study aimed to highlight the importance of the environmental consequences associated with lockdowns on parental burnout. We compared data on parental burnout levels from two French samples: the first collected in 2018 (N = 1332) and the second collected during the last month of lockdown (N = 522). Our results show that parents included during the lockdown period reported significantly, but slightly, higher saturation (a dimension of the parental burnout construct) than parents included 2 years earlier. However, the number of children per age group, maintaining employment, and having to provide schooling at home are not variables that explain differences in the level of parental burnout between our two samples. Our results are discussed with regard to the risk factors identified and the French context.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-02T03:42:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030038
       
  • Could Personality and Parental Relations Be a Risk Factor for
           Self-Injurious Behavior'

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      Authors: Vesile Soyyiğit Oktan, Ezgi Saylan, Pınar Toksoy
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Self-injurious behavior is one of the important problems expanding especially among adolescents day by day. The aim of this study is to examine the personal traits and parental relations of the adolescents showing self-injurious behavior. In this study with correlational survey model, the research group consists of a total of 739 adolescents, 361 of whom are females and 378 of whom are males from six high schools randomly selected in a city centrum in the north of Turkey. The findings have revealed that the adolescents show significant difference in terms of the sub-dimensions of “responsibility,” “untidiness,” and “sentimental unbalance” depending on whether they show NSSI or not. No significant difference has been found between the adolescents showing and not showing NSSI in Adolescents’ Parental and Adolescent Relation Quality Scale “Explanation to mother” sub-dimension, but significant differences have been found in the other sub-dimensions.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-01T12:50:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030047
       
  • The Trajectory of Subjective Well-Being: A Partial Explanation of the
           Marriage Advantage

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      Authors: Alfred DeMaris, Gary Oates
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Although several studies have documented a distinct marriage advantage in well-being, it is still unclear what it is about marriage that renders this benefit. We hypothesize that it is due to factors theorized to accrue to matrimony, such as elevated financial status and specific social psychological supports. We examine the trajectory of subjective well-being for 1135 respondents from the three-wave 2010 GSS panel survey utilizing linear mixed-effects modeling. We find that about two-fifths of the marriage advantage in subjective well-being is accounted for by a mixture of control variables, finances, and emotional factors, with most of this due to elements that are associated with the marital context. Higher annual income, enhanced interpersonal trust, greater sociability, and less of a sense of loneliness and isolation appear to be responsible for a substantial component of the marital advantage. We further find that the marriage advantage is invariant to both race and gender.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-01T12:37:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030033
       
  • Adverse Childhood Experiences in Parents and Their Effects on Adult
           Children

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      Authors: Simona L. Seteanu, Cezar Giosan
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Adverse childhood experiences (ACE) are associated with negative psychological consequences later in life, for both the victims and their children. The present study examines the links between parents’ ACE and psychological outcomes in their adult children. A sample of 162 participants from 54 intact families with adult children was evaluated for ACE history and current mental health. Results showed that ACE was a predictor of mental health for all the participants, explaining 31.2% of the variance. Furthermore, parents’ ACE, negative parenting, and parents’ marital satisfaction had a significant influence on their adult children’s mental health. The results also showed that fathers’ ACE are associated with negative parenting, as well as their adult children’s ACE and self-reported psychopathological symptoms. These results point to the importance of examining multiple familial factors in the development of psychopathology in young adults. Limitations of the study are also presented.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-01T12:28:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030043
       
  • Attitudes Towards Home Care of Older Persons With Disabilities: The Case
           of Trinidad

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      Authors: Bephyer Parey
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Caring for persons with disabilities is challenging, yet it is assumed that people would care for their relatives with disabilities because of a feeling of closeness. Using a convergent mixed methods design, this article examines attitudes towards older persons with disabilities in the context of home care using Trinidad as a case study. The analytical framework involves (a) measuring attitudes towards the inclusion of older persons with disabilities in the home and (b) identifying the reasons for these attitudes. This framework is applied to a representative sample of 868 adult Trinidadians as well as the subsamples of adult Trinidadians dwelling and not dwelling with older persons with disabilities. Not all adult Trinidadians agreed that older persons with disabilities should be included in the home, and integrated findings indicate the need for monitoring systems for both home care and at homes for the aged.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-06-29T12:02:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211029248
       
  • Domains of Ongoing Communication Between Former Spouses: Associations With
           Parenting Stress and Children’s Post-Divorce Well-Being

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      Authors: Jonathon J. Beckmeyer, Melinda S. Markham, Jessica Troilo
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Using data from 708 divorced parents (52.4% mothers), we examined how ongoing communication (i.e., topics and frequency of communication) with former spouses was associated with parenting stress and child internalizing and externalizing behavior. Based on hierarchical multiple regression models, ongoing communication was not associated with parenting stress but was associated with child externalizing and internalizing behavior. Specifically, communicating about sex/romance was associated with more child externalizing behavior. Communication about self and family and communication about sex/romance were associated with more, but coparenting communication with less, child internalizing behavior. Overall, the results support recent suggestions by family scientists and clinicians that divorced parents should limit their communication to shared parenting issues. Discussing non-coparenting topics may lead to a post-divorce family system that undermines children’s well-being. Talking about having a sexual or romantic relationship with their former spouses may be harmful for children’s well-being.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-06-29T01:20:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211029264
       
  • Work-to-Family Conflict and Children’s Problems with School, Friends,
           and Health: Household Economic Conditions and Couple Relationship Quality
           as Contingencies

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      Authors: Lei Chai, Scott Schieman
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      What is the relationship between work-to-family conflict (WFC) and children’s problems with school, friends, and health' And does that association depend on household economic conditions and couple relationship quality' Using four waves of longitudinal data from the Canadian Work, Stress, and Heath Study (2011–2017), the present study finds that—overall—both fathers’ and mothers’ levels of WFC are associated with elevated levels of children’s problems over time. However, we also discover that household income and spousal disputes moderate this focal relationship—and they do so differently for mothers and fathers. First, the positive association between WFC and children’s problems is stronger for mothers (but not fathers) in households with lower income. Second, the positive association between WFC and children’s problems is stronger for fathers (but not mothers) who report more frequent disputes with their spouse. We discuss the implications of these patterns for current theorizing about stress amplification dynamics and situate that discussion within broader ideas in the ecological model of human development.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-06-26T04:14:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211026953
       
  • To Disclose or Conceal' Workplace Disability and Eldercare-Related
           Disclosure Decision-Making Strategies

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      Authors: Lisa Maureen Stewart, Avelina Charles
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Using qualitative methods, this study explored workplace disclosure decisions made by employees caring for children and younger adults with disabilities or special healthcare needs and compared these experiences with those of employees caring for older adults when seeking family support at work. Nineteen semi-structured interviews included participants caring for children and younger adults with disabilities and older adults who were predominantly female, white, college-educated, and middle-aged. Employees in the sample had developed communication competence from prior experiences that impacted their ability to negotiate workplace supports to achieve positive outcomes. Differences found between the groups relate to the experiences of stigmatization and the use of formal flexibility supports. Findings highlight the need for employers to understand employees’ experiences of work-life fit when they care for children and younger adults with disabilities as well as those caring for older adults. Implications for work–family theory, workplace inclusion policies, and practices are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-06-23T10:22:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211026965
       
  • Gender Role Ideology, Work–Family Conflict, Family–Work Conflict, and
           Marital Satisfaction Among Korean Dual-Earner Couples

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      Authors: Jieun Yoo
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the gender role ideology of Korean dual-earner couples on marital satisfaction through work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict. The subjects of the study were 4059 participants (2434 men and 1625 women) in South Korea selected from the 2015 Fact-Finding Survey in Families. Results of the study revealed that women scored higher on gender role ideology and family-to-work conflict, but men scored higher on work-to-family conflict and marital satisfaction. Gender role ideology had a significant indirect relationship on marital satisfaction through family-to-work conflict for men in the study, but there was no significant indirect relationship found for the women studied. Gender differences existed between marital satisfaction and its predicting variables. Based on the results of this study, the discussion in this article addresses implications and future research directions.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-06-19T01:44:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211026966
       
  • Changes in Attachment and Commitment in Couples Transitioning to
           Parenthood

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      Authors: Rose Lapolice Thériault, Audrey Brassard, Anne-Sophie Gingras, Anne Brault-Labbé, Marie-France Lafontaine, Katherine Péloquin
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined whether attachment predicts changes in commitment and whether commitment predicts changes in attachment in both partners during the transition to parenthood. Both partners of 93 couples completed online questionnaires individually at the second trimester of pregnancy and at 4 months postpartum. Autoregressive cross-lagged path analyses based on the Actor–Partner Interdependence Model tested the bidirectional associations between attachment dimensions (anxiety and avoidance) and three modes of commitment (optimal, over-commitment, and under-commitment). Results revealed that for both partners, prenatal attachment avoidance was associated with a decrease in optimal commitment and an increase in under-commitment from pre- to postpartum. Fathers’ attachment anxiety was associated with a decrease in mothers’ under-commitment. Furthermore, prenatal optimal commitment was associated with a decrease in attachment avoidance, whereas under-commitment was associated with an increase in attachment avoidance. Fathers’ prenatal over-commitment was associated with an increase in their own attachment anxiety and avoidance. These results highlight how attachment insecurities and relationship commitment interrelate during this major transition.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-06-19T01:15:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211026946
       
  • A World Through Glass: A Narrative Around the Family Experiences During
           the Confinement of COVID-19

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      Authors: Gustavo González-Calvo, Marta Arias-Carballal
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      COVID-19 was declared a pandemic in March 2020, and the world has witnessed significant changes since then. Spain has been forced to go into extreme lockdown, cancelling all school classes and outdoor activities for children. Our study explores how parents of a group of school children aged 7 to 8 years have experienced confinement due to the COVID-19 health crisis. Following a narrative methodology, the results have been organized around a story that takes as a reference the period of confinement for a mother and worker in times of confinement. The conclusions of our study suggest that participants have experienced significant changes in their routines, having faced numerous personal and professional dilemmas in a climate of great emotional burden. This study is the first of its kind in investigating how the COVID-19 pandemic has influenced the ways that children and their families live and its possible implications for their futures.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-06-14T06:23:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211024989
       
  • “I Cannot Wait to Build that One Day”: Lesbian and Bisexual
           College-Age Women’s Views on Marriage and Family

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      Authors: Rosalyn Zacarias, Robert J. Zeglin, M. N. Barringer
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      After the US Supreme Court ruled in favor of marriage equality in 2015, the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community has gained visibility. One cohort that is affected by this decision is lesbian and bisexual college-age women. The present study, through six face-to-face semi-structured interviews with self-identifying lesbian and bisexual college-age women, sought to understand how these women view marriage and family. Three themes emerged are: (a) Heteronormative socialization, (b) Personal endorsement of marriage, and (c) LGBT Parenting. The results of this study suggest that college-age women still carry the effects of growing up and entering adulthood in a largely heteronormative society, endorse marriage as an institution, and find profound personal meaning in the prospect of forming a family. Even in the face of protracted legal battles that are eventually won, the humanity of individual and personal motivation remains the most salient factor in forming bonds and building families.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-06-14T06:17:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211024992
       
  • Parents’ Sleep Across Weekdays and Weekends: The Influence of Work,
           Housework, and Childcare Time

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      Authors: Leah Ruppanner, Ben Maltby, Belinda Hewitt, David Maume
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Children increase time demands with important consequences for sleep. Here, we test whether parents’ paid and unpaid time demands and the presence of young children equally reduce mothers’ and fathers’ sleep, comparing the married/cohabiting to unmarried. Applying data from the American Time Use Survey (ATUS, 2003–2016), we find married/cohabiting mothers report less sleep when young children or multiple children are present; they are employed; their spouses are employed; and they spend more time in housework and childcare. By contrast, unmarried mothers report less sleep when children are present because of their larger domestic loads. For married/cohabiting fathers, the presence of multiple children is associated with less sleep but doing more housework results in more sleep. Finally, unmarried fathers’ employment time explains the association of children on their sleep. Parents report a sleep deficit relative to the childless but the reasons vary by gender and the co-presence of a partner.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-05-28T10:04:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211017932
       
  • Intimate Partner Violence among Korean Immigrant Women in the United
           States: Intersectionality of Gender Norms, Immigration, and Socioeconomic
           Status

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      Authors: Sei-Young Lee, Ga-Young Choi
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      With the theory of feminist intersectionality, this study examined intimate partner violence (IPV) among Korean immigrant women focusing on gender norms, immigration, and socioeconomic status in the contexts of Korean culture. A total of 83 Korean immigrant women who were receiving a social service from non-profit agencies in ethnically diverse urban areas were recruited with a purposive sampling method. Hierarchical regressions were conducted to examine changes in variance explained by models. Having non-traditional gender norms, a college degree or higher education, immigrant life stresses, and living longer in the United States were positively associated with IPV while having higher income and being more fluent in English were negatively associated with IPV. Findings were discussed to understand Korean immigrant women’s internal conflict affected by their higher education and more egalitarian gender norms under the patriarchal cultural norms while experiencing immigrant life stresses and living in the United States. Implication for practice was also discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-05-26T09:36:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211017945
       
  • Racial Family Configurations and Inequalities in Private School Enrollment
           Among Adopted Children

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      Authors: Kevin J. A. Thomas, Ashley Larsen Gibby
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study uses data from the American Community Survey to examine the relationship between race, family configurations, and inequalities in private school enrollment among adoptees. We find that private school enrollment is higher in transracial than in same-race families. This disparity is driven by the outcomes of adoptees in transracial families with zero rather than one same-race parent. Among adoptees themselves, there are diverging patterns of racial stratification in same-race and transracial families. White adoptees in same-race families are more likely to be enrolled in private school than Black, Asian, or Hispanic adoptees in such families. However, among adoptees in transracial families, the highest odds of private school enrollment are found among Asians. Finally, we argue that our findings have important implications for understanding how kinship cues, compensation, and social disadvantage shape parental investment in adopted children.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-05-25T11:17:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211018251
       
  • Navigating the Gap: Children’s Experiences of Home and School Life
           Following Maternal Death

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      Authors: Helle Holmgren
      First page: 1139
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This article is the second reporting on the findings from a study of the experiences of families following the death of a parent. Four Danish families consisting of four fathers and seven children were interviewed about their experiences following the death of the mother in the family. The results presented here focus on the experiences of the children. Using thematic analysis assisted by the qualitative data analysis software NVivo 12 Pro, two overall themes were found, “Life in the Home” and “Life Outside the Home.” The children experienced a clear dichotomy between the two lifeworlds post-loss and found it difficult navigating between the two. The recommendations offered for an improvement of the care for bereaved children are based on the children’s own advice.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-02T07:13:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211022384
       
  • “Those Are Typical Tell-Tale Signs of a Lesbian”: LGBQ Young
           Peoples’ Perceptions of Parental Messaging Surrounding Gender
           Non-Conforming Behavior

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      Authors: Michelle L. Estes, Zachary T. Carlisle, Rachel M. Schmitz
      First page: 1162
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Socialization surrounding gender and sexuality is prominent within the familial context. Gender and sexuality are frequently linked with the assumption that gender-expansive behavior leads to nonheterosexuality. Research has largely focused on parental perspectives, leaving queer youth experiences largely invisible. Utilizing semistructured interviews with 10 queer young adults, this project contributes to the existing discussions regarding gender and sexuality socialization while growing up. First, participants described parents’ seemingly natural ability to correctly categorize youth’s sexual orientation, which is often linked to gender nonconforming behavior. Participants reinforced essentialized ideas of gender and sexuality through their discussion of engagement in expansive gender behavior. Furthermore, women discussed more freedom to engage in diverse gender behavior, while being expected to conform to traditional gender roles. Through elevating youth’s viewpoints on gender and sexuality family dynamics, these findings can assist service providers and parents in supporting queer youth across their gender and sexual development.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-03T06:25:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211022395
       
  • “A Woman’s Degree Must End in the Kitchen”: Expectations of Women in
           the Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo

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      Authors: Maroyi Mulumeoderhwa
      First page: 1190
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study draws on a qualitative approach to explore how adolescents perceive women’s and men’s roles in marriage and family life. A sample of 56 boys and girls aged 16–20 from two urban and two rural high schools in South Kivu province took part in focus groups, and 40 of them were subsequently interviewed individually. The results show that most male participants believe husbands should fill the breadwinner role, and expect wives to remain the primary caretakers. Female participants reported that men are reluctant to allow their wives to have a job despite their degrees. However, most female participants disapproved of the mentioned beliefs of expecting wives to remain home doing housework and the husband to be the only primary breadwinner. The majority of male and female participants identified socio-cultural pressure for men (rather than women) to acquire education, formal employment, and, eventually, household decision-making. There is a need to challenge the structures of rigid gender roles that relegate women to a secondary role in work, making them “naturally” responsible for domestic chores and childcare.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-02T07:16:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211022398
       
  • Personality Traits and Attachments Styles in Romantic Relationships
           Deciding

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      Authors: Cansu Tosun, Murat Yıldırım, Fatma Altun, Hikmet Yazıcı
      First page: 1219
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The research highlights the need for identifying factors influencing decision-making processes in romantic relationships. This study examined whether attachment styles could explain variance in decision-making process in romantic relationships above and beyond the personality traits. The sample included 428 Turkish adults (70.3% females, Mage = 24.69, SDage = 5). Participants completed the Relationship Deciding Scale, Big Five Inventory, and Relationship Scales Questionnaire. Correlation analysis showed that relationship decision-making correlated with personality traits and attachment styles. Regression analyses revealed that preoccupied and secure attachments significantly predicted decision-making in romantic relationships above and beyond the personality traits. The results suggest that attachment styles are important in explaining decision-making in romantic relationships that may be useful for research and practice focusing on romantic relationships.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-02T07:11:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211022383
       
  • Life Course Statuses and Sibling Relationship Quality during Emerging
           Adulthood

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      Authors: Lindsey Aldrich, Kei Nomaguchi, Marshal Neal Fettro
      First page: 1235
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (N = 1,366), we examine how major life course statuses are related to sibling relationships during emerging adulthood with attention to similarities and differences in these statuses between sibling dyads. We find that full-time employment, marriage/cohabitation, and parenthood are related to more distant sibling relationships, whereas college education is related to closer sibling relationships. Similarities in employment between the siblings are related to closer relationships, but differences in education, marriage/cohabitation, and parenthood are related to closer relationships, in that respondents report more help-seeking and emotional closeness with their siblings who have higher education than theirs; unpartnered respondents report more calls and fewer fights with their partnered siblings; and childless respondents report more visits and emotional closeness with their parenting siblings. Examining both one’s and one’s sibling’s life course statuses is important in understanding life course variations in sibling relationships.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-03T01:55:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211022401
       
  • Couples’ Relative Resources, Male Power, and Relationship Conflict from
           a Comparative Perspective

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      Authors: Maike van Damme, Clara Cortina, Maria José González
      First page: 1263
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Using two waves of the Generations and Gender Survey for eight European countries, we test under what conditions couples experience high levels of disagreement over time or separate. The results partly support the idea of relative resources, suggesting that a decrease in the status of men in couples (job loss) is significantly associated with high levels of conflict. The transition to high conflict is more frequent when there is a discrepancy between policy and behavior. Social policies designed to meet the needs of working parents in dual-earner couples together with the diffusion of gender egalitarian values can lead to a reduction in unhealthy levels of couple conflict.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-03T01:50:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211022397
       
  • In the Case of Union Dissolution of Couples with Children. Who Decides to
           Avoid the Courts and Why'

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      Authors: Amalia Gómez-Casillas, Marc Ajenjo, Montserrat Solsona
      First page: 1288
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Thoroughgoing changes in western countries over the last decades have led to increased self-regulation of intimacy, thus avoiding judicialization of union formation or dissolution. However, when children were born to a couple, legal proceedings would seem to be crucial in reaching or formalizing agreements between parents regarding custody and alimony, among other aspects. Despite these benefits, almost 20% of couples with children avoid resorting to legal proceedings, according to the results of a survey conducted in six Spanish Autonomous Communities. The article analyses this data with the aim of addressing a gap in the literature on the determinants of reaching out-of-court agreements. The results indicate that upper-class individuals, immigrants in cohabiting relationships, and couples with just one child and currently not in a relationship are more likely to reach out-of-court agreements. The implications of these findings are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-03T01:47:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211022388
       
  • Beyond the Economic-Need Hypothesis: A Life-Course Explanation of
           Women’s Extended Family Living Arrangements in Chile

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      Authors: Julieta Palma
      First page: 1308
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Previous research has mainly understood household extension as a family strategy to face economic deprivation, giving little attention to other factors affecting it. Using 2017 data from the National Socioeconomic Characterization Survey, this article evaluates the role played by economic and life-course factors in extended family living arrangements among women in family units in Chile (n = 60,111). Results indicate that economic needs are an important driver for those seeking refuge in someone else’s home, but they are less important for those hosting other relatives within their household. Importantly, the likelihood of living in an extended household—and the position that family units occupy within the household (as head-families or subfamilies)—changes over the life span. Young women (15–34 years) are more likely to live in extended households as sub-families, while middle-aged women (45–64 years) tend to live in extended households as household heads, hosting young cohabiting couples, or lone mothers.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-07T09:04:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211022396
       
  • Policy Frameworks and Parental Choice: Using Conjoint Analysis to
           Understand Parental Decision Making for Child Care

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      Authors: Adrienne M. Davidson, Samantha Burns, Delaine Hampton, Linda White, Michal Perlman
      First page: 1335
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Many children in Canada and the United States experience poor-quality child care on a regular basis. Under the rubric of “parent choice,” governments continue to permit a variety of licensed care providers (centers and homes) as well as unlicensed home child care providers. Research suggests, however, that parents are not well-informed consumers about child care services, unaware of even the basic characteristics of their child’s care. In this study, we provide findings from a latent profile analysis based on a conjoint survey conducted in Toronto, Canada to better understand the factors that influence parents’ decisions in selecting child care services. Based on responses from over 700 parents, we identify five classes of parents that reflect a range of preferences in selecting child care. However, most groups show a strong preference for licensed early childhood education and care (ECEC) options. Limitations of this study and implications for policy are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-07T09:02:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211022386
       
  • The Role of Dyadic Coping for the Individual and Relational Well-Being of
           Couples During the Transition to Parenthood

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      Authors: Sara Molgora, Chiara Acquati, Emanuela Saita
      First page: 1364
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Becoming parents represents a potentially stressful transition, which may negatively affect the individual and relational well-being of both partners. Limited literature has investigated the role of dyadic coping during the transition to parenthood. This work explored partners’ differences in dyadic coping, anxiety, depression, and couple adjustment during pregnancy and 3 months postpartum. Furthermore, through Actor–Partner Interdependence Model analyses, the relationship between common dyadic coping and well-being was investigated. Women reported higher levels of depression at both times and men presented higher levels of anxiety in the postpartum. For women, higher scores on couple adjustment were predicted by their own and their partner’s common dyadic coping. For men, higher scores on anxiety were associated with elevated common dyadic coping. Results highlight gender-related predictors on postpartum well-being and support the need to assess individual and relational outcomes across the transition to parenthood to better understand the role of dyadic coping behaviors.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-03T01:49:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211022394
       
  • Can Parents Manage Their Children’s Future Happiness'—: A
           Retrospective Inquiry

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      Authors: Guy Barokas, Tal Shavit, Arie Sherman
      First page: 1386
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The article addresses a novel concept: Parental Happiness Management (PHM)—which refers to parents’ educational or decisions aimed to improve their children’s well-being in adulthood. We ran a survey among 1,110 adults and asked them to retrospectively assess four types of parental decisions: discipline, autonomy, pro-social preferences, and parental acceptance. The results confirm the association between retrospective assessments of PHM and adults’ subjective well-being as measured by global life evaluation, positive, and negative feelings, and a sense of meaning in life. We report a positive association between discipline and meaning in life, but also between discipline and negative feelings. Education for pro-social preferences was found to be positively associated with all components of subjective well-being. The child’s autonomy was found to be positively associated with global life evaluation. We view parents as managers, who allocate their limited parental resources so as to maximize their children’s well-being in adulthood.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-07-16T09:32:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211022793
       
 
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