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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 243 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACOSS Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
African Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Argumentum     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Australian Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Bakti Budaya     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
British Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 104)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Care Management Journals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Social Work Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Comunitania : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ConCienciaSocial     Open Access  
Contemporary Rural Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Critical and Radical Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Critical Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Critical Social Work : An Interdisciplinary Journal Dedicated to Social Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuadernos de Trabajo Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Developmental Child Welfare     Hybrid Journal  
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
ECI Interdisciplinary Journal for Legal and Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
European Journal of Social Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Families in Society : The Journal of Contemporary Social Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Gambling Research: Journal of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Geopolitical, Social Security and Freedom Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Global Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access  
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Indonesian Journal of Guidance and Counseling     Open Access  
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Care and Caring     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Islamic Counseling : Jurnal Bimbingan Konseling Islam     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Janus Sosiaalipolitiikan ja sosiaalityön tutkimuksen aikakauslehti     Open Access  
Journal for Specialists in Group Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Journal of Baccalaureate Social Work     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Care Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Community Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Comparative Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Family Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Forensic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Rights and Social Work     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 395)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 235)
Journal of Public Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 206)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Jurnal Guidena : Journal of Guidance and counseling, Psychology and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Leidfaden : Fachmagazin für Krisen, Leid, Trauer     Hybrid Journal  
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Migration Action     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access  
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nordisk välfärdsforskning | Nordic Welfare Research     Open Access  
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Partner Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 239)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Policy Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Prospectiva : Revista de Trabajo Social e Intervención Social     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psikopedagogia : Jurnal Bimbingan dan Konseling     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Qualitative Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Qualitative Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Research on Social Work Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revista Brasileira de Tecnologias Sociais     Open Access  
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Katálysis     Open Access  
Revista Serviço Social em Perspectiva     Open Access  
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
SER Social     Open Access  
Service social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Serviço Social & Sociedade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Sexualidad, Salud y Sociedad (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access  
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 2)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Social Care and Neurodisability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)

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Similar Journals
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Journal of Family Issues
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.86
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 24  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0192-513X - ISSN (Online) 1552-5481
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • Alexithymia, Fear of Intimacy, and Relationship Satisfaction

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Michael Lyvers, Louisa Pickett, Katarina Needham, Fred Arne Thorberg
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Alexithymia, fear of intimacy, attachment security, and mood variables were examined as predictors of satisfaction in couple relationships after accounting for age, sex, relationship length, and marital status. Participants were 158 adults (52% women and 48% men) in an ongoing couple relationship for 1-19 years. They completed validated measures of the variables of interest online. Bivariate correlations were significant for all predicted associations. Multiple mediation modelling examined the hypothesis that the low relationship satisfaction reported by those with alexithymia can be explained by fear of intimacy, insecure attachment, and negative affect, after accounting for relevant covariates. Mediation was indicated for fear of intimacy and negative affect. Such factors may merit particular attention by clinicians working with alexithymic clients in couples therapy.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-04-22T06:36:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211010206
       
  • Effect of Daily Stress on Desire for Physical Proximity and Emotional
           Closeness

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      Authors: Roi Estlein, Yoav Lavee
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The current study explores how fluctuations in proximity seeking and emotional closeness in married couples are associated with stress experiences of daily hassles and with global evaluations of the relationship and personality traits. To document the associations of daily experiences of self-related, relational, and external sources of stress with both partners’ regulation of closeness and distance, perceived marital quality, attachment, and neuroticism, we employed a mixed-method research that included a repeated time sampling approach (a daily diary) and survey instruments. Multivariate multilevel statistical and actor–partner interdependence models revealed that all sources of stress were negatively associated with proximity seeking and dyadic emotional closeness but somewhat varied across men and women. In addition, global assessments of marriage and personal traits related to experiences of daily hassles and to dyadic closeness. Findings are discussed in terms of their theoretical, operational, and practical implications.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-04-22T06:34:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211007528
       
  • Family Dynamics at the Intersection of Languages, Cultures, and
           Aspirations: Reflections of Young Adults from Immigrant Families

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      Authors: Olena Nesteruk
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined family dynamics and parent–child relations that stem from the intersection of languages, cultures, and aspirations of first-generation parents and their U.S.-raised children. Based on 50 in-depth interviews with young adults from ethnically diverse immigrant families, this study explored reflections and distinctive themes characteristic of the participants’ immigrant childhoods and relationships with parents. From a more mature perspective of young adulthood, participants’ narratives demonstrated acceptance of the unique features of their family dynamics and appreciation of their immigrant parents’ idiosyncrasies and sacrifices. Despite some struggles to bridge generational and cultural gaps through language and cultural brokering, these young adults were highly motivated by their parents’ aspirations and work ethic to uphold their end of the immigrant bargain and achieve success. The study has important implications for educators, counselors, and other practitioners working with immigrant parents and their children.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-04-21T12:10:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211007527
       
  • The Experience of Being Fathered of Mexican-origin Male Youth

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      Authors: Florian Sichling
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Fathers are important influences for the healthy development during the transition to adulthood of their children. Despite the theoretical acknowledgement of the reciprocal nature of the father–child relationship, we currently know very little about the experience of being fathered, particularly of immigrant male youth. Drawing on qualitative data from a study of Mexican-origin male youth in Chicago, this article documents the respondents’ experiences of their fathers as providers, role models and authority figures. The analysis reveals however, that the respondents experienced these rather traditional father roles in different ways, ranging from extreme violence and neglect to dedication and sacrifice, which in turn, led to rejection, modification, or emulation in their own conceptions of fatherhood. The findings urge researchers to examine the long-term effects of being fathered among immigrant youth and more specifically, how the experience of being fathered leads to different or similar patterns of fathering behavior later in life.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-19T09:12:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211001430
       
  • Changes in Importance of Motherhood Following Pregnancy Loss

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      Authors: Gina Erato, Lucia Ciciolla, Karina M. Shreffler, Arthur L. Greil
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Pregnancy loss (i.e., miscarriage, stillbirth) is a relatively common and often traumatic experience. Although prior research has examined mental health consequences of pregnancy loss, to our knowledge, none have examined how the experience of pregnancy loss affects how women perceive or value the importance of motherhood. Using longitudinal data from the National Survey of Fertility Barriers, we applied change-score regression analysis to examine how a pregnancy loss that occurred between survey waves was associated with a change in importance of motherhood scores, controlling for sociodemographic and pregnancy-specific characteristics. We found that women who experienced a pregnancy loss reported an increase in importance of motherhood compared to women without a pregnancy loss. The findings suggest that an increase in the importance of motherhood following a pregnancy loss could be a grief response. Health care professionals should consider validating maternal identity following a pregnancy loss, as women highly associate with this role.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-16T10:42:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21994138
       
  • Challenging Heteronormativity: An Analysis of the Effect of Sexual
           Orientation on Earnings in Spain

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      Authors: M. José González, İbrahim Sönmez
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Using data from the Spanish Labor Force Survey between 2006 and 2018, we explore whether sexual orientation causes wage differences for partnered women and men in Spain. The study confirms that men in same-sex couples significantly earn less than men in opposite-sex couples, confirming our hypothesis for the “hegemonic masculinity premium.” Women in same-sex couples also outearn women in opposite-sex couples, but this effect disappears after controlling for differences in human capital characteristics. Despite the high degree of social acceptance of homosexuality in Spain, partnered gay men are not able to avoid the negative earnings effects of discrimination in the labor market.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-15T06:39:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993184
       
  • Work–Family Conflicts among Female Staff of Higher Institutions in
           Nigeria

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      Authors: J. A. Ademuyiwa, T. N. Dahunsi, A. A. Adetunji, A. O. Adeniran
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Striking balance and maintaining harmony between work and family have always been a great challenge for women in general. This article examines factors that conflict between official responsibilities and family demand among female staff of higher institution of learning in Nigeria. A structured questionnaire is administered to female staff of higher institutions across the country. Hierarchical sampling technique is used to select female staff from each institution. Simple percentage and bar charts are used to present the socio-demographic characteristics of respondents. The mean responses for each factor are ranked and the first four ranked factors are discussed. Stress, mental fatigue, and psychological burnout/disorder are the major effects observed, while resuming and closing work at convenience is the major mechanism being used by women in tertiary institutions. Other highly ranked mechanisms are using a housekeeper/help, using a childcare center closer to workplace, and using help from colleagues in carrying out official assignments.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-12T12:13:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21994132
       
  • Impact of the 2020 pandemic of COVID-19 on Families with School-aged
           Children in the United States: Roles of Income Level and Race

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      Authors: Cliff Yung-Chi Chen, Elena Byrne, Tanya Vélez
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the experiences of families with school-aged children during the first three months of the 2020 pandemic of COVID-19 in the United States, while focusing on the roles of income level and race/ethnicity in their experiences. Two hundred and twenty-three parents of school-aged children participated in this study by completing an online survey. The results revealed that low-income and lower-middle class parents, as well as parents of color, experienced more instrumental and financial hardships due to the pandemic, when compared to their higher income, White counterparts. In contrast, parents with higher income and White parents were more likely to feel stressed over structuring home learning environments and planning educational and physical activities at home for their children. The overall findings suggest that family income level and race/ethnicity play a significant role in the lives of families coping with a variety of challenges due to the pandemic.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-12T12:09:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21994153
       
  • Parenthood Desire in Italian Homosexual Couples

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      Authors: Alessandra Santona, Arianna Vecchi, Laura Gorla, Giacomo Tognasso
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Many Italian gay and lesbian individuals have the desire to become parents, despite the fact that they still face barriers due to the low acceptance of same-sex parenthood. This study investigates the desire and motivation of same-sex couples to have children. The sample consists of 31 same-sex couples (17 lesbian couples and 14 gay male couples) and 31 heterosexual couples. All the participants were childless at the time of the study and had been involved in their current relationship for at least two years. We used the Parenthood Motivation List (PML) to assess motivations underlying the desire to have children. The results showed that both groups wanted to have children and considered the same motivations to be important for parenthood. We discovered that happiness, well-being, and parenthood were important for same-sex parenthood, while social control was considered less important. In addition, gay men and lesbians had lower scores for well-being and identity.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-11T11:03:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21999691
       
  • Fairness Perceptions of the Division of Household Labor: Housework and
           Childcare

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      Authors: Tara Koster, Anne-Rigt Poortman, Tanja van der Lippe, Pauline Kleingeld
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      An unequal division of housework has been found to be often regarded as fair, which may explain why women still do most household labor. This study extends previous research by also investigating childcare—an increasingly important part of household labor, which is likely to have a different meaning than housework. It examines how perceptions of fairness for both housework and childcare are influenced by the division of housework, childcare, and paid labor, and whether patterns differ by gender. Data from the Netherlands (men: N = 462; women: N = 638) show that unequal divisions of housework, and especially childcare, are often perceived as fair. When it comes to how an increasingly unequal household labor division is related to unfairness, associations are stronger for women than for men. Fairness of the household labor division is evaluated in relation to total workload and not in isolation from other types of labor.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-11T10:57:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993899
       
  • Predicting Longitudinal Changes in Familism in an Emerging Immigrant
           Context

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      Authors: Yesenia Mejia, Laura K. Taylor, Gabriela L. Stein, Laura M. Gonzalez
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Building on the Behavioral Process Model of Familism, the current study examined the longitudinal association between public and private ethnic regard and familial support, and familism values in a sample of 141 Latinx 7th–10th graders living in a semi-rural, emerging immigrant community. Analyses revealed that changes in public and private regard were positively related to changes in familism (p
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-11T10:57:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993205
       
  • Changes in Family Roles and Subjective Well-Being among Japanese Adults

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      Authors: Yuko Hara
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Research in Western countries has demonstrated that marriage is associated with improved well-being, and parenthood with decreased well-being, for both men and women. However, less is known about whether the associations are universal for both genders across countries. Using nine waves of panel data and fixed effects models, this study examines the relationship between changes in family roles and subjective well-being of men and women in the highly gendered social context of Japan. Well-being was assessed across two domains: self-rated health and mental health. The results broadly support the protective effect theory, which posits that marriage itself has a positive effect on well-being; however, no association was observed between becoming a wife and self-rated health. Contrary to what previous research predicts, only men’s self-rated health negatively responds to transition to parenthood. These findings highlight the importance of country context and gender differences in the significance of family obligations.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-11T10:56:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21994137
       
  • Stepfamily Involvement in and out of School and (Step)children’s College
           Preparation Behaviors: A Latent Cluster Analysis

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      Authors: Jacqueline Bible, David T. Lardier, Frank Perrone, Brad van Eeden-Moorefield
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Using a latent class analysis (LCA) with data from a subsample of children in stepfamilies (N = 6,637) from the 2009 High School Longitudinal Study (HSLS), this study examined how stepfamily involvement in their (step)child’s education in and outside of school influenced their (step)child’s college preparation. Stepfamily involvement in their (step)child’s education in school (e.g., help with homework) and outside of school (e.g., educational experiences such as going to a museum) may help overcome challenges associated with academic and college preparation for children in stepfamilies. Results broadly indicate students with higher stepfamily involvement in education in and out of school had (step)parents who believed that college was attainable, students engaged in more activities that would prepare them for their future, and students took more AP/IB level courses and tests. Together, findings suggest that stepfamily involvement in education both in and out of school is important for their (step)child’s college preparation behaviors.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-11T10:46:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993874
       
  • Can Supportive Siblings Protect against the Risk that Stress from Feelings
           of Alienation with Parents and Peers Poses to Mental Health in Emerging
           Adulthood'

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      Authors: Muna Osman, Dave Miranda
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Feelings of alienation with parents and peers can lead to psychological distress, possibly because such feelings are stressful. Supportive siblings are known to foster mental health in youth, but research in emerging adulthood is limited. We hypothesized supportive sibling climate as a protective factor in the risks that stress from parent and peer alienation poses to psychological distress among emerging adults. A proposed moderated-mediation model was tested, across three samples, using latent moderated mediation structural equation modeling. Results indicated that parental and peer alienation were associated with more psychological distress, and stress partially mediated the link between parental (but not peer) alienation and psychological distress in two samples. However, a supportive sibling climate was not protective as it did not moderate the links among alienation, stress, and psychological distress. In sum, siblings seem beneficial, but perhaps it is not sufficient to protect emerging adults’ mental health against stress from parent and peer alienation.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-11T10:44:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993859
       
  • Child Development Knowledge and Father Engagement: The Mediating Role of
           Parenting Self-efficacy

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      Authors: Lisa A. Connor, Heidi E. Stolz
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Early father engagement is associated with numerous positive child outcomes including cognitive development, emotional regulation, and fewer problem behaviors. Various fathering programs attempt to encourage father engagement through teaching fathers about young children’s development and needs. This study examined 181 low-income fathers’ child development knowledge (self-perceived and objective) as predictors of father engagement (verbal stimulation, caregiving, and physical play) with infants. Additionally, parenting self-efficacy (PSE) was examined as a mediator. Results revealed that fathers’ self-perceived child development knowledge positively predicted engagement with infants (verbal stimulation and caregiving), but objective knowledge did not. PSE did not mediate the relationship between self-perceived knowledge and father engagement. These findings yield important implications for fathering research and interventions, suggesting that it may be particularly beneficial to increase fathers’ confidence in their ability to understand and meet their child’s needs rather than exclusively focusing on improving fathers’ knowledge of child development.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-10T11:52:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21994628
       
  • Social Capital and Self-Perceived Health in Lone Mothers: A Multilevel
           Cross-Sectional Study across Europe

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      Authors: Sara Trujillo-Alemán, Åsa Tjulin, Glòria Pérez, Emma Hagqvist
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to explore the distribution of social capital and its relation to self-perceived health in lone mothers across Europe. Data were drawn from the European Social Survey Round 5. The sample was restricted to women (15–64 years), not cohabiting with a partner, and with children (≤ 18 years) living in the household. Social capital was measured using variables, representing both structural (political engagement, social support, and social activity) and cognitive (generalized trust, institutionalized trust, reciprocity, and a feeling of safety) components. Individual-level measurements: age, educational attainment, employment status, income level, and household economy. Country-level measurements: family policy model and collective social capital. A multilevel analysis was conducted. The results revealed cross-country variance in the level of lone mothers’ social capital. After adjustment for individual-level and country-level measurements, only reciprocity and a feeling of safety were related to good self-perceived health among lone mothers in Europe.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-10T11:50:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21994163
       
  • Social Representation of Family: A Comparative Study on Italian Young and
           Older Adults

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      Authors: Pozzi Maura, Fasanelli Roberto, Marta Elena, Ellena Adriano Mauro, Virgilio Giuseppe, Di Taranto Adriana, Pistoni Carlo
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      In Italian society, known for the massive presence of so-called traditional families, different forms of it are nowadays spreading. The scientific and political debates on this issue are very intense and the common view of family is changing. Taking as a reference the theory of social representations and in particular the central nucleus theory, the present study aims to evoke the social representation (SR) of family in two different Italian groups: 220 young adults and 83 older adults. A semi-structured questionnaire divided into two sections was used: an open question (content) and a task of free associations, based on the technique of hierarchical evocations (structure). A content analysis and a representational structure analysis were applied. Comparing the SRs emerged among the two groups, young adults evoking family as an entity connoted predominantly in an affective way, while older adults evoking positive values declined in a more concrete and pragmatic way.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-10T11:49:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21994160
       
  • Satisfying Marital Relationship among Dual-Career Couples: A Validation
           Study

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      Authors: Maheen Abid Ali, Zahid Mahmood, Sadia Saleem
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study was to develop a culturally relevant scale of satisfying marriage for dual-career couples. In order to explore the phenomenology of satisfying marriage, 25 participants, 25–42 years of age, were interviewed and their responses were recorded. Responses were then collated and duplicate and vague items were discarded. The remaining responses were transformed into a four-point Likert scale to assess the content validity; 45 items constituted the Satisfying Marriage Scale (SMS). meaning] After expert validation by 13 experienced psychologists, the scale was administered to 250 married couples with age ranging from 21 years to 50 years (M = 31.40, SD = 6.27) to establish psychometric properties. meaning] SMS along with a demographic performa, Couple Satisfaction Index (CSI), and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) were administered. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) yielded three factors cooperation and coordination, mutual support, and mutual respect. The scale was found to have high internal consistency (α = 0.95), and split-half reliability (r = 0.81) with moderate levels of concurrent and construct validity. Results of the indigenous scale were further discussed in relevance to Pakistan’s cultural context.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-10T11:45:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21994131
       
  • Parenting as Beta Testing: Perceived Changes in Parenting from Firstborns
           to Secondborns

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      Authors: Joseph S. Rand, Ryan D. McLean, Alexander C. Jensen
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Research suggests that parents often change parenting strategies between children, but few studies have examined parents’ perceptions of those changes. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to create a measure of parental perception of experience-based change between firstborn and secondborn. Participants included 401 parents (62.9% female, 76.6% White, Mage = 39.91) with at least two adolescent children (older Mage = 14.5; younger Mage = 11.84) split evenly between mixed (49%) and same gender (51%) sibling pairs. The measure items assessed parents’ perception of parenting changes between their children for monitoring, expectations, nurturing, and discipline. Analyses further support the reliability and validity of the measure; for example, parents who reported lower expectations between children reported lower parenting self-efficacy, and parents who perceived becoming less nurturing between children reported a less positive relationship with the secondborn. Discussion focuses on implications and directions for future research using the measure.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-10T11:44:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21994129
       
  • Family Visitation Patterns during Incarceration in Denmark

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      Authors: Anne Sofie Tegner Anker, Christopher Wildeman
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      While qualitative evidence has highlighted psychological benefits of visitation during incarceration, and quantitative evidence has linked visitation to better post-release outcomes for inmates, we know little about heterogeneity in visitation patterns and the factors shaping them. Using Danish administrative data on inmates incarcerated at least a year between 2004 and 2014 (N = 5,441), we first examine average frequency and duration of family visits across the first year of incarceration and then describe five distinct visitation patterns using latent class analysis. Finally, we investigate what predicts visitation patterns.The findings highlight that (a) there is substantial heterogeneity in the patterns of family visitation and (b) both individual-level and institution-level factors partially predict this heterogeneity. Parenthood, high pre-incarceration income, and long sentences were associated with high levels of visitation and being placed far from home and transferred between facilities were associated with a higher risk of receiving low or decreasing levels of visitation.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-10T11:41:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21991187
       
  • Trajectories of Exposure to Psychological Domestic Abuse and the Relevance
           

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      Authors: Thomas Wojciechowski
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study sought to examine patterns of change and continuity in psychological domestic abuse as a strain-related process that may be predictive of violent offending in adulthood. This study also examined the mediating role of negative affect in this relationship. The Pathways to Desistance data were utilized in analyses. This sample comprised 1,354 juvenile offenders. Group-based trajectory modeling was used to identify latent patterns of development in exposure to psychological domestic abuse. Negative binomial regression models were used to examine the direct effect of trajectory group assignment on violent offending in adulthood and the mediating role of negative affect. Results indicated that a four-group model best fit the data. Assignment to the Declining group was associated with decreased violent offending seriousness in adulthood, relative to assignment to the Accelerating group. Negative affect partially mediated this relationship, accounting for around 35% of magnitude of the direct effect observed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-09T11:13:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993894
       
  • Sacrifice and Indebtedness: The Intergenerational Contract in Chinese
           Rural Migrant Families

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      Authors: Xiaorong Gu
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      For four decades after China initiated economic reform, rural-urban migration has become a central experience for rural families. How do families negotiate economic production and social reproduction across geographic spaces and against institutional constraints' This article identifies the concept of intergenerational contract as an analytical tool to answer this question. Based on qualitative data gathered in Hunan and Shenzhen, I reveal that (a) children’s education is pursued as a family project, deeply rooted in families’ classed social mobility aspirations; (b) by spatializing the living and responsibilities of generations, rural migrant families selectively appropriate the hierarchical economic geography produced by state policies, to balance work and family arrangements; and (c) children engage in emotional labor guided by normative expectations and rules to reciprocate older generations’ care and support. The study uncovers coexisting resilience and vulnerabilities of migrant families and opens theoretical spaces to address the linkages between family, culture, and class in contemporary China.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-09T11:10:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993890
       
  • Parental Economic Migration and Children’s Outcomes in Romania: The Role
           of Social Support, Parenting Styles, and Patterns of Migration

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      Authors: Alina Dafinoiu, Beatriz Olaya, Cecilia A. Essau
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Since the fall of communism, approximately 10%–15% of the Romanian population are estimated to have left the country in search of economic opportunities, resulting in a high number of children being left behind (i.e., children of migrant parent; CMP) in Romania.This study explored patterns of parental migration and frequency and correlates of mental health problems among CMP. A total of 889 adolescents, aged 13–18 years, with migrant parent(s) participated in the present study. Results showed a high prevalence of mental health problems, with dysthymia (51%) being the most common. As for parenting styles, “inconsistency” was found to increase the risk for depression and dysthymia. “Higher involvement” from parents significantly decreased the risk for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, panic, and substance abuse. The findings were discussed in terms of their clinical, training, and political implications.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-09T11:07:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993855
       
  • Spouses’ Employment Situations and Marital Separation in Germany: A
           Dyadic Perspective

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      Authors: Lisa Schmid
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Previous research shows that men’s and women’s employment situations can affect the stability of marital unions, but results differ by country context and different measurements. This study models the effect of spouses’ employment situations on the risk of divorce. It focuses on time aspects and financial aspects, resulting from the employment situation of married spouses in Germany. A broad variety of employment indicators measured in a dyadic perspective lead to an array of hypotheses about marital stability. Event history models on the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) data show mixed evidence for spouses’ permanency of the job and their relative income. Marriages of couples with higher income are more stable. In addition, the spouses’ employment situation does not seem to affect marital stability. The study shows that the precarious job characteristics, which can destabilize marriages in analysis at the individual level, become blurred in analyzing dyads in a 1.5-earner society.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-09T10:57:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993853
       
  • Family Contributions to School Performance of Adolescents: The Role of
           Fathers’ Perceived Involvement

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      Authors: Miguel Morales-Castillo
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Parental involvement is a valuable contribution to early adolescent behavior, particularly in educational contexts. This study analyzes the role of father’s socioeconomic status (SES) and perceived involvement (PI) when understanding school performance (SP) of adolescents, considering that involvement could be expressed as home-based and school-based. In a cross-sectional design, a sample from Colombia (South America) composed of 419 fathers (mean age = 42.2 years; SD = 7.37) and their adolescents (mean age = 12.63 years; SD = 0.86) completed self-administered questionnaires to measure SES, PI, and SP, and structural equation modeling was used to evaluate relations. Results indicate that the contribution of fathers to adolescent SP implies PI, considering that the direct effect of SES on SP is significant but small in comparison to the mediated path through PI. This article addresses the relevance of father’s contribution through involvement to understand the SP of adolescents, suggesting issues for studying the role of fathers in the adolescent’s outcomes.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-09T10:53:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21994143
       
  • From Kindness and Diversity to Justice and Action: White Parents’
           Ethnic–Racial Socialization Goals

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      Authors: Cari Gillen-O’Neel, Virginia W. Huynh, Taylor Hazelbaker, Asya Harrison
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Ethnic–racial socialization (ERS) is the collection of practices by which individuals learn about norms, values, and customs regarding ethnicity and race (Hughes et al., 2006). In contrast to research with families of color, few studies have examined ERS among White families (Umaña-Taylor & Hill, 2020). In this study, we used the Consensual Qualitative Research procedure (Hill et al., 2005) to analyze the ERS goals expressed by 35 White parents of White children during semi-structured interviews. We identified 11 domains (privilege awareness, take action, racism, value diversity, egalitarianism, children lead the way, informed, embracing the difficulty of being anti-racist, empathy, protection, and racial–ethnic identity) that generally map onto Hughes et al.’s (2006) existing ERS framework. Our results suggest that some White parents have ERS goals that move beyond kindness and diversity to delve into issues of equity and justice in order to support children in their own anti-racist journies.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-06T11:13:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21996392
       
  • Communication Pattern, Dyadic Adjustment, and Parenting Practices among
           Married Couples in India: Mediating Role of Dyadic Coping

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      Authors: J. Indumathy, Barani Kanth
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The primary goal of the current study was to examine the dyadic association between communication patterns (CP), dyadic coping (DC) efforts, dyadic adjustment (DA), and parenting practices (PP), using a sample of 340 married couples (N = 680) in India. The findings from the actor–partner interdependence mediation modeling (APIMeM) indicated that the husbands showed both actor and partner effects between all the variables. The actor and partner effects were not significant for the link between communication patterns and dyadic coping for wives. Still, they showed significant actor and partner effects for the association between dyadic coping and dyadic adjustment, as well as parenting practices. One’s own and spouse’s dyadic coping mediated the association between communication patterns and dyadic adjustment and parenting practices for husbands but not wives. These findings shed light on the communication and coping mechanisms and their link with adjustment and parenting practices among couples beyond Western cultural contexts.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-06T11:11:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21995873
       
  • The Intergenerational Transmission of Life Satisfaction between Parents
           and Children and the Mediating Role of Supportive Parenting

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      Authors: Lara Augustijn
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Processes of intergenerational transmission can have long-lasting negative consequences for children, thereby perpetuating or exacerbating existing social and health inequalities within society. The present study investigates the intergenerational transmission of life satisfaction between parents and their adolescent children. Based on cross-sectional data from the German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP), multilevel linear regression models were estimated for 4,154 adolescents at the age of 17 years, and their parents. The statistical analysis provided evidence for the intergenerational transmission of life satisfaction between parents and their children, as parents’ levels of life satisfaction were positively and significantly related to levels of life satisfaction in adolescents. Furthermore, mothers’ and fathers’ supportive parenting partially mediated this relationship, with higher levels of supportive parenting contributing to increased levels of adolescent life satisfaction. However, the results of the analysis revealed no significant differences between same-sex and opposite-sex parent–child dyads in the intergenerational transmission of life satisfaction.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-06T11:09:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21995868
       
  • Received Affection and Caregiving in the Grandparent–Grandchild
           Relationship

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      Authors: Daniel Hans Mansson
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Grounded in Affection Exchange Theory’s assumptions that affectionate communication fosters relational benefits and increases people’s likelihood of survival, this study sought to examine young adult grandchildren’s willingness to serve as their grandparents’ caregivers as a function of received affection from their grandparents. Young adult grandchildren (N = 209) independently completed a questionnaire in reference to a specific, biological grandparent. The results of a multiple regression analysis revealed partial support for the hypothesized positive relationships between grandchildren’s received affection from their grandparents and the grandchildren’s willingness to care for their grandparents. These findings are indicative of both practical and theoretical implications.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-06T11:07:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21994159
       
  • It Is Your Decision to Date Interracially: The Influence of Family
           Approval on the Likelihood of Interracial/Interethnic Dating

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      Authors: Byron Miller, Savanah Catalina, Sara Rocks, Kathryn Tillman
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Although attitudes toward interracial romantic relationships (IRRs) have generally improved over the years, many Americans still disapprove of their family members being in IRRs. Prior studies have examined correlates of individual-level attitudes about interracial romance, but less is known about whether family members’ attitudes are directly associated with young people’s decisions to date interracially. Using data collected from 790 romantically involved college students at two large public four-year universities, we find that young adults who believe their siblings, parents, and grandparents approve of IRRs have greater odds of dating interracially. Compared to Whites, Blacks and Hispanics are more likely to be interracially involved but their decision to do so is much less dependent on the approval of their parents and grandparents. We also find young adults are more likely to date interracially if they have five or more relatives with IRR experience themselves. The findings and their implications are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-06T10:58:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21994130
       
  • Mexican-Origin College Students’ Stress, Sibling Relationships, Academic
           Motivation, and Depressive Symptoms

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      Authors: Samantha K. Jones, Sarah E. Killoren, Gabrielle C. Kline, Edna C. Alfaro, Fiorella Carlos Chavez, Eric Salinas
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The current study investigated associations among interpersonal, academic, financial, and ethnicity-related stressors and college students’ academic motivation and depressive symptoms, as well as the moderating role of positive sibling relationships on these associations. Participants included 171 Mexican-origin college students (80.7% female; M = 21.6 years). Data were collected using an online survey and analyzed with path analysis. Under conditions of more positive sibling relationships, there was a positive association between interpersonal stress and academic motivation, a negative association between ethnicity-related social stress and academic motivation, and a positive association between financial stress and depressive symptoms. Under conditions of less positive sibling relationships, there was a positive association between interpersonal stress and depressive symptoms. Findings suggest that sibling relationships may only be protective for certain types of stress.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-05T12:08:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21994135
       
  • Role of Attachment and Family Functioning in Problematic Smartphone Use in
           Young Adults

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      Authors: M. V. Jimeno, J. J. Ricarte, A. Toledano, S. Mangialavori, M. Cacioppo, L. Ros
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Overuse of the smartphone causes negative consequences on the health and behavior of younger people. It is necessary to know which factors can determine the problematic use of the smartphone. The aim of the present study was to explore the relationship between problematic smartphone use, attachment styles, and perceived family functioning in young adults. Three hundred and thirteen Spanish young adults took part in the study (255 women, 58 men) and completed the following instruments: the Smartphone Addiction Scale (SAS), the Relationship Questionnaire (RQ), the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI), and the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale (FACES IV). The results of the path analyses show that the cohesion and enmeshed functioning variables were the best predictors of problematic smartphone use. The preoccupied attachment scale was the only one whose score also showed indirect effects on problematic smartphone use through the variable of enmeshed family functioning.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-05T12:06:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993881
       
  • Like My Own Children: A Quantitative Study of Stepparents Claiming Adult
           Stepchildren

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      Authors: Kirsten van Houdt
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The different dimensions of parenthood—for example, biological relatedness, child-rearing, co-residence—are disconnected in increasingly many families as the result of upward trends in separation and repartnering. By studying stepparents’ claiming (i.e., stepparents perceiving their adult stepchildren as their own), this study provides insight into how people define kinship and adds a new dimension to knowledge about stepfamilies. Using the Ouders en Kinderen in Nederland (OKiN) survey data, this study (a) provides nationally representative estimates of how Dutch stepmothers and -fathers (N = 3,327) perceive their adult stepchildren and (b) shows how the context (i.e., co-residence, duration, timing, marriage) and relations to biological children relate to stepparents’ claiming. The more similar the context is to “traditional” parent–child relations, the more stepparents claim their stepchildren. As opposed to the expectation that relations to one’s own biological children would serve as an important reference, having biological children from either a previous or current relationship has little explanatory power.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-04T11:55:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993898
       
  • The Role of Gender in the Perception of Different Forms of Psychological
           Violence in Young Couples

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      Authors: Fabiola Perles, Jesús San Martín, Jesús M. Canto, Macarena Vallejo
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The objective of the present study has been to assess the influence that the sex of the aggressor and the sex of participant have on the perception of three types of psychological violence in young couples. A total of 693 young people, ranging from 17 years to 25 years, were randomly assigned six different scenarios in which situations of psychological violence between young heterosexual couples were described and where the sex of the aggressor and the types of psychological violence varied. The results of our research revealed that differences in the perception of violence are observed based on the sex of the aggressor, the sex of the participant, and the type of psychological violence, independently, as well as in the interaction of the three variables. This result is relevant as it points to the need for further in-depth study into situations that could contribute to justifying violence.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-04T11:55:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21996390
       
  • Transnational Couples Parenting in the United States: A story of
           Integration, Navigation, and Resilience

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      Authors: Blendine P. Hawkins, Catherine Solheim, Virginia S. Zuiker
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Over a million people migrate and resettle in the United States every year. Subsequent to the diversification of the U.S. population is a rising rate in transnational marriage. Juxtaposed with the increasing prevalence of intermarriage are historical restrictions and continued antipathy of such marriages and the families that they build. Using a phenomenological design, this study explored how transnational couples experience their parent and partner roles. Six couples were interviewed, each partner separately and then together with in-depth questions about how their family and social and familial context informed their roles and how they navigated their relationship as parents and partners. Three themes emerged from the couples’ experience: integration of past and present selves, intersections between partners, and navigation as parents.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-04T11:55:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993878
       
  • What Is Natural Is Best: A Qualitative Exploration of Women’s Engagement
           in Attachment Parenting

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      Authors: Elizabeth Hulen
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Attachment Parenting is a form of “intensive parenting” and involves a set of caretaking practices that are perceived by proponents of Attachment Parenting to nurture a strong maternal–child bond. Based on semi-structured interviews with 15 women who self-identified as Attachment Parents and observations of La Leche League meetings, this study investigates the ways in which parenting behaviors are understood and rationalized in relation to the philosophies of Attachment Parenting and the wider parenting culture. Study findings illustrate how the women in this study account for their parenting practices through both an appropriation and rejection of Attachment Parenting expertise and engagement in a discursive appeal to “what is natural is best.” Given a wider sociocultural environment characterized by multiple forms of expertise and risk, the ways in which Attachment Parenting serves as an interpretive frame and moral road map for the women in this study are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-04T11:54:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993885
       
  • Healthy and Indulgent Food Consumption Practices Within
           Grandparent–Grandchild Identity Bundles: A Qualitative Study of New
           Zealand and Danish Families

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      Authors: Stephanie O’Donohoe, Malene Gram, Caroline Marchant, Heike Schänzel, Anne Kastarinen
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Both grandparenting and food provisioning practices play an important role in contemporary family life, but the role of food in grandparent–grandchild and wider family relationships is underresearched. Popular and academic discourse often focuses on grandparents as indulgent feeders with negative implications for children’s weight and eating practices. Drawing on the concept of family identity bundles and interviews with Danish and New Zealand grandparents and grandchildren, it was found that, for both generations, being alone together was a treat in itself and a time for treats, although they were fluent in the discourse of balance and moderation. Grandparents’ food-related practices were shaped by the internalized as well as actual presence of the parents, but they tended to experience rather than express tensions over parental feeding practices. These findings offer a nuanced account of grandparents’ role in children’s (un)healthy eating practices and of the role of food in intergenerational family relationships.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-02T06:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21992391
       
  • Cohabitation and Its Consequences in Ghana

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      Authors: Rosemary Obeng-Hinneh, Albert Kpoor
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Although largely considered an unconventional form of domestic partnership, cohabitation is a growing phenomenon in Ghana. The lived experiences of cohabiting couples have, however, received little scholarly attention. Drawing on in-depth interviews conducted with cohabiting couples in Accra, Ghana, this study focuses on the implications of cohabitation on cohabitees. The data showed that cohabitees often face pressures from their families, churches, friends, and neighbors to either convert their unions to marriage or end the relationships. The relationships are also characterized by intimate partner violence and poor relationship quality. Women, more than men, tend to suffer these consequences of cohabitation. The study’s general conclusion is that the implications of cohabitation are mostly negative, and the gendered nature of the experiences reflects the sociocultural landscape of the Ghanaian society and how men and women are viewed differently in terms of their marital status.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-02T06:04:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21994155
       
  • Intergenerational Perspectives of Paternal Parenting Practices: A
           Descriptive Qualitative Study

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      Authors: Chang Hui Ee, Sng Qian Wen, Shefaly Shorey
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      There are limited studies exploring the phenomenon of fatherhood in an Asian context, and no dyad qualitative studies have been conducted to understand grandfathers’ and fathers’ perspectives on parenting. This study aims to explore the intergenerational perspectives of paternal parenting practices in Singapore. A descriptive qualitative approach was adopted. Face-to-face interviews were conducted on 12 grandfather–father dyads from the pediatric general ward in a public tertiary hospital in Singapore. Thematic analysis revealed four themes on the influences that affect grandfathers’ and fathers’ perspectives on parenting: (a) Personal traits influencing fathers’ perspectives, (b) external influences that shape parenting, (c) personal views on parenting, and (d) child’s traits that influence parenting. The findings urge professionals to involve fathers in maternity and pediatric care and encourage fathers to work closely with grandfathers to promote positive child developmental outcomes. Further research is needed to develop educational or supportive programs for fathers and grandfathers.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-02T05:44:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21994152
       
  • Triangulations of “Motherly Love”: Negotiated Intimacies among Migrant
           Domestic Workers, Mothers, and Children

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      Authors: Iris Hoiting
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Persistent economic inequality between men and women, combined with differences in gender expectations and growing inequalities among women globally, has resulted in families “outsourcing” childcare by employing migrant domestic workers (MDWs). While studies have addressed the intimacy and complexity of “mothering” in such contexts, the agentic position of child-recipients of such care have seldom been explored. This article increases our understanding of care-relationships by examining their triangularity among children, MDWs, and mothers in Hong Kong. Drawing on in-depth interviews with young people who grew up with MDWs, alongside interviews with MDWs themselves, this article describes processes through which care work transforms into what Lynch describes as “love labor” in these relational contexts. In these contexts, commodified care from MDWs can develop, through a process of mutual trilateral negotiations, into intimate love-laboring relationships that, in turn, reflect larger dynamics of familial transformation that are endemic to “global cities.”
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-02T05:42:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993858
       
  • The Relationship Between Conflict Topics and Romantic Relationship
           Dynamics

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      Authors: Dixie Meyer, Renata Sledge
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Romantic coupling in the United States is changing (e.g., communication patterns). Research investigating couple conflict topics has not updated with current trends. A large, representative sample (n = 1,013) selected frequent couples conflict topics and reported relationship satisfaction and conflict behaviors. Results suggested communications was the most frequently reported conflict topic for all couples and parenting was the most frequently reported conflict topic for parents. Other commonly reported topics included personal/partner habits, household chores, finances, decision-making, quality time, sex, screen time, role expectations, and time management. Finances, parenting, and sex were negatively associated with relationship satisfaction, whereas household chores and time management were positively associated with relationship satisfaction. Communication, finances, parenting, and sex were associated with an increase in dysfunctional conflict behaviors, whereas time management was associated with a decrease in dysfunctional conflict behaviors. Understanding how conflict sources affect relationships may help couples navigate conflict to preserve the relationship.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-02T05:41:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993856
       
  • Protective Factors for Military Veteran Fathers’ Parenting
           Functioning and Satisfaction

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      Authors: Jennifer K. Karre, Nicole R. Morgan, Julia A. Bleser, Daniel F. Perkins
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Employing a strengths-based perspective, this study examined protective factors related to fathers’ positive parenting behaviors and parenting satisfaction. The sample included 3,810 active duty veteran fathers who separated from the active component and had at least one child 18 years and younger. Logistic regression analyses indicated that financial status, health functioning, resilience, social support, positive social functioning with community and friends, and positive social functioning with relatives were all associated with parenting functioning. The interaction of the number of deployments and resilience was related to parenting functioning. Furthermore, health functioning, resilience, social support, positive social functioning with community and friends, and positive social functioning with relatives were associated with parenting satisfaction. Among fathers in a romantic relationship, the interaction of the number of deployments and romantic relationship functioning and the interaction of the number of deployments and romantic relationship satisfaction were both related to parenting functioning and parenting satisfaction.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-02T05:39:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993852
       
  • The Husband: Navigating the Relational Challenge Of Her
           Institutionalization Or His Widowerhood

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      Authors: Laura K. Soulsby, Edward H. Thompson, Kate M. Bennett
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Marital status is central to one’s identity. Using interview data from US husband caregivers and British widowers, we explore how men’s relational identity as husband is maintained despite challenges as, and after, marriage ends. These data, analyzed using the constant comparative method associated with constructionist grounded theory, corroborate that the work of being married is key to identity maintenance for husbands and that the married relationship and its associated responsibilities affirm a sense of self as a man. Marriage shelters men, providing a secure place for that self-perception as a man. But a wife’s institutionalization in long-term care or widowerhood threatens the ontological security offered through marriage and prompts identity work. We extend the literature in finding that (former) husbands attempt to retain their long-term relational identity and thus remain sheltered by marriage. They reconstruct masculinity-affirming identities through activities that help them harbor their self-presentation as a (former) husband.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-02T05:37:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993199
       
  • Parents’ and Children’s Privacy Management about Sensitive
           Topics: A Dyadic Study

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      Authors: Rachael Hernandez, Diana Ebersole
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Parents and children in families must manage private information about sensitive topics. This privacy management can necessitate both individual and collective privacy rules. However, parents and children may have significantly different views of individual and collective privacy boundaries and rules for managing them. Particularly for adolescents, changing expectations and privacy needs may lead to different perceptions of privacy rules, with various relational consequences. To better understand parents’ and children’s perceptions of privacy rules in the family, this study analyzed individual interviews with 41 parent–adolescent dyads to provide a crystallized view of privacy rules in families. Parents’ and adolescents’ perceptions of privacy management both converged and diverged in this study, and reflected the nature of the parent–child relationships. When privacy rules could not be reconciled, there were both relational and privacy management implications.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-02T05:35:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993192
       
  • Dyadic Coping, Parental Warmth, and Adolescent Externalizing Behavior in
           Four Countries

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      Authors: Ann T. Skinner, Sevtap Gurdal, Lei Chang, Paul Oburu, Sombat Tapanya
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined parental warmth as a mediator of relations between mothers’ and fathers’ perceptions of dyadic coping and adolescent externalizing outcomes. Data from 472 adolescents, mothers, and fathers were collected over a three-year period from families in China, Kenya, Sweden, and Thailand. For mothers in all four sites and fathers in three sites, better parental dyadic coping at youth age 13 years predicted higher levels of parental warmth at youth age 14 years. For mothers in all four sites, higher levels of maternal warmth were in turn related to less youth externalizing behavior at the age of 15 years, and higher levels of dyadic coping at youth age 13 years were related to less youth externalizing behavior at the age of 15 years indirectly through maternal warmth. Emotional Security Theory helps explain the process by which dyadic coping is related to adolescent externalizing behavior. The results have important implications for parent- and family-based interventions.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-02T02:33:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993851
       
  • Religion and Attitudes toward Childlessness in the United States

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      Authors: Jeremy E. Uecker, Rebecca Bonhag, J. J. Burtt, Hannah R. Evans, Amanda D. Hernandez
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Attitudes toward childlessness have received little attention from social scientists even as childlessness as a family form has become more popular. One key predictor of childlessness attitudes is religious commitment, though few studies have examined this association in-depth. Using data from two recent, national datasets—the National Survey of Family Growth and the Survey of U.S. Catholics and Family Life—we assess the relationships between individuals’ religious characteristics and various attitudes about their own and others’ childlessness, as well as how these factors may vary across gender. We find strong associations between religious affiliation, religious attendance, and religious salience, and each of the outcomes such that religious commitment tends to be associated with more negative attitudes toward childlessness. Interactions across gender were rare and the direction of the interactions was mixed. Religion is a pivotal factor in perpetuating pronatalist attitudes in the United States among both men and women.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-03-01T08:43:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21994148
       
  • The Role of Parental Style and Self-efficacy as Predictors of Internet
           Addiction among Israeli-Palestinian College Students in Israel

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      Authors: Qutaiba Agbaria, Dana Bdier
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Prior studies have suggested the importance of individual characteristics among youths (e.g., self-efficacy) and parents (e.g., parenting style) that may mediate the risk of the youth engaging in compulsive, addictive behaviors like Internet addiction (IA). The current work was the first to examine the associations of IA with self-efficacy and parenting styles among a unique sample of Muslim college students in Israel. Participants (n = 500) reported on their symptoms of IA, self-efficacy, and their parents’ parenting practices. Consistent with the study hypotheses, authoritative parenting style and self-efficacy were correlated with fewer symptoms of IA (r = −0.34, p < 0.01; r = −0.49, p < 0.01, respectively), whereas permissive and authoritarian parenting styles were correlated with elevated indicators of IA (r = 0.41, p < 0.01; r = 0.46, p < 0.01, respectively). These findings are consistent with previous literature in Western samples, suggesting the cross-cultural importance of these personal attributes for reducing the risk of addictive Internet use.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-02-25T10:26:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21995869
       
  • Divorce Ideation and “Deal Breakers” among Married Gay Men and
           Lesbians: A Qualitative Exploration

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      Authors: Aaron Hoy, Anfa Diiriye, Emily Gunderson
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Regardless of whether married individuals are actively pursuing divorce, at all stages of marriage, individuals can experience thoughts of divorce, which are often termed “divorce ideation” in the literature. However, with same-sex marriage only being legalized in 2015, the literature has yet to explore divorce ideation among individuals married to a same-sex partner. In this article, we used semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 28 married gay men and lesbians to explore how and under what circumstances gay men and lesbians think about divorce. We find that although a slight majority of participants had never considered divorce, many had, especially during periods of marital conflict. In addition, nearly all participants indicated that they would be willing to consider divorce under certain circumstances such as infidelity, the loss of trust and/or intimacy, and unhappiness with the relationship. We conclude by discussing the limitations of our research and directions for future research.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-02-25T09:32:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993854
       
  • Testing the Economic Independence Hypothesis: Union Formation Among Single
           Mothers in Chile

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      Authors: Laura Cuesta, Sarah Reynolds
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the increasing proportion of single-mother families, the literature on union formation among unpartnered parents in Latin America is scant. Using a sample from a Chilean longitudinal survey (N = 3,318), we estimated regression models to test associations between single mothers’ economic resources in 2010 and coresidence with the biological father of their children in 2012. We also examined whether these associations differed in subgroups with higher rates of labor market participation. We found that mothers’ paid work was not associated with union formation. Receiving government benefits and living with a parent were associated with lower probability of coresidence with the biological father, even among the most advantaged subgroups. We conclude that in contexts in which most mothers of young children are not doing paid work, economic resources coming from government and extended family may be more consequential than earnings’ potential in influencing single mothers’ union formation behavior.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-02-25T09:27:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993201
       
  • The Role of Men During Pregnancy: A Cross-Sectional Study of Perceptions
           and Beliefs of Primary Caregivers in Tanzania

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      Authors: Heidi J. Niedfeldt, Trent E. Sever, Rilee Smith, Elizabeth A. Davis, Generose Mulokozi, Scott Torres, Mary Linehan, Kerry Ann Dobies, Taylor Hoj, Joshua H. West, P. Cougar Hall, Benjamin T. Crookston
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the relationship between men’s involvement and primary caregivers’ antenatal visits, acquiring antenatal tablets, and working less during pregnancy. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 5,000 Tanzanian primary caregivers living in households with one or more children under the age of 2 years. Results indicated that primary caregivers who received help from their husband/partner, or perceived that men in their community helped their pregnant spouses, were more likely to practice healthy antenatal care behaviors, including attending antenatal visits, acquiring antenatal tablets, and working less during pregnancy. Similarly, women who thought that all their friends receive help from their husbands/partners were twice as likely to reduce their workload during their pregnancy. These findings suggest the importance of male involvement and support during pregnancy in order to improve antenatal care, reduce workload, and increase tablet consumption among primary caregivers.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-02-19T10:48:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993189
       
  • Paternal Response to Ultrasound Predicts Increased Paternal-Fetal
           Attachment

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      Authors: Richard M. Tolman, Tova Walsh, Deborah Bybee, Neal Davis, Lauren A. Reed, Paige Safyer, Vijay Singh
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Utilizing data from a longitudinal online survey of couples expecting their first child, this study sought to examine the trajectory of paternal-fetal attachment across the three trimesters of pregnancy. Expectant fathers (N=124) who completed at least the first two assessments were included in the analysis. Attachment was assessed using the Paternal Antenatal Attachment Scale, and paternal response to the ultrasound was measured with a four-item scale developed for this study. Longitudinal multilevel regression was used to model change in paternal-fetal attachment across assessments. Paternal-fetal attachment increased among all fathers, including those who showed less response to ultrasound and those who reported the pregnancy as mistimed or undesired. However desired pregnancy and stronger paternal response to ultrasound were associated with a larger increase in paternal-fetal attachment. The findings of the study have implications for the support of paternal-fetal attachment in health care and other settings.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-02-19T10:47:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993197
       
  • Fictive Kin Networks among African Americans, Black Caribbeans, and
           Non-Latino Whites

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      Authors: Robert Taylor, Linda Chatters, Christina J. Cross, Dawne Mouzon
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Using data from the National Survey of American Life, we investigated the social and demographic correlates of fictive kin network involvement among African Americans, Black Caribbeans, and non-Latino Whites. Specifically, we examined the factors shaping whether respondents have fictive kin, the number of fictive present kin in their networks, and the frequency with which they received support from fictive kin. Overall, 87% of respondents had a fictive kin relationship, the average network size was 7.5, and 61% of participants routinely received fictive kin support. Affective closeness and contact with family, friends, and church members were positively associated with fictive kin relations. Age, region, income, and marital and parental status were related to fictive kin network involvement, though these associations varied by race/ethnicity. Collectively, findings indicate that fictive kin ties extend beyond marginalized communities, and they operate as a means to strengthen family bonds, rather than substitute for family deficits.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-02-19T10:47:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993188
       
  • The Relation of Helicopter Parenting to Maladaptive Perfectionism in
           Emerging Adults

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      Authors: Katey N. Hayes, Lisa A. Turner
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Helicopter parenting may contribute to the development of children’s maladaptive perfectionism. This relationship may be salient in emerging adulthood, a time characterized by decision-making and navigating novel situations. This cross-sectional study was designed to investigate the relation of helicopter parenting and maladaptive perfectionism. Emerging adult college students (n = 264) completed measures of helicopter parenting and a measure of maladaptive perfectionism. Factor analysis of the helicopter parenting measures yielded two factors: the perceived parental behavior factor included items about parents intervening in the emerging adults’ lives and the affective response factor included items about how the emerging adults felt about the reported parental intervention. Findings supported a mediation model where parental behavior was related to maladaptive perfectionism through the construct of affective response. These findings document the importance of understanding behaviors associated with helicopter parenting as well as individual differences in how emerging adults interpret and respond to those behaviors.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-02-15T09:33:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993194
       
  • Does Family Context Moderate the Effects of Discrimination on Emerging
           Adults’ Health'

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      Authors: Yehsong Kim, Hannah L. Schacter, Geoffrey W. Corner, Hannah F. Rasmussen, Gayla Margolin
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Given the adverse impacts of discrimination on overall well-being, this study tests whether family context, specifically family hostility (FH) and positive family environment (PFE), moderate well-documented associations between discrimination and mental and physical health symptoms. Diverse emerging adults (n = 345) completed an online questionnaire about perceived discrimination due to a broad range of characteristics, positive and negative qualities of their families of origin, and depressive, anxiety, and physical health symptoms. Multiple linear regression analyses indicated that family factors moderated the effects of discrimination, such that discrimination was more strongly linked with health symptoms in the context of low, compared to high, family risk. Conversely, some models showed independent, non-interactive effects of discrimination and family factors on health. Gender differences emerged, though with no consistent pattern of effects. Together, these findings highlight that discrimination and negative family factors are salient social-environmental risks for emerging adults.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-02-13T10:26:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993196
       
  • Psychological Well-Being and Family Functioning in Middle Childhood: The
           Unique Role of Sibling Relational Dynamics

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      Authors: Ashley T. Geerts-Perry, Shelley A. Riggs, Patricia L. Kaminski, Amy Murrell
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Despite being the longest relationships across the lifespan, the sibling dyad is the most under-studied relationship in the family system. Researchers have documented the harmful and beneficial effects of sibling relationships and family dynamics on individual well-being. Extending this research to middle childhood, the current study examined family functioning, sibling relational dynamics, and self-reported adjustment and internalizing symptoms among 8- to 11-year-old children. Path analyses revealed significant direct effects between conflictual family functioning and children’s psychological well-being. Significant interactions between family functioning and sibling dynamics suggested that congruent relational dynamics at multiple levels of the family system had a cumulative impact on the child’s well-being. Findings from the current study highlight the role of family functioning and the unique contributions of sibling relationships to children’s functioning, suggesting that consideration of sibling relational dynamics may improve treatment planning by pointing out additional targets for intervention and/or potential sources of support.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-02-13T10:21:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993191
       
  • Grandparent Affection and Emotional Well-being of Adolescents with
           Different Family Types

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      Authors: Pilar Ramos, Carmen Moreno, Sara Luna, Francisco Rivera
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the increasing importance of grandparents in raising their grandchildren, few studies analyze the impact that these intergenerational relationships have on the grandchildren, especially during adolescence. With a sample of 3432 adolescents between 11 years and 16 years old, we analyze to what degree grandparent affection explains adolescent emotional well-being. The results reveal interesting findings according to family type: traditional two-parent families, families with joint custody, or families with only one biological parent (specifying between father or mother). Lastly, we analyze and discuss the implications of the relevant results related to the grandparents’ sex, lineage, and state of health, the adolescent’s age, as well as finding a higher impact of grandparent affection has on adolescents from families with only the father as a reference figure. This study advocates for reinforcing the role of the grandparents during adolescence, becoming especially relevant for boys and girls living in father-only families.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-02-13T10:16:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993183
       
  • Parenting of Adolescent Single Children: A Mixed-methods Study

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      Authors: Ameerah Khadaroo, Fiona MacCallum
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Globally, the average number of children per household is expected to drop to 1.0 by 2020. Single-child families are increasingly the norm, with nearly half of British families classified as single-child. Despite this, research on only-children and their families is scant. Using a convergent mixed-methods design, this study explores parenting of adolescents in British single-child families. Single-child (31 adolescents, 47 mothers, 25 fathers) and multiple-children families (46 adolescents, 76 mothers, 31 fathers) completed online surveys. In-depth interviews were also conducted with 15 only-child families and 15 multiple-child families. All adolescents were aged 11 years to 14 years. Surveys did not find any differences in parenting between one-child and multiple-children families. However, interview data found single-child families were more child-centered, reporting higher overprotective and pushy parenting, but less authoritative and authoritarian parenting. Findings challenge negative stereotyping of single-child families and provide an in-depth insight into the experiences of adolescent only-children and their parents.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-02-11T06:46:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993180
       
  • Does Locus of Control Influence Parentification and Anxiety in
           Father–Daughter Relationships'

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      Authors: Cindy J. Mays, Lacy E. Krueger
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Parentification is a role-reversal phenomenon in which boundary violations occur such as children being their parents’ physical or emotional caretakers. Researchers have shown that childhood parentification can produce anxiety, but locus of control (LOC) moderates this relationship. We sought to examine the influence of LOC on the parentification-anxiety relationship in father–daughter dyads, as this dyad is under-represented in the parentification literature. One hundred and eighty-one undergraduate women completed an anxiety measure, parentification questionnaire, and an LOC inventory. Higher levels of parentification and lower levels of internal LOC were associated with higher reports of anxiety, but internal LOC did not appear to moderate the anxiety-parentification relationship. For individuals residing at home, parentification predicted anxiety, whereas internal LOC predicted anxiety among those not residing at home. These results further the paternal parentification literature, as well as show the relationship between childhood parentification and women’s anxiety for those currently living at home.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-02-09T11:42:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993187
       
  • Longitudinal Associations Between Household Labor Division Inequity and
           Conflict Among Newlywed Couples

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      Authors: Megan J. Adelson, Jackie A. Nelson, Mariam Hafiz
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The division of household labor among couples is a frequently occurring topic of conflict. The present investigation examined longitudinal associations between inequities in household labor divisions and conflict about those divisions in 219 newly married heterosexual couples without children enrolled in the Louisiana Marriage Matters Panel Survey of Newlyweds. We used autoregressive latent trajectory models across three time points spanning approximately 3.5 years. More conflict about labor inequity was related to declines in household labor inequity by the next wave. Additionally, greater household labor inequity was related to declines in conflict by the next wave. We discuss findings in terms of the demand-response hypothesis and ideological reasons why higher labor inequities may relate to less conflict.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-02-09T11:40:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X21993185
       
  • Conflict Resolution Strategies and Marital Adjustment of Heterosexual
           Couples: Assessment of Actor–Partner Interaction

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      Authors: Crístofer Batista da Costa, Clarisse Pereira Mosmann
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study tested a dyadic theoretical model in which conflict resolution strategies have impact on couples’ marital adjustment. The study features a quantitative and transversal approach and a correlational and explanatory design. Participants included 231 heterosexual couples from different regions of Brazil, contacted after indication. The instrument composed of the Conflict Resolution Behavior Questionnaire (CRBQ) and the Revised Dyadic Adjustment Scale (R-DAS) was filled out in the residence of the participants. Data were submitted to dyadic analysis by the latent trait model. The results indicated that the strategies have a strong impact on the individual’s adjustment. Assessing the impact of one of the spouse’s strategies on the other, only the marital adjustment of the men was affected. The evidence suggests differences between husbands and wives regarding the impact of strategies on adjustment. The data are discussed in light of the literature and considering their applicability in the clinical area.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-01-30T05:08:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X20986974
       
  • Differential Effects of Widowhood on Network and Support

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      Authors: Daniela Klaus
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the mobilization of close and supportive relationships following widowhood and whether these trajectories differ by educational level or gender. It is assumed that widowed spouses call up social relationships to compensate for their spousal loss and accompanying cuts in subjective well-being. Using longitudinal data from the German Ageing Survey (N = 7,012; observations = 20,816), fixed effects models were estimated. Widowhood results in increases in the network size and the providers of support up to the fourth post-widowhood year. After that, starting decreases reach pre-widowed levels around seven years after widowhood. The most pronounced changes were found for widowed spouses with university degree and for widowed women. The overall mobilization of social relationships is thus limited in time and widowed spouses without vocational degree, as well as men in part, are the most vulnerable to the adverse social consequences of widowhood.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-01-30T05:06:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X20988068
       
  • Rural Masculinities and Fathering: The Lived Experiences of Chinese
           Farmers

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      Authors: Yanping Liu, Jianhong Zheng
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Little attention has been paid to the process of Chinese fathers in the countryside representing themselves as men while encountering rapid social changes. This qualitative study explored how rural Chinese men construct masculinities through stories about their fathering experiences. Fifteen farmers from southwest China were interviewed about their involvement in childrearing. The fathers were identified to have constructed configurations of masculinity fitting their social context, which were negotiated using various personal, interpersonal, and contextual resources. The participants presented themselves as family supporters, collaborative husbands, and strict but caring fathers who envisioned relying on their children near death. Gender inequalities were revealed, and participants legitimized these by emphasizing the instrumentality of such gender relations in childrearing and family development. Study limitations and implications for future research and practices related to rural Chinese fathers are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-01-29T10:28:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X20988070
       
  • Mothering and Fathering, or just Parenting: Measurement Invariance of
           Parental Beliefs by Gender

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      Authors: J. Scott Crapo, Jacqueline A. Miller, Kay Bradford, Brian J. Higginbotham
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      In the ongoing discussion about the possible differences between mothering and fathering, tests of measurement invariance play an important role. However, there remains a need to investigate the measurement invariance of parental beliefs by gender. Mothers (n = 2,236) and fathers (n = 1,106) who attended parenting education courses reported on their beliefs using both original and validated measures. Using factor analytic techniques, we estimated a series of nested models that applied parameter constraints hierarchically to assess measurement invariance between mothers and fathers for these parenting beliefs. Results indicated strict invariance for some, but not all, constructs. Namely, beliefs regarding facilitating children’s independence and beliefs regarding structure were invariant, whereas beliefs regarding connection showed levels of systematic difference between genders. Testing invariance allows researchers to shed light on which aspects of parenting are the same and which are different, and to what extent mothering and fathering can be directly compared.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-01-28T07:26:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X20988772
       
  • Educational Attainments of Children with Adopted Siblings

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      Authors: Jason Fletcher, Jan Greenberg, Marsha Mailick, Jieun Song, Barbara Wolfe
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Although adoption is a widespread phenomenon in the United States, little research has examined the effects on biological siblings. This article uses two representative datasets to compare educational attainments of individuals who grew up with an adopted sibling and those that did not. We find large heterogeneity (based on sex, family income, and cohort) in the outcomes of those with an adopted sibling. Brothers appear more influenced than sisters. For brothers, we find that family income moderates differential associations, where males from low-income families have lower education if they have an adopted sibling, but males from higher-income families do not. Our results have implications for our understanding of family dynamics as well as how sex shapes educational attainments of children.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-01-28T07:26:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X20984495
       
  • Parent–Child Anxiety Symptoms in Emerging Adults: Moderation by
           Gender and Religiosity

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      Authors: Melanie Stearns, Cliff McKinney
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Although research has indicated that parent and child anxiety are connected, religiosity may serve as a protective factor and help weaken this connection. The current study asked 1,002 emerging adults (67.7% female) to report on their mothers’ and fathers’ anxiety symptoms and their own anxiety symptoms and religiosity. Structural equation modeling indicated that personal religiosity served as a moderator between the perceived anxiety symptoms of mothers and fathers and emerging adult anxiety symptoms for daughters but not sons. Participant gender also suggested a 3-way interaction among variables as the interactions occurred for daughters but not sons. Additionally, parent gender suggested a 3-way interaction, given that the results indicated that for emerging adult daughters, the interaction was stronger for mothers than fathers. Thus, emerging adult religiosity as well as parent and child gender may be contributing factors to better understanding of how offspring anxiety relates to that of their parents.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-01-16T05:59:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X20985905
       
  • Role of Social Support in Women facing Domestic Violence during Lockdown
           of Covid-19 while Cohabiting with the Abusers: Analysis of Cases
           Registered with the Family Counseling Centre, Alwar, India

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      Authors: Meerambika Mahapatro, Moksh M. Prasad, Sudhir Pratap Singh
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The present study aims to analyze the role of social support in the lives of women survivors of domestic violence who filed a complaint with the Mahila Salah and Suraksha Kendra (MSSK) Alwar, India, while residing with the abusive husband and his family during the lockdown period of COVID-19. The study explores the role of MSSK with extended vulnerability of women during the lockdown period at large. This study adopts an exploratory qualitative method. A total of 36 married women who had filed a complaint with MSSK before and during the lockdown were included. Interviews with the women were held through telephonic conversations on vulnerability, coping mechanism and extent and forms of social support. Thematic content analysis was done in a stepwise manner. Results show that degeneration of social support model is time -bound and the accuracy of applying this model wane under extended condition of vulnerability caused due to COVID-19. MSSK can expand support by creating and integrating virtual community networks to detect and deter violence during the lockdown. The study suggests that the government can ensure and empower bystanders with skills of modern communication. The existing physical institutional delivery mechanism need to evolve strategies that are resilient to emerging threats from the vulnerable ecosystem.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-01-11T10:59:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X20984496
       
  • Love in Cyberspace: Self Presentation and Partner Seeking in Online Dating
           Advertisements of Older Adults

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      Authors: Wendy Watson, Charlie Stelle
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This qualitative content analysis of a systematically selected sample of 200 heterosexual adults aged 60+ years examined older adults’ self-presentation in online dating ads and what they sought in a partner. Online dating ads were examined from one site for adults of all ages (match.com) and a site specifically geared to older adults (ourtime.com). Results showed that aspects of self that are presented for men and women, although in different order of importance, included one’s status, enjoying leisure activities and being fun-loving, kind/compassionate, and being friend and family focused. Men and women were interested in a companion and someone fun-loving and kind/compassionate. Additionally, women sought a partner who was honest and would do leisure activities with them. Men sought women who were physically attractive and would provide emotional support. The discussion focuses on gender differences and how the act of self-presentation is central in the narratives of dating ads for older adults.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-01-11T06:06:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X20982024
       
  • Opportunities and Constraints of the Partner Market and Educational
           Assortative Mating

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      Authors: Johannes Stauder, Tom Kossow
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to determine to what extent the opportunities and restrictions of the partner market influence educational assortative mating. It also analyzes the interplay between the opportunity structure and preferences. Matching district-based partner market indicators to heterosexual couples when they move in together based on the German Socio-Economic Panel, we find strong effects of the opportunity structure on educational homogamy. The results further imply that the density of the supply of potential partners is more important for educational assortative mating than imbalanced supply and competition. While the impact of partner market imbalances on assortative mating is a mere effect of the opportunity structure, the effects of the partner market density of relevant and available partners in space weakly imply that homophile and maximization preferences are simultaneously at work.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-01-11T05:26:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X20984494
       
  • Linked in Life and Death: A Note on the Effect of Parental Death on
           Sibling Relations in Young and Middle Adulthood

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      Authors: Karsten Hank
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the important role of adult parent–child and sibling relations in the family system, only few studies have investigated yet, how the common adult experience of parental death impacts sibling relations. Estimating fixed-effects regression models using four waves of data from the German Family Panel (pairfam; n = 4,123 respondents), the present note focused on changes in three dimensions of adult siblings’ relationship qualities following the first parent’s death. Our analysis revealed a short-term positive effect of parental death on sibling contacts as well as longer-lasting increases in emotional closeness and conflicts. Next to an intensification of sibling relations following the first parent’s death, we also detected significant spillover effects from respondents’ relationship with the surviving parent to their sibling relations. Our analysis thus provided evidence for adult parent–child and sibling relations to be “linked in life and death,” underlining the benefits of jointly analyzing intra- and intergenerational family relationships.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-01-09T10:21:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X20985566
       
  • The Intersection of Childhood Maltreatment and Marriage: Implications for
           Adult’s Health

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      Authors: Michael Fitzgerald, Bryan Spuhler, Cailyn Hamstra
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Childhood maltreatment is associated with mental and physical health problems across the life course. Marriages may be a risk factor for continued mental and physical health problems or, alternatively, they could buffer the effects of maltreatment severity on adult health. Using data from the study of Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS), we evaluated marital support and strain as moderators of child maltreatment and adults’ subjective evaluations of physical and mental health in a sample of 760 married adults using the life course perspective. Results show that the interaction between childhood maltreatment severity and marital strain was associated with poorer physical health and was marginally associated with mental health. Marital support did not significantly interact with childhood maltreatment severity in predicting adult mental or physical health. Results suggest maltreatment and marital strain interact resulting in a greater accumulation of disadvantage leaving adults at risk for health problems.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-01-09T09:16:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X20984505
       
  • Collectivist Discourses in Relational Intersectionality: Insights from
           Chinese American Christian Couples

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      Authors: Karen Mui-Teng Quek, Natalie Wei-Mun Hsieh, Christie Eppler
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Intersectionality espouses progressive societal dominant discourse norms that describe persons as individuals connected to a variety of social locations (e.g., gender, socioeconomic status [SES], ethnicity, sexual orientation, spirituality, vocation). This may not resonate with the cultural ideals of collectivist and bicultural communities, who are better understood when considered in context of both dominant and local intersectionality discourses. This retrospective interpretive thematic analysis examines the lived experiences of Chinese American Christian couples as they negotiate identity and roles in early parenthood. Findings indicate that the intersection of collectivist group identity markers, cultural values and spirituality guides how partners understand identity and negotiate relationship roles in marriage. Couples’ varied responses to cross-cultural and dominant discourse norms and other social location factors (e.g., vocation and SES) also account for individual differences. Implications for Chinese American Christian couples, and for the application of intersectionality theory to diverse populations, are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-01-09T08:54:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X20983387
       
  • Digital Pollution and Its Impact on the Family and Social Interactions

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      Authors: Shiv Ratan Agrawal
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The present study was an attempt to identify the most prevailing means of digital devices and its impact as digital pollution on family and social interactions. Despite the obvious benefits of digital devices, in recent years researchers have taken more concern about its potential negative effect on human attitude and behavior, which in turn affects our society. A total of 613 usable responses were collected from Bangalore, India of excessive users of digital devices, such as a smartphone, computer/laptop, and television. All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 23.0, AMOS 23.0, and SmartPLS 3.0. The results indicated that as the use of smartphone and computer/laptop increases, levels of digital pollution also increase, which in turn significantly triggers unfavorable impact on family and social interactions. The study indicated that digital pollution appears as an important predictor, which significantly affects social interaction unfavorably. The present study explored the various critical dimensions within this domain and delineated gaps in our knowledge of digital pollution. It was found that smartphones are more responsible for digital pollution among all the identified digital devices, followed by computer/laptop.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-01-07T06:26:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X20985558
       
  • Ex-athletes as Parents Promoting Healthy Lifestyles in Their Families: The
           Nutrition and Physical Activity of Mothers, Fathers, and 6-Year-Old
           Children

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      Authors: Mariusz Lipowski, Małgorzata Lipowska, Magdalena Jochimek, Jurek Paweł
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Parents healthy behaviors have an undeniable influence on the long-term health of their children by preventing risky behaviors, as well as overweight or obese, which are currently a global problem. The aim of this study was to examine whether parents being ex-athletes is associated with their family having a healthy lifestyle and raising preschool children in healthy ways. An ex-athletes families (n = 350) with partners (mean age Mmother = 34.20, SD = 5.29; Mfather = 36.73, SD = 5.63) and children and a control group of families (n = 336; mean age Mmother = 34.47, SD = 5.05; Mfather = 36.88, SD = 5.69) participated in the study. We analyzed the influence of current participation in physical activity (PA) and proper nutrition habits of parents on the parents’ feeding styles and children PA. When at least one parent was an ex-athlete, the control over eating feeding style was used more often and the emotional feeding style was used less often in comparison to the control group. Children from families with an ex-athlete spent more hours per week on PA compared to children from the control group.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-01-06T10:15:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X20984501
       
  • The Role of Young Adult Children’s Income in the Relationship between
           Single Mothers’ Poverty and Their Young Adult Children’s Depression

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      Authors: Jaewon Lee, Jennifer Allen
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the relationship between single mother’s poverty and their young adult children’s depression, and it examined the mediating effect of young adults’ income on the relationship. The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 79 for Children and Young Adults (NLSY79 CY) were used. A total of 4,224 dyads were selected and the mediation model was conducted. Single mother’s poverty was related to low income and depression among their young adult children. The relationship between mother’s poverty and their young adult children’s depression was partially mediated by their young adult children’s income. Poverty prevention or reduction programs for female-headed households should be provided to single mothers to reduce future levels of depression among their young adults. Improving inequality in intergenerational economic mobility is one way to address depressive symptoms among the young adult children of single mothers in poverty.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2021-01-06T10:13:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X20984497
       
 
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