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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
ACOSS Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
African Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Argumentum     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Asian Journal of Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Australian Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access  
Bakti Budaya     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
British Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Care Management Journals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Social Work Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
ConCienciaSocial     Open Access  
Contemporary Rural Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Critical and Radical Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Critical Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Cuadernos de Trabajo Social     Open Access  
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Developmental Child Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
European Journal of Social Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Families in Society : The Journal of Contemporary Social Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Geopolitical, Social Security and Freedom Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Global Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Groupwork     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Indonesian Journal of Guidance and Counseling     Open Access  
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Care and Caring     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Islamic Counseling : Jurnal Bimbingan Konseling Islam     Open Access  
Janus Sosiaalipolitiikan ja sosiaalityön tutkimuksen aikakauslehti     Open Access  
Journal for Specialists in Group Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Care Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Community Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Comparative Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Family Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Forensic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Human Rights and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 351)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 160)
Journal of Public Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access  
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Leidfaden : Fachmagazin für Krisen, Leid, Trauer     Hybrid Journal  
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access  
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 73)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nordisk välfärdsforskning | Nordic Welfare Research     Open Access  
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Partner Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 188)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Policy Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Prospectiva : Revista de Trabajo Social e Intervención Social     Open Access  
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Qualitative Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Qualitative Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Research on Social Work Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Serviço Social em Perspectiva     Open Access  
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Service social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 3)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 139)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Social Work & Social Sciences Review     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Social Work / Maatskaplike Werk     Open Access  
Social Work and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Social Work Education: The International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Social Work With Groups     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Socialinė teorija, empirija, politika ir praktika     Open Access  
Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Family Issues
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.86
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 22  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0192-513X - ISSN (Online) 1552-5481
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • ‘It’s a Man’s Job’: Doing Gender and Male Gatekeeping in the
           Division of Household Labor

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Emily Christopher
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Changes to domestic divisions of labor have been widely documented, but some tasks seem particularly resistant to change. Using the lens of ‘doing gender’, this article draws on interviews with 25 heterosexual working parent British couples who produced a ‘household portrait’ of their division of labor. It examines how they explain men’s continuing responsibility for ‘man-typed’ domestic tasks and why this is so resistant to change. Although men’s ‘gatekeeping’ of these tasks is consequential for the overall household division of labor, there is relatively little opposition from their women partners. This gatekeeping reproduces gendered meanings of ‘man-typed’ tasks and enables both men and women to ‘do gender’ while supporting their image of a ‘sharing’ couple.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2024-01-24T01:36:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231224109
       
  • Ready for Parenthood' On Intensive Parenting Ideals and Fertility

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kerstin Ruckdeschel
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The present study asks for the consequences of intensive parenthood demands on fertility decisions for a first, second or third birth in Germany. The prevalence of intensive parenting norms was analysed using data from the representative panel ‘Concepts of Family in Germany’. The results show that intensive parenting norms are widely accepted in Germany, especially the need for expert guidance and financial investment in children. Parities of zero, one and two children are associated with differences in these norms. The transition to a first or further birth is influenced negatively by fatherhood norms (childless individuals), financial norms (parents of one or two children) and child-centredness norms (parents of two children), but the impact is small. Instead, their non-significance may be interpreted as a preparation towards parenthood which we call ‘nest-building’.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2024-01-20T09:49:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X241227872
       
  • The Experience of Work–Family Conflict: Does Being the Only Child
           Matter'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Shujie Chen, Mei-I Cheng
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      A lack of resistance resources in the family, such as a lack of sibling support, might cause the family to be more prone to family crises; however, little if anything is known about whether being the only child will influence the experience of work–family conflict (a family crisis). Using an online questionnaire sample of 622 Chinese employees, we investigated the influence of only child status on work–family conflict and further explored the moderating effect of only child status on the relationship between work–family conflict and its performance outcomes. Analyses revealed that being the only child would spend less time on family responsibilities, thereby decreasing the level of family-to-work conflict; in addition, being the only child would ease the negative impact of work-to-family conflict on family performance. The recommendations for future studies, implications of this study, and the need for further research on only child’s work–family conflict experience are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2024-01-10T01:40:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X241227296
       
  • “I Would Like to, But My World Wouldn’t End If I Didn’t”: Marital
           Aspirations Among Sexual Minority Young Adults

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Aaron Hoy
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the legalization of same-sex marriage across the US, research on young adults’ marital aspirations has tended to overlook sexual identity altogether or focus exclusively on those who are heterosexual. To address this, in this article, I draw upon quantitative and qualitative data from an online survey to describe the marital aspirations and motivations of a convenience sample of sexual minority young adults (N = 256). Descriptive analyses indicate that although a majority of respondents would like to marry someday, a similar number claim that getting married is not “a major life goal.” Those who want to marry cite several primary reasons, including companionship and lifelong commitment, but also qualify their marital aspirations in several ways, including by questioning both the necessity and normativity of marriage. The relatively small number of respondents do not want to marry express similar concerns and critique marriage as a heteronormative institution.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2024-01-05T05:57:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231226146
       
  • Longitudinal Association Between the Quality of the Separated Parents’
           Relationship and the Frequency of Father–Child Contact: The Mothers’
           Perspective

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sylvie Drapeau, Karl Larouche, Hans Ivers, Sarah Dussault, Amandine Baude
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This longitudinal study is based on family systems theory and aims to explore the association between the quality of the separated parents’ relationship and the frequency of father–child contact up to five years after parental separation. Using data collected from 408 families from the Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development (QLSCD), multilevel analyses and latent growth curve model were carried out. The results highlight a positive association between the separated parents’ relationship and father–child contact and demonstrate the impact of the initial contact frequency on the evolution over time of the separated parents’ relationship. They also highlight the contribution of custody tension, the child’s age, the length of time the couple lived together, and the socio-economic status on the initial levels of the studied trajectories.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2024-01-05T03:41:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231226149
       
  • Families at Psychosocial Risk. Analysis of the Relation Between Parenting
           Competencies and Externalizing Problems in Children and Adolescents

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ester Herrera-Collado, María Dolores Lanzarote-Fernández, Lucía Jiménez, Victoria Hidalgo
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      It is well known that children who grow up in at-risk families tend to have more behavioral problems; however, few studies have addressed this issue from a parenting competencies framework. This investigation analyzed the relation between parenting competencies and children’s externalizing problems. A total of 562 caregivers from at-risk families were assessed through the Interview for the Assessment of Parenting Competencies and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. The three competencies in which the families presented more difficulties were parental co-responsibility, child stimulation and family life structuring, and emotional self-regulation. According to the hierarchical regression, the capacity to offer warmth and to establish a healthy communication could explain children’s behavioral difficulties. Family interventions should focus on those competencies where families tend to have more difficulties. Furthermore, to prevent and/or reduce externalizing problems, it is convenient to foster, particularly, communication and warmth among their members.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-12-30T07:15:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231225594
       
  • “Once You Become a Parent, You are a Parent Forever”: An Examination
           of Memorable Messages About Having Children and Becoming a Parent

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Eve-Anne M. Doohan
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined memorable messages about the decision to have children and become a parent. A total of 440 memorable messages were coded, and three main themes were found. Advice and considerations included warnings, messages about delaying having children, predictions about changing one’s mind, messages about financial and relational stability, and messages emphasizing personal choice. The theme of positive emphasis included children bring meaning/purpose to life, general positivity, messages about how children complete a family, and messages about how the parent–child relationship is unique and special. Family expectations and influence included messages about a family expectation to have children, family lineage, how the child becomes the caregiver, the parents’ desire to become grandparents, and marriage being a necessity. The memorable messages overall offered both positive and negative portrayals of having children. The continued theorizing about memorable messages is also discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-12-28T01:48:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231225596
       
  • Number of Siblings and Mental Health Among Adolescents: Evidence From the
           U.S. and China

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Douglas B. Downey, Rui Cao
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      A growing number of children are being raised with few or no siblings yet the consequences of this seismic demographic shift in family forms are not well understood. We investigate this question in the U.S. and China because previous studies highlight how contextual features can play an important role shaping how siblings matter. Our Chinese analyses draw on more than 9,400 eighth graders from the China Education Panel Study (CEPS). In the U.S., we analyze over 9,100 American eighth graders from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study—Kindergarten Cohort of 1998 (ECLS-K:98), where our data allow us to consider multiple features of the sibship structure (e.g., size, sex composition, and density). We find that number of siblings is negatively associated with mental health in both China and the U.S., although the details of this pattern (non-linear association, sisters versus brothers, and closely versus widely spaced siblings) vary.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-12-09T03:40:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231220045
       
  • Children’s Contact With Fathers Who Never Co-Resided With Them and
           Father–Child Relationship Quality at age 9

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jay Fagan
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Using a sample of 868 unmarried fathers who did not live with their children from birth to age 9, this study focused on the association between patterns of father–child contact during infancy and early and middle childhood and children’s perceptions of their relationship with the father at age 9. Children perceived significantly better quality relationships with fathers at age 9 when they had regular contact with fathers during infancy and early and middle childhood, than fathers who never saw their children. Children who no longer saw their fathers after infancy perceived more negative relationship quality at age 9. Contact with fathers at ages 1 and 5 were associated with better quality relationships even if there was no contact at age 9. Implications for policy and programs are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-12-06T10:47:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231220037
       
  • Families With Early History of Parental Abuse and Neglect: Midlife Adult
           Children’s Relationships With Their Parents During COVID-19

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Karen A. Roberto, Emma C. Potter, Lisa Fedina, Jasmine Love, Yujeong Chang, Todd I. Herrenkohl
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      For families with an early history of parental abuse and neglect (EHPAN), personal and situational stressors can increase relational vulnerabilities. We examined relationship dynamics between midlife adults with EHPAN and their parents during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. Analysis of semi-structured qualitative interviews with 31 participants (aged 44–50), examined patterns of contact and support to provide insights into relationship dynamics and relational changes experienced during the pandemic. Three relational themes characterized midlife adult child-parent relationships during COVID-19: tightening ties with parents while taking few COVID-19 precautions; keeping customary ties to maintain the status quo centered around instrumental support; loosening ties in which the relationship drifted. We found areas of resilience and vulnerabilities within each type of relationship. Recognizing that past adversity continues to shape relationship dynamics throughout the life course underscores the need for further research to identify factors that contribute to long-term family resilience and challenges.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-11-23T02:35:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231217007
       
  • How Important Is Early Paternal Engagement' Deriving Longitudinal Measures
           of Fathers’ Childcare Engagement and Exploring Structural Relationships
           With Prior Engagement and Employment Hours

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Helen Norman, Mark Elliot, Darya Vanchugova
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Paternal childcare engagement is a focus of work–family policy debates yet there is little consensus about what engagement means and how it might be measured. Drawing on Lamb’s (1986) classification of paternal involvement, we run confirmatory factor analysis on a sample of two-parent households from the UK’s Millennium Cohort Study to derive latent paternal engagement measures at nine months, three, five, seven and eleven years old. Structural Equation Modelling is used to explore the relationship between the engagement measures and parents’ employment hours. Employment hours have a significant association with paternal childcare engagement in the early stages of a child’s life, but it is paternal engagement in the previous time period that has a far stronger effect at every age. Specifically, paternal engagement in the first year of parenthood is important for fostering ongoing engagement until the child is at least age eleven, and this positive effect builds over time.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-11-20T01:27:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231214642
       
  • Families in Multi-Problem Situations in India: Exploration From the Fifth
           Round of the National Family Health Survey

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alex M. Carvalho, Rajeshwari A. Biradar, Jang Bahadur Prasad, Sadashiva Hegde
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Family is the cornerstone of many concepts in the social sciences, especially in demography and sociology. It is generally regarded as a major social institution and is positioned as the locus of much of an individual’s life-course decisions. This study’s aim was to investigate families in multi-problem situations and their determinants in India. National Family Health Survey round fifth was used. A total of 19,763 samples of families were analyzed using univariate, bivariate, and chi-square tests and multinomial logistic regression. More than half of Indian families are facing multiple problems. In India, 23.2% of families suffer from three and more problems. Those families with one problem have more domestic violence (25.6%) among women. The use of tobacco (36.4%) and alcohol (35.7%) among men is more in families having two problems. Families facing three problems have more women consuming tobacco (31.8%), more men consuming alcohol (31.4%), and more underweight and alcohol-consuming women (30.2% and 30.9%) in the family. The multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that more than two problems were associated with the men’s age groups, wealth index, status of shared toilet facilities, educational level of men and women, and caste. Findings suggest the importance of addressing multiple problems in Indian families. Inclusion of education, sanitation, violence, use of alcohol and tobacco, malnutrition among women, and children management strategies services needs to be taken into consideration by the program and policymakers.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-11-15T08:42:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231214624
       
  • How New Mothers’ and Fathers’ Allocation of Tasks Relate to Their
           Coparenting Relationship

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Esmeralda Martin, Melissa Dahlin, Clarielisa Ocampo, Stephanie M. Reich, Natasha Cabrera
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      New parents must decide how to divide household, childcare, and financial responsibilities. These divisions can be difficult, especially when couples’ wants do not align. Interviewing ethnically and racially diverse new parents (n = 198 couples), we explore how parents’ desired allocation of childcare, household, and financial tasks differ from perceived distribution and whether discrepancies relate to coparenting relationship quality. All parents perceived mothers doing more housework and childcare and fathers contributing more financially. When women reported doing more housework and childcare than wanted, coparenting relationship quality was lower. For women, discrepancies between what they and their partners report was associated with lower coparenting relationship quality. Findings reflect traditional gender roles among new parents and women’s desire for their partners to take on more household and childcare work. Such findings can help inform parenting interventions for new parents, encouraging communication between partners about the division of tasks to support their coparenting relationship.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-11-11T09:36:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231211460
       
  • Changing Motherhood in the South African Middle-Class Context

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      Authors: Rachel Zaidman Mograbi, Katherine Bain, Edmarie Pretorius
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Parenting has been found to be highly contextually and culturally determined and there have been calls to research parenting within culture as it is lived. Due to changing social and economic factors, middle-class South African mothers face unique challenges in relation to the navigation of culture and class in child-rearing. Foregrounding the complexity of acculturation, this paper uses social constructionist theory in the analysis of maternal narratives and responses to video-recordings of their interaction with their infants, of a group of middle-class South African mothers from various cultural and racial groups, with an aim to understanding how mothering is changing amongst middle-class South African mothers. The findings suggest that acculturation is complex and influenced by a combination of socioeconomic status, geographical location, contact with other cultural groups and personal emotional experiences of having been parented within a particular culture.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-11-04T11:00:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231211455
       
  • Marital Beliefs and Decisions Among Young Chinese Medical Workers

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      Authors: Kaixuan Ma, Qiujie Guan, Weiwei Cheng, Yang Niu, Yijun Zhou
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The marital status of young medical workers deserves attention due to their working situation, occupational, and personal characteristics. This study investigated the marital decisions and the influencing factors of marital decisions (i.e., marital beliefs, marital policy, work stress, social support, and demographic variables) among 500 young medical workers in China. The results found that the majority of young medical workers decide to marry and have children, and most of them choose to marry or have children before the age of 30, have only one child, and have no preference for the sex of their child. Young medical workers placed the highest importance on marital relationships among the four dimensions of marital beliefs (i.e., marital salience, marital context, traditional norms, and marital relationships). The results further showed that marital salience, marital context, gender, age, educational level, job type, census register, and satisfaction with marital policy had influences on marital decisions. In the future, attention should be paid to different groups' marital beliefs and decisions, help young medical workers improve intimate relationships, enhance awareness of the importance of marriage and childbearing, and strengthen marital welfare policies and services.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-11-03T04:47:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231209050
       
  • Promoting Social Support as a Protective Factor for Parental Stress and
           Child Behavior Problems During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Lily Ross, Lucinda Okine, Julie A. Cederbaum
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Child and family routines were significantly disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic stay-at-home orders, leaving individuals isolated from school, work, and peer networks. This work examines how social support from family/friends and systems was connected to associations between parental stress and child behavior problems. Data was collected between January and March of 2021 from 195 parents of children in elementary school who were primarily in remote learning due to the pandemic. Hierarchical linear regression models indicated that younger child age and child gender were associated with parental stress in step 1; only child age remained significant when child behavior problems were added. Support from family, but not external systems, attenuated associations between child characteristics and behavior on parental stress, though child behavior problems remained consistent with parental stress even when support was present. Exploring parental stressors and investing in support networks may protect children and families from immediate and ongoing challenges.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-10-31T08:35:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231209047
       
  • Say Yes to the Grandkids: Grandparenting in Chinese Lesbian and Gay Parent
           Families

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      Authors: Wei Wei, Jiayu Wang
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing data from a study on LGBT parent families that combined in-depth interviews with members of 19 families and a national online survey of 595 families, this paper focuses on the role of grandparents in providing childcare within these families. Similar to their heterosexual counterparts, grandparents are heavily involved in childcare in these lesbian and gay parent families. The participation of the families of origin in childcare not only greatly alleviates the family pressure experienced by our participants due to their alternative sexuality, but also contributes to the normalization of these queer families in the face of public scrutiny. Despite the alternative construction of kinship in queer families, the conventional notion of blood ties still influences grandparents’ involvement in childcare. We contend that grandparenting in LGBT parent families exemplifies the complex yet innovative improvisation of intergenerationality in contemporary China, reflecting the ongoing negotiation between family responsibility and individual autonomy.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-10-26T04:59:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231210515
       
  • Social Spheres of Protection and Threat: The Experiences of Black Men
           Married to White Women

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      Authors: Michael E. Woolley, Geoffrey L. Greif, Victoria Stubbs
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The number of interracial marriages in the United States has increased to one-in-six among recently married couples. Therefore, researchers and clinicians need the knowledge and skills to effectively serve such families. The current qualitative study, part of a larger mixed-methods project, reports on findings from interviews with 10 Black men married to White women. A central theme emerged related to experiences of these Black men of safety, threats, and feeling the need to provide protection for his family across different social spheres related to their interracial relationship. This theme emerged across six social spheres: the Couple, their Children, the men’s Extended Family, In-laws, Friends, and the larger Macrosystem. These six spheres were experienced as protected, threatening, or mixed in terms of safety related to race issues. Direct quotes are provided to illustrate these six spheres and their levels of protection. Implications for clinical practice with interracial couples are offered.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-10-23T12:06:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231209052
       
  • Imbalanced Sex Ratios and Marital Transitions in Mexico

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      Authors: Scott J. South, Katherine Trent, Soojin Han
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Migration from Mexico to the United States results in numerical imbalances between men and women in the communities left behind, but little is known about how these imbalanced sex ratios in Mexican communities affect family formation behavior. Using two waves of data from the Mexican Family Life Survey (MxFLS) and 2000 Mexican census data, we examine how the sex composition of the municipality population is associated with the likelihood that Mexican women and men marry. Consistent with demographic-opportunity theory, but not sociocultural theory, results from logistic regression analyses show that men’s probability of marrying is positively associated with the numerical availability of eligible women in the municipality population. Consistent with the argument that many Mexican migrant men, but not migrant women, remain eligible partners for those who remain in Mexico, the sex composition of the municipal population is significantly associated with men’s but not women’s likelihood of marrying.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-10-23T12:00:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231209048
       
  • Parenting Beliefs and Practices of Immigrant Chinese in the Midwestern
           United States: A Qualitative Study

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      Authors: Dan Wang, Xiaoqing Tu, Maria Rosario de Guzman, Yan Xia
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Guided by the developmental niche framework, this ethnographic study aimed to explore immigrant Chinese parenting beliefs and practices in the Midwestern United States. Nine immigrant Chinese parents (eight mothers and one father) living in two Midwestern states were interviewed for their caretaking practices, expectations for children, understanding of cultural influences on parenting, and perceived challenges and resources in the community. Qualitative thematic analyses revealed five themes of immigrant Chinese parenting in the Midwest, including (1) teaching children Chinese language and culture; (2) integrating American and Chinese parenting; (3) communicating expectations with children; (4) adjusting parenting in the Midwestern context; and (5) maintaining connections to Chinese families and friends. Findings emphasized the dynamic nature of parenting in the shifting contexts and highlighted the importance of including settings, childrearing customs, and the unique caregiver psychology in immigrant parenting studies. Limitations and implications for future research were discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-10-23T11:41:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231209045
       
  • Politics Matters for Life Satisfaction of Mainland Chinese Spouses in
           Taiwan

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      Authors: Weinan Wang, Yida Zhai
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined how politics, along with familial and socioeconomic factors, influence the life satisfaction of marriage migrants in Taiwan. We conducted a social survey in Taiwan and offered a multidimensional and dynamic view on adaptation and life satisfaction among them. The results showed that in Taiwan, family relationships and socioeconomic class were significant factors of life satisfaction among mainland Chinese marriage migrants. A high level of social integration was positively related to life satisfaction, while the prejudice faced from neighbors, rather than from the media, was negatively related. Regarding political factors, political disagreement with their Taiwanese partners undermined life satisfaction among spouses from mainland China. However, those who possessed a dual identity (i.e., both Chinese and Taiwanese) and those who viewed mainland China and Taiwan as two separate entities tended to have high levels of life satisfaction.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-10-18T01:34:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231205493
       
  • The Role of Adverse Childhood Experiences in the Trajectories to Adulthood
           of Chinese Youth: A Retrospective Study

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      Authors: Dianxi Wang
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study uses data from a retrospective survey of the life history of participants from five cohorts born between 1930 and 1979, to analyze the role of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs). We found that ACEs have significant effects on the transition of young Chinese people into adulthood. Young people who have experienced more ACEs were more likely to transition to adulthood earlier, and accelerate their acceptance of adult social roles, and young adults with a high incidence of ACEs also have an increasing probability of falling into the disadvantaged or least successful trajectory to adulthood. More ACEs are associated with a decreased probability of being classified into the delayed and advantaged trajectories into adulthood characterized by high education and stable work, and an increased probability of being classified into the early and disadvantaged trajectories into adulthood characterized by unemployment, early marriage, and more children.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-10-04T12:00:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231204021
       
  • Development of the Culturally Affirming and Responsive Experiences (CARE)
           Measure: Observing Responsiveness and Ethnic-Racial Cultural Socialization
           in Mother–Child Interactions

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      Authors: Brianna Jaworski, Jennifer LoCasale-Crouch, Etomgi Okezie, Aubrey Hill, Kirsty Thompson, Khara L. P. Turnbull, Deiby Mayaris Cubides Mateus, Dheepthi Ravikumar
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The existing literature on the importance of maternal responsiveness and the growing body of literature supporting early ethnic-racial cultural socialization highlight the need for an observational measure of how they co-occur during mother–child interactions. This study presents the development and initial validation of the Culturally Affirming and Responsive Experiences (CARE) measure, an observational measure of the presence and quality of responsiveness and ethnic-racial cultural socialization within early mother–child interactions. Pilot study results with 103 racially and ethnically diverse mother–child dyads demonstrated initial reliability and validity of the CARE measure. Implications of applying the CARE measure to early mother–child interactions to assess quality of responsiveness and ethnic-racial cultural socializations are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-10-03T10:01:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231204983
       
  • Portraits of Life After Loss: Understanding Parental Loss Within A Social
           Context

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      Authors: Tanya Ann Antony, Bhumika Kapoor
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Parental loss at any age is a life transition that brings with it unprecedented changes. Encountering this loss in emerging adulthood can be especially challenging because of the many consequences characteristic of this stage of life. Existing research has excluded the experiences of young people grieving the death of a parent. Thus, the present study attempts to bridge this gap by focusing on the experiences of emerging adults dealing with parental loss with an emphasis on their journeys of coping with the loss, and how grief unfolded in a social context. In this exploratory research, four participants in the age range of 18–28 years were interviewed, and the data were subjected to interpretative phenomenological analysis. Three superordinate themes emerged from the data, namely, early days following the loss, changing relational realities, and coping in the context of the other. Limitations and implications of the study have been discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-10-03T06:29:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231204981
       
  • Factor Structure and Predictors of Resilience Among Custodial Grandparents

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      Authors: Ke Li, Fengyan Tang, Mary Elizabeth Rauktis, Guoping Jin, Elizabeth M. Z. Farmer
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Resilience plays a significant role in buffering the negative effects of parenting stress among custodial grandparents. Using a sample of 76 custodial grandparents, this study aimed to investigate the psychometric properties and factor structure of the 10-item Connor–Davidson Resilience Scale and to examine the predictors at individual level (demographic characteristics and stress management), interpersonal level (positive social support and negative social support), and community level (formal service use). The results of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses yielded two factors: adaptability and persistence, and positivity. The findings suggest that low levels of stress management and negative social support may undermine resilience in coping with parenting stress. This study emphasizes the significance of both individual and family interventions in fostering resilience among custodial grandparents by aiding them in building stress management skills and improving the quality of social relationships.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-09-30T07:59:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231204946
       
  • Online Schooling, Race, and the Supervision of Children at the Height of
           the Covid-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Kevin J.A. Thomas, Ashley Larsen Gibby
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      At the height of the Covid-19 pandemic, there was a shift from in-person to online schooling as the primary mode of instruction for children. This study examines racial/ethnic inequalities in children’s participation in online schooling at the height of the pandemic, and how their families adjusted to the process. The analysis was conducted using data from the 2022 Covid-19 in American Communities-2 study. The results indicate that the children of Black respondents were the most likely to report online schooling and non-enrollment as their primary modes of learning at the height of the pandemic. However, the outcomes were part of a broader pattern of disadvantage. The children of Black respondents also faced unique constraints by experiencing decreases in school supervision if a household member was infected with COVID-19. Additionally, the results showed that mothers supervised online schooling more frequently than other adults, except among Hispanics.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-09-29T09:26:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231204959
       
  • Closeness and Direct Engagement: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of
           Non-Resident Father Involvement

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      Authors: Jaimie L. O’Gara
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Measures of father involvement have predominantly comprised quantitative/frequency measures of direct engagement activities with children. Such measures tend to show that non-resident fathers are less involved than resident fathers and limit our understanding of non-resident fathering. This study’s purpose was to identify a construct of non-resident fathering that included an affective dimension, father–child closeness, among racially/ethnically diverse fathers and their nine-year-old children (N = 1267). A confirmatory factor analysis using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study was conducted using father- and mother-reports of paternal direct engagement and child reports of father–child closeness. Results indicated a good model fit and that father–child closeness and direct engagement were appropriate indicators of non-resident father involvement. Results suggest that researchers should consider including both affective and frequency measures when studying father involvement, and practitioners should attend to the potential value of promoting father–child closeness among racially/ethnically diverse, low-income fathers.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-09-29T03:58:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231204022
       
  • From Work-To-Family Conflict to Father-Infant Bonding: The Role of Marital
           Satisfaction

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      Authors: Marijana Matijaš, Barbara Lovrić, Sandra Nakić Radoš
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Bonding, as parental feelings and thoughts toward a child, can be challenging for employed parents due to work-family role conflict. This study aimed to investigate concurrent associations between work-to-family conflict dimensions (time-, strain-, and behavior-based) and father-infant bonding, with marital satisfaction as a potential mediator. Employed fathers (N = 170) from Croatia who had infants (1–12 months old) completed questionnaires on work-family conflict, marital satisfaction, bonding, and questions on demographic and job-related data. Path analysis showed that the time-, strain-, and behavior-based conflict did not have direct effects on father-infant bonding. However, strain-based work-to-family conflict indirectly affected father-infant bonding through marital satisfaction. Fathers who experienced higher strain-based work-to-family conflict reported decreased marital satisfaction, negatively impacting father-infant bonding. To improve the bonding experience for fathers, the spousal relationship should be taken into account. Additionally, family-friendly policies at work should focus primarily on reducing the fathers’ strain-based work-to-family conflict.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-09-26T03:23:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231204017
       
  • Persistent Exposure to Work Family Conflict and Depressive Symptoms Among
           Korean Working Women: An Exploration of Temporal Patterns and Age
           Heterogeneity

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      Authors: Gum-Ryeong Park, Eunsol Song, Jinho Kim
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines whether persistent exposure to work family conflict (WFC) is longitudinally associated with depressive symptoms and this association differs by age. Using eight waves of a nationally representative study of Korean women (N = 6,544), individual fixed effects models were used to account for unobserved individual-level heterogeneity. Depressive symptoms increased immediately following exposure to WFC and peaked during the second wave of exposure. Since the peak, depressive symptoms have decreased and returned to the pre-exposure level by the fifth wave of exposure. While older women in their 60s experienced an increase in depressive symptoms only until the second wave of exposure, younger women in their 30s continued to experience an increase in depressive symptoms up to the fifth and subsequent waves of exposure. The results of this study inform the development of interventions to mitigate the long-term mental health effects of WFC among working women.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-09-26T03:17:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231204018
       
  • Investigation of the Mediating Role of Sense of Coherence Between Family
           Harmony and Well-Being Among High School Students in Turkey

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      Authors: Bilal Kaya, Fulya Cenkseven Önder
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigated the mediating role of sense of coherence between family harmony and well-being in high school students. The study was conducted with 405 students, 226 (55.8%) females and 179 (44.2%) males. The participants’ age ranged between 14 and 18. Data were collected through the Family Harmony Scale, the Sense of Coherence Scale, and the Adolescent Well-being Scale. Structural equation modeling and Bootstrapping procedures were performed for the analyses. Results showed that family harmony predicted well-being positively. Sense of coherence predicted well-being positively. Family harmony predicted sense of coherence positively. Sense of coherence had a mediating role in the relationship between family harmony and well-being. Bootstrapping results showed that sense of coherence had a partial mediating role in the relationship between family harmony and well-being. The results were discussed in line with the literature, and recommendations were made for practitioners and researchers.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-09-25T08:07:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231204016
       
  • Joint Utility or Sub-optimal Outcomes' Household Income Development of
           Same-Sex and Different-Sex Couples Transitioning to Parenthood in Denmark,
           Finland, Norway, and Sweden

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      Authors: Maaike van der Vleuten, Marie Evertsson, Ylva Moberg
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Unequal divisions of paid work and care among new parents contribute to increasing inequalities. One explanation for this is joint utility maximization and the benefits of partners (temporarily) specializing in paid work and care. This paper examines the (dis)advantages of specializing compared to dividing tasks more equally by studying whether differences in specialization between same-sex and different-sex couples lead to differences in household earnings after entering parenthood. Using register data from Norway, Finland, Denmark, and Sweden and examining first-time parents, we show that female couples have a more equal within-couple income development during the transition to parenthood than different-sex couples do. However, we find no differences in household income (including or excluding social transfers) between the two types of couples. Although a more equal task division may be preferred from an individual perspective, our results show no evidence of a “best strategy” when it comes to maximizing household income.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-09-20T02:15:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231194305
       
  • Sandwiched Mothers: Parent Involvement and Mother’s Subjective
           Well-Being

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      Authors: Christopher E. Near
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      I investigated subjective well-being (SWB)—happiness, meaningfulness, sadness, stress, and tiredness—of 7,087 mothers, engaged in 11,154 cases of activities in which their children were present, using the Conservation of Resources theory. Results of OLS analysis of data from the American Time Use Study suggested that the presence of her parent(s) during the activities was associated positively with the mother’s happiness and negatively with her stress. Total time spent with her parent(s) was positively associated with the mother’s tiredness. Co-residence with parents was not significantly related to the mother’s SWB. The association between the mother’s SWB and her involvement with parents was positively moderated by demographic variables that may have increased her need for core resources in the form of kin support. The focus on sandwiched activities in which a mother engaged with her children and parents permitted direct assessment of how those activities affected the mother’s SWB.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-09-14T04:57:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231201978
       
  • Women’s Attitudes Toward Intimate Partner Violence in Sindh, Pakistan:
           An Analysis of Multiple Indicators Cluster Survey

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      Authors: Faisal Abbas, Verda Salman
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Intimate partner violence is a major impediment to gender equality in developing countries like Pakistan, which requires thorough analysis to ascertain the extent of prevalent violence and identify its underlying causes. Consequently, this study aims to empirically examine the factors associated with women’s attitudes toward violence in Sindh province (the second largest by population, income, and employment in Pakistan) using Sindh Multiple Indicators Cluster Survey data. The province presents an ideal candidate for studying intimate partner violence as it is quite uneven in terms of development. Our results reveal a high prevalence of intimate partner violence, with 55% of married women providing an affirmative answer to any one scenario of wife beating in the Sindh province. Multivariate regression analyses results of our study found that higher education, access to media, and the wealth status of both partners are protective factors against attitudinal acceptance of violence.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-09-14T03:03:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231201977
       
  • Predictors of Positive and Negative Parenting Practices Among Mothers of
           Two-to-Three-Year-Old Children: Findings From Tirana, Albania

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      Authors: Klea Ramaj
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this article is to determine the predictors of positive and negative parenting practices among mothers of two-to-three-year-old children in Tirana, Albania. Cross-sectional data were obtained from a representative sample of 328 mothers of two-to-three-year-old children recruited through eight randomly selected public nurseries in Tirana. Results from bivariate regressions showed significant associations between the key relevant maternal characteristics and maternal parenting practices, in line with previous studies conducted in Western societies. Results from multiple regressions showed that maternal attitudes towards child maltreatment were a dominant significant predictor of negative parenting practices (punitive parenting, inconsistent parenting, and child maltreatment) and that maternal sense of parental competence was a dominant significant predictor of positive parenting practices. The findings suggest a strong, consistent link between maternal belief systems and parenting practices among mothers of toddlers in Tirana and call for the implementation of parent training programmes that address attitudes towards child maltreatment and sense of parental competence in the Albanian society.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-08-30T07:55:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231198593
       
  • Will Adults’ Happiness be Affected by Childhood Parental
           Divorce' Evidence From China

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      Authors: Yiwei Liu, Zhenglian Ren
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Happiness is an important dimension to measure the quality of life. The divorce rate of Chinese families has been increasing in recent years, so will adults' happiness be affected by childhood parental divorce' Data were derived from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study, a nationwide social survey project that was conducted among Chinese individuals aged 45 or older in 2014. The results show that childhood parental divorce was significantly negatively associated with happiness, and health condition, education level, and social interaction mediated this relationship. We should analyze the influence of early age factors on happiness from the perspective of life cycle, and actively deal with the factors that have negative effects on happiness, thus improving the quality of life in adulthood.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-08-30T06:50:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231194292
       
  • A Sense of Connectedness in Reproductive Donation. Contrasting Policy With
           Donor and Donor Kin Lived Experience

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      Authors: Petra Nordqvist, Leah Gilman
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This article asks how well new developments in family life are reflected in law and policy, with a particular focus on donor conception. There has been an unprecedented ‘opening up’ of family life in recent decades; this increased diversity is, at least in part, linked to developments in reproductive technologies, including gamete donation. In family lives touched by donation, genetic relations with ‘donor connections’ take genetic connectedness beyond traditional notions of kinship. There is not yet an established social script for how to understand what constitutes meaningful connectedness in reproductive donation. Focussing on the UK context specifically, where assisted conception is highly regulated, this article examines on the one hand, how UK law and policy portray meaningful connectedness in the context of donation, and, on the other hand, how well this fits with connectedness as experienced within egg and sperm donor communities. Drawing on original data from UK law and policy analysis, and empirical interview data with egg and sperm donors and their kin, our analysis shows important disparities between law and policy, and the empirical evidence, suggesting a need for an overhaul of UK donor conception law and policy.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-08-25T06:25:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231194285
       
  • Happier When (We Think) We All Get Along: Satisfaction With Perceived
           Relationships Among Family Members and Parents’ Mental Health

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      Authors: Reilly Kincaid
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Harmonious family relationships are integral to well-being. Given that family relationships are fundamentally interdependent, parents’ well-being may be shaped not only by satisfaction with their own relationships with their family members but also by their perceptions of their family members’ relationships with each other. This study examines how parents’ mental health is shaped by satisfaction with (their perceptions of) the relationships among their children (i.e., perceived children–sibling relationships) and between their spouses and their children (i.e., perceived spouse–child relationships). Analyses using HILDA survey data (N = 43,913 person-years) suggest that parents’ satisfaction with their children’s relationships with each other and their spouse’s relationship with their children are indeed associated with better mental health, primarily through their roles in shaping satisfaction with parent–child and spousal relationships, respectively. Parent–child and spouse–child relationship satisfaction are especially important to mothers’ mental health. Findings contribute to family systems research and offer practical implications for promoting family well-being.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-08-24T10:50:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231197401
       
  • Exploring the Value of Children in the Context of China’s
           Modernization Transition

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      Authors: Yanyu Xia, Aruna Wu, Dan Li, Lingling Wu, Jingxin Han
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The perception of the value of children (VOC) can elucidate why individuals consider it beneficial to have children by uncovering their subjective intentions and experiences regarding their fertility decisions. Using VOC perceptions to understand fertility change in the modernization process, this qualitative study explores how parents’ VOC change meshes with China’s socioeconomic and cultural contexts. This article examines intergenerational VOC evolution under the support and constraints of socioeconomic environments and cultural norms. Grandparents, embedded in the rural economy and traditional culture, exhibit economic/utilitarian and social/normative VOC. Young parents, living, and having grown up in urban economic and modernized cultural contexts, recognize emotional/psychological VOC for fertility intention. Migrant parents living in urban economies but bound by traditional culture believe that social/normative VOC is important for fertility intention. The results advance understanding of the integration of individuals’ psychological intentions with the socioeconomic-cultural contexts that influence their fertility and VOC.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-08-22T04:26:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231197407
       
  • Perspectives on Sexual Socialization from a Sample of Black Heterosexual
           College Women

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      Authors: Helyne Frederick, Jeannette M. Wade, Sharon Parker, Hannah Dillon, Stacie Durocher, Dorrian Wilson
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Informed by ecological and Black feminist approaches, this inductive, thematic analysis analyzed narratives from 24 Black college women, ages 18–25, about the sexual socialization they received from multiple agents within and outside of the family. The themes were: Avoidance, Safety and Consent, Fun and Action-Centered Acts, (Mis)Information About Sexual Health, Gendered Norms, and Purity versus Sexual Freedom. The women received messages of avoidance, purity, safety, consent, and gendered norms, from their families and schools. Peers and media socialized women to view sex as fun and action centered. Given the persistent increases in sexually transmitted infections and diseases, and formation of longer-lasting romantic relationships during the college years, it is important for young adult women, including Black women, to receive adequate knowledge and skills to advocate for safe and healthy romantic sexual relationships. Implications of the findings are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-08-21T04:41:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231194284
       
  • How Does Religion Influence Parental Support of Young Adult Children'

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      Authors: Lei Lei, Frederic Traylor
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Religion is an important cultural institution that shapes family ideologies and behaviors. Although previous research has documented religious differences in parenting behaviors and parent–child relationships in adolescence, how religion influences parental support of young adult children is not clear. Using data from the Transition into Adulthood Supplement (TAS) of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID, 2005–2017; N = 9,754 person-years), we employed mixed-effect logistic and linear regression models to examine the impacts of young adults’ religious affiliation, religious salience, and parent–child religious concordance on parental coresidence and financial support. The results show that mainline Protestant and Catholic young adults are more likely than nonreligious youth to live with their parents. Catholic and Jewish young adults receive more financial support from their parents than nonreligious youth did when they are religiously concordant with their mother. The associations between religious affiliation and parental support are strengthened by young adults’ religious salience and religious concordance with their mother.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-08-19T05:30:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231195653
       
  • Study on Marriage Pairings and Women’s Fertility Intentions in China

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      Authors: Wenze Tian, Yiming He, Xiaoyu Wang
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The effect of marriage pairings on fertility intentions is specific and has attracted increasing scholarly attention in recent years. Using data from the China Family Panel Studies (CFPS), this study explored the impact of couples’ educational pairings, age pairings, and income pairings on women’s desired number of children and their preference for sons. The results showed that marital-educational pairing had a greater effect on women’s fertility intentions than age and income pairing. The effect of marital pairing on women’s fertility intentions is also influenced by women’s age and urban–rural differences. The study helps to understand the changes in women’s fertility intentions and the factors influencing them after the fertility policy transition in China and inspires scholars to pay more attention to the interaction process between couples in the study of fertility intentions.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-08-15T12:29:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231194299
       
  • Exploring Civil Partnership From the Perspective of Those in Mixed-Sex
           Relationships: Embracing a Clean Slate of Equality

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      Authors: Nikki Hayfield, Bethan Jones, Julia Carter, Adam Jowett
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Civil partnerships first became available to mixed-sex couples in England and Wales in December 2019. To date, there has been no research exploring the perspectives of mixed-sex couples who choose to become civil partners. We interviewed 21 people, as individuals or in couples, who were considering, planning, or had already entered into a civil partnership. Our thematic analysis resulted in two themes. In Free from the patriarchal baggage of marriage: Civil partnership as a clean slate of equality, we discuss how participants portrayed marriage as imbued with problematic traditions. In contrast, civil partnerships were portrayed as a contemporary form of relationship recognition that was in fitting for them and their relationships. In the second theme, Doing thing differently' Rejecting or reimagining weddings we discuss how participants critiqued traditions to navigate whether and how to reject them entirely, or attempt to creatively reimagine them. We consider the implications of our results.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-08-14T03:33:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231194298
       
  • Hours of Work and Early Childhood Education and Access to Care Services in
           Latin America: Evidence From Colombia, Chile, Mexico, and Uruguay

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      Authors: Verónica Amarante, Cecilia Rossel, Federico Scalese
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explores the relationship between access to early childhood education and care (ECEC) services and family arrangements in the distribution of work in four Latin American countries. We find that households in which all children aged 0 to 5 receive ECEC services exhibit smaller gender gaps in unpaid work, mainly due to a decrease in the amount of time women devote to care work. Women in these households devote more time to paid work, such that the gender gap in total work does not differ between households based on use of ECEC services. However, use of ECEC services for children aged 0 to 5 is associated with reduced hours of unpaid work among women and an increase in women’s hours of paid work. These findings confirm the importance of increasing access to early childhood care and education services to reduce gender gaps in the region.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-08-11T05:02:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231194296
       
  • Grandparents’ Retirement and Mother’s Employment Quality: The
           Mediating Role of Intergenerational Caregiving

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      Authors: Yiwen Shangguan, Chuanfeng Han, Jing Zhao
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The grandparents’ retirement behavior has important support on mother’s employment quality. This paper aims to estimate the influence of grandparents’ retirement behavior on mother’s employment quality, based on the China Family Panel Studies of 2018. The findings reveal a significant enhancement in mother’s employment quality resulting from grandparents’ retirement behavior. The mediating effect of grandparents’ intergenerational caregiving explains approximately 68.77% of this improvement. Furthermore, the positive effect of grandparents’ retirement behavior on mother’s employment quality is more pronounced in families where the grandchild is older and in better health. Notably, the involvement of paternal grandparents yields more favorable outcomes compared to maternal grandparents. Findings from this study suggest that grandparent’s retirement behavior play an important role in mother’s employment quality through the provision of childcare assistance. Moreover, these findings highlight that the effectiveness of such support varies depending on the characteristics of both grandchildren and grandparents.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-08-11T02:01:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231195654
       
  • Foster Caregiver Experiences: Implications for Retention and Satisfaction

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      Authors: Jacquelyn K. Mallette, Cherish R. Elmore-Li
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Foster homes promote optimal outcomes among youth who experience difficulties in their original families. However, foster caregivers often face various challenges and difficulties. Guided by ecological framework, the current study examined how multiple factors from foster caregivers’ surrounding environments impact satisfaction and retention among 462 foster caregivers in the United States. Regression analyses suggested that certain demographics, parenting characteristics, and agency characteristics were associated with foster care retention, levels of satisfaction, and overall foster care experience. To probe these findings further, results from latent profile analyses suggested that foster caregivers fell into two profiles—those who experienced a large amount of challenges or few challenges during their time as foster caregivers. On average, those who experienced few challenges reported significantly more satisfaction with foster caregiving, greater intention to continue fostering, and a better overall fostering experience compared with those who experienced more challenges. Implications and limitations are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-08-11T01:25:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231194609
       
  • Lower-Income Nonresident Fathers’ Self-Perceptions About Their Parenting
           Quality and Relationships With Children

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      Authors: Yoona Kim, Lawrence M. Berger, Daniel R. Meyer
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Research on fathering has substantially increased but we still know relatively little about whether and how fathers’ own perspectives on their parenting differ across a variety of family situations. We estimate associations between nonresident fathers’ family types and nonresident fathers’ perceptions of the quality of their parenting and their relationships with their children, using data from the Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration program on lower-income nonresident fathers (n = 5,835) and logistic regressions. High-quality parenting is more likely to be reported by nonresident fathers with multiple-partner fertility and both resident and nonresident children than either those with multiple-partner fertility and only nonresident children or those with single-partner fertility. High-quality relationships with children are more likely to be reported by those with single-partner fertility than those with multiple-partner fertility. These findings suggest the importance of resident children in fathers’ perceptions of their parenting and highlight the difficulties of parenting across multiple households.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-08-10T09:24:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231194288
       
  • Household’s Stressors and Well-Being During the Global COVID-19
           Pandemic

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      Authors: Ana Balsa, Juanita Bloomfield, Alejandro Cid, Martina Lorenzo, Paula Patrone
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Home environments suffered a range of stressors during COVID-19 pandemic. This study examines the impact of these stressors on children’s well-being by households’ conditions. Participants included main caregivers (N = 615) with a child under the age of 3 in a developing Latin-American country. We use multivariate analysis to explore associations between these shocks, the childrearing environment, and children’s well-being. We find that households with lower education and recipients of government assistance were more exposed to negative shocks linked to COVID-19. However, the most educated households were more likely to face an increased burden of childcare. Exposure to negative shocks was associated with a deterioration in the emotional well-being of adults, a higher prevalence of intra-family violence, and behavioral changes in children. Households that reported more time spent caring for children, as well as difficulties in combining care and work, showed higher levels of parental depression and worse indicators of parenting quality. We observe a drop in the frequency of parental involvement in didactic and socializing activities with their children, and a poorer mental health status for the main caregiver (mostly mothers).
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-08-09T08:57:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231194289
       
  • Forgiveness in Marriage: From Incidents to Marital Satisfaction

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      Authors: Kinga Kaleta, Aleksandra Jaśkiewicz
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Although marital forgiveness has been found to increase marital satisfaction, no research to date has examined the actual mechanism. This could derive from the ABCM model of marital satisfaction (Hall, 2021), in which disposition to forgive is understood as one of the marriage maintenance strategies contributing to spousal happiness. In two cross-sectional studies, we examined the association between marital forgiveness and satisfaction. We also tested a model in which dispositional forgiveness mediates the link between forgiveness of a particular marital incident and satisfaction with spousal relationship, moderated by transgression severity and apology. The Marital Offence-Specific Forgiveness Scale, the Heartland Forgiveness Scale and measures of marital satisfaction were used. Positive main effects between forgiveness and multidimensional marital satisfaction emerged. Moderated mediation revealed the mediation effect of dispositional forgiveness, which did not depend on the level of the moderators (severity and apology).
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-08-09T05:37:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231194294
       
  • How Does Grandparental Childcare Influence Children’s Efforts'

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      Authors: Qiang Zhou, Yang Li, Li Sun
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores the effect of grandparental care with no parents at present on children’s efforts, using the data from China Family Panel Studies from 2010 to 2018. In order to avoid the endogeneity of family childcare decisions, we use two instrumental variables (IVs): community caregiving rate (IVI) and whether the parent is born before 1978 (IVII). We find that grandparental care significantly reduces children’s efforts, and the finding remains robust. The negative marginal effect of this care pattern is more pronounced in rural and middle school children. Compared with parental care, grandparental care has increased the parental fertility intentions and decreased parental involvement and supervision investment to children, which leads them to be more likely to spend time on recreational and non-academic activities.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-08-09T03:37:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231194308
       
  • Psychosocial Consequences of Disclosing Misattributed Paternity: A
           Narrative Review

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      Authors: Alyona Cerfontyne, Levita D’Souza, Lefteris Patlamazoglou
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Unlike adoption and donor-assisted reproduction, misattributed paternity occurring within the context of spontaneous conception and outside of formally recognised practices of having a child remains largely an understudied phenomenon. Despite being an age-old phenomenon affecting a substantial population, the psychosocial consequences of disclosing and discovering misattributed paternity continue to lack empirical understanding. The current paper delineates misattributed paternity from other paternal discrepancies and reviews the limited body of scholarly arguments regarding the potential psychosocial consequences of disclosure/non-disclosure for individuals with paternal discrepancy. Four major categories of pro- and anti-disclosure arguments have been identified and reviewed: arguments concerned with potential disclosure/non-disclosure consequences for the child; for the parents; for the child-parent relationship and for the family unit. The review highlights the dearth of empirical knowledge on the psychosocial consequences of misattributed paternity and advocates a more nuanced exploration of this phenomenon and the need for specialist support.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-08-08T12:40:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231194302
       
  • Out-of-Wedlock Adolescent Motherhood and Intimate Partner Violence in
           Kenya

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      Authors: Steve Muchiri
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates trends and prevalence of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) among out-of-wedlock adolescent mothers and their likelihood of being IPV victims later in a marriage. We address possible selection bias using a propensity score matching technique. The study uses the Kenyan DHS and finds that the prevalence of IPV (a composite measure of emotional, physical, and sexual violence) was 43%, but 28%, 12%, 34%, and 13% for emotional, severe physical, less-severe physical, and sexual IPV, respectively. Overall, out-of-wedlock adolescent mothers are associated with approximately 14% higher likelihood of IPV later in marriage than non-adolescent mothers. Policy and intervention plans for out-of-wedlock adolescent motherhood are clear strategies for abating IPV. This could be addressed by advocating for improved human capital among girls, laws to combat domestic violence and rape, and managing cultural practices like acceptance of “wife-beating.”
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-08-08T08:33:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231194301
       
  • Ethnic-Racial Socialization of White Children by White Parents: A
           Systematic Review

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      Authors: Tanya Nieri, Lissette Montoya, Clarissa Carlos
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This systematic review of the literature examined the extent and nature of white parent’s ethic-racial socialization (ERS) of white children, the factors associated with white parents’ ERS, and the child outcomes of white parents’ ERS. It followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. The review included 43 English-language works published between January 2000 and June 2021 and referenced in PsycINFO, PubMed, Web of Science, or Sociological Abstracts. It showed that white parents are engaged in ERS, employing many of the same strategies identified in research with parents of color as well as strategies identified as specific to white families. The review revealed child and parent factors related to ERS and child outcomes of ERS, including racial attitudes. In contrast with parents of color’s ERS, white parents’ ERS tends to teach strategies of advantage, preparing children to maintain their privilege. We offer recommendations for practice and future research.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-08-07T01:14:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231194306
       
  • Infidelity and Anger within Incarcerated Couples: A Brief Report

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      Authors: Eman Tadros, Shannon Pedersen
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionIncarcerated couples face a variety of concerns and barriers in their relationships, with infidelity being a major problem. This study sought to research incarcerated individuals’ intimate relationships and experiences of anger and fidelity for both partners.MethodsUsing data from the Multi-site Family Study on Incarceration, Parenting, and Partnering we utilized Actor-Partner Interdependence Modeling (APIM) to examine fidelity and anger management for incarcerated men and their non-incarcerated female partners.ResultsThe findings showed that the actor effect was not statistically significant, but the partner effect was statistically significant for both the incarcerated male partner and non-incarcerated female partner. There was no statistical significance for the control variable of education, which is contrary to previous correlational studies of anger management and education levels.DiscussionBased on these results, it is recommended that incarcerated individuals receive anger management training to strengthen fidelity.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-08-04T03:34:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231194295
       
  • The Cyber Intimate Partner Violence: Prevalence, Context, and Relationship
           With In-Person Intimate Violence Victimization

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      Authors: Jalal Kayed. Damra, Sanaa Abujilban, Mutasem Mohammad Akour
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to examine the extent and characteristics of cyber intimate partner violence (IPV) and in-person IPV (IP-IPV) in a sample of 214 women aged 18–60 years in Jordan. A cross-sectional, correlational design was implemented, using the Cyber Aggression in Relationships and Revised Conflict Tactics Scales to evaluate both in-person and cyber IPV. The findings revealed that 65.4% of participants reported experiencing some form of cyber IPV, while 98.7% reported experiencing IP-IPV within the previous six months. Some demographic factors were linked to the prevalence of two cyber IPV types (cyber-stalking and cyber psychological aggression). Psychological and physical abuse were the most prevalent forms of IP-IPV. Exposure to cyber IPV was a predictor of psychological, physical, and injury types of IP-IPV. Overall, this study highlights the alarming prevalence of both IP-IPV and cyber IPV against women in Jordan and their interrelatedness
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-08-01T03:18:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231181366
       
  • “We all have Regrets; it doesn’t Mean we are Failures”: Rejecting or
           Regretting Motherhood

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      Authors: Margaret Anne Johnson, Gyða Margrét Pétursdóttir
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      A woman’s choice to remain childfree is often met with disapproving comments. This article focuses on pronatalism and the social discourse that promotes and maintains motherhood as the preferred choice for women in a country that has achieved high levels of gender equality. Critical discourse analysis is applied to 30 qualitative interviews with women, trans, and non-binary people in Iceland, who are either childfree by choice or who regret motherhood. The results indicate that despite neoliberalism advocating a woman’s right to freedom of choice, pronatalist ideologies continue to undermine reproductive self-determination, promoting motherhood as the right choice. Unsolicited comments act as powerful mechanisms that serve to shame those who can bear children into becoming mothers or facing regret yet simultaneously condemn women who regret motherhood. Women who choose to remain childfree privately challenge unwanted comments by overturning pronatalist discourses, whereas those who regret their choice to become mothers struggle to express their feelings for fear of being judged and branded as failures.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-07-28T03:09:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231181376
       
  • Employment Resources and the Physical and Mental Health of Mothers of
           Young Children

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      Authors: Kate C. Prickett, Robert Crosnoe, R. Kelly Raley
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study explored resources from paid employment that could promote women’s health during a vulnerable period of motherhood (raising young children). Following theoretical perspectives on work–family interplay and stress, it tested two sets of hypotheses by applying cross-lagged modeling techniques to nationally representative data on mothers from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (n = 7450) and occupational conditions from the Occupational Information Network database. In general, mothers of young children reported better health when employed in occupational sectors with more socioemotional resources, such as opportunities to develop a sense of mastery and connection. For the specific set of mothers who had children with health problems, more instrumental resources on the job, such as the ability to telecommute, appeared to better support health. There was some evidence of resources mattering more in the context of part-time employment, but there were no links between any resources and mental health.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-06-13T07:23:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231181370
       
  • Do Filipinos Still Say “I do”' The Continuing Increase in Non-Marriage
           and Cohabitation in the Philippines

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      Authors: Jeofrey Bautista Abalos
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to examine the trends in non-marriage in the Philippines and identify the factors associated with this phenomenon. It will also assess trends in cohabitation in the country and its differentials by levels of education. Data are drawn from various censuses and national surveys. Results show a continuing increase in the proportion of Filipinos who are unmarried in their 40s, particularly men. The proportion of Filipinos who are living together or cohabiting has also increased over time, while the share of those who are formally married has declined. These changes are accompanied by more liberal attitudes toward marriage and cohabitation in the Philippines.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-06-10T03:00:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231182366
       
  • “That Conversation within the Conversation”: A Mixed Methods Study of
           Skin Tone and Black Parents’ Racial Socialization

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      Authors: Dalhia D. Lloyd
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines whether there is a relation between assigned skin tone and parental racial socialization of their young children (ages 5–8). The concurrent mixed methods design combined quantitative and qualitative findings to explore the complexity and role skin tones play in Black parents’ messages to their children. In the quantitative strand, 178 Black parents completed a survey and questionnaire. The qualitative strand consisted of a one-on-one interview with 10 parents from the quantitative sample. Quantitative findings revealed that parents who assigned a light skin tone to their children engaged in more specific types of racial socialization than those who assigned a darker skin tone to their children. Analysis of qualitative interviews revealed parents’ unique messages based on assigned skin tones. Data from the two strands were integrated using a weaving approach that compared findings from both strands.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-06-08T01:26:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231181375
       
  • Development of the Family Function Scale: Indonesia Version

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      Authors: Rahmi Lubis, Zahrotur Rusyda Hinduan, Ratna Jatnika, Baydhowi, Hendriati Agustiani
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The unproperly functioning family can provoke adolescent mental health and behavior problems. The measurement of family function in Indonesia still uses instruments from the West, so it is necessary to develop a more suitable community tool. This study aims to validate the Indonesian version of Chinese Family Assessment Inventory. We selected 396 participants randomly from four high schools in Medan. Data analysis showed that all scale items had high validity (CVI = .86). The Confirmatory Factor Analysis concluded that the ICFAI has an identical factor structure to the original version. The data fit with the model (Chi-square 8892.122; p < .000; RMSEA = .575; CFI = .945; TLI = .939). 32 of 33 items have a good quality (t-value
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-06-07T05:51:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231181363
       
  • Parenting Concerns During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Results From a Canadian
           Crowdsourced Sample

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      Authors: Mila Kingsbury, Rubab Arim, Leanne Findlay
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Early research suggests that the COVID-19 pandemic may impact parental functioning. The purpose of this study was to examine parents’ concerns during the pandemic and to explore the characteristics of families who may be particularly vulnerable to parenting concerns. Data were drawn from an online crowdsourcing survey of parents of children under age 15 in Canada (N = 32,228). Many parents were very or extremely concerned about managing child behaviour (61%) and having less patience with, scolding, or yelling at their children (46%). Family characteristics, including working from home, age of children, number of adults in the home, and child disability were associated with these parenting concerns in logistic regression models. Results are discussed in the context of the known impacts of stress on parenting and families, highlighting family-level and pandemic-specific stressors.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-06-07T04:30:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231181364
       
  • Ethical Responsiveness as a Mediator Between Enduring Vulnerabilities and
           Relationship Quality

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      Authors: J. Scott Crapo, Adam M. Galovan, David G. Schramm
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The strong relationality model of relationship flourishing emphasizes the role of ethical responsiveness (how well a person intrinsically responds to the manifest or identifiable needs of others) as a direct predictor of relationship quality and as an indirect pathway for explaining the influence of vulnerabilities. This study is among the first explicit tests of the theorized role of ethical responsiveness. The sample consisted of 1432 adults in a romantic relationship, from the United States and Canada. Modeled as latent variables, ethical responsiveness served as a path between the variables of depression, anxiety, and friend and family support, and the dependent variable of relationship-focused relationship quality. Depression and friend support predicted ethical responsiveness. Ethical responsiveness, both supports, and depression predicted relationship quality. Friend support and depression had an indirect effect through ethical responsiveness. Our findings support the role of ethical responsiveness and suggest continued research into how and why it influences relationships.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-06-06T03:58:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231181373
       
  • Bonding With Adolescents in Foster Care: Perspectives of Foster Parents

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      Authors: Alicia Nicoleau-Poliard, Curtis A. Fox, Diadrey-Anne Sealy
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Adolescents in foster care are removed from their families of origin and are placed with foster families for temporary care until they are able to be granted a more permanent placement. This purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the bonding experience of adolescents in foster care = with their foster parents. This study included 10 foster parents who had an African-American adolescent between the ages of 12 to 18 in their care. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. The analysis began with coding to develop an understanding of the bonding experiences between adolescents and their foster parents. Four processes emerged that seemed to influence bonding: communicating in conflict with empathy or assertion, sharing personal time, creating rituals, and offering support. Foster parents appeared to demonstrate the processes when there was a focus on the adolescent being a part of the family. This present study has implications for theory, research, and practice.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-06-05T05:03:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231181362
       
  • Parenting While Depressed: The Influence of Interpersonal Supports and
           Community Resources for Mothers

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      Authors: Sarah Dow-Fleisner, Christopher Baum, Shanta Pandey, Summer Sherburne Hawkins
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Maternal depression may have a significant impact on multiple aspects of parenting throughout childhood, leading to negative outcomes for children. However, the impact of depression on parenting perceptions, practices, and involvement may differ among mothers, particularly when protective factors are present. Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, we compared three aspects of parenting (perceptions, practices, and involvement) between depressed and non-depressed mothers, and then investigated the influence of interpersonal supports and community resources on these aspects of the parenting, specifically for depressed mothers. Findings indicated that mothers with depression were equally involved with the child at home, but were more likely to hold negative perceptions of parenting. Furthermore, interpersonal supports and community resources had an indirect impact on parenting practices and involvement through perceptions of parenting, highlighting the importance of interventions for mothers with depression that address the appraisal and expectations of parenting stress and competencies.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-06-05T04:38:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231181369
       
  • A Hybrid Model for the Intergenerational Relationship Between Maternal
           Poverty and Their Young Adult Child’s Self-Esteem

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      Authors: Jaewon Lee, Hyejung Lim, Jennifer Allen
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to examine how mothers’ poverty differently affects young adult children’s self-esteem over time. We consider how young adult children’s income moderates the between-subject relationship and the within-subject relationship. This study used two data sets such as the NLSY79 and the NLSY79CY. We used six waves from 2004 to 2014. A total of 3975 mother–adult child dyads were chosen. The hybrid model was employed to explore both the between-subject and the within-subject relationship. There was a significant between-subject relationship regarding the effect of mothers’ poverty and adult children’s income on adult children’s self-esteem. In the between-subjects relationship, an interaction effect was found, such that children’s income moderated the between-subject relationship between mothers’ poverty and children’s self-esteem. Long-term anti-poverty programs should be provided to women with children even after they completely are away from poverty. Minimizing inequality in intergenerational economic mobility may be critical to enhance adult children’s self-esteem.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-06-03T07:36:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231181365
       
  • The Impact of Mobile Internet Use on Intergenerational Relations in Aging
           Society

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      Authors: Yang Chen, Jin Lu, Yan Su
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Considering data from the fourth wave of the China Family Panel Studies (CFPS2016), this paper examines the impact of mobile Internet usage on the relationship between adult children and elderly parents. Results drawn from ordered Probit and mediation models show that mobile Internet use, rather than the usage of the fixed Internet, enhances the parent–child relationship. Secondly, older parents, having two or more children, cannot benefit well from using the mobile Internet, and they may rely more on phone calls to uphold intergenerational contact. Thirdly, the mobile Internet enhances the non-face-to-face contact between the two generations. Also, it reduces face-to-face contact in child–parent relationships and improves face-to-face contact in the parent–child relationship. Therefore, related to increasing in the population aging, relevant departments should continue to enhance the use of mobile Internet by reducing the usage costs, improving the usage capabilities, and innovating mobile phone functions, and remain cautious due to the reduction in face-to-face communication caused by the mobile Internet use.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-06-01T02:35:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231181372
       
  • COVID-19 and the Housework Gender Division: Traditional or New Gender
           Patterns'

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      Authors: Beatriz Larraz, Rosa Roig, Cristina Aybar, Jose M. Pavía
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, the gender dimension of its more visible socio-economic impacts has been the topic of study by several researchers. The current paper takes this further by focusing on the invisible chores done in the families at home. This paper studies how people’s behavior towards housework changed during and after the confinement period in Spain. We analyze whether people did more housework during the lockdown period than before it, the way this housework was distributed between women and men, and whether this has changed since the end of lockdown. The empirical analyses point to a new trend in the housework gender gap: differences between men and women have narrowed since the lockdown, although women continue to bear most of the responsibility.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-05-16T03:03:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231172287
       
  • Doing Housework in Context: Dyadic Analyses of the Division of Domestic
           Labor in Contemporary Couples

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      Authors: Natascha Nisic, Miriam Trübner
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The persisting gendered division of domestic labor in Western societies remains puzzling. Beyond standard economic and normative explanations, more recent approaches emphasize affective, cognitive, and incorporated aspects of housework and the production, reproduction, and negotiation of gendered expectations via social interactions. However, the relevant indicators for these more implicit mechanisms are not routinely included in social surveys. Based on a unique set of items and a representative sample of heterosexual couples (N = 1396) from pairfam (wave 10), we analyze the mutual effects of both partners’ enjoyment, quality standards, and reciprocally perceived competencies on the division of housework. Actor–partner interdependence models (APIM) are applied, which explicitly model the partner dyad. Both an actor’s own and their partner’s assessments of competences and preferences—and particularly men’s attributes and perceptions—prove to be powerful predictors of housework share. The results contribute quantitative evidence on processes of doing and undoing gender in context.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-05-12T02:38:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231172285
       
  • Young Black Fathers’ Perceptions of Fatherhood: A Family Systems
           Account

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      Authors: Zimbini Ncayiyane, Lindi Nel
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Within the historical context of South Africa, fathers are largely considered the breadwinner, an ideology linked to financial affordability. The breadwinner title may be a masculine boost for some but denotes a sense of disempowerment for those without financial muscle. This is especially true for young black South African fathers who are still confronting socio-historical challenges including continued high levels of unemployment. This qualitative study sought to explore how young black fathers perceive and understand fatherhood based on their individual experiences and given their socio-historical and cultural challenges. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and focus groups. Eight participants were selected through non-probability purposive sampling. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data with the foundation of a family systems theoretical framework. Findings indicated that the perception of fatherhood is constructed through (a) financial insecurity, (b) (un)expectancy and psychological distress, (c) shared responsibility, (d) cultural dynamics and (e) a renewed sense of self meaning. The study has added value in ensuring that the voices of young black fathers are captured through their lived experiences. The findings suggest that much investment is still required to understand the different angles and dynamics of young black fathers in South Africa.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-04-28T12:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231172955
       
  • Are You Satisfied' Examining Positive Interaction and Satisfaction in
           Romantic Relationships

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      Authors: Taylor S. Vasquez, Chelsea Moss, Victor Harris, Brian Visconti
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Relationship satisfaction has consistently been associated with numerous important intrapersonal, interpersonal, and familial outcomes. In accordance with affection exchange theory, positive interaction between romantic partners should contribute to greater relationship satisfaction. However, what is less understood is the specific theoretical mechanism through which this process might occur. This study’s findings reveal that affectionate communication (given and received) positively predicted relationship satisfaction indirectly via the serial mediation of partner commitment and couple quality. This model was tested using a sample of participants of the ELEVATE relationship education program (N = 2235). Theoretical and practical implications are discussed, including a call for further exploration of other theoretical pathways that may impact relationship education program evaluation.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-04-24T07:41:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231172286
       
  • Financial Stress, Family, Marital, and Life Satisfaction of Turkish
           Families During Covid-19: What Did We Learn'

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      Authors: Selda Coşkuner Aktaş, Birgül Çiçek
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      It is well known that the Covid-19 that hit the world caused a global economic crisis. This present study aimed at examining the economic impact of this crisis with respect to families with both quantitative and qualitative approaches. In this study, we intended to demonstrate how families (n=247) met their basic needs, how they coped with financial stress, how financial stress relates to family characteristics and how it affects marital, family, and life satisfaction. The impact of family characteristics on financial stress was examined through regression analysis. The impact of financial stress on marital, family, and life satisfaction was determined through content analysis. The results of the regression analysis showed that the influence of education, debt, minimum wage employment, and fear of being laid off on financial stress was significant. The qualitative results show that individuals' marital, family and life satisfaction were negatively affected due to the financial stress they experienced during the Covid-19.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-04-18T02:36:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231169558
       
  • Marital Beliefs and Concerns of Spanish Emerging Adults

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      Authors: Cecilia Serrano, Javier García-Manglano
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Young adults’ beliefs about life-long commitment such as marriage are decisive when making decisions and setting life priorities. Using a representative sample of Spanish emerging adults (ages 18–29), we explored the relationship between beliefs about marriage and life priorities (also called ultimate concerns). Using latent class analysis, we found six different marital paradigms among the population: indifferent, reject, contextual, hesitant, convinced, and traditionalist. These groups were significantly different in their life priorities—for example, in the importance they assign to parenting or their professional career. The traits of emerging adults in each paradigm helped explain differences in risk-taking and sexual behaviors, particularly for men. In sum, marital beliefs are relevant when seeking to understand the commitments, decisions, and behaviors of emerging adults.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-04-14T11:03:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231169657
       
  • Parents’ Access to Flexible Work Arrangements and Time in Active
           Caregiving Activities

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      Authors: Jennifer March Augustine, Jaeseung Kim, Mina Lee
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Greater access to flexible work arrangements is considered a solution to many working parents’ challenges balancing the demands of work and family, yet it remains unclear whether such arrangements are associated with parents’ time in the active caregiving activities linked to children’s development and parents’ notions of quality time. We examine this question using data from the American Time Use Survey and Leave and Job Flexibilities Module (2017–2018) (n = 1,874 mothers, n = 1,756 fathers) and linear regression and inverse probability weighting techniques. Results indicate that access to flextime is associated with more active caregiving time for mothers but not fathers. They also provide suggestive evidence that flexplace is associated with more active caregiving time for mothers and fathers and strong evidence that it is associated with more passive caregiving time for both parents. The findings highlight the importance of expanding parents’ access to flexible work options, and the limits of doing so.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-04-12T04:59:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231169653
       
  • “Sometimes, During Deployment, It Seems Like We Won’t Make It”: U.S.
           Military Deployment Transition Issues as a Precursor to Couples’
           Reintegration Issues

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      Authors: Julia K. Weiss, Christine K. Anzur
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The bulk of the literature on the Relational Turbulence Model relating to U.S. military couples clusters around examining relational turbulence and communication issues when a service member returns from a deployment and reintegrates back into the home. Lacking in comparison is a deeper examination of turbulence and all of its related variables when the service member leaves the home to go on the deployment. The current study examines these components as they relate to overseas military deployment. A thematic analysis of participants’ perceptions uncovered major themes of Relational Uncertainty, Partner Interferences, and Relational Turbulence along with several subthemes and additional subtheme-types. If we consider the well-established relational communication issues couples face during reintegrating, these findings suggest that those issues may actually stem from the perceptions of relational turbulence in the initial parts of the deployment cycle during deployment.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-03-29T01:58:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231162968
       
  • Attitudes and Feelings Among Married Mothers and Single Mothers by Choice
           During the Covid-19 Crisis

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      Authors: Michal Shamir, Orit Shamir Balderman
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The current study examined how state anxiety is related to social support (formal and informal), work–family conflict, and level of happiness among married mothers and single mothers by choice (SMBC) during the first lockdown of the Covid-19 crisis. The uniqueness of the present study lies in its comparison of married mothers and SMBC, whereas previous studies examined differences between single mothers, who are usually divorced, and married mothers. Moreover, the present research is the first to combine all relevant variables in one coherent study. A sample of 386 SMBC and 293 married mothers filled out a closed online questionnaire sent through social networks. The study findings show negative correlations between the level of social support, level of happiness, and type of support (friends, family, and significant others) and the level of state anxiety. Most women did not turn to formal sources of support such as aid and welfare agencies. Finally, a positive correlation was found between state anxiety and work–family conflict.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-03-22T05:18:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231155661
       
  • Intergenerational Transmission of Values: From Parent–Child Value
           Similarity to Parent–Child Value Continuity

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      Authors: Daniela Barni, Ioana Zagrean, Claudia Russo, Francesca Danioni
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The process of value transmission between parents and children is unanimously considered the hallmark of successful socialization. The outcomes of value transmission have been often solely measured in terms of parent–child value similarity, thus assuming that the higher is the parent–child value similarity, the more successful is the value transmission. The present study highlighted the dialectical nature of the intergenerational transmission of values and aimed at developing a different perspective on this process by introducing the concept of value “continuity.” This term etymologically means “hang together” and entails a flow and a progression across generations. The study involved 325 Italian mother–adolescent dyads, who were asked to fill in a self-report questionnaire. Results showed the importance of considering children’s autonomous motivations in accepting or rejecting their parents’ values to find more comprehensive meanings of parent–child value similarities and differences. Implications of the findings and future research developments are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-03-18T04:57:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231163939
       
  • The Inverse Association Between Number of Siblings and Divorce: New
           Evidence From China and Europe

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      Authors: Doug B. Downey, Man Yao, Joseph Merry
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      In the U.S., evidence has emerged suggesting that divorce is lower among those with many versus few siblings, a pattern that may indicate that children develop important social skills via their childhood interactions with siblings. However, this pattern has yet to be tested in other countries with varying fertility and divorce rates. We extend the empirical basis of the sibship size/divorce literature by exploring the association in China and Europe, each with unique demographic characteristics. Each additional sibling is associated with an 11 percent decline in the probability of divorce in China and a two percent decline in Europe, net a wide range of covariates. We also test whether these patterns vary across cohorts and alternative coding schemes. The results have implications for our understanding of how growing up with siblings influences later life outcomes and the contextual features that form that relationship.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-03-16T01:35:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231162977
       
  • Don’t Forget the Parents: Caregiver Coping Strategies for Daughter’s
           Juvenile Legal System Involvement

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      Authors: Rebecca L. Fix, Tamar Mendelson
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Caregivers of adolescent daughters with juvenile legal system involvement face unique stressors that have been largely overlooked in research and practice. The current study recruited 183 Black and Native North American/Indigenous caregivers with daughters involved in the juvenile legal system via a Qualtrics survey distributed using MTurk with careful screening practices. Results indicated high levels of stress and worry related to daughter’s juvenile legal system involvement. Female caregivers used prayer, talking with friends, going to therapy, and exercise significantly more than male caregivers as coping strategies. Problems associated with daughter’s juvenile legal system involvement and worry about daughter’s juvenile legal system involvement significantly impacted use of most coping strategies. Finally, nearly all caregivers were interested in trying new activities to strengthen their relationship with their daughter and in strategies to improve their own mental health. Potential intervention components highlighted by caregivers indicate future directions for family-focused programming targeting families with juvenile legal system involvement.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-03-15T08:04:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231163937
       
  • Exploring Linkages Between Mother–Child and Sibling Relationship Quality
           and Prosocial Behavior Between School-Aged and Adolescent Siblings

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      Authors: Caroline C. Piotrowski
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The present study investigated the degree to which the quality of sibling relationships interacted with the quality of mother–child relationships to concurrently predict prosocial behavior between school-aged siblings while taking age spacing into account. Forty-five families with two school-aged siblings were recruited from the community. Prosocial behavior was coded from unstructured laboratory observation of sibling interaction. Both children reported on the quality of their sibling relationships; the quality of mother–child relationships was assessed by coding laboratory observation of mother–child interaction, conducted separately with each sibling. A compensatory pattern was found; higher warmth between widely spaced siblings was associated with greater sibling prosocial behavior when maternal positivity was low, and also when maternal negativity was high. These compensatory patterns did not occur for siblings closer in age. Findings suggested that sibling dynamics and relational roles play an important function in children’s prosocial development. Results were discussed within family systems frameworks.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-03-14T02:10:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231162965
       
  • Parents’ Family Coping Strategies during the Pandemic: Effects on
           Parent and Child Well-Being

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      Authors: Lindsey R. Gedaly, Joseph A. Cifelli, Mark E. Feinberg, Michelle L. Hostetler
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to understand the strategies families used to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic, and their effects on family, parent, child, and couple functioning and well-being. In April and May 2020, and again one month later, 277 parents from 174 families who previously participated in a trial of a family preventive intervention were invited to participate in an online survey regarding the pandemic. Parents completed measures regarding family cohesion, couple coparenting and relationship quality, parenting quality, and parent and child mental health and well-being. Parents were asked to share the coping strategies they found most effective, and responses were coded into four groups: Family Unity, Healthy Habits, Adaptability, and Child-Focused. Adaptability was associated with increases in couple relationship quality but also in child internalizing and externalizing behaviors from Month 1 to Month 2. The results suggest that the strategies parents use may have differing effects on parents and children.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-03-13T11:10:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231162980
       
  • Stigma, Outsider Status and Mothers in Prison

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      Authors: Julia Morgan, Caroline Leeson
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on Elias’s work on established-outsider figurations, stigmatisation and the civilising process, this study explores the narratives of women, who are mothers of children under the age of 18 years old, in one female prison in England, United Kingdom. We conducted 31 in-depth interviews as well as three focus groups with 26 different women, exploring their experiences of being an imprisoned mother as well as staying in contact with their children from prison. Moreover, we interviewed 15 members of staff. Our findings highlight the stigmatised ‘outsider’ nature that is ascribed to mothers in prison which is reinforced by the prison environment and figurations between mothers and prison staff. By highlighting the stigmatised and outsider positioning of mothers in prison, this research has significance for practice and policy. Improving support for imprisoned mothers and the development of non-stigmatising, more inclusive, compassionate institutions and compassionate responses are thus required.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-03-13T03:34:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231162975
       
  • Contemporary Marriage in Cambodia

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      Authors: Patrick Heuveline, Michelle Kao Nakphong
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Previous work has suggested that the drastic Khmer-Rouge-era changes to the family institution have not endured. Potentially more influential in the long term were the rapid socio-economic changes Cambodia underwent starting in the 1990s. We use four waves of the Cambodian Demographic and Health Surveys from 2000 to 2014 to document contemporary trends in marriage formation and dissolution. We find little change in the centrality of marriage, as both cohabitation and sex between unmarried partners remain quite rare. Marriage also continues to be nearly universal and early for women, but we find that the transition to self-arranged “love” marriages occurred earlier and faster than previously documented. A sign that parental endorsement may still matter though, marriage dissolution continues to be associated with spousal characteristics deemed undesirable by past generations. While higher among recent marriage cohorts, especially in the first year after marriage, levels of marriage dissolution remain comparatively low overall.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-03-11T07:17:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231155590
       
  • Self-Reported Reasons for Divorce, Social Support, and Depression: An
           Exploratory Study With Hmong Women

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      Authors: Malina Her, Zha Blong Xiong
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Contrary to other Asian Americans, Hmong, a subgroup of Southeast Asians, have seen a steady increase of divorce rates in prior decades. Due to their clan-based patrilineal system and collectivistic values, divorce is stigmatized and discouraged, especially for Hmong women. A mixed-methods approach was used to explore Hmong women’s reasons for divorce, divorce initiation, and the relationship of social support and depression levels. To analyze findings, a thematic content analysis of written responses in addition to regression models were conducted. Our qualitative findings show the most prominent reasons for divorce reported by Hmong women were personality or life differences, abusive behaviors, and infidelity. No statistical significance was found between initiation of divorce and perceived social support or depression and perceived social support. Implications of findings are shared.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-03-09T01:14:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231162966
       
  • Whose Preference Matters More' Couple’s Fertility Preferences and
           Realization in the Context of China’s Two-Child Policy

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      Authors: Yuying Tong, Yiqing Gan, Chunxue Zhang
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The universal two-child policy in China did not lead to a significant increase in fertility, which results in many public debates. In this study, we examine to what extent a couple’s desires for more children are associated with their behavior for having a second child, and whether there is a gender power imbalance in the realization process. Using the China Family Panel Studies data in 2014 and 2018, the findings suggest that the overall rate of having a second child is low after the policy relaxation. Compared to wives, husbands have greater power in the second-child realization, and this phenomenon is only salient in rural areas. Education, as an indicator of resources and a tool of empowerment, played a limited role in reversing the husband’s dominance in fertility outcomes in rural areas. This study sheds light on domestic power relations and fertility realization in an era right after the policy relaxation in China and calls for policies to target the issues of how to raise fertility levels without sacrificing women’s interests.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-24T02:29:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221150976
       
  • Transmission of and Views About Family Values in an Australian Convenience
           Sample: A Mixed Methods Study

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      Authors: Damien W. Riggs, Clemence Due
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Family values operate in both immediate (i.e., familial) and broader social contexts. This study used a mixed methods approach to examine both forms of family values in the Australian context. A convenience sample of 856 people completed a measure of family values about both their own values and their perceived values of one of their parents, and a measure of familism. Using a story completion approach, a majority of the sample also responded to three story stems focused on the perceived values held by fictional families. Quantitative findings identified relationships between participant and perceived parent values in terms of gender. Participants reported high levels of familism, predicted by religiosity, age, and being a parent. Qualitative findings suggested that some participants were mindful of discrimination faced by the fictional families, but many participants also provided deficit accounts.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-22T12:56:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231158688
       
  • Macro-Level Correlates of Early Marriage in Asia

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      Authors: Fatemeh Torabi
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Although the practice of child or early marriage—defined as marriage by age 18—has been declining around the world, one in every five young women still marry as children. The majority of child brides live in Asia and that includes over 400 million women. Yet, no study to date has investigated cross-national differences in early marriage and its correlates in Asia. Using data from multiple sources, this paper describes the geographical distribution of early marriage in Asia, assesses the extent to which the exiting variation is related to demographic, economic, and gender-related factors, and examines the association between early marriage and health outcomes. The findings suggest that (1) the prevalence of early marriage varies widely among Asian countries; (2) the best single predictor of early marriage is the proportion of girls progressing to secondary school; and (3) early marriage is associated with poor health outcomes among women and children.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-18T05:27:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231157392
       
  • Emerging Dimensions of Marriage in Asia

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      Authors: Wei-Jun Jean Yeung, Gavin W. Jones
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This article contextualizes and highlights findings from the 14 articles included in this special issue that aims to examine emerging dimensions in Asia. The articles cover a wide range of topics and all make an original contribution to our understanding of different aspects of marriage in the region. The vast diversity in East, Southeast, and South Asia continues to be observed ranging from universal marriage and the high prevalence of child marriages in some countries to high singlehood rates in others. This issue explores the extent to which the “second demographic transition” occurs in Asia, documenting the rising cohabitation, singlehood, and divorce in the Philippines, China, Indonesia, and Taiwan. Transnational marriages in Singapore and South Korea and remarriage patterns in Thailand are also examined. The rise in women’s education remains a key determinant of union formation behavior empowering women in making decisions about whether, when, and to whom they marry.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-15T10:11:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231157403
       
  • Immigration and Intergenerational Co-Residency Among Working-Aged Adults
           in the United Kingdom

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      Authors: Zohra Ansari-Thomas
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Studies in the United Kingdom have shown distinctions in intergenerational co-residency between UK-born and foreign-born individuals, however, little research has examined how factors such as immigrant incorporation, economic adaptation, and kin availability shape household formation patterns among immigrants. This paper uses data from the UK Household Longitudinal Study (2009–2010) to explore differences in the likelihood of UK-born and foreign-born working-aged adults to co-reside with at least one parent, highlighting distinctions by life stage (age) at migration and gender. Results show that, regardless of life stage at migration, foreign-born women and men are less likely to co-reside with parents than UK-born, however, intergenerational co-residency is high among some second-generation immigrant groups, particularly UK-born Indian, Pakistani, and Bangladeshi individuals. These findings challenge cultural assumptions about household formation patterns and point to the need for additional research on how economic inequality, kin availability, and gender norms shape immigrant household composition.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-15T05:56:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231155660
       
  • Modern Marriage in a Traditional Society: The Influence of College
           Education on Marriage in India

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      Authors: Kriti Vikram
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      India has witnessed a dramatic expansion of higher education, and women have emerged as noteworthy winners in the process. This paper focuses on the role of female college education on four dimensions of marriage: age at marriage, autonomy in the choice of spouse, work and financial empowerment, and quality of marital relationship. The study uses a sample of 35,561 currently married women from the 2011-2012 wave of the nationally representative India Human Development Survey (IHDS). It demonstrates that higher education, particularly college education, enables women to lead lives substantively different from their less-educated peers. College-educated women marry at later ages, enjoy greater autonomy in choosing their husbands, and have a more egalitarian relationship with their spouses. Furthermore, the study finds that educational homogamy and hypogamy afford greater autonomy to women. Even without a concomitant increase in labor force participation, college education among women appears to have a transformative effect on marriage in India.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-13T05:09:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231155591
       
  • Re-Examining the Link Between Premarital Sex and Divorce

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      Authors: Jesse Smith, Nicholas H. Wolfinger
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Premarital sex predicts divorce, but we do not know why. Scholars have attributed the relationship to factors such as differences in beliefs and values, but these explanations have not been tested. It is further unclear how this relationship changes by number of sexual partners, or differs by gender. We re-examine this relationship with event history models using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health. Models include measures of adolescent beliefs and values, religious background, and personal characteristics, as well as approximate number of premarital sexual partners in young adulthood. We find the relationship between premarital sex and divorce is highly significant and robust even when accounting for early-life factors. Compared to people with no premarital partners other than eventual spouses, those with nine or more partners exhibit the highest divorce risk, followed by those with one to eight partners. There is no evidence of gender differences.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-13T03:04:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231155673
       
  • Family Dynamics in Cross-National Families With Young Children in
           Singapore

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      Authors: Wei-Jun Jean Yeung, Shuya Lu
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Transnational marriages between Singaporeans and non-Singaporeans have increased significantly in the 21st century, peaking at 41% among citizen marriages in 2009. About three-quarters of these couples are Singaporean grooms marrying foreign brides originating from lower income countries in Asia. We use a new nationally representative study—Singapore Longitudinal Early Development Study (SG LEADS)—to examine gender relations between spouses with young children and their family dynamics. Results show that compared to native-born mothers, foreign-born mothers have a more traditional gender ideology, bear heavier responsibility for housework, and are less likely to take primary responsibility for financial matters in the family. Data also reveal that there are more disagreements about childrearing between spouses and a higher level of family conflicts in these cross-national families. These differences can partly be accounted for by the age gap between spouses, mother’s education, family income, mother’s employment status, and family composition.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-11T04:55:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231156675
       
  • Educational Attainment, First Employment, and First Marriage in Japan

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      Authors: Noriko O. Tsuya
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the patterns of educational attainment and first employment among young Japanese, and their effects on the likelihood of first marriage, using micro-level data drawn from a national family survey in 2004 and its follow-up in 2007. Attainment of higher education increased dramatically in postwar Japan, and such gains were especially notable for women. Meanwhile, regular employment has decreased, and temporary employment has risen rapidly among young Japanese since the 1990s. The study reveals that obtaining regular employment as the first job strongly enhances the likelihood of first marriage for both genders although the marriage-enhancing effect is stronger for men than for women. First entry to the labor market as a temporary worker also significantly diminishes the likelihood of first marriage for men. Like other industrialized economies in Asia, improving educational attainment is found to be a factor causing declining first marriage among young Japanese women.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-10T05:50:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231155594
       
  • “Going-With-The-Flow” or “Getting-Things-Done”: A Folk Model of
           Intensive Parenting Among Middle-Class Parents

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      Authors: Shira Klimor Maman, Danny Kaplan, Shira Offer
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Research on intensive parenting norms still lacks a systematic framework to account for the ways these translate into everyday childcare practices and underlying logics and ideals. Based on in-depth interviews with 42 middle-class Israeli parents, we delineate a folk model of intensive parenting associated with ideals of self-fulfillment. The model comprises two parenting approaches, each differentiated into practices, logics, and cultural discourses. The first approach is characterized by “going-with-the-flow” practices stressing expressive bonding geared toward the child’s desires. It points to a logic of aspiration development grounded in therapeutic discourse. The second approach is associated with practices of “getting-things-done” by “activating” the child to accomplish goals and reflects a logic of capability enhancement grounded in neoliberal discourse. By deconstructing contemporary parenting, we show that therapeutic and neoliberal values converge at the discursive level but are experienced as contradictory in everyday practice, thus accounting for the tensions of intensive parenting.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-10T05:15:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231155658
       
  • Working Hours and Fertility: The Impact of Nonstandard Work Schedules on
           Childbearing in France

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      Authors: Anne Lambert, Mariona Segú, Chhavi Tiwari
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The relationship between nonstandard work schedules (NSWS) and fertility assumes prominence in developed countries that have witnessed a concerning decline in fertility and an increase in NSWS. Our study investigates the effect of different types of NSWS on women’s fertility in France. We use the Conditions de Travail (CT) panel dataset covering 4178 women of childbearing age in 2013, 2016, and 2019. Using fixed effect models, we find that working a nonstandard schedule decreases the propensity of a woman to have a new child. In addition, the result is primarily attributable to the first child compared to the second child. When assessing the different types of NSWS, we find that the negative effect of NSWS is stronger for the night schedule than the weekend, evening, and morning work. Finally, the implications of these findings are discussed related to work-life policies.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-08T09:24:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221150975
       
  • How to Find Mr/Miss Right' The Mechanism of Search Among Online Daters
           in Shanghai

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      Authors: Yang Shen, Yue Qian
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Although online dating tools have become increasingly diverse over the decades, little is known about the search strategies of individuals or their choices of using certain dating platforms. Based on interviews with 29 heterosexual, highly-educated daters conducted in Shanghai, we examine their strategies for finding a partner online. Online daters can be categorized into three distinct dating types depending on their mating goals and mate preferences: dating, xiangqin (matchmaking), and mixed. We investigated the underlying gendered factors that drove them to specific dating types and guided their choices of online dating platforms. Despite the heterogeneity in dating types, online dating exhibited homophily effects, which may reinforce social inequality in China’s marriage market. While existing research often contrasted online dating with “traditional venues” and used online dating to symbolize modernity, we illustrate the subtlety between xiangqin and dating, thereby challenging the widely-used dichotomy of traditionality and modernity in conceptualizing family-related behaviors.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-08T07:29:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231155603
       
  • Premarital Cohabitation, Marital Dissolution, and Marital Quality in China

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      Authors: Zheng Mu
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Using data from the 2018 Chinese Family Panel Studies, this study examines the associations between premarital cohabitation, marital satisfaction, and the probability of a subsequent divorce and captures the gradated variations of marital quality by incorporating divorce and self-rated marital satisfaction into a generic measure of marital quality. Findings show positive associations between cohabitation and divorce and negative associations between cohabitation and marital quality. Results further show that the negative association between cohabitation and marital quality is weakened by better education, higher income, and rural origin, and stronger among men. The consistent negative associations between cohabitation and all the marital quality outcomes indicate the persistent strength of the norm of universal marriage, based on which cohabitation is still considered substantively distinct from marriage both in terms of legal status and social recognition. The diverse social gradients of the cohabitation-marital quality links reflect the heterogeneous social meanings of cohabitation in contemporary China.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-07T06:57:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231155663
       
  • Determinants of Cohabitation in Taiwan: A Panel Data Analysis

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      Authors: Ying-Ting Wang, Wen-Shan Yang
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Cohabitation has become more common in communities that have experienced demographic transitions, including in Taiwan, and hence it has become a research interest. However, our understanding of cohabitation in Taiwan has been limited to indirect estimations and cross-sectional analysis due to the lack of appropriate data. These analyses can provide a quick overview of the prevalence of cohabitation at specific periods, but they cannot portray the risk of cohabitation over the life course. Using recent panel data from the Taiwan Youth Project, we estimate cohabitation risk among young adults in their mid-20s to early-30s. We also examine the determinants of cohabitation. Results show that being a woman, not employed, living in emerging regions, not having varying residential locations, ever having sex (especially at an earlier age), and being more open to premarital intimacy were associated with higher odds of cohabitation.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-07T04:53:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231155589
       
  • Family Life During and Beyond COVID-19: The Impact of Relationship Quality
           on Caregivers’ Management of Paid Work, Caregiving, and Self-Care

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      Authors: Sarah C. Hunter, Chelsea E. Mauch, Kate Ridley, Jessica Shipman, Damien W. Riggs, John Coveney, Rebecca Feo, Rebecca K. Golley
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This multi-method project examined how Australian caregivers navigated family life during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 and subsequent impact on family health behaviours. Participants were invited to complete all three phases. In phase 1, 115 caregivers completed an online survey, focussed on 2020 experiences of COVID-19. In phase 2, 96 of the participants completed a use-of-time recall and 80 completed a dietary recall examining participants’ health behaviours including how they spent their time, their physical activity, and diet quality. Phase 3 involved 24 of the participants completing an online story completion task, focussed on understanding participants’ sense-making of COVID-19. Through triangulating analyses of the three phases, this project identified how poor relationship quality negatively affected families’ experiences of significant disruptions and transitions. This project provides a nuanced picture of how COVID-19 in 2020 impacted family life and highlights the importance of caregiver relationship quality for family health and wellbeing.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-07T02:39:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231155668
       
  • Siblinghood Amongst Older Adults: What Being a Sibling or Having Siblings
           Means

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      Authors: Dana Sýkorová
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study is to understand siblinghood in old age through the perspective of Czech older adults. Forty-one in-depth interviews were analyzed, and four themes characterizing siblinghood among older persons were identified in the data: (1) Siblinghood as a unique bond, understood through genetic relatedness, the sense of belongingness, shared memories, and awareness of being the last members of the family of origin. (2) Being consanguineous and, as a result, irrevocably bonded by mutual commitments. (3) Being emotionally supportive and ready for help if needed and as resources allow. (4) The rules of doing siblinghood: the genealogical rules vs. the rule of family of procreation priority; the rule of genetic relatedness vs. the selectivity rule, or rather the preferences of particular siblings; the rules of “good siblinghood” (being interested in themselves, mutual respect, no envy).
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-07T02:23:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221150974
       
  • Becoming Independent and Responsible Adults: Does Parental Financial Help
           Interfere'

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      Authors: Monica Kirkpatrick Johnson, Sadie Ridgeway
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The extension of parental financial support into young adulthood has fueled concerns in the U.S. about young people’s development of independence and responsibility—financial and otherwise. This study draws on data from the Transition to Adulthood Supplement to the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to examine young people’s self-assessments of these qualities as well as their financial concerns. The findings indicate that receiving financial support from families was negatively associated with young adults’ assessments of their independence and how much financial responsibility they have for themselves. It was also associated with more frequent worrying about money. Panel models offered no support for the argument that such associations result from financial assistance undermining these accomplishments, instead indicating that financial assistance is in some cases beneficial. In contrast, earlier assessments of these qualities and concerns predicted later receipt of financial support, supporting more of a selection argument.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-07T01:34:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231155600
       
  • Teaching Wife’s Language to the Children of International Marriage
           Couples in South Korea

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      Authors: Soomin Kim, Doo-Sub Kim
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the social factors and bilingual education for the children of international couples in South Korea. Previous studies identified two negative factors for bilingual education based on destination and immigrant characteristics: resistance from local spouses and the immigrants’ need for assimilation. We further develop the concept of global language status, which may moderate these effects. Using the 2015 Korean Multicultural Family Survey, we conduct regression analyses to test the two factors based on the origin country of immigrant wives. The findings show that the global language status is a meaningful factor that impacts the direction of the local resistance and assimilation effects. Korean husbands’ decision-making power on children’s education is significantly associated with a decrease in bilingual education. Korean language proficiency and citizenship as markers of assimilation also affect bilingual education, but they show a decrease for Chinese wives but an increase for Southeast Asian wives.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-06T09:53:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231155651
       
  • Division of Housework and Women’s Fertility Willingness

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      Authors: Cheng Zhang, Yanan Liang, Xiaoyu Qi
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Low fertility willingness has become a major practical reality in China. From the perspective of family gender equality, this paper analyzes the impact of division of housework on women’s fertility willingness by using the data of China Family Panel Studies (CFPS). The results of propensity score matching method and instrumental variable method show that husbands’ participation in housework can effectively improve wives’ fertility willingness. Mechanism analysis shows that husbands’ active participation in housework can effectively reduce wives’ work–family conflict, increase wives’ satisfaction with husbands’ housework contribution, and help improve wives’ happiness and fertility willingness. Further discussion on whether families have had children or not shows that women who have had children are more sensitive to their husbands’ participation in housework. This study provides empirical evidence for the applicability of family gender equality theory in China and the factors affecting women’s fertility willingness.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-06T09:31:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231155666
       
  • Men’s Marriage Trends in Asia: Changes and Continuities

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      Authors: Gavin Jones, Xiaorong Gu
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Focusing on men’s negotiation of traditional norms and new gender dynamics amidst rapid social changes, the current study reveals nuanced trends and inter-regional heterogeneity in marriage behavior of men during the past decades in Asian societies. Since the 1970s, marriage age for men across Asia has risen and the slope of change is especially sharp in East Asia; while men in East and Southeast Asia increasingly remain single in their 30s and early 40s, earlier and almost universal marriage continues to dominate men’s nuptiality in South Asian societies. We contextualize these empirical patterns in the complex interplay of aggregate-level socioeconomic development, the changing labor market conditions (as reflected in a high level of job insecurity and informalization), shifting gender dynamics in educational attainment and labor market participation, and remaining legacies of traditional gender role expectations. This study offers compelling empirical evidence for further theorizing marriage and gender in Asia.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-06T09:20:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231155656
       
  • Parents’ Wisdom and Adolescents’ Cognitive, Social, and Emotional
           Developmental Qualities

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      Authors: Motahareh Zare Mazloom, Monika Ardelt, Samaneh Asadi, Fahimeh Dehghani
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigated relations of parental three-dimensional wisdom on 15–17-year-old adolescents’ cognitive, social, and emotional developmental qualities. Families were recruited in 10th and 11th grades of public schools in Yazd, Iran, and a total of 140 father–mother–adolescent triads participated in the research. In multivariate regression analyses, parental wisdom was positively related to adolescents’ social intelligence and emotional competence but unrelated to adolescents’ cognitive skills and intelligence. Moreover, significant interaction effects between parental wisdom and adolescent gender showed that paternal wisdom only predicted sons’ social intelligence and emotional competence, whereas maternal wisdom only predicted daughters’ social intelligence and emotional competence. These results indicate that (a) wise parents appear to be role models for the social and emotional development of same sex adolescents and (b) intellectual development depends on other factors than parental wisdom. This suggests that promoting wisdom development in parents likely benefits the psychosocial development of their children.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-06T03:23:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231155650
       
  • Remarriage in Thailand: A Study of Emerging Trends, Correlates, and
           Implications for Women's Well-Being

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      Authors: Wiraporn Pothisiri, Bussarawan Teerawichitchainan, Nitchakarn Kaewbuadee
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Thailand’s marriage system has been undergoing a significant transformation. Past research has often focused on the declining marriage rates, delays in marital timing, and the rise in marital dissolution. Much less attention is paid to remarriage trends and consequences. Addressing this pertinent gap, we analyze multiple nationally representative surveys to examine recent trends, correlates, and potential implications of remarriage among Thai reproductive-age women. Our results indicate that remarriage is commonplace in Thailand, and that birth cohort, educational attainment, residence location, age at first marriage, and children from a previous marriage are significantly associated with the likelihood to remarry. We find that Thai women tend to have additional children after remarriage. While research elsewhere suggests the positive effect of remarriage on health and life satisfaction, this is not evident in Thailand. Women whose remarriage has ended reported significantly lower life satisfaction than those who did not remarry.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-03T07:28:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231155659
       
  • Divorce Narratives and Class Inequalities in Indonesia

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      Authors: Rachel Rinaldo, Eva F. Nisa, Nina Nurmila
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      In the past 20 years, divorce has increased in Indonesia. Indonesian statistics show that divorces initiated by women exceed those by men. One issue that is often neglected is how socioeconomic differences also play a role in this matter. Drawing on our collaborative research on Muslim divorces in Indonesia, this paper focuses on the interplay between divorce strategies and socioeconomic differences among Muslim couples. Our in-depth interviews with 93 Muslim men and women and 19 judges from Islamic courts show that class differences shape distinctive dynamics of divorce among Muslim Indonesians. Couples from less educated, lower-income backgrounds accept marriage dissolution more easily, with women becoming much less tolerant of men’s behaviors such as infliction of domestic violence, infidelity, and failure to provide financial support. Educated, middle-class urban couples divorce for similar reasons but tend to experience a lengthier process accompanied by complex layers of conflict. Many educated women’s narratives emphasize their ability to support themselves through working, and a desire to be free of a bad marriage at any cost. Class and education thus contribute to significant differences in the experience and trajectories of divorce in Indonesia.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-03T07:24:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231155657
       
  • Age Gap Between Spouses in South and Southeast Asia

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      Authors: Premchand Dommaraju
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Age gap between spouses has important implications for a range of outcomes—from fertility and longevity, to gender relationships, marital quality, and stability. This paper examines the age gap between spouses in 12 countries in South and Southeast Asia. The average age difference (husband’s minus wife’s age) is positive in all countries and ranges from 2.7 in Myanmar to 8.4 in Bangladesh. Age homogamous marriages accounted for 5% of all marriages in Bangladesh to close to half of all marriages in Thailand. The proportion of age hypogamous marriages was uniformly low in all the countries except for Myanmar where it reaches close to 10%. Men’s marriage age has a stronger effect in determining the age gap. In general, the age gap for women with lower education was larger than for those with higher education. However, much of this effect was explained by the difference in marriage timing across educational groups.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-02T01:32:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231155662
       
  • A Typology of Marital Quality among Javanese People

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      Authors: Siti Rohmah Nurhayati, Farida Agus Setiawati, Nesya Adira
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Marital quality typologies have been the subject of many studies in Western psychology, and dimensions of marital quality have been associated with various positive life outcomes. However, marital quality in the context of a collectivist culture, where marriage could have a different quality, has not been explored extensively. This study aimed to classify marital quality among Javanese people, one of the largest groups representing collectivist culture in Indonesia. Using data collected online from participants in five regions in Java (N = 889), we conducted a cluster analysis based on a two-dimensional marital quality scale (relationship and well-being). Three types of marital quality emerged from the analysis, namely, flourishing, functional, and surviving marriages. The flourishing type was the most positive marital quality indicator. Participants belonging to this type reported better relationship quality and well-being compared to the other two types.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-01T02:54:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231155655
       
  • The Role of Communication in the Quality of Relationships for Biological
           Children in Adoptive Families

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      Authors: Jana L. Hunsley, Rachel D. Crawley, Stephanie Villaire
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Recent literature reveals the multifaceted experiences of the biologically related children of parents in adoptive families, or adoptive siblings. Adoptive siblings report a range of positive and negative experiences related to adoption. Some adoptive siblings describe their families as fractured or broken after adoption while others describe adoption as bringing their families closer together. Because of the range of experiences expressed, the current study examines specific factors to determine what is related to or affects adoptive sibling’s view of their family relationships. Results of this study revealed that no specific family factors were significantly related to adoptive sibling’s views; however, adoptive siblings who reported being in families that talked openly and honestly about their thoughts and feelings reported increased family connection and satisfaction and increased sibling closeness with their adopted sibling. These findings elicit further understanding of the adoptive sibling experience and include clinical implications for supporting adoptive families post-adoption.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-01-30T04:55:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221150980
       
  • Factors Influencing Employment Decisions Among Immigrants Caring for a
           Child With Special Health Care Needs

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      Authors: Lisa M. Stewart, Claudia Sellmaier, Lisha Shrestha, Eileen M. Brennan
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Immigrant parents may struggle to secure and maintain employment if they raise children with disabilities. The current study examines data from immigrant parents responding to the 2018 National Survey of Children’s Health, including 618 raising children with special health care needs (CSHCN) and 2937 parenting children needing typical care. Parents of CSHCN had higher levels of both aggravation and resilience, but less access to a medical home than parents with typical care responsibilities. Immigrants were less likely to change jobs, but more likely to cut back work hours, or quit work, if they had CSHCNs lacking a medical home, missing more school days, and living in unsafe neighborhoods. Parents of CHSHNs also spent substantial time coordinating care and providing health care at home. Results indicate the need for service providers to connect immigrant families with CSHCNs with culturally supportive organizations that can help them handle family responsibilities while maintaining employment.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-01-28T01:47:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221150981
       
  • White Parents’ Racial Socialization: Questionnaire Validation and
           Associations with Children’s Friendships

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      Authors: Courtney Hagan, Amy Halberstadt, Alison Cooke, Pamela Garner
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      White parents’ approaches to racial socialization can have significant consequences for children’s understanding of race, racial bias, and racial justice. Across three studies, we attempted to identify three racial socialization practices that White parents employ. In Study 1, 238 White parents self-reported their racial socialization practices and listed their children’s friends’ age, race, and gender. Exploratory factor analysis suggested evidence for three scales: race-consciousness, discussion-hesitancy, and race-evasiveness. Parents’ discussion hesitancy was positively associated, and race consciousness negatively associated, with the racial homogeneity of their child’s friendship group. In Study 2 (N = 79), White parents’ discussion-hesitancy was again positively associated with the racial homogeneity of their child’s friendship group. In Study 3, with 21 White parents and their children independently reporting, White parents’ discussion hesitancy was again positively associated with the racial homogeneity of their child’s friendship group. Parents’ comfort level when discussing race and parents’ intergroup contact provided additional validational evidence.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-01-17T09:08:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221150973
       
  • Attitudes Toward Heterosexual and Lesbian Stepmothers: An Experimental
           Test in the Italian Context

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      Authors: Silvia Di Battista, Monica Pivetti, Marco Salvati
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This experimental study examines attitudes toward stepmothers in the Italian context and predicts that negative attitudes towards heterosexual and lesbian stepmothers – compared to heterosexual biological mothers – would be higher at higher levels of gender role stereotypes. One hundred and eighty-nine Italian participants completed an online questionnaire in which they read one of three vignettes regarding a mother – (1) heterosexual biological mother; (2) heterosexual stepmother; (3) lesbian stepmother – and her child who was misbehaving. Then, participants responded to measures that assess their gender role beliefs and their beliefs concerning the mother and the child described in the vignette. Results of moderation analyses indicated that the lesbian and heterosexual stepmothers were perceived as being less competent parents, with fewer positive traits and more responsible for the child’s misbehaviour as compared to the heterosexual biological mother among participants with medium and high levels of gender role stereotypes.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-01-16T08:04:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221150986
       
  • Interracial Couples at Risk: Discrimination, Well-Being, and Health

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      Authors: Patricia S. Pittman, Claire Kamp Dush, Keeley J. Pratt, Jen D. Wong
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      As the number of interracial couples in the U.S. continues to grow, it is important to examine stressors that may lead to decreased well-being and self-rated health due to stigma. Using AddHealth, we conducted ordinary least squares (OLS) regressions to test if individuals in Black/White interracial couples experience (1) higher stress and discriminatory experiences, (2) worse depression and self-rated health, and (3) if depression and self-rated health vary as a function of perceived stress and experiences of discrimination. Biological sex differences were assessed as well. Compared to White couples, interracial couples were, on average, more likely to experience discrimination, and higher perceived stress, more depressive symptoms, and worse overall self-rated health. Our findings suggest a potential mechanism underlying these associations might be through increased stress and discrimination. Future research should further assess additional stressors to understand if interracial couples experience worse health outcomes due to being in a stigmatized relationship.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T07:07:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221150994
       
  • Coparenting, Couple Conflict, Social Support, and Relationship Quality: A
           Dyadic Exploration of Couples From LIEM Backgrounds

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      Authors: Siera J. Reimnitz, Heidi Stolz, Rebecca G. Renegar, Jessica L McCaig, Megan Baumgardner
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Economically marginalized families may face enduring vulnerabilities that make adaptive relational processes leading to healthy, long-term relationships more difficult. Informed by the vulnerability-stress-adaptation framework, we utilized an actor-partner interdependence model and dyadic data from a sample of 199 low-income couples who were expecting or had recently given birth to investigate the association of two adaptive processes (couple conflict and coparenting alliance) and two personal resources (instrumental and emotional support) with their relationship quality. Results indicated significant actor effects of men’s and women’s coparenting alliance and men’s instrumental support on their own reports of relationship quality. Additionally, results indicated three significant conjoint actor-partner effects—couple conflict and couple emotional support on women’s relationship quality and couple conflict on men’s relationship quality. These findings contribute to the literature on the transition to parenthood and extend the literature examining dyadic relational processes in families from low-income and economically marginalized backgrounds.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T06:01:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221150984
       
  • International Displacement and Family Stress in Latin America

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      Authors: Abigail Weitzman, Katarina Huss, Matthew Blanton, Jeffrey Swindle, Gilbert Brenes Camacho, Arodys Robles
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Family stress theories posit that individual family members are positioned to adapt to external stressors differently and that these differences can strain family systems. Analyzing in-depth interviews with a diverse sample of migrant mothers in Costa Rica, we investigate how families adjust to the stressors of international displacement. Three stages of family stress adjustment emerged from our analysis: (1) parents’ prioritization of safety, (2) parents’ and children’s grappling with new legal, economic, and social circumstances, and (3) parents’ protracted uncertainty in one or more of these realms concomitant with children’s feeling resettled. A fourth stage of (4) convergent parent and child resettling also emerged, but only among select families who enjoyed stable financial or emotional support from extended kin or local institutions in Costa Rica. Parents’ perceptions of their security, and social, economic, and legal circumstances contributed to the progression between stages of stress adjustment.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T05:16:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231151291
       
  • Who You Live With Matters: Living Arrangements and Life Expectancy With
           the Evidence From Eighteen-Year Follow-Up Data

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      Authors: Juwen Wang, Chi-Tsun Chiu
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      No study has quantified the association between living arrangements and life expectancy in Taiwan. This study aims to fill this gap by investigating life expectancy among various types of living arrangements in Taiwan. We applied the Taiwan Longitudinal Study on Aging, a longitudinal survey of a nationally representative sample of older adults in Taiwan. We conducted hazard models to estimate the life expectancy of older adults by gender, at age 60, and in 12 different types of living arrangements. Our results have confirmed an association between living arrangements and life expectancy among older Taiwanese. Older adults who live with their parents enjoy a longer life expectancy. In contrast, living with a caregiver or in nursing institutions, and living only with their son/son-in-law have a relatively shorter life expectancy. Living arrangements suggested the allocation of family resources and support, and the demand/need for health care differs across living arrangements.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T03:16:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231151296
       
  • Types of Family Leisure Activities in Families With Adolescents

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      Authors: José Santiago Álvarez Muñoz, Ma Ángeles Hernández Prados
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Leisure has been acquiring a leading role in families to the point of being represented in different areas of society. In fact, a diversified practice is necessary to obtain maximum benefit. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine which are the types of family leisure activities most exercised. The degree of frequency of 11 types of family leisure activities was measured on a four-point Likert scale. The same consisted of 1054 Compulsory Secondary Education students from the southeast of Spain. Results revealed that gastronomic, digital, and commercial leisure are the most frequently practiced, while solidarity and spiritual leisure are the least practiced by adolescents with their families. In addition, age, academic performance, and parents' level of studies were variables significantly associated with the types of family leisure activities. In this way, there is a need to offer a more diversified model of family leisure activities.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-01-11T08:23:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221150995
       
  • Trajectories of Paternal Contact After Parental Separation: A Latent Class
           Growth Analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Amandine Baude, Sylvie Drapeau, Véronique Lachance, Hans Ivers
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      A latent class growth curve analysis was conducted to model post-separation, paternal involvement trajectories over an 8-year period from the time of separation. Our sample was composed of 245 separated mothers whose data was drawn from a representative survey of Québec children. Four classes of distinct trajectories were identified: shared-time, near-shared-time, moderate-stable, and low-decreasing. The majority of fathers maintained a consistently high level of contact with their children, and the frequency of visits at the time of separation seemed to determine future father–child contact. Several factors predicted contact trajectories, including socioeconomic status, a new partner in the mother’s life, and the quality of the inter-parental relationship.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2023-01-10T05:47:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X231151297
       
 
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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
ACOSS Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
African Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Argumentum     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Asian Journal of Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Australian Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access  
Bakti Budaya     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
British Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Care Management Journals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Social Work Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
ConCienciaSocial     Open Access  
Contemporary Rural Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Critical and Radical Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Critical Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Cuadernos de Trabajo Social     Open Access  
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Developmental Child Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
European Journal of Social Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Families in Society : The Journal of Contemporary Social Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Geopolitical, Social Security and Freedom Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Global Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Groupwork     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Indonesian Journal of Guidance and Counseling     Open Access  
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Care and Caring     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Islamic Counseling : Jurnal Bimbingan Konseling Islam     Open Access  
Janus Sosiaalipolitiikan ja sosiaalityön tutkimuksen aikakauslehti     Open Access  
Journal for Specialists in Group Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Care Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Community Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Comparative Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Family Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Forensic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Human Rights and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 351)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 160)
Journal of Public Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access  
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Leidfaden : Fachmagazin für Krisen, Leid, Trauer     Hybrid Journal  
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access  
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 73)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nordisk välfärdsforskning | Nordic Welfare Research     Open Access  
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Partner Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 188)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Policy Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Prospectiva : Revista de Trabajo Social e Intervención Social     Open Access  
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Qualitative Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Qualitative Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Research on Social Work Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Serviço Social em Perspectiva     Open Access  
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Service social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 3)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 139)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Social Work & Social Sciences Review     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Social Work / Maatskaplike Werk     Open Access  
Social Work and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Social Work Education: The International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Social Work With Groups     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Socialinė teorija, empirija, politika ir praktika     Open Access  
Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift     Open Access  

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JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 18.207.129.175
 
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