A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2        [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
ACOSS Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
African Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Argumentum     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Australian Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access  
Bakti Budaya     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
British Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Canadian Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Care Management Journals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Social Work Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access  
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
ConCienciaSocial     Open Access  
Contemporary Rural Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Critical and Radical Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Critical Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Cuadernos de Trabajo Social     Open Access  
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developmental Child Welfare     Hybrid Journal  
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
European Journal of Social Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Families in Society : The Journal of Contemporary Social Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Geopolitical, Social Security and Freedom Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Global Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Groupwork     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access  
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Indonesian Journal of Guidance and Counseling     Open Access  
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Care and Caring     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Islamic Counseling : Jurnal Bimbingan Konseling Islam     Open Access  
Janus Sosiaalipolitiikan ja sosiaalityön tutkimuksen aikakauslehti     Open Access  
Journal for Specialists in Group Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Care Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Community Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Comparative Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Family Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Forensic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Human Rights and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 285)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 129)
Journal of Public Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access  
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access  
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Leidfaden : Fachmagazin für Krisen, Leid, Trauer     Hybrid Journal  
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access  
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Nordisk välfärdsforskning | Nordic Welfare Research     Open Access  
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri     Open Access  
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Partner Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 146)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Policy Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Prospectiva : Revista de Trabajo Social e Intervención Social     Open Access  
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Qualitative Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Qualitative Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Research on Social Work Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Serviço Social em Perspectiva     Open Access  
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Service social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access  
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 2)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 114)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Social Work & Social Sciences Review     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Social Work / Maatskaplike Werk     Open Access  
Social Work and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Social Work Education: The International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Social Work With Groups     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Socialinė teorija, empirija, politika ir praktika     Open Access  
Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift     Open Access  

        1 2        [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Family Issues
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.86
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 21  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0192-513X - ISSN (Online) 1552-5481
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • “This Gradual Swing Back into Us”: Active Duty Army Spouses’
           Experiences During Homecoming and Post-Deployment Family Reintegration

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alison L. Drew, Abby E. Blankenship, Tessa K. Kritikos, Vanessa M. Jacoby, Katherine A. Dondanville, Jeffrey S. Yarvis, Allah-Fard Sharrieff, Cindy A. McGeary, Tabatha H. Blount, Stacey Young-McCaughan, Alan L. Peterson, and Ellen R. DeVoe
      Pages: 1946 - 1967
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Volume 43, Issue 7, Page 1946-1967, July 2022.
      There is acknowledgment that deployments can be stressful for military spouses; however, less is known about their experiences post-deployment. This qualitative study examined the post-deployment experiences of 16 female spouses, whose active duty Army husband had returned from deployment within the previous 2 years and who had a young child during the deployment. Spouses reported that the time surrounding their husbands’ return was one of the great transitions, often accompanied by stress. Most families were able to work through challenges and show positive adjustment over time. However, some spouses described severe post-deployment challenges marked by disconnect from their partners; three of these were spouses whose husbands had posttraumatic stress disorder. The findings address how spouses prepared for their husband’s return, their reunion experiences, the process of reintegrating their husband into family life, and individual changes in the partners post-deployment. Facilitators and challenges to adjustment were identified as potential targets for interventions.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T04:08:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030023
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Self-Perspectives on Marriage Among Arabs With Disabilities Living in
           Israel

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Leena Badran, Ayelet Gur, Hira Amin, Michael Ashley Stein
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to examine the subjective perspectives on marriage of Arabs with disabilities living in Israel. Semi-structured interviews were conducted among 15 Arabs in Israel with physical, visual impairment, and mental disorders. Themes were generated using thematic analysis. Two main recursive and intertwined themes emerged: reflections about marriage and the reality of marriage. The real-life situation feeds into social perceptions: when the disabled person sees that people with disabilities hardly marry, this increases self-stigma and the fear of rejection. Similarly, social and personal perceptions exacerbate the situation on the ground. Gender also played a key factor with women with disabilities facing more stigma and negative experiences relative to men with disabilities. The findings call for raising awareness of the marital rights of Arabs with disabilities and combating negative social attitudes towards them as first steps to creating a more accessible and inclusive environment, with particular attention to gender differences.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-06-11T01:57:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221107448
       
  • The Racialization of Latino Families

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Maxine Baca Zinn, Barbara Wells
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      While racial and demographic changes producing a multiracial United States are well-acknowledged in the family field, insufficient attention is given to Latinos as a racialized population. As the Latino population continues to expand, it is essential for family studies to move beyond a Black/White binary. We call for making race and racialization central building blocks in research and analysis of Latino families. This paper provides an overview of research and thought on the racialization of Latino families, advancing a structural framing to reveal: (1) how race and intersecting inequalities shape families; and (2) how racialization processes use families to sustain and reinforce institutional inequalities. This structural framing encompasses a set of analytic premises for extending the study of family racialization to Latinos, thereby building a more comprehensive racial analysis of U.S. families.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T05:24:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221105246
       
  • Non-Standard Employment and Partnership Dissolution: A Comparison of
           Nonmarital Cohabitations and Marriages

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Inga Laß
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This paper investigates the link between non-standard employment (NSE) and the risk of partnership dissolution, applying event history analysis to data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) and the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey for the period 2001–2016. It moves beyond previous studies by (a) considering a broader range of employment types, including fixed-term and casual contracts, temporary agency work and part-time work, and (b) by comparing the effect of NSE in nonmarital cohabitations and marriages. The results show that the effect differs by employment type, gender and partnership type. For example, among women, part-time work is associated with a decreased dissolution risk compared to full-time work in marriages but not in cohabitations. Temporary employment is linked to increased dissolution risks compared to permanent employment in both partnership types, with the association partly being stronger for casual and/or agency work than for fixed-term contracts.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-06-09T01:49:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221107452
       
  • ‘It’s Nothing Serious I Suppose’ Family Help-Seeking for
           Adolescent Social Anxiety

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Cal Mc Donagh, Eilis Hennessy
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates how families seek professional supports for adolescent social anxiety. Many adolescents meet diagnostic criteria for social anxiety disorder but do not access professional mental health supports. Access to timely interventions is important because social anxiety has a range of developmental implications and typically persists into adulthood when untreated. Twelve adolescents (aged 14 to 18) who had attended mental health services for support with social anxiety and 13 mothers of such adolescents participated in semi-structured interviews which were analysed thematically. Findings indicated that mothers play an important role in noticing difficulties and initiating help-seeking for their children, although adolescents and their mothers can initially view anxiety as ‘just shyness’ and often seek help for a range of difficulties, including unhappiness, rather than anxiety specifically. Furthermore, many adolescents described experiencing help-seeking as embarrassing or shameful. Implications for facilitating families to access professional supports for adolescents are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T06:08:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221106736
       
  • The Effects of Parents’ and Their Children’s Characteristics on
           Parental Involvement in Sport

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Krisztina Kovács, Rita F. Földi, Noémi Gyömbér
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The present study explored factors potentially influencing parental involvement. A total of 1260 parents (Mage = 43.54, SD = 5.10) completed an online form including demographic questions, questions on their children’s sport participation, and three self-report measures (Parental Involvement in Sport Questionnaire (PISQ), Competitive State Anxiety Inventory 2 (CSAI-2), and Perceived Autonomy Support Scale for Exercise Setting (PASSES)). Possible predictors of the four assessed types of parental involvement were tested with hierarchical linear regression models. The significant predictors were the parent’s gender, her/his sporting experience (or the lack thereof), and the child’s current stage of sport participation. Furthermore, significant associations were found between directive parental behavior and state anxiety and between parental praise/understanding and autonomy support, which were independent of the parent’s gender and sporting experience, and of the child’s age and sport injuries. The obtained results expand the existing knowledge of the complexity of parents’ importance in children’s sport career.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T03:05:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221106739
       
  • Educational Difference Between Partners and Wife’s Happiness

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zhongwu Li, Xueliang Feng
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This paper uses the China Family Panel Studies to investigate the relationship between educational difference between partners and wife’s happiness. Employing some econometric models, this paper finds that the status of wife having more education than husband has a negative impact on wife’s happiness. To alleviate the endogeneity of educational difference, this paper uses an instrument variable approach to identify the causal relationship between them, and obtains conclusions consistent with the baseline regression. Heterogeneous analysis shows that for women who are less educated and subject to external traditional cultural norms, the negative happiness effect of wife having more education than husband is particularly significant. While greatly influenced by traditional cultural norms, these women are not only unwilling but also afraid to deviate from the role orientation of women in the existing social norms. Therefore, once women transcend the traditional norms to have more education than their husbands, their happiness will be reduced.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T03:01:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221106731
       
  • Consequences of Work-to-Family Conflicts for Parental Self-Efficacy—The
           Impact of Gender and Cultural Background in Germany

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ayhan Adams, Katrin Golsch
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The central theoretical assumption is that work-to-family conflicts are having a direct impact on parental self-efficacy, and thus, play an important role within the parent-child relationship. This study examines relationships between work-family conflicts and parental self-efficacy, taking into account two potential moderators: gender and cultural differences between East and West Germany. We analyze data on 1746 employed mothers and fathers from three waves of the Pairfam study (2013, 2015, 2017), using cross-lagged panel models. The findings suggest that gender and cultural background moderate the relationship between work-family conflicts and parental self-efficacy, provided that the risk of reverse causality bias is not ignored. The findings show that work-to-family conflicts are associated with lower levels of parental self-efficacy for women, especially in West Germany. Future research can serve to illustrate how relationships between work-to-family conflicts and parental self-efficacy affect children’s well-being and parent-child relationships.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-06-07T05:09:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221106729
       
  • Differences in Life Satisfaction and Emotions by Romantic Coupling and
           Sexual Orientation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dixie Meyer, Aaron Cohn, Brittany Robinson, Max Zubatsky
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Subjective well-being is defined using a triune model including positive affect, negative affect, and life satisfaction. These variables are positively related to romantic relationship satisfaction and influenced by demographic characteristics (i.e., sexual orientation and relationship status). However, research often neglects how the interaction of identifying as specific demographics (e.g., gay or lesbian, in a committed relationship) may lead to different experiences of subjective well-being. A sample of individuals (N = 811) participated in this national, online survey that assessed relationship quality, life satisfaction, and positive/negative affect. A two-way multivariate analysis of variance revealed those in a committed romantic relationship, regardless of marital status, reported more life satisfaction and fewer negative mood symptoms demonstrating greater personal subjective well-being. When assessing differences by sexual orientation, gay men reported less life satisfaction than heterosexual individuals and lesbian women, regardless of relationship status. While these findings help clarify that being in a romantic relationship may influence life satisfaction and emotional demeanor, they also speak to the challenges gay men may face in our society.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-06-07T01:49:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221106737
       
  • Effect of Commitment on Supportive Dyadic Coping: A Longitudinal Test of
           Interdependence Theory With German Couples

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Matthias Kuppler, Michael Wagner
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Unresolved stress reduces the well-being of romantic relationships. Supportive coping helps resolving stress and protects relationship well-being. However, the conditions that promote supportive coping are largely unknown. According to interdependence theory, commitment promotes relationship maintenance behaviors in general. This study investigates whether commitment also promotes supportive coping. Data come from six waves of the German Family Panel, N = 3,057. Fixed-effects models were applied to isolate the effect of commitment on supportive coping from time-constant confounders. Commitment shows a significant positive association with supportive coping. The results provide support for interdependence theory, suggesting that high commitment and feelings of “we-ness” can increase couples’ resilience against the detrimental effects of everyday stress.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T03:27:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221106738
       
  • Relationship Status and Well-Being in the Context of the COVID-19 Pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Christin L. Carotta, Erin S. Lavender-Stott, Aileen S. Garcia, Hung-Ling (Stella) Liu
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to examine well-being, loneliness, and hope among single and partnered adults in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. A total of 560 adults in the U.S. (50.2% female, 48.9% male, 28.7% single, 71.3% partnered) completed an online survey regarding their experiences amid the global health crisis. Results indicated that single and partnered individuals reported similar experiences of loneliness, hope, and well-being. Furthermore, hope served as a significant positive predictor of psychological well-being for both single and partnered individuals. Single and partnered individuals also engaged in a similar number of social interactions during the pandemic. The nature of these interactions (i.e., in-person vs. digital), however, uniquely predicted well-being across relationship status. Among single individuals, connecting with others in person significantly predicted well-being, whereas digital connections did not. The inverse was found for partnered individuals, where digital connections predicted well-being, but in-person interactions did not.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-06-02T07:41:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221105242
       
  • Socioeconomic Disadvantage as a Risk Factor for Attachment Insecurity: The
           Moderating Role of Gender

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ezgi Sakman, Nevin Solak, Nebi Sümer
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Although socioeconomic conditions are crucial predictors of adult attachment, the relationships between attachment patterns and distinct dimensions of socioeconomic disadvantage, reflecting its structure as a multi-faceted social construct, remain largely unexplored. Moreover, the overwhelming majority of the previous studies utilized samples from Western, educated, industrialized, rich, and democratic (WEIRD) societies, so little is known about how these relationships unfold in underrepresented cultural contexts. To fill these gaps, we explored the relationships between attachment dimensions and multiple indicators of socioeconomic disadvantage in a large community sample of married couples (N = 2622) in Turkey. We expected that indicators of socioeconomic disadvantage would be positively related to both attachment anxiety and avoidance, particularly among women. In line with our expectations, we found that several indicators of socioeconomic disadvantage are related to both dimensions of insecure attachment. Furthermore, lower income levels emerged as a predictor for women’s attachment avoidance. Results are discussed in light of gender, evolutionary, and cultural perspectives.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-06-02T02:20:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221105250
       
  • Parenting Stress During COVID-19 Lockdown: Correlates with Family and
           Child Factors

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gen Li, Tony Xin Tan, Peng Wang
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      In response to the COVID-19, a 76-day city-wide strict lockdown was imposed in Wuhan, China. This study aimed to document the family’s psychological status during the lockdown and test the role of family functioning, children’s mental health, child-parent relationship as well as parenting time during pandemic on parenting stress. The results showed that nearly 18% of the children exhibited clinical-level mental health problems. The children’s mental health and child-parent conflict fully mediated general family functioning’s impact on parenting stress. The change in childcaring time moderated the effect of the children’s mental health problems and child-parent conflict on parenting stress. Findings indicated that, during COVID-19 lockdown, children’s mental health and child-parent conflict contributed to parenting stress. More childrearing time would reduce the impact of children’s mental health on parenting stress.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-06-02T01:30:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221106719
       
  • Weathering the Storm: Longitudinal Evidence on Women’s Changing Family
           Relationships During COVID-19

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jeremy W. Lim-Soh, Poh Lin Tan
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The massive socioeconomic changes wrought by COVID-19 have disrupted multiple aspects of family life. However, evidence is still lacking on the sustained long-term impact of the pandemic and how families are adapting to this new normal. This article studies changes in women’s family relationships against the backdrop of evolving COVID-19 public health responses, and investigates the adverse effects of working from home, income loss, and anxiety about the virus. We survey 356 Singaporean mothers over four waves: a baseline in April–July 2018 and follow-ups in May, June, and November 2020. Results suggest that while some family relationships suffered during the early days of the crisis, most families displayed resilience in the long-term. Nevertheless, a substantial minority continued to report worsened relationships. Mother’s work from home status and father’s income loss emerged as significant predictors of change in family relationships, highlighting the gendered nature of adaptation to crisis.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-05-31T04:48:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221087721
       
  • COVID-19 attributed Changes of Home and Family Responsibilities among
           Single Mothers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lisbeth A. Pino Gavidia, Hoda Seens, James Fraser, Marudan Sivagurunathan, Joy C. MacDermid, Laura Brunton, Samantha Doralp
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Lockdown measures during COVID-19 have presented increased challenges in the home and family responsibilities. Single mothers may face unique challenges as they may be isolated from external family supports. Changes on a 19-item home and family work role survey pre- and post-COVID were tested with a paired t-test and sign test; the impact of age and people in the home was assessed using linear regression. There was a significant increase (p < 0.05) in 6/19 post-COVID-19 family responsibilities. In comparison to pre-COVID-19, post-COVID-19 single mothers reported a statistically significant median increase in family responsibilities (Mdn = .0000), p < .041. Each additional person living in the home was associated with a decrease in family responsibilities (B = -13.1, 95% CI [-21.943, -4.247]). Changes in the home and family responsibilities confirm that COVID-19 led to increased unpaid work to fulfill home and family responsibilities among single mothers.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T12:40:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221105247
       
  • Financial Literacy in the Family Context: The Role of Spousal Education
           and Gender Among Older Couples

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yang Li, Jan E. Mutchler, Edward Alan Miller, Reginald Tucker-Seeley, Jing Jian Xiao
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      We examine cross-spouse associations between education and financial literacy among older couples, net of own education, and whether the cross-spouse associations differ by gender. Using data from the Cognitive Economics Study, we employ multilevel actor–partner interdependence regression models to examine both the actor and partner associations between education and financial literacy (N = 205 dyads) and the moderating role of gender. Findings indicate that the partner association between education and financial literacy was moderated by gender. Husbands’ education was associated with wives’ financial literacy, net of own education and controls, but wives’ education was not associated with husbands’ financial literacy. The study adds to our knowledge of the role of the family context in financial literacy, net of own education. Results suggest that factors shaping financial knowledge may spill over from husbands to wives. Interventions to enhance older adults’ financial knowledge should take into account the family context and consider couple-based approaches.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T04:01:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221105244
       
  • Do Stepmothers Pay a Wage Penalty'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Melissa D. Day, Rebecca Glauber
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      There is an abundance of research on the motherhood wage penalty, but few studies have looked at stepmotherhood and its association with women’s work hours, labor market experience, and wages. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979–2016) this study presents results of descriptive statistics and fixed effects regressions. We find that married residential stepmotherhood is a relatively transitory experience. Further, the transition to parenthood was associated with a reduction in all women’s time at work, but was smaller for stepmothers and larger for biological mothers. Compared to married biological mothers, residential stepmothers spent more time at work, accumulated more labor market experience, and did not pay a motherhood wage penalty. These results broaden our understanding of how different pathways to motherhood may impact the nature of women’s relationships with their children, and in turn, other aspects of women’s lives including women’s work–family experiences.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T02:23:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221087723
       
  • Longitudinal Psychological Family Studies in Austria: A Scoping Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Laura Freischlager, Magdalena Siegel, Amos S. Friedrich, Martina Zemp
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Longitudinal psychological research on family outcomes provides crucial information about families in a changing society, but an evidence synthesis for Austria is currently lacking. Therefore, we aim to summarize psychological longitudinal research on family-related outcomes in Austria using a scoping review approach. Adhering to PRISMA guidelines, we searched five scientific databases (PsycInfo, PSYNDEX, Pubmed, Scopus, and Web of Science) and conducted manual searches to identify additional grey literature. Ten sources reporting on six data collection efforts between 1991 and 2015 were identified. Most samples consisted of heterosexual nuclear families, while research on more diverse family types is needed. Methods were primarily quantitative with conventional designs, but noteworthy exceptions exist. Comprehensive longitudinal data collection efforts across child development are lacking for the new millennium. State-of-the-art research implementing a triangulation of methods, designs, and perspectives that incorporate diverse family types is needed to draw accurate conclusions about the changing family landscape in Austria.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T02:17:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221092026
       
  • Children’s Experiences of Lockdown and Social Distancing in the
           Covid-19 Pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gustavo González-Calvo, Valeria Varea, Alfonso García-Monge
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Covid-19 was declared a pandemic in March 2020, and the world has witnessed significant changes since then. Spain has been forced to go into extreme lockdown, cancelling all school classes and outdoor activities for children, which may have significant consequences on young people. This paper explores how young children have experienced lockdown as a consequence of the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and what they think about their future lives after Covid-19. Data were collected from 73 students aged from 7 to 9 years old, using participant-produced drawings and short questions with children’s and parents’ descriptive comments. We used a children’s rights perspective and the Freirean approach of a pedagogy of love and hope to analyse the data. Results suggest that participants have been through significant changes in their routines, and that what they miss most from their lives before Covid-19 is playing outdoors with their friends and visiting their grandparents. To our knowledge, this paper is the first of its kind in investigating how the Covid-19 pandemic has influenced the ways that children lived during pandemic and its possible implications for their futures.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T09:29:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221094038
       
  • ‘I Am on a Family Planning Program, but I Have Not Told My Husband’:
           Contraceptive Decision-Making of Child Brides in Ghana

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sylvia E Gyan, George Domfe, Antoinette Tsiboe-Darko
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores the factors that influence child bride’s decision making, either independently or jointly on modern contraceptive use in Ghana. The findings of this study are based on qualitative data collected through in-depth interviews with 15 child brides aged 15–24 years from four administrative regions in Ghana. It was observed that knowing about contraceptives, quality of the knowledge, attitude and sociocultural influences affected child brides’ decision to use contraception. Thus, autonomy in decision making requires first, making the decision to access contraceptives and secondly, whether the decision can be implemented alone or with permission or in consultation with their spouses. It can be concluded from this study that child brides are not always as vulnerable and unable to exercise agency as is sometimes suggested because they sometimes used contraceptives without informing their partners although there is the possibility of a negative backlash from their partners when it is known.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T10:15:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221093297
       
  • The Remarriage Belief Inventory: A Validation Study in the Remarried
           Portuguese Population

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Carina Santos, Brian J. Higginbotham, Maria Emília Costa, Mariana Veloso Martins
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Dysfunctional beliefs from previous experiences and unrealistic expectations can lead to low remarital quality. This study assessed the factor structure of the Portuguese version of the Remarriage Belief Inventory (RMBI). Data were analyzed with 741 remarried individuals. Participants were recruited through a web-based survey (LimeSurvey software) between January 2019 and July 2020. Two independent researchers translated the RMBI, and retroversion was performed by an independent bilingual research. The Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) revealed seven dimensions (Adjustment, Finances, Priority, Partner, Success, Stepfamily, and Past) confirming the original seven-factor structure. Confirmatory Factor Analysis confirmed good fit of data (CFA) fit (χ2 (130) = 363.588, χ2/df = 2.79, p = .000; CFI = .93; GFI = .95; RMSEA = .05). Results revealed good internal consistency (α = 0.72). The RMBI also revealed good psychometric properties for construct validity, with measures of dyadic adjustment, stress, and social support. Implications and future research were discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T10:15:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221092052
       
  • The Well-Being of Parents in the Year After Childbirth

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Andreja Brajša-Žganec, Marija Džida, Tihana Brkljačić, Ljiljana Kaliterna Lipovčan, Lana Lučić
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study is to analyze the well-being of individuals who had a newborn child during the previous year and to compare their well-being with that of individuals who had children previously and with childless individuals. The sample consisted of 2008 respondents (81% women) who participated in an online survey. Respondents rated their life satisfaction, positive and negative affect, and flourishing in two time points spanning one year. 102 respondents experienced childbirth between the two time points, 673 had children before, and 1233 did not have children. The results show that life satisfaction increased between two time points in the subsample of individuals who had a child during the previous year; they also had higher life satisfaction compared to other parents and non-parents. There was no difference between the groups in affective well-being and flourishing. However, parents who had a newborn child showed a decrease in flourishing.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T03:33:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221096799
       
  • College Student Persistence: A Focus on Relationships With Parents

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Suzanne Bartle-Haring, Alessandra Bryant, Stephen M. Gavazzi
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to investigate persistence to degree in a nationally representative sample of college students. The sample included first-generation and/or underrepresented minority students who had ever been enrolled in a 4-year degree program, and specifically focused on relationships with parents to examine if relationship quality had any impact on persistence to degree using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) 1997 dataset. We conducted logistic regression analyses to predict persistence. Predictors included first-generation status, ethnic minority status, sex, family income, family structure, geographic location of home, and relationship with parents. Our most significant finding was that the relationship students had with their parents was more predictive of non-persistence than first-generation status. These results are discussed in terms of their implications for family-based programming for students struggling to persist in college, and the necessity to involve the family in an intentional way throughout the college experience.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-03-27T04:35:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211068920
       
  • Whiteness in the COVID-19 Pandemic: Who is Talking About Racism With Their
           Kids'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Keira B. Leneman, Sydney Levasseur-Puhach, Sarah Gillespie, Irlanda Gomez, Gordon C. Nagayama Hall, Leslie E. Roos
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The present study investigated factors associated with parent awareness and socialization surrounding COVID-19-related racial disparities among White parents of children ages 1.5–8 living in Canada and the United States (N = 423, 88% mothers). Participants responded to an online survey about parenting during the pandemic between mid to late-April 2020. Participants reported on their level of awareness of COVID-19-related racial disparities as well as how often they discussed these with their children. Although 52% reported some level of awareness, only 34% reported any amount of discussion with their child about it. Regression models were used to further examine stress-related, socioeconomic, parenting, and news-watching associations with awareness and socialization. This study provides unique insight into which White parents are aware of racial inequities exposed by the pandemic and which are choosing to speak to their children about them. Current summary recommendations for White racial socialization and related research are also presented.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-03-27T04:25:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221079328
       
  • Chinese Lesbian and Gay Adults’ Self-Reported Experiences of Negative
           Treatment and Violence From Family of Origin: Evidence From a Larger-Scale
           Study in China

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yiu Tung Suen, Eliz Miu Yin Wong, Randolph C. H. Chan
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Lesbian and gay adults’ self-reported experiences of violence from family of origin in adulthood have been less examined in previous research on interpersonal violence from intimate others. In China, while it has been understood that lesbians and gay men face mounting pressure to marry and have children, there is little empirical evidence on their experiences of violence from family of origin. This paper analyzes self-reported experiences of negative treatment and violence from a larger-scale study in China of 11,048 Chinese lesbian and gay cisgender adults. The majority of Chinese lesbians and gay men felt pressure to get married and have children (70.4%), and experienced different forms of negative treatment and violence from their family members based on sexual orientation (54.2%). A significant gender difference was observed. This paper provides novel empirical evidence for the lived experiences of lesbians and gay men in China and bears implications for China’s Anti-domestic Violence Law.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-03-14T01:20:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211064874
       
  • Adolescents’ Perceptions of Sibling Caregiving

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gabrielle C. Kline, Sarah E. Killoren
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of the current study is to examine adolescents’ perspectives of sibling caregiving and how sibling caregiving is associated with adolescent development and family relationships. Using role theory as a framework, focus group data were collected from 13 primarily white (n = 10) female (n = 9) adolescents in a suburban midwestern city and inductive thematic analysis was conducted. Overall, our findings revealed that sibling caregiving is an important part of adolescents’ lives and may have important links to adolescent development and family relationships. It is important to note, however, that while these findings are not without limitations (i.e., lack generalizability) due to sample size and characteristic (predominately female and white), the examination of adolescent’s perspectives is an important avenue as we highlight the multidimensional nature of sibling caregiving, and the influence that sibling caregiving may have on adolescents’ development and family relationships within this sample.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-03-13T07:05:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221079330
       
  • Estrangement Between Siblings in Adulthood: A Qualitative Exploration

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lucy Blake, Becca Bland, Alison Rouncefield-Swales
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Relationships between siblings have been described as the longest lasting an individual can have, yet siblings both can and do become estranged from one another in adulthood. An online survey was disseminated to individuals who had sought support from the charity Stand Alone, which supports individuals who are experiencing family estrangement. Individuals estranged from one full genetic sister and/or brother were asked to describe the relationship in their own words. Open-text responses were thematically analysed from 291 respondents. Family systems were described as being characterised by estrangements, alliances and conflicts; there was variation in the participant’s preferences regarding reconciliation; and most respondents focused on describing their sibling’s challenging or disappointing characteristics and behaviour. The fact that siblings both can and do become estranged challenges commonly held assumptions about family relationships, confirming that they are not necessarily or always life-long, significant or supportive.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-03-11T10:09:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211064876
       
  • Perceptions of Nonreligious Parents

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Heather H. Kelley, Loren D. Marks, David C. Dollahite
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Although religious intolerance and marginalization still exist today, research suggests that perhaps one of the most marginalized groups is those who report no religion. Through interviews with 31 nonreligious couples (N = 62 individuals), we investigated what nonreligious parents want religious people to understand about them and their families. Using a team-based approach to qualitative data analysis, we identified three themes related to what our participants wanted religious people to know: (1) we are good people, good parents, and not that different from you; (2) religion does not equate with morality; and (3) do not judge beliefs, actions are what matter. We identified an additional theme regarding how they would like to convey these and other matters to religious people, that we termed as (4) I do/do not want to talk about religion and here is why. Implications include suggestions and recommendations to increase understanding, tolerance, and respect between religious and nonreligious individuals, family members, and groups.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-03-04T10:59:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X221079332
       
  • Intergenerational Attitudes Toward Child Maltreatment: A Mixed Methods
           Study of Parents and Their Late Adolescents Following a Canadian
           Two-Generation Preschool Program

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Carla Ginn, Robert Perry, Karen Benzies
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      For Canadian families experiencing social vulnerability, challenges of living with low income, parental mental illness, addiction, and/or lack of social support are frequently intergenerational. US two-generation programs demonstrate positive effects on child and parent well-being; Canadian two-generation programs are rare, with CUPS (formerly Calgary Urban Project Society) the Canadian exemplar. In this cross-sectional, concurrent, triangulation mixed methods study, we used Maslow’s Hierarchy as a framework. We explored experiences of parents and adolescents at CUPS through written answers on questionnaires (39 parents and 55 adolescents), measuring attitudes toward child maltreatment (44 parent/adolescent dyads), and ACE scores (48 parent/adolescent dyads). Experiences encompassed movement toward resiliency and intergenerational shifts in risk for child maltreatment, including use of corporal punishment, and lower ACE scores in adolescents than parents. Effective early childhood interventions for families experiencing vulnerability must focus on intergenerational approaches, emphasize social support systems, breaking cycles of adversity, and lifelong movement toward resiliency.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-03-04T06:39:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211054459
       
  • Coupling with COVID: The Role of Dyadic Coping in Relationship
           Satisfaction and Psychological Distress during the COVID-19 Pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Michelle T. Leonard, Charles Giraud, Christen Abraham
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Models of dyadic coping suggest that facing a stressful situation, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, with one’s partner to meet their needs is associated with positive outcomes. This study explored dyadic coping and its association with relationship satisfaction and distress in the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. Data were collected online from 564 participants. Participants completed measures of dyadic coping, relationship satisfaction, COVID anxiety, and OCD, and asked to describe their experience in an open-ended question. Results showed that experiences were quite polarized. Significant gender differences and differences for couples with/without children were noted for distress and relationship satisfaction. There was a significant interaction between dyadic coping and relationship satisfaction for women when predicting COVID OCD; however, post-hoc analysis showed that this interaction was only significant for women with children. The potential exponential burden that female couple members may face during COVID-19 as well as implications for intervention, are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-03-02T08:21:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211030028
       
  • COVID-19 and Family Distancing Efforts: Contextual Demographic and Family
           Conflict Correlates

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sesong Jeon, Daeyong Lee, Carl F. Weems
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Since the COVID-19 outbreak, family members have spent more time together at home. This study introduces the concept of “family distancing”—the efforts to prevent the spread of the coronavirus to family members. We explore which demographic characteristics are associated with family distancing efforts and how the family distancing efforts are associated with family conflicts. Survey data were collected from adults (N = 324, M = 37 years; SD = 10.5 years; 65.1% female) in Korea. We found that gender, education, marital status, physical health status, and number of family members who live together were significantly associated with family distancing efforts. In addition, lower compliance with the request for family distancing was significantly associated with a higher degree of negative emotions (i.e., anger), which in turn was associated with more family conflict. The findings highlight the potential importance of family distancing efforts to maintain health but also their potential to increase family conflict.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-02-25T10:14:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211055123
       
  • Changes in Perceived Fairness of Division of Household Labor Across
           Parenthood Transitions: Whose Relationship Satisfaction Is Impacted'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nicole Hiekel, Katya Ivanova
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Using a nationally representative, prospective study of young German adults, we address two research questions: First, are changes in the perceptions of the fairness of (un)paid labor division associated with changes in men’s and women’s partnership satisfaction across fertility transitions' Second, is this association moderated by men and women’s pre-birth gender role attitudes' Our results indicate that differences between respondents in changes in relationship satisfaction after fertility transitions could be observed across perceptions of the fairness of the division of labor, rather than across differing actual divisions of household labor. That effect was found for women, but not men. Across gender role attitudes, the perception of a stable fair arrangement was detrimental to traditional men’s relationship satisfaction, whereas the perception of increased fairness protected against declines in relationship satisfaction only for egalitarian women. We discuss how the mismatch between imagined and lived realities might affect relationship dynamics across fertility transitions.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T12:50:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211055119
       
  • “We Can’t Say This Won’t Happen to Me”: Parent-Child Communication
           About Anti-Latino Discrimination

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Keren Eyal, Krista Perreira, Samantha Schilling
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      In recent years, discrimination toward Hispanic/Latino Americans has escalated, threatening the health of Hispanic/Latino families and children. Previous research in African American families demonstrates the importance of parent–child communication in interrupting the pathway between childhood discrimination and poor health outcomes, but parent–child communication regarding discrimination has not been well-studied in Hispanic/Latino families. This study uses the minority child development model to explore how Hispanic/Latino parents discuss anti-Latino and anti-immigrant discrimination, bias, and unfair treatment with their children. In-depth interviews were performed with Hispanic/Latino immigrant parents (N = 14) of 25 children ages 5–17 years. Interviews were analyzed using phenomenological thematic analysis. Seven major strategies utilized by Hispanic/Latino parents emerged: (1) champion success; (2) comfort and encourage; (3) advocate, appeal, and defend; (4) understand, ignore, and accept; (5) learn from it; (6) teach tolerance; and (7) prepare for bias. The development of resources to enhance parent skills in this area is discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-02-16T01:34:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211069585
       
  • Network Financial Transfers and Psychological Distress Among Unmarried
           Mothers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Melissa Radey
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Almost 50% of single-mother households live below 200% of the poverty line. In addition to material needs, mothers living in poverty have higher levels of psychological distress. Although some forms of network support (e.g., perceived support, welcomed support) promote well-being, how do financial transfers relate to unmarried mothers’ levels of distress' Drawing from support mobilization, social inequity, and reciprocity theories, this study used The Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (FFCWS) (n = 3,117 mothers and 10,676 observations) and longitudinal mixed-effects models to examine financial transfer behavior stability and its relationship to maternal psychological distress. Results indicate that, net of extensive controls, mothers commonly participated in giving or receiving money despite their disadvantaged, volatile circumstances, and engagement, regardless of direction, related to more symptoms of distress. This connection is problematic given the weakening public cash safety net and U.S. economic uncertainty.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-02-12T06:56:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211071051
       
  • Mental Health Across the Life Course for Men and Women in Married,
           Cohabiting, and Living Apart Together Relationships

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Deniz Yucel, Beth A. Latshaw
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the underexplored relationship between union type and mental health for married, cohabiting, and living apart together (“LAT”) individuals. Further, we assess whether gender and age moderate (separately and jointly) this relationship. Using data from Wave 1 of the Generations and Gender Survey (N = 34,833), results suggest that cohabitors and LATs have worse mental health than married individuals. The negative effects of cohabiting or living apart on mental health are stronger for women than men. Young and middle-aged female LATs (to an equal magnitude) have worse mental health than married women of the same ages, while there are no such differences among older women. Middle-aged and older male LATs have worse mental health than married men of the same ages (with the larger effect found for middle-aged men), but there are no such differences among younger men. Thus, we highlight previously undocumented gender and life course dynamics of union type and mental health.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-02-04T01:02:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211068038
       
  • The Double-Edged Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Chinese Family
           Relationships

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yongqiang Jiang, Yuxin Tan, Dazhou Wu, Jinxiu Yin, Xiuyun Lin
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      To comprehensively understand the Chinese family relationships (i.e., marital relationship, parent–child relationship, sibling relationship, and grandparent–grandchild relationship) during the COVID-19 pandemic, this study investigated the changes of family relationships and the individual differences related to knowledge of the COVID-19, personality traits (i.e., neuroticism and optimism), and emotional characteristics (i.e., emotion regulation and negative emotional reactions). From March 1 to April 5, 2020, 8821 participants were involved, including 3995 teenagers, 1146 unmarried young adults, 3571 married adults, and 109 grandparents. Results revealed a double-edged pattern that people experienced both positive changes and negative changes during the pandemic. Teenagers reported significant negative changes in the relationships with their parents. Peoples’ knowledge of the COVID-19, neuroticism, optimism, emotion regulation, and negative emotional reactions were in varying extents to which accounted for the individual differences in the changes of family relationships. These findings help recognize the overall Chinese family relationships during the hard period.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-02-03T07:11:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211041990
       
  • ‘I Have to be the Mum and Dad for 4 Weeks Straight’. Exploring the
           Experiences and Support Needs of Australian Parents and Partners Engaged
           in Fly-In/Fly-Out Work Practices

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Cassandra K. Dittman, Joanne A. Rathbone
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Fly-in/fly-out (FIFO) work practices have become common place in Australia over the past two decades. Research has documented the personal impact of these work practices, but little peer-reviewed research is available on the family impact of this work. The study aimed to better understand (1) the impact of FIFO work arrangements on children, parents and relationships; (2) strategies parents use to manage the home-away cycle; and (3) preferences for parenting support. Interviews were conducted with six FIFO workers and 15 partners of FIFO workers with at least one child aged 2–12 years. Inductive thematic analysis revealed six themes: effects on children; effects on family relationships; effects on parenting; managing transitions; managing separations; and the need for flexible, tailored parenting support. The findings provided important insight into the experiences of working FIFO with a family and can inform the development of parenting support targeted at FIFO families.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-29T06:43:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211071061
       
  • Coping With Parental Pressure to Get Married: Perspectives From Chinese
           “Leftover Women”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tianhan Gui
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Postponed marriage has become a trend in China’s major cities over the last decade. However, due to persistent traditional gender role expectations, women who remain single in their late 20s and beyond still face significant parental pressure to get married and are the subjects of negative societal discourse. Through semi-structured interviews with 30 never-married Chinese professional women who are white-collar workers based in Beijing, this research explored the parental pressure these women faced, their response to the pressure, and their own perceptions on marriage and romantic relationships. The results demonstrate the two generations’ different viewpoints on marriage, romantic relationships, and gender roles, as well as young women’s aspirations for autonomy and independence.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-29T05:37:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211071053
       
  • The Relationships of Divorced Grandparents with Their Grandchildren

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ahuva Even-Zohar
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      In recent years, divorce at a later age has increased in Israel as well as in other developed countries, and there are more grandparents who go through a divorce. The purpose of this study was to examine the meaning of divorced grandparents’ relationship with their grandchildren. Employing a qualitative methodology, in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 22 divorced Israeli grandparents aged 54–81. Analysis of the interviews identified several themes: Informing the grandchildren about the divorce and their response; the effect of the relationships between the divorced grandparents on the grandchildren’s perception of the divorce; the effect of the relationship with the parents' generation on relations between grandparents and grandchildren; the relationship with the grandchildren. The results show that grandparents who experience divorce continue to be involved in their grandchildren's life, although some changes can be seen following the divorce process.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-19T11:57:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211055110
       
  • Mate Selection Behavior of GED Recipients

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kate H. Choi, Brandon G. Wagner
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The General Educational Development (GED) degree is designed to be a credential equivalent to the high school diploma. However, growing evidence indicates that GED recipients have worse outcomes than high school graduates. Such findings raise the question: is the GED socially equivalent to the high school diploma' Although educational assortative mating patterns have long been used as a barometer of the social distance across educational groups, there has not been a study that has addressed this question by examining the marital sorting patterns of GED recipients. Using log-linear models, our study shows that the odds of intermarriage between GED recipients and high school graduates resemble those between GED recipients and those without a secondary degree. Racial/ethnic minorities had greater difficulty crossing the GED/high school graduate boundary when they married. Our findings detract from the purported view that the GED degree is equivalent to a traditional high school diploma.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-10T07:51:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211059825
       
  • Student Parents or Parent Students in Lockdown Pandemic' A Third Space
           approach

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zoi Nikiforidou, Sarah Holmes
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The pandemic has affected families in many ways. Parents, who at the same time are studying, tend to be an under-represented cohort of adult learners, and in this study, their experiences and reflections, on how they navigated through their dual identities during lockdown, are explored. Through an online survey, 91 student parents from 20 different higher education institutions in the United Kingdom shared their views as to how they balanced their parenting and studying responsibilities during lockdown in early 2021. Findings indicate how student parents felt both their roles were impacted rather negatively, but also how the pandemic provided them opportunities for bridging and resisting binaries, through the emergence of a Third Space (Bhabha, H. K. (1994). The location of culture. New York, NY: Routledge; Soja, E. W. (1996). Third space: Journeys to Los Angeles and other real-and-imagined places. Malden, MA: Blackwell). The study shows how student parents re-positioned their identities, identified ways to manage disruptions caused by the lockdown and acknowledged family time and family relationships as very important.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-08T11:29:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211067524
       
  • Socio-economic Correlates of Marital Status and Marriage Timing Among
           Adult Men in Nigeria

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: David A. Okunlola, Olusesan A. Makinde, Stella Babalola
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      There is a gradual tendency towards prolonged bachelorhood among men in Nigeria. Studies have linked this to socio-economic factors, but this evidence is sparsely explored in the context of Nigeria. Hence, this study fills the knowledge gap. The 2016/17 Nigeria Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey data of 7803 adult men (aged 18–34 years) was analysed by using descriptive and fitting binary logitic regression and Cox regression models. Results show that slightly more than one-third of adult men in Nigeria (35%) had a marriage history and their median age at first marriage was about 24 years. Educated men (than the uneducated) and those in middle wealth group (than the poor men) were less likely to have ever been married and to delay marriage, respectively. Wealthy men were more likely to delay marriage. Employed men were more likely to have a marriage history and to delay marriage.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T07:18:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211059828
       
  • Parental Mediation of Cell Phone Use and Adolescent Autonomy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ron Warren, Lindsey Aloia
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Adolescents’ cell phone use occurs during significant developmental shifts in parent–adolescent relationships, as adolescents’ drives for independence can conflict with parents’ desires for connection. This study examines parental mediation of cell phone use within an interpersonal and family communication framework. Previous mediation research has not examined connections with social penetration theory, uncertainty reduction theory, relational dialectics theory, and communication privacy management, each of which has conceptual links to parental mediation. Cell phone mediation reflects the broader phenomenon of disclosure in interpersonal relationships. The extent to which individuals disclose information is influenced by personal desires for autonomy and connection, privacy and intimacy, which are components of interpersonal and family communication theories. This study explores the notion that families develop norms and expectations about cell phones that might influence parental mediation. Results indicate that perceptions of parent–child relationships and family expectations for cell phone use both significantly influence mediation.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T06:13:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211066955
       
  • Parenting During a Pandemic: Predictors of Parental Burnout

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Cara S. Swit, Rose Breen
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The global pandemic, COVID-19, has resulted in significant changes in many aspects of our lives. For parents, the impact has been great as they combine work, family, and homeschooling while maintaining the wellbeing of themselves and their family. COVID-19 has brought about challenges that many parents have not faced before, putting them at risk for parental burnout. The goal of this study was to investigate risk and protective factors that predict parental burnout during COVID-19. Eighty-six parents (75 mothers; Mage = 40.73; SD = 7.88) living in New Zealand during COVID-19 lockdown participated in the survey. Results showed parental violence, parental constellation, unemployment, major decreases in finances, and living in a disadvantaged neighborhood were the strongest predictors of parental burnout. Child independence and parental emotional regulation were the strongest protective predictors of parental burnout. COVID-19 restrictions did not predict parental burnout. Findings highlight that promoting protective factors may support parental equilibrium during future crises.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T06:02:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211064858
       
  • Familial Predictors of Alcohol and Drug Use-Related Problems Among
           Middle-Aged and Older Adults

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sara E. Miller, Jennifer L. Maggs, Rina D. Eiden, David M. Almeida
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study evaluated whether recent family member alcohol and substance use problems (ASP) and density of family ASP (i.e., number of members with ASP) predict alcohol-related problems and drug use-related problems among middle-aged and older adults. Data were drawn from participants (age 42–93 years, n = 2168) in the longitudinal Midlife in the United States Study (MIDUS). Poisson regression models revealed that adults’ alcohol- and drug use-related problems were predicted by similar problems among family members. In particular, parent and partner ASP, but not child ASP, predicted alcohol-related problems in the middle-aged and combined samples, while only partner ASP predicted participants’ drug use-related problems. In addition, density of family ASP predicted alcohol-related problems, but not drug use-related problems. There were no gender interactions. Study findings highlight that understanding how adult children, spouses, and aging parents impact each other’s substance use should be a priority of future aging and family research.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T01:21:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211064877
       
  • We Are Family: Effects of a Relationship-Strengthening Prevention
           Intervention on Parenting Behaviors Among Black and Latino Adolescent
           Couples

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Valen R. Diaz, Tashuna Albritton, Marina Katague, Victoria Dancy, Jean M. Breny, Trace Kershaw
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Relationship strain or dissolution between new parents can affect the co-parenting relationship and parenting engagement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a relationship-strengthening intervention on parenting behaviors among adolescent couples. Data from a pilot randomized control trial conducted with predominantly Black and Latino couples were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance. Observed intervention * time effects and intervention * time * gender effects were not statistically significant, but had small to moderate effect sizes. Intervention couples demonstrated increased parenting sense of competence compared to control couples. Gender differences in intervention effects were observed for both parenting experiences and parenting engagement. Given the pilot nature of the study, these findings provide preliminary evidence of the effectiveness of this couple-based intervention for improving parenting outcomes. Future research should assess the intervention in a larger sample and leverage technology-based approaches as methods for content delivery.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-05T05:11:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211064860
       
  • Consensus on Constraints in Marital Satisfaction Among Married People in
           African Context

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tumbwene E. Mwansisya, Ipyana H. Mwampagatwa
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Marriage is considered as the most important social institution and symbol of adulthood in Africa. However, the trend of divorce has increased alarmingly in recent years. We explored the constraints towards marital satisfaction by using the Delphi technique with assumptions that couples are the experts on their marriages. Participant’s panel included married heterosexual couples divided into two groups: men and women couple’s panels. The group of women’s panel included 31 participants and men’s panel contained 25 males. Then in the final stage, both groups provided their views and discussed on the possible solutions to the identified constraints. Five major themes emerged: satisfaction in sexuality among couples, difficulties in communication, economic and financial conflicts, the role of extended families, and opportunity for behavioural change to achieve marital satisfaction. Our findings support the hypothesis that satisfaction with sexual intercourse, respectful communication, financial stability and careful handling of relatives influence marital satisfaction.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-04T11:35:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211056939
       
  • Facilitators and Barriers of Mother Engagement in a Home-based Parenting
           Program Following Concerns of Child Maltreatment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alison Fogarty, Holly Rominov, Monique Seymour, Kirsty Evans, Catherine Fisher, Andi Jones, Jacquie O’Brien, Rebecca Giallo
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The current study aimed to explore mothers’ perceptions of facilitators and barriers to engagement in the HoPES program, an intensive home-visiting intervention for families with young children identified as having child maltreatment concerns. Seven mothers who had participated in the program participated in semi-structured interviews about their experiences. Thematic analysis was conducted using NVivo Version 12. Themes relating to facilitators of engagement included the following: (1) clinician behaviours; (2) treatment relevance/acceptability; (3) strong therapeutic relationship; (4) mothers’ cognitions and beliefs about treatment and (5) program delivery. Themes relating to barriers to engagement included the following: (1) contextual/external barriers to treatment; (2) treatment relevance/acceptability; (3) mothers’ cognitions and beliefs about treatment and (4) program processes. This study highlights the important role which services and clinicians have in engaging parents at risk of child maltreatment. Specifically, the prioritisation of the therapeutic relationship through all intervention processes, and the utilisation of strength-based approaches, may facilitate engagement.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-04T08:04:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211067525
       
  • “It’s More Us Helping Them Instead of Them Helping Us”: How Class
           Disadvantage Motivates Asian American College Students to Help Their
           Parents

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Blair Harrington
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      While considerable attention has been given to the ways that parents contribute to undergraduates’ success, far less attention has been given to what these students do for their families, variation in students’ provision of help, or the consequences of giving. Drawing on 61 interviews with Asian American college students from diverse ethnic and class backgrounds, this paper extends conventional understanding of families and college by analyzing the financial assistance and translation support Asian American undergraduates give their parents. Using a trichotomous model of class—comparing disadvantaged, advantaged, and ambiguous students—I show that class disadvantage motivated students’ helping, advantage deterred it, while the ambiguous fell in between. Culture (i.e., filial piety) and a broad view of family (i.e., siblings’ contributions) also influenced students’ help. Finally, based on interview data combined with partial support from analysis of participants' grade point averages data, I demonstrate that helping had positive and negative implications for students’ college experience.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-03T10:54:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211064867
       
  • Does Gender Difference Exist in Typologies of Intergenerational
           Relations' Adult Son–Parent and Daughter–Parent Relations in Hong
           Kong

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chenhong Peng, Qijin Cheng, Paul S. F. Yip
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the typologies of adult son–parent and daughter–parent relations in Hong Kong, a place where East meets West. Data were drawn from a survey of 834 adult children (381 sons and 453 daughters) aged between 18 and 60 with at least one living parent. Latent class analysis identified four types of relations for both son-parent and daughter-parent relations: tight-knit, distant ascending ties, obligatory, and detached. Sons were more likely to engage in obligatory and tight-knit relations with parents, whereas daughters were more likely to engage in distant ascending ties relations. Multinomial logistic regression found that adult children who were young, single, or co-residing with their own child aged above 18 were more likely to have tight-knit relations with their elderly parents. Our findings suggest that although the male-dominated norm remains influential in Hong Kong, daughters are increasingly maintaining close interactions with their parents.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-03T10:43:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211066954
       
  • The Struggle to Balance Work and Family Life During the COVID-19 Pandemic:
           Insights Based on the Situations of Working Women in Delhi

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Deeksha Tayal, Aasha Kapur Mehta
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic generated economic contraction across the world. In India, the stringent lockdown led to extreme distress. The unprecedented situation adversely affected the women’s efforts to balance professional life with family life because of a disproportionate increase in their domestic work burden and a shift in their workstation to home. Since every job cannot be performed remotely, women employed in healthcare services, banks and media witnessed additional risks of commuting and physical interaction at the workplace. Based on personal interviews of women in the Delhi-NCR region, the study aims to explore the commonalities and variances in the challenges experienced by the women engaged in diverse occupations. Using the qualitative methodology of flexible coding, the study finds that a relatively larger section of women travelling to their office during the pandemic, rather than those working from home, had an effective familial support system that helped them navigate this tough time.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-03T05:56:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211058817
       
  • Marital Quality as a Mechanism Linking Childhood Abuse to Mental Health

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Michael Fitzgerald, Jacob A. Esplin
      Abstract: Journal of Family Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Childhood abuse has been widely associated with mental health problems in adulthood and marital quality may be one possible mediator. We examine marital quality as a mediator linking childhood abuse to positive affect, negative affect, emotionally reactivity, and aggression. Using data from Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS), results of structural equation modeling indicate that the indirect effects from childhood abuse to each of the mental health outcomes were significant. Marital quality may be a source of resilience among adults who were abused in childhood and could be a point of intervention for clinicians.
      Citation: Journal of Family Issues
      PubDate: 2022-01-03T05:03:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0192513X211059831
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.235.228.219
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-