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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 243 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACOSS Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
African Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Argumentum     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Australian Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Bakti Budaya     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
British Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 104)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Care Management Journals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Social Work Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Comunitania : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ConCienciaSocial     Open Access  
Contemporary Rural Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Critical and Radical Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Critical Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Critical Social Work : An Interdisciplinary Journal Dedicated to Social Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuadernos de Trabajo Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Developmental Child Welfare     Hybrid Journal  
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
ECI Interdisciplinary Journal for Legal and Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
European Journal of Social Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Families in Society : The Journal of Contemporary Social Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Geopolitical, Social Security and Freedom Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Global Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access  
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Indonesian Journal of Guidance and Counseling     Open Access  
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Care and Caring     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 69)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Islamic Counseling : Jurnal Bimbingan Konseling Islam     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Janus Sosiaalipolitiikan ja sosiaalityön tutkimuksen aikakauslehti     Open Access  
Journal for Specialists in Group Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Journal of Baccalaureate Social Work     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Care Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Community Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Comparative Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Family Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Forensic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Rights and Social Work     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 394)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 235)
Journal of Public Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 205)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Jurnal Guidena : Journal of Guidance and counseling, Psychology and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Leidfaden : Fachmagazin für Krisen, Leid, Trauer     Hybrid Journal  
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access  
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nordisk välfärdsforskning | Nordic Welfare Research     Open Access  
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Partner Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 239)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Policy Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Prospectiva : Revista de Trabajo Social e Intervención Social     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psikopedagogia : Jurnal Bimbingan dan Konseling     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Qualitative Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Qualitative Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Research on Social Work Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revista Brasileira de Tecnologias Sociais     Open Access  
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Katálysis     Open Access  
Revista Serviço Social em Perspectiva     Open Access  
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
SER Social     Open Access  
Service social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Serviço Social & Sociedade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Sexualidad, Salud y Sociedad (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access  
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 2)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Social Care and Neurodisability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 212)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)

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Similar Journals
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International Social Work
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.581
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 22  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0020-8728 - ISSN (Online) 1461-7234
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • Social work for tomorrow in the new normal

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Patrick O’Leary, Ming-sum Tsui
      Pages: 647 - 648
      Abstract: International Social Work, Volume 64, Issue 5, Page 647-648, September 2021.

      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-06T01:10:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211038214
      Issue No: Vol. 64, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • News from our societies - IA: Social solidarity and the future of social
           work

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 806 - 809
      Abstract: International Social Work, Volume 64, Issue 5, Page 806-809, September 2021.

      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-06T01:10:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211041026
      Issue No: Vol. 64, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Abstracts (French, Spanish, Chinese)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 810 - 831
      Abstract: International Social Work, Volume 64, Issue 5, Page 810-831, September 2021.

      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-06T01:10:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211042253
      Issue No: Vol. 64, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • One more has been killed: Implications for service provision for persons
           with intellectual disability in recent Hong Kong

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lee Mei Yin
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      A tragedy occurred recently in Hong Kong as the attack of COVID-19 rocked the whole society. This brief note intends to call for local and international discussions about difficult cases caused by the infection control measures. Current social distancing practice requires social work practitioners to detect high-risk cases not only for those living alone but also for those living together, and to assess the risks to care. In addition, social workers should join forces with stakeholders’ associations to advocate suitable and sufficient service provision in order to enhance well-being of families of children with intellectual disabilities.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-12T08:49:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820985923
       
  • Social work with refugees: Examining social workers’ role and practice
           in times of crisis in Greece

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dimitra-Dora Teloni, Sofia Dedotsi, Alexis Lazanas, Aristeidis Telonis
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Since the so-called ‘refugee crisis’ in 2015–2016, the hostile EU migration policies, the restricted access of refugees to welfare and neoliberalism have put social work in a rather difficult position. This self-funded quantitative research was carried out from June to August 2018 in Greece, addressing social workers working with refugees in various organizations, such as NGOs, public institutions and EU-funded projects. This article will present and discuss social work’s day-to-day practice with refugees and the social workers’ role as human rights defenders and claimants of social justice in the context of systematic violation of the human rights of refugees.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-12T08:44:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211046980
       
  • Are residential care homes really bad for children' Voices of alumni
           of residential child and youth care in Trinidad and Tobago

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Petra Roberts
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Social workers have advocated closing large youth care institutions and moving to adoption, foster care and group homes. However, these approaches have proven to be costly and often disruptive of children’s lives. This study of 24 alumni of orphanages and large group homes in Trinidad and Tobago shows that the children experienced stability and happiness, with siblings kept together and almost universal secondary school graduation. Problems occurred in the transition from the homes to the community. With attention to gender in discharge policies, large group care may be beneficial and cost effective, especially for low-resource developing countries.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-12T08:41:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211031975
       
  • Golden opportunities for resolving students’ emotional disturbance in
           learning social work values: A 3Ps approach in f ieldwork practicum

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kitty Yuen-han Mo, Wallace Wai-hung Tsang, Evan Yee-Wan Wong, Lai Hung Sing, Johnson Chun-Sing Cheung
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      The term golden opportunities to discuss with supervisees about social work values refers to the episodes of struggles and conflicts encountered by students in fieldwork. They are so-called golden opportunities to discuss social work values with students. Limited attention has been paid as to how to seize these golden opportunities. This study explores the causes of emotional disturbance and the methods applied by supervisors to discuss social work values with their students. In total, 22 Hong Kong students in Higher Diploma Social Work programmes at three higher education institutes were interviewed. Themes identified include ambivalent feelings, methods and expectations of students. An emotionally interactive approach which consists of 3Ps (‘perceived safe and trusting supervisory relationship’, ‘process of supportive supervision’ and ‘positive and accepting attitudes of supervisors’) is proposed.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-11T12:48:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820985914
       
  • Structured peer group supervision: Systematic case reflection for
           constructing new perspectives and solutions

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      Authors: Karmen Toros, Asgeir Falch-Eriksen
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This article reflects on the experiences of Estonian social work undergraduate students with a five-phased structured peer group supervision model, consisting of information, clarification, analysis, feedback and reflection phases. This kind of systematic case reflection enables the generation and critical exploration of new perspectives and solutions among those seeking to become professional social workers. Students emphasised that this model is a useful method for case supervision and that it is feasible to apply it after one-time or short training/experience.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-07T08:42:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820969774
       
  • Understanding the complexity of domestic violence service delivery through
           the lived experiences of domestic violence advocates

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      Authors: Ga-Young Choi, Soonok An, Hyungak Cho, Eun Koh
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This qualitative research explored the lived experiences of domestic violence advocates to better understand the elements involved in domestic violence service delivery in the United States, focusing on positive and challenging aspects of their work. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 advocates who assisted domestic violence survivors. Advocates’ persistent engagement in reflective practice and advocacy for the survivors against a victim-blaming culture were identified as important elements in delivering multi-faceted domestic violence services. Implications for social work and domestic violence practice in improving domestic violence service delivery for the survivors are discussed.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-07T08:39:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211041673
       
  • International field education: A case study of developing an anti-colonial
           group study program in Mexico

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Christine A Walsh, Elyse Borlé, Liza Lorenzetti, Lauren Birks, Lorena Cerecero, Pedro Isnardo de la Cruz Lugardo
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      International field education offers an exemplary means by which social work students can enhance cultural awareness and develop skills in working with diverse communities. This article describes an exploratory study using 14 key informant interviews to establish a social work group study program in Mexico. Findings illustrate how the incorporation of key academic and community-based stakeholders using an anticolonial/postcolonial framework in international field education can contribute to an enriched experience for all participants. Providing social work students with exposure to epistemologies and ontologies that may differ from the Western-dominated education are important in understanding the human experience in different contexts.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-05T01:09:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820976756
       
  • Community responses to LGBT+ adults with intellectual and developmental
           disabilities during the COVID-19 confinement in Madrid

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: R Lucas Platero, Miguel Ángel López-Sáez
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      A group of 50 people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs) as well as diverse sexualities and gender identities in Madrid participated in a feminist community-based project, which supported them through the first wave of the pandemic. Facilitated by professionals, the project offered online meetings twice a month, helping them to articulate their needs and promote their agency over their choices and experiences. Based on their demands, participants chose the topics they wanted to discuss, proposed activities, and were the center of the program, while facilitators set up and maintained the online space, helping with participation and access to information and resources. Through this transformative experience, the members of the group developed friendship networks and started their activism, making public appearances in video campaigns and mainstream newspapers to make their needs visible to peers, families, social workers, policy makers, and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). This research is part of a larger project that tackles the psychosocial factors that affected Spanish people with sexual and gender diversity during the first wave of the pandemic.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-04T01:21:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211044741
       
  • The doctor, development and (un)sociable monkey: An autoethnography of a
           social worker

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Raj Yadav
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This article is a critical autoethnographic investigation in which I explore development and social work vis-à-vis my own life episodes. I examine various tensions, for example, (1) becoming and being a colonial development subject; (2) encountering social work and compliance to it; (3) a U-turn, in disagreement with social work; and (4) a doctoral journey, reinvigorating my ‘social worker self’ through conceptualisation of a model of ‘decolonised, developmental social work’. This autoethnography leads me to critical discourses not only to question development and social work but also to uncover the ‘sense of (my) becoming and being’ regarding those two.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-04T01:19:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211031961
       
  • Does macrosocial orientation matter in frontline social workers’
           professional identity' Considering the critical factors of social work
           development in China

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Miao Zhu, Xuesong He, Yean Wang, Guanghuai Zheng
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This study focused on the macrosocial orientation of frontline social workers to develop an integrated model for professional identity. We used a nationally representative sample of 3069 frontline social workers in China and conducted confirmatory factor analysis, structural equation modeling, bootstrapping mediation, and multiple-group moderation analyses. The results show that cynicism and job characteristics, as a causal chain, serially mediated the relationship between macrosocial orientation and professional identity, and those relationships varied depending on the following three factors: social work education, licensing, and workplace setting. The findings have theoretical and practical implications for how frontline social workers form professional identity.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-04T01:18:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211031960
       
  • Surviving on the margins: Volunteers’ agency to survive poverty and
           vulnerability in Zimbabwe

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Itai Kabonga, Kwashirai Zvokuomba
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This ethnographic study, as part of a broader study of volunteerism and social development in the Chegutu district, Zimbabwe, explores the agency of volunteers to survive in a context of socio-economic challenges. Volunteers in Zimbabwe are operating in a context characterised by socio-economic challenges. They are living on the margins. The situation is exacerbated by non-governmental organisations’ non-payment of stipends or the inadequacy of the stipends that are eventually paid. Using their agency, volunteers are involved in Internal Savings and Lending Schemes, group-based income-generating activities, multiple affiliations, grocery initiatives, accumulation of social capital, and building networks and relationships to survive.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-29T09:40:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211045423
       
  • Working on Chinese male carers’ ‘Qing’ in a social work group with
           an innovative approach – ‘Emoto’

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Cathy So-Chi So, Kai-Chung Lo, Johnson Chun-Sing Cheung
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This article presents a one-year ‘Emoto’ project for male carers. In this project, photography is used as an intervention tool to work with this underrepresented group. Photos taken by voluntary photographers according to various ‘Qing’ (primary emotion) themes were used as the prominent means of communication. These photos encouraged male carers using nonverbal media to assist the expression of untold thoughts and unrecognized feelings. Besides responding to the growing psychological hardship of male carers in the community, the project aimed at informing practitioners and the general public about male carers’ needs.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-28T01:31:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211045426
       
  • Rethinking the residual policy response: Lessons from Hong Kong older
           women’s responses to the COVID-19 pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sam Wai Kam Yu, Iris Po Yee Lo, Ruby Chui Man Chau
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines older women’s experiences of searching for face masks and handling mask-related issues during COVID-19. Set within the context of the Hong Kong government’s policy reaction to the shortage of masks in early 2020, the article draws on interviews with 40 older women in Hong Kong to identify their various forms of vulnerability to welfare threats and their active and diverse responses in times of crisis. The findings reveal the implications of the government’s residual policy response for people’s vulnerability to welfare threats. They also carry practical implications for the support that social workers can provide.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-28T01:30:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211036179
       
  • Factors associated with the prevalence of diarrhoea among children in
           rural areas of Enugu State, Nigeria: Practice considerations for social
           workers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Casmir Odo, Chinyere Onalu, Uche Nwatu, Nneka Nwafor, Samuel Ebimgbo
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Poor health conditions such as diarrhoea are often associated with low- and middle-income countries. Diarrhoea in Nigeria contributes to an estimated 151,700 (16%) annual infant deaths, with a prevalence of 10–18 percent. With the high rate of diarrhoea-related infant mortality, it becomes important to investigate the barriers to its prevention. Data were sourced using five Focus Group Discussions involving 18 health workers and 30 nursing mothers. Findings show high prevalence of diarrhoea and identified ignorance, cultural/religious beliefs, and lack of funds as major barriers to its prevention. To address these problems, engaging social workers as welfare professionals is recommended.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-28T01:29:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211034229
       
  • Human insecurity and psychological well-being in migrants hosted in a
           Nigerian transit center: A qualitative exploration on risk and protective
           factors

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      Authors: Guido Veronese, Diego Romaioli, Rachel Pancake, Marzia Vigliaroni
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Our explorative work aimed to qualitatively analyze the factors affecting human security and psychological well-being in a group of migrants temporarily hosted in a Nigerian transit center. The study involved 250 migrants from different Western and sub-Saharan African countries who were interviewed during their stay in International Organization for Migration – supported transit centers. Thematic content analysis was performed on the texts of the interviews. Motivations for departure from the home country, resources available for migrants’ sense of security, expectations for their future, experience in the host country, and the relationship between human insecurity and life satisfaction were the main emerging themes.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-28T01:27:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211034223
       
  • Investigating the influence of the Catholic Church on social work in the
           Philippines: An exploration of policy, practice and education

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      Authors: Carmela Otarra, Catherine Flynn
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Despite historical and current connections between the Catholic Church and social work in the Philippines, studies investigating these connections have been limited. Using an exploratory research design, this study examined this relationship by drawing on existing documents: legislation; curricula and minimum standards for social work programmes; course syllabi; the Code of Ethics; and textbooks. Three themes emerged in the analysis, offering tentative explanations for the Church’s widespread influence: religion as embedded in Filipino life; the Catholic Church and Catholic-based organisations as key partners in the delivery of social services; and the intersection of Catholic teachings, social work principles and Filipino values.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-23T10:55:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211031974
       
  • Career commitment among social workers: The contribution of personal,
           organizational, and vocational factors

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      Authors: Anat Freund, Guil Javier Koltun, Amit Zriker
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Despite today’s considerable changes in the labor market, studies on the career commitment of social workers remain scarce. The current study focuses on the personal, organizational, and vocational factors of social workers’ career commitment. The study included 251 social workers from various organizations in Israel. Findings show that their career commitment is positively correlated with Protean and Boundaryless career patterns, as well as with their perceived career success. These findings could contribute in developing tools that could increase social workers’ career commitment, which in turn would enable them to be more effective at work, to the benefit of their clients.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-23T10:52:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211031963
       
  • Social work in the face of emerging technologies: A technological
           acceptance study in 13 countries

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      Authors: Evaristo Barrera-Algarín, José Luís Sarasola-Sánchez-Serrano, Alberto Sarasola-Fernández
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Significant technological advances have taken place in recent years, especially in ICT, which are rapidly transforming the different professions, including social work. We want to verify the degree of technological acceptance of social workers at the international level and how the relationship between professional practice and the use of new technological possibilities is established. For this purpose we applied a specialized questionnaire and Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) scale, to 1144 social workers from 13 countries. A high degree of technological acceptance is detected; a clear identification between professional practice, the use of technological advances, and their connection with NASW standards.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-17T01:54:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211041672
       
  • Indigenization and authentization of epistemology in China’s social
           work: Moving beyond Confucianism, Taoism, and Chinese Buddhism

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      Authors: Kedi Zhao, Weijia Tan, A Ka Tat Tsang
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      How China’s social work can establish its own epistemology has remained largely unexplored. This article focuses on Confucianism, Taoism, and Chinese Buddhism to start this epistemological exploration, as they represent Chinese culture and can provide valuable epistemological elements for China’s social work. Moving beyond epistemological elements from these philosophies, how social workers in China can further develop social work research and practice based on the unique Chinese context is also discussed, specifically through the processes of indigenization and authentization of epistemology in China’s social work. Limitations and future research directions are also presented to guide future discussion.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-17T01:54:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211041669
       
  • Work-related stressors accompanying school social workers while assessing
           children’s well-being: A comparative study between Germany and Finland

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      Authors: Kathrin Franziska Beck, Riitta Vornanen, Juha Hämäläinen, Stefan Borrmann
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This article presents the results of a comparative study investigating work-related stressors (WRSs) that accompany German and Finnish school social workers (SSWs) while assessing children’s well-being. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in combination with the case vignette technique. The interview data were subjected to a coding process and visualized with the MAXQDA software program. The findings are embedded in the respective country-specific socio-political and legislative context and suggest that the SSWs are confronted with several, but different WRSs, depending on whether they have a child protection mandate (Germany) or not (Finland). Recommendations are generated based on the findings.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-15T02:05:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872821996748
       
  • ‘Respect’ and ‘justice’ for whom' Culturally irresponsive
           ethical practices with refugee communities

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      Authors: Neil Bilotta
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores how two common social work ethical principles, respect for persons and justice, are understood by refugee young people aged 18–30 years old in Kenya. Through 31 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with refugee young people who had previously participated in academic and/or organization-based qualitative research, this article explores how this group conceptualizes research ethics. The analysis suggests that refugee young people in Kenya did not necessarily feel that researchers were respectful. As such, the article claims that researchers must reconsider how Eurocentric social work and research ethics codes are understood globally.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-08T09:10:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211031967
       
  • Gaps between academia and practice: Perspectives on new graduates’
           readiness for social work practice in Georgia

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      Authors: Inga Saitadze, Darejan Dvalishvili
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      The study explores the perspectives of social work students, faculty, and the main employer of social workers with regard to new graduates’ readiness for social work practice in Georgia. The results of focus groups and in-person interviews revealed significant gaps and tension between academic programs and professional practice contributing to students’ low levels of readiness for practice. Participants identified various concerns regarding academic program curricula, field education, and professional practice; although, reasons for new graduates’ lack of readiness for practice highlighted by the main employer and academic program faculty were conflicting and pointed need for further actions.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-08-26T10:28:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211026361
       
  • The perceived importance of educational qualifications and professional
           development/continuous education for social work administrators: A case of
           the NASW-KY chapter

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      Authors: Hamad A Alaslawi, Jeremiah K Garrett
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Social work administrators may be receiving inadequate training due to the undervalued importance of formal education and professional development. This study employed a cross-sectional survey on a sample of 150 members of the Kentucky chapter of the National Association of Social Workers. The majority were women (81%). Most held an MSW degree (68.5%). Correlation analysis revealed: (1) perceived capabilities of social work administrators correlated with the perceived importance of formal educational qualifications and (2) perceived qualities, skills, functions, and practices correlated with the perceived importance of professional development/continuous education. Understanding this perceived link and the gaps presented is an important step toward developing better professional development/continuing education programs.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-08-26T10:23:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211022796
       
  • Formulating and teaching a course in international social work: Some
           curriculum and pedagogical insights from the Indian context

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      Authors: Sainkupar Ranee Bodhi
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This article engages with International Social Work education. The subject is new, and in many countries, especially in India, content for teaching has only begun to be formulated. While many attempts are being made across the world to provide international social work with a sound theoretical base, these efforts are only beginning to take shape in India. This article traverses the thinking, experience, and insights of a social work educator who has engaged in such a process – the development and teaching of a course on international social work for postgraduate students of an institute in Mumbai.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-08-03T06:29:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211026743
       
  • Global trends in forced migration: Policy, practice and research
           imperatives for social work

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      Authors: George Palattiyil, Dina Sidhva, Amelia Seraphia Derr, Mark Macgowan
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Global forced migration rates are the highest since World War II. This article presents an overview of migration and presents an original argument as to the imperatives for social work. First, global trends are presented and forced migration is conceptualised as an international phenomenon. Second, global responses are explored with a focus on legal and protection frameworks. Finally, existing policy, practice and research gaps related to human mobility and forced displacement are examined, and recommendations for social work policy, research and practice are presented. The contextual influence of the Covid-19 pandemic is considered in this article.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-07-28T11:41:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211022791
       
  • Challenges in making school social work a reality in Brazilian schools

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      Authors: Erick da Luz Scherf
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      At the end of 2019, the presence of social workers became mandatory in Brazilian state-funded elementary schools. This brief note explores the challenges schools may have in translating the new legislation from paper to practice. The goal is to frame and advance the discourse of school social work in Brazil. Among other topics, this note discusses the role of social workers in educational environments in Brazil and identifies the barriers that may exist to the exercise of the profession in these institutional spaces. Ultimately, suggestions are made on how to develop effective social work interventions in Brazilian schools.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-07-27T11:50:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211031965
       
  • Addressing the issue of child sexual abuse in Pakistan: A conceptual
           analysis

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      Authors: Steven Granich, Tahira Jabeen, Sonia Omer, Muhammad Arshad
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on academic and government literature and the authors’ professional experience in working with child sexual abuse (CSA), this article details the current issues in Pakistan within a global context of Asia. This discussion addresses the context of CSA in Pakistan, causes and incidence of CSA, reporting of CSA, lack of effective structures to protect children, public education for CSA, and finally discusses the example of Punjab Province in Pakistan and its approach to dealing with CSA. The article contributes to an understanding of current reporting, intervention, and treatment of victims of CSA in Pakistan from a social work/policy perspective.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-07-27T11:48:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211031955
       
  • Cartography of Southern Feminisms: Contributions of decolonial feminisms
           and community feminisms

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      Authors: Silvana Martínez, Juan Agüero
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This work is based on a theoretical research study on Southern Feminisms and Social Intervention developed at the National University of Mar del Plata, Argentina. The South is understood as a metaphor for human suffering systematically caused by the oppression and domination of an imperialist, capitalist, colonial and patriarchal North. It is a very powerful geo-corporate-political and epistemological metaphor because it reveals and problematises the devices used for oppression and domination. This article uses cartography as a methodology to make explicit the analytical and interpretative matrices present in decolonial feminisms and community feminisms. It also makes explicit the criticisms that these feminisms make of hegemonic-academic-Western feminism. Contributions from feminist experiences in Australia and New Zealand are included and the specific contributions of Southern Feminisms to the theory and practice of social work are made explicit.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-07-08T06:16:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211001417
       
  • Toward an inclusive digital economy for all: Perspectives from an
           intersectional feminist social work lens

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      Authors: Crystal Kwan
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      The digital global economy is increasingly becoming the economy. The current pandemic has accelerated the digitization of the economy as offline economic activities are suspended, and ‘going digital’ is touted as a survival strategy for economic sectors worldwide. In this conceptual article, I argue that this emerging economy is (re)producing social inequalities. Social workers need to be knowledgeable about the digital global economy and engage in economic justice initiatives to actualize social justice. I employ an intersectional feminist lens to critique the digital global economy’s state and delineate two areas that social workers can engage in.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-30T06:20:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211009579
       
  • How the environment is conceptualised and represented globally in social
           work codes of ethics

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      Authors: Kang Liu, Catherine A Flynn
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      While the environment is fundamental to humankind’s wellbeing, to date, social work has been largely focused on the social, rather than the physical, environment. To map how the broader environment is captured in the profession’s foundational documents, an exploratory sequential mixed methods study (QUAL → quan) analysed data from 64 social work codes of ethics. Findings indicate that although the environment is mentioned in the majority of these, there is a continued focus on the social, overlooking to some degree the physical, predominantly the built, environment. A more holistic understanding of the environment would enable social work to better fulfil its commitment to human rights and social justice.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-22T06:36:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211020071
       
  • The influence of leisure-based community activities on neighbourhood
           support and the social cohesion of communities in Spain

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      Authors: Txus Morata, Paco López, Teresa Marzo, Eva Palasí
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      To analyse the effects of leisure-based community activities in improving neighbourhood support and social cohesion, data were collected in two neighbourhoods of Barcelona (Spain) through questionnaires and interviews. The results indicate that promoting neighbourhood support requires a different strategy from promoting participation in leisure-based activities aimed at developing social cohesion within a community. The study also suggests various useful strategies to strengthen the effects of leisure-based community activities. The strategies recommended revolve around networking, use of the public space, recognition of diversity and conflict management.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-21T07:07:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211021144
       
  • Managing social policy in the emerging welfare regime of governance: What
           Indonesia can learn from South Korea’s experience

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      Authors: Tauchid Komara Yuda, Pinurba Parama Pratiyudha, Kafa Abdallah Kafaa
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Although Indonesia and South Korea have parallel narratives concerning their political-economic order that influenced social welfare arrangements, they have had different welfare outcomes. The main purpose of this study is to survey the possibility for Indonesia to adopt key features from Korea that can be applied to catch up in terms of its welfare outcome improvements. We argue that the key to the success of Korean social welfare development is closely related to the adaptive and responsive capacity of existing political institutions in responding to global changes, leading to a collaborative model of governance in welfare service.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-11T07:20:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211011634
       
  • Resilience-based intervention for youth: An initial investigation of
           school social work program in Kuwait

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      Authors: Malak Al-Rasheed
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This article describes the preliminary investigation of the initial feasibility of the ‘Fostering Youth Resilience Project’, a universal school-based program delivered by school social workers to 54 high school students in Kuwait. Results reported significant positive change and high satisfaction with the program. The study provided initial evidence support to the applicability of the program for youth in a non-Western culture. Future research needs to evaluate the effect of the program in larger groups, using controlled trials and longer term follow ups. Discussion of limitations and practical implications for the social work profession are presented.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-03T11:09:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211018729
       
  • Perceptions of stigma toward mental illness in Arab society in Israel

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      Authors: Kholoud Fahoum, Alean Al-Krenawi
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Stigma is a major obstacle for people diagnosed with mental illness and this impacts the burden of the disease. This study compares the relationship between personal and social stigma in patients diagnosed with mental illness in two distinct Arab communities: the Bedouin in the Negev Desert in Israel and the Arabs of East Jerusalem. The sample consisted of 140 participants. Research instruments measuring self-stigma, social stigma, and social support were deployed. Positive correlation between personal and social stigma was found. Personal stigma was higher among Bedouins, while social stigma was higher among East Jerusalem Arabs.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-03T11:08:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211018727
       
  • Gendered dimensions of health in refugee situations: An examination of
           sexual and gender-based violence faced by refugee women in Nakivale
           refugee settlement, Uganda

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      Authors: Hadijah Mwenyango
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyses the interplay between women’s social identity, migration and manifestation of sexual and gender-based violence. The research used mixed quantitative and qualitative methods. The findings show experiences of domestic, sexual, community and survival violence. Their predicaments are exacerbated by socio-cultural and structural influences, and despite commitments for protecting refugees, more has to be done to meet the needs of victims. The article reveals the urgency for the adoption of gender-responsive and rights-based approaches in refugee interventions. The capacity of frontline workers must be enhanced to detect violence, appreciate the needs and rights of victims and provide appropriate support.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-03T11:02:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211003973
       
  • An exploration of teachers’ perceptions of Syrian students in Turkey and
           implications for school social work

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      Authors: Tuba Yüceer Kardeş, Ezgi Arslan Özdemir, Münevver Eryalçin, Burcu Özdemir Ocaklı
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Low rates of school enrolment emerge as a significant problem among Syrian students in Turkey; however, enrolment in the school brings about new challenges not only for the Syrian refugee students but also for Turkish students and their teachers. In order to address this issue, this study aims to depict the perceived problems experienced by Syrian and Turkish students and their teachers. In the scope of the study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 primary and secondary school teachers to gather their perceived opinion on the issue. The findings are discussed within the context of school social work interventions.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-05-29T07:10:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820969782
       
  • Vietnamese social work practitioners’ preparedness to practise with
           sexual minorities: Training and self-reported confidence

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      Authors: Trang Mai Le, Nilan Yu, Fiona Buchanan
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Social workers must be prepared to work with all members of society given their commitment to social justice. This article reports the findings of a study examining the preparedness of Vietnamese social work practitioners to practise with sexual minorities. The study employed a mixed-methods approach, comprising a paper-based survey (N = 292) and semi-structured interviews (N = 12). The findings indicate that most practitioners felt ill-equipped to work with clients who identified as lesbian or gay. The discussion highlights the lack of formal and in-service training in this practice area. Implications for social work education are discussed.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-05-24T12:43:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211013877
       
  • Empowering Kibera during political change: A case study through a Freirean
           lens

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      Authors: Neil Gibson, Stephen Vertigans, Natascha Mueller-Hirth
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Empowerment is an often used concept and the work of Paulo Freire has helped to define the application and outcomes of approaches. The researchers visited Kibera in Nairobi, Kenya, during periods of political activity which had previously resulted in violence. Community members identified strategies employed in an attempt to curtail heightened risk. These factors were analysed to evaluate whether empowerment, as espoused by Freire, was still relevant in community development work. Empowerment strategies were multi-faceted and highlighted that they had created new issues for the community to address, suggesting strategy and outcomes need to be strong considerations in future work.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-05-22T10:03:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211010215
       
  • Parenting for Child Development: The development and preliminary pilot of
           a parenting intervention to reduce violence against children in Papua New
           Guinea

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      Authors: Gary Robinson, Simon Moss, Yomei Jones
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Papua New Guinea (PNG) is a low-income country experiencing high rates of family violence and child maltreatment. Child protection services are under-developed, and few tertiary-trained social workers are employed by them. A research team was commissioned to develop a parenting programme for implementation in remote provinces. After development and co-design of the programme, a pre- and post-evaluation was conducted in 10 communities to test the programme’s potential to facilitate change. Measures of harsh parenting, family well-being and parental attitudes were translated by experienced academics and administered to parents by a team of staff and students from a local university. Responses were subjected to factor analyses. A series of paired-sample t-tests was conducted to ascertain change in parents’ reported family well-being and use of harsh disciplinary practices (sample n = 159). Encouraging numbers of caregivers attended the programme in all sites. The analysis of change between pre- and post-programme scores revealed statistically significant reductions in verbal abuse and corporal punishment, and in harsh parenting overall, with reductions in partner violence and family difficulties contributing to improvements in family well-being. The evaluation indicates that with further development, this programme could be implemented as a primary prevention measure to complement child protection services. To consolidate the programme’s future implementation by building the pool of trained personnel, links with social work education should be further developed.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-05-15T08:56:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211008965
       
  • Enhancing social work education’s diversity-oriented perspective by
           integrating refugees into higher education: Experiences from the
           ‘refugee crisis’ in Germany

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      Authors: Stefan Borrmann
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This note describes how integrating refugees into programs of social work education at universities and universities of applied sciences in Germany influenced the education provided, especially in rural areas where student bodies tend to be homogeneous groups. The refugees enrolled in social work courses changed those mostly homogeneous groups of students not only with their presence but moreover by introducing new perspectives on course content. As the changes prompted shifts in the global mindedness of fellow students and the teaching staff, the quality of the programs was enhanced.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-05-15T08:55:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211008228
       
  • Indigenous methods and knowledge: Maternal health policy and practice in
           Ethiopia, Africa

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      Authors: Aissetu B Ibrahima, Brian L Kelly
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This methodological article explores using Indigenous methodologies to elicit, gather, and report Indigenous knowledge as it relates to maternal health and mortality in the North Wollo Zone of Ethiopia. The authors demonstrate how attention to recruitment procedures (i.e. researcher and research assistant familiarity with the zone), data collection (i.e. interviews, visual dialogues, and observations), and data analysis (i.e. Circles and talking pieces) facilitated the elicitation and gathering of Indigenous knowledge. The authors contend using Indigenous methodologies to elicit, gather, and report Indigenous knowledge is essential to developing and implementing effective maternal health and mortality policies and programs in the region.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-05-15T08:55:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211008961
       
  • Living arrangements and intergenerational support among older Chinese:
           Does the gender of the co-resident adult children make a difference'

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      Authors: Shuyan Yang, Lili Xie, Ting Li
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the effect of living arrangements on intergenerational support for older Chinese, using a nationally representative survey data of 9713 respondents (mean age = 70.18 years). The results of a generalised ordered logit and logit model showed that older adults living with a daughter received better instrumental and emotional support than those living with a son. The associations between residing with a daughter and the provision of intergenerational support varied between urban- and rural-dwelling older adults. The findings suggest that attention should be given to the gender perspective in gerontological social work practices and family support policies.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-05-15T08:55:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211001427
       
  • Application of social work in meeting the Sustainable Development Goals
           for children: A case study from Abkhazia

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      Authors: Yamile M. Marti Haidar, Mashkhura Akilova, Catherine Carlson, Amina Zantaria, Yan Luo
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Social work can be an effective tool in reaching the Sustainable Development Goals, specifically those concerning children and families such as ending poverty, hunger, promoting good health, wellbeing, peace, justice, and strong institutions. Now, more than ever, with the COVID-19 pandemic, social work has a crucial role in promoting the SDGs through communities that are suffering from illness, isolation, grief, economic despair and mental health illness, and particularly to support children. Using a case study from the post-conflict partially recognized state of Abkhazia, this article will discuss how strengthening and expanding the social work profession can support communities striving to meet Sustainable Development Goals related to child outcomes. We will present the general social work model of practice and training program developed in Abkhazia, in collaboration with UNICEF.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-05-03T07:06:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211001510
       
  • Creating alternative interventions in social work to promote
           socio-economic development in South Africa: Lessons from selected social
           enterprises

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      Authors: Robert M Kajiita, Simon M Kang’ethe
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Social work interventions for families, individuals and communities should be comprehensive and sustainable. A social enterprise model with dual social and economic value creation provides a useful framework for such interventions. Through a qualitative research approach and case study design, three social enterprises were studied. The findings indicate that social enterprises pursue people-centred investment; engineer and promote social integration and equity in the local communities; and create employment and promote skill development for vulnerable groups such as women and youth. Thus, a social enterprise dual mission for accruing social and economic value aligns with the social work helping mandate, and therefore smoothly integrates.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-04-29T10:11:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820972463
       
  • HIV/AIDS knowledge and attitudes among social work students: A comparative
           study

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      Authors: Oscar Labra, Augustin Ependa, Isis Chamblas, Gabriel Gingras-Lacroix, André Antoniadis, Cristine Biston, Marthe Mukeshimana, Marie-Ève Giroux
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      The article describes a quantitative cross-sectional study of a sample of 674 university students enrolled in social work programmes in four countries: Belgium, Canada, Chile and Switzerland. The study aimed to assess HIV/AIDS knowledge and attitudes among participants. The median HIV-KQ-18 score for the sample was 14.0, which Carey and Schroder classify as indicating borderline low levels of knowledge. Based on the results, the authors argue that social work education and training programmes should more comprehensively address HIV/AIDS within their curricula to better equip future social workers to challenge stigmatising and exclusionary practices rooted in long-standing lack of knowledge and erroneous beliefs about the disease.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-04-28T11:17:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211004676
       
  • ‘From our ownselves’: Acompañamiento with Indigenous
           Women in Perú

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      Authors: Mirna E Carranza
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This article contributes to the ethical and practical conceptualizations of centring marginalized voices in research across borders. This project worked within the parameters of international social work (ISW) in Perú, which is a space where the advancement of globalization and colonization has deepened the historical exclusion and marginality of Indigenous women. To work towards social justice, this project developed creative innovative approaches to engagement and resisted western notions of progress. As research is not neutral, deconstruction of contextual forces that shape research makes visible how knowledge(s) are understood and subjugated in ISW, in particular that of Indigenous women.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-04-28T11:14:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820970261
       
  • A systematic review of the roles of social workers in inclusive education
           for children with disabilities

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      Authors: Edward Asamoah, Cherry Hau-lin Tam, Ebenezer Cudjoe
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      International and local communities have made commitments to ensure that children with disabilities have equal opportunities in education, just like their non-disabled counterparts. Regardless of the increasing research about the development of inclusive education for children with disabilities, inclusive education is not achieved. This calls for a focus on what other professionals, like social workers, can contribute to the successful implementation of inclusive education. A systematic review yielding 11 studies revealed that social workers perform well-known generalist practitioner roles like advocacy, collaboration, education, facilitation and provider of psychosocial support which emphasises the need to involve social workers in inclusive schools.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-04-26T05:23:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820971707
       
  • Bridging the know–do gap in African road safety through social work

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      Authors: Steven Jones, Catherine Carlson, Frances Sumner-Jones, Olive Musoni
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      The global road safety crisis disproportionately affects low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Indeed, with relatively low rates of vehicle ownership, Africa bears a disproportionate burden of annual road fatalities per population. Transportation and public health professionals have long been aware of the behavioral aspects of the global road safety epidemic. Successful collaboration of social work and public health in Africa is well documented. Road safety presents an opportunity for interdisciplinary research and practice with road safety professionals to bridge the know–do gap that continues to challenge progress toward reducing the burden of injuries and deaths attributable to crashes.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-04-15T09:11:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820971691
       
  • ‘All social work takes place in a macro context’: The gap between
           international social work training and practice

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      Authors: Hanna Kim, Tamara Sussman, Mohammad Nuruzzaman Khan, Sarilee Kahn
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This explanatory sequential mixed-methods study combined data from an online survey with international social workers (N = 44), and key informant qualitative interviews (N = 6), to identify gaps and synergies between what is taught in graduate social work programmes and expected by employers. Findings suggested that although social work values align well with international social work, gaps exist between the macro knowledge and skills required for international work and that which graduate training offers. Findings further suggested that if unaddressed, these incompatibilities may contribute to the invisibility of social work as a viable training ground for practice in international aid agencies.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-04-09T07:14:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872821993524
       
  • Social work education in Turkey at the crossroads: An analysis of
           educational trends and socio-political context in a historical perspective
           

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      Authors: Hakan Acar, Gonca Polat
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Similar to the trajectory in many countries, social work education in Turkey developed in the aftermath of World War II, the foundations of which were shaped along international dynamics rather than local context. In this regard, there has been an ongoing debate on localization of social work education. This article discusses the historical trajectory of social work education in Turkey through a systematic review of literature and analysis of data collected by semi-structured interviews with key informants. The implications of neoliberalism for the social work profession in Turkey reflect a dual framework where the human rights perspective co-exists with a faith-based approach.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T06:35:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872821993520
       
  • Connecting the dots: Neighbourhood House and institutional accessibility

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      Authors: Miu Chung Yan, Sean Lauer
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Accessibility to public resources has been a major challenge to many service users. The fragmentation among different organizational stakeholders in social service generates a ‘wicked problem’ that creates an institutional barrier for service users in the community to navigate the maze of service networks. However, this institutional barrier has not been fully discussed and articulated in the social service literature. Based on the findings of a study on Neighbourhood House in Metro Vancouver, Canada, we argue that as a place-based community service organization it has successfully generated an institutional accessibility for service providers and service users to reach each other.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T06:28:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820972469
       
  • Supervisory relationship in cyber supervision: Implications for social
           work supervision

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      Authors: Kitty Yuen-han Mo, On-fat Chan
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      There is a dearth of research in supervisory relationships in the emerging practice of cyber supervision. This study explores supervisees’ perception of supervision experience and the building of supervisory relationships on a cyber platform. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 24 participants in a nationwide supervision training programme. The findings revealed three themes concerning supervisees’ perception of satisfaction with the online supervisory relationship – the elements that hinder and facilitate relationships – and their impacts on future cyber supervision. The study helped to increase understanding of relationship building on cyber platforms and will have implications for future cyber supervision.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T06:22:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872821991887
       
  • Changing nature of adoption and need for post-adoption services:
           Intercountry adoption practice in Taiwan and Australia

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      Authors: Ching-Hsuan Lin, Yu-Wen Chen, Chin-Wan Wang, Amy Conley Wright, Margaret Spencer, Sonja Van Wichelen
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores issues on post-adoption services in intercountry adoptions based on the perspectives of adoption professionals from Taiwan and Australia. Findings revealed that both birth and adoptive families identify service needs for material and emotional support and connection after the adoption process is finalized. However, the current lack of government funding for post-adoption services result in gaps in service delivery. Adoption agencies experience challenges in funding and balancing the interests of the child and the two families. Implications for practice and policy are discussed to enhance the quality of post-adoption services and improve the well-being of the adoption triad.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T06:18:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820969773
       
  • African migrants and stress coping strategies in Australia: Implications
           for social work

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      Authors: Irene Ikafa, Dieu Hack-Polay, Janet Walker, Ali B Mahmoud
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This research investigates resettlement stress among African migrants in Australia and how migrants manage stress. The research used 30 semi-structured interviews with African migrants in Western Australia. Participants used various strategies, including reliance on family as a community and on God – usually constructed by alliance rather than kinship – to manage stress. The article’s key contribution highlights the multilayered approach for social work to integration strategies for migrants. The study identifies three significant issues emerging: the importance of ‘families’ as community networks, the experience of discrimination and the significance of faith in God as crucial migrant support factors.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T06:16:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820963435
       
  • Considerations for integrating technology into social work practice: A
           content analysis of nine professional social work associations’ Codes of
           Ethics

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      Authors: Katheryn Margaret Pascoe
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This article provides an overview of key ethical considerations for the adoption of technology in social work practice. A content analysis was conducted across nine professional social work associations’ Codes of Ethics. Although considered key reference documents to guide safe practice, this research found limited and varied coverage of technology and focused predominantly on social media use. In an increasingly Internet-based and technology-driven world, social workers must resist reactionary responses to rapid technological developments. Consulting multiple sources is vital to assess the advantages and limitations of technology use, and to mitigate risks to service users, their families, fellow practitioners and the profession.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-04-02T05:59:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820980833
       
  • Trajectories of incorporation and the socioeconomic status of immigrants
           in Spain during the economic crisis: The case of the Basque Country

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      Authors: Arkaitz Fullaondo, Gorka Moreno
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Spain has experienced a major social transformation, which is the result of immigration. This article looks at the differences that occur in their trajectories of incorporation, taking into consideration the socioeconomic, migratory and legal variables. The results show the social stratification of the immigrant group and the differences in terms of internal inequality. Furthermore, it has been noted that while in a period of economic boom, human capital was the most important factor in explaining a rising incorporation, in the period of recession, duration of stay is the crucial variable, not so much for a rising incorporation, but to maintain the same socioeconomic status.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-04-02T05:54:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820980814
       
  • Planning for future care provision for children living with disabilities:
           A cross-cultural consideration

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      Authors: Clara Choi
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Cultural context has a significant influence on family support and parenting for children living with disabilities and has been powerful in shaping treatment and service provision. For parents, a pervasive concern lies with planning for future care provision for their child, and here culture plays a role. This qualitative research explores how cultural context shapes the future care provision plans for Korean parents by examining similarities and differences of future care provision-planning between Korean migrant families in New Zealand and those living in Korea. Specifically, the article examines the influence of familism on planning for future care among Koreans.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-03-31T05:27:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820970615
       
  • A global review of violence prevention plans: Where are the men and
           boys'

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      Authors: Lana Wells, Sarah Fotheringham
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Given the wealth of research calling for meaningful engagement of men and boys in preventing violence against women, this study examined whether current government-endorsed violence prevention plans in countries of the Global North included men and boys as a target for primary prevention. One hundred and fourteen plans from 14 countries were analysed, and findings revealed that engaging men and boys as primary prevention advocates is still in its infancy and mostly focused on individual change. The article concludes that governments should invest in comprehensive prevention strategies and whole-of-population approaches that target social structures and norms that reinforce violence.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-03-30T07:18:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820963430
       
  • A structural social work approach to oral health care in Nepal

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      Authors: Laura Spero, Lisa Werkmeister Rozas
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Structural social work (SSW) is a critical theory that frames poverty, violence, and disease as the product of oppressive social structures. SSW concepts were applied to a rural dentistry project in Nepal. Delivery of oral health care in Nepal is influenced by capitalist, colonialist, and scientific-modernist ideologies that disadvantage the rural poor. Jevaia Oral Health Care operationalizes SSW principles of tension relief, consciousness-raising, collectivization, and power-brokering, but is limited in tackling structural problems around etiological aspects of oral disease. SSW offers useful and important practice strategies for improving oral health care in Nepal.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-03-29T05:07:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820967431
       
  • Understanding professional distress through social representations:
           Investigating the shared experience of healthcare social workers in Canada
           

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      Authors: Lilian Negura, Maude Lévesque
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Our study sought to refine our understanding of professional distress by examining the experience of healthcare social workers in the following three Canadian provinces: Manitoba, Ontario and New Brunswick. Thirty semi-directed interviews were conducted to explore the social workers’ social representation of professional distress and its ties to professional identity and growing organizational constraints. Attitudes, work–life imbalances, and negative workplace experiences were found to increase the subjective experience of distress. Current psychosocial and organizational contexts of front-line practitioners are contributors to their professional distress, a matter further exacerbated by the misrepresentation of social work by colleagues and service beneficiaries.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-03-29T04:52:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820967428
       
  • Development of research on social work practice in mainland China:
           Context, challenges, and opportunities

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      Authors: Shiyou Wu, Miao Wang, Brian E Perron, Jin Huang, Juliann Li, Xiaochun Zhou, Yuhong Zhu, Xuesong He, Jun Wen, Fengzhi Ma
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Research on social work practice is essential for developing an indigenized base of knowledge. In China, while social work education has grown rapidly, much of what is taught – and many social work priorities in research and practice – is influenced by rapidly changing national government policies. This policy environment creates both opportunities and challenges to building an infrastructure to support research on social work practice. This article reviews the context and challenges related to developing research on social work practice in mainland China, and the important role for social work education to support this development.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-03-27T12:28:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820980797
       
  • Peace, love, and justice: A participatory phenomenological study of
           psychosocial well-being in Afghanistan

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      Authors: Martha Bragin, Bree Akesson, Mariam Ahmady, Sediqa Akbari, Bezhan Ayubi, Raihana Faqiri, Zekrullah Faiq, Spozhmay Oriya, Rohina Zaffari, Mohammad Hadi Rasooli, Basir Ahmad Azizi, Fareshteh Barakzai, Yasamin Haidary, Sediqa Jawadi, Hannah Wolfson, Sayed Jafar Ahmadi, Basir Ahmad Karimi, Sataruddin Sediqi
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      While there have been many studies that elucidate the extent of human suffering in Afghanistan, there has been no formal study of what it means to be psychologically and socially well. This article reports on a participatory phenomenological study conducted in Afghanistan designed to better understand psychosocial well-being. Collecting data from 440 Afghan participants in 56 focus group discussions, the research specifically elaborated and operationalized definitions of psychosocial well-being that were relevant to the Afghan context. This study adds critical value around definitions of what it means to be psychosocially well in Afghanistan and other conflict-affected countries.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-03-20T05:26:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820969781
       
  • A socially innovative service model in Istanbul

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      Authors: Aysu Uzsayilir, Tüzin Baycan
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study is to strengthen the urban rights and quality of life of vulnerable groups by contributing to the development of a new approach and standards in urban social services. Toward this goal, we present the socially innovative service model (SISM) which ensures a framework of daytime care and support centers for disabled individuals established in the Eyüp district, wherein generally the lower and lower-middle classes of Istanbul reside. SISM provides an important perspective on rights-based social policies as well as community and city interaction, thereby enabling interdisciplinary study of social sciences and planning.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-03-19T06:34:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820972466
       
  • Thinking about offender social reintegration: A case study of one NGO
           programme in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa

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      Authors: Emmison Muleya
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Successful social reintegration is critical if we are to reduce recidivism and crime in general. This voice of people article presents a background case for why effective offender reintegration services are key in South Africa, and the Eastern Cape in particular, through an example of the Offender Reintegration programme rendered by the National Institute of Crime Prevention and Reintegration of Offenders (NICRO). Apart from the paucity of literature on offender reintegration, very few voices from people working directly with these former offenders are ever heard. Therefore, this article seeks to address this gap by contributing to the body of knowledge on offender social reintegration.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-03-17T06:24:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820967425
       
  • Social exclusion, mental health, and social well-being among African
           immigrants in the United States

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      Authors: Sherinah Saasa, David Okech, Yoon Joon Choi, Larry Nackerud, Tenesha Littleton
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the effects of social exclusion (socio-cultural and structural-economic exclusion) on the mental health and social well-being of African immigrants in the United States (N = 409). We found that social exclusion increased depression and anxiety symptoms, decreased societal trust, increased subjective isolation, and increased worries about one’s safety among African immigrants. The results further indicated strong negative effects of discrimination on mental health and social well-being. The findings highlight the need for social work interventions that target discrimination and structural exclusionary mechanisms in efforts to improve the mental health and social well-being of African immigrants in the United States.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-02-11T10:27:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820963425
       
  • A critical review of Chinese and international social work: Walking a
           tightrope between local and global standards

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      Authors: Qian Meng, Mel Gray, Lieve Bradt, Griet Roets
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This article presents a critical analysis of the challenges global social work standards present for mainland China (hereafter China) with its authoritarian political ideology that is in tension with the profession’s universal values grounded in liberal individualism. China is caught between the Scylla of universal standards and Charybdis of indigenisation seeking to adapt social work to its unique sociocultural contexts. Based on our extensive literature review, we identified four challenges for Chinese social work: (1) balancing personal social services and social development, (2) negotiating global standards and local realities, (3) responding to poverty and other national social development issues and (4) pressures towards indigenisation, while remaining in step with social work’s global standards. China favours the continued adaptation of imported knowledge and practice interventions within local and national sociocultural, economic and political realities. This study also highlights social work in China’s urban bias and limited attention to rural issues, acknowledging this is a concern for social work even in Western contexts.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-01-09T07:37:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820963424
       
  • Ubuntu and its potential impact on the international social work
           profession

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      Authors: Bernard Mayaka, Rory Truell
      First page: 649
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Ubuntu is the current theme for the Global Agenda for Social Work and Social Development and represents the highest level of global messaging within the social work profession for the years 2020–2030. This article presents an in-depth description of Ubuntu as a philosophy of social development that can strengthen social work theory and practice in its global aims of supporting community systems of social protection and social justice. The article concludes with advancing proposals on how the learnings from Ubuntu can strengthen international social work ethics, principles and practice.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-07-20T07:25:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211022787
       
  • COVID-19 and the calls of humanistic social work: Exploring the
           developmental-clinical social work concerns of the pandemic

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      Authors: Robert K Chigangaidze
      First page: 663
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Any health outbreak is beyond the biomedical approach. The COVID-19 pandemic exposes a calamitous need to address social inequalities prevalent in the global health community. Au fait with this, the impetus of this article is to explore the calls of humanistic social work in the face of the pandemic. It calls for the pursuit of social justice during the pandemic and after. It also calls for a holistic service provision, technological innovation and stewardship. Wrapping up, it challenges the global community to rethink their priorities – egotism or altruism. It emphasizes the ultimate way forward of addressing the social inequalities.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-04-23T06:53:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211007911
       
  • Social workers helping each other during the COVID-19 pandemic: Online
           mutual support groups

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      Authors: Elena Cabiati
      First page: 676
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Social workers not only help service users, they also help each other, and they know the group as a space through which opportunities to give and receive help multiply. In Italy, the initiative ‘Social Workers Helping Each Other’ was launched to help practitioners stay resilient and mutually supportive during the COVID-19 pandemic. In these unprecedented and turbulent times, social workers have been called on to face new challenges and new concerns for service users and for themselves. The initiative consisted of online mutual support groups for social workers conducted through a virtual platform. Participants were 45 social workers divided into three groups on the basis of the social workers’ area of intervention. The author facilitated the groups, encouraging the development of reciprocal support dynamics typical of self-help and mutual aid groups. Group sessions were very rich in content, and the discussion focused on several topics following the participants’ needs. The content analysis revealed that the mutual support conversations among social workers focused on three main categories: practical and organizational; methodological and ethical; and personal and emotional. The groups offered supervision and mutual support based on experiential learning processes. The article presents the rationale, methods and outcomes of the experience. This initiative could inspire the development of online mutual support groups for social workers.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-02-08T04:46:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820975447
       
  • Using mobile apps in social work behavioral health care service: The case
           for China

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      Authors: Julian Chun-Chung Chow, Laura Elizabeth Pathak, Shang Tzu (Trish) Yeh
      First page: 689
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Mobile apps have increasingly become an innovative tool that can provide information and resources to those who have service needs but often lack access to and knowledge about how to improve their well-being in today’s society. In China, although the number of Internet users has increased substantively, there has been little discussion on how mobile apps can help social workers in their delivery of behavioral health services. This article features three highly used apps that facilitate behavioral health care service delivery in the United States and provides recommendations for developing apps for social work practice in China.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-08-03T06:30:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211031953
       
  • COVID-19 and mental health services delivery at Ingutsheni Central
           Hospital in Zimbabwe: Lessons for psychiatric social work practice

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      Authors: Wilberforce Kurevakwesu
      First page: 702
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This qualitative study explores the factors affecting mental health services delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic at Ingutsheni Central Hospital. A descriptive phenomenological design was used. Data were collected from 16 participants using interview guides and were analysed through interpretative phenomenological analysis. Participants underlined several factors affecting mental health management and these were, inter alia, the congestion of wards and lack of resources. In riposte, they recommended several solutions towards curtailing these challenges. Based on the findings, the research then elucidates roles that psychiatric social workers can take towards improving mental health services delivery during the pandemic period.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-07-28T11:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211031973
       
  • Resisting politics of authoritarian populism during COVID-19, reclaiming
           democracy and narrative justice: Centering critical thinking in social
           work

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      Authors: Eunjung Lee, Marjorie Johnstone
      First page: 716
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Authoritarian populism that fosters deep hate of ‘Others’ and a desire for obedience and order, has attacked the fundamental principles of social work and democracy. During the global health crisis, another global pandemic – xeno or racism – is evoked to corroborate authoritarian populism. We critically analyze the dynamics of populism that shift the focus from ‘people’ to ‘problems’ and how it has been intensified during COVID-19. Using narrative justice as a guiding framework, we invite social workers to critically reflect on how this politics has impacted marginalized populations and injuries done to democracy and how social workers can contribute constructing social justice narratives.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-05-15T08:56:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211011627
       
  • Degrading a global COVID-19 contagion: Charting a holistic social work
           response

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      Authors: Tracy BE Omorogiuwa, Solomon Amadasun
      First page: 731
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      The eclectic nature of social work in addition to the person-in-environment perspective, as well as its biopsychosocial frame, warrants the utilization of a holistic interventionist lens amid the coronavirus pandemic. This is paramount if we intend to prevent and stymie not just the dreaded contagion in itself, but also its rampaging impact on individuals, families, groups and communities. In this essay, we highlight some empowering framework necessary for action and clarify potential ethical concerns. Given the extensive fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic, illustrative guidelines conducive for holistic professional intervention, during and in the aftermath of the disease, are rolled out.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-03-17T06:22:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872821991203
       
  • Serving the affected: Role of social workers during the pandemic

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      Authors: Meeta Baid, Sukhjeet Kaur Matharu
      First page: 736
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      The new era marked its beginning with the first global pandemic universally known as COVID-19. Marked by stringent lockdowns, social distancing, and quarantine measures, social work initiatives aimed at resolving mental health problems and increased gender violence, facilitating the patients requiring health care, and providing social work services.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-08-09T04:53:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211006185
       
  • The impact of teaching culture online during COVID-19

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      Authors: Bindi Bennett
      First page: 739
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This article speaks to an Aboriginal academic’s experience during COVID-19 teaching cultural content via the Internet and an online platform. It highlights the challenges of teaching deeply spiritual content online in a unit where being able to develop relationships and trust before these units are offered would be beneficial.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-03T11:03:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211017963
       
  • When field isn’t field anymore: Innovating the undergraduate social work
           field experience in response to the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Johanna Crocetto
      First page: 742
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This essay summarizes one undergraduate social work field program’s innovative response to the enormity of the COVID-19 pandemic. The virtual field program provided flexible, accessible options meeting the diverse and immediate needs of students. Reflections here include the project’s implementation, insights gained, and plans to sustain these new field initiatives.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-07-27T11:52:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211031950
       
  • The importance of keeping a social perspective during pandemic times:
           Social psychiatry in Sweden

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      Authors: Kristina Engwall, Palle Storm
      First page: 745
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      We discuss the pandemic strategies in Sweden concerning social psychiatry during the first wave. We argue that the omission of social workers’ perspective in the COVID-19 strategy has negatively impacted clients with psychiatric disabilities and has also weakened the overall pandemic strategy.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-05-28T09:24:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211011625
       
  • Policy response for disadvantaged groups during the COVID-19 pandemic:
           Vietnam experiences

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      Authors: Nguyen Tuan Hung, Vu Thu Trang, Dang Kim Khanh Ly, Le Hong Hanh, Nguyen Xuan Long, Pham Tien Nam
      First page: 750
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This article aims to describe the Vietnamese Government’s policy response to support disadvantaged groups affected by the COVID-19 pandemic through the relief package. The Vietnamese policy response is characterized by rapid response, priority for disadvantaged groups in communities, social work core values in the policy, openness, and transparency. We hope the experiences from Vietnam could be helpful for similar settings in the world.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-03T11:06:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211017975
       
  • Practising social work groups online: Practitioners’ reflection on
           the COVID-19 outbreak

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      Authors: Elsa Ngai Hung, Terence Tat-Tai Lee, Johnson Chun-Sing Cheung
      First page: 756
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Conducting online social work groups, as a substitute for traditional forms of groups, was uncommon in Hong Kong before the outbreak of COVID-19. Frontline social workers encountered several difficulties and challenges while trying to provide this alternative form of social work intervention. This article serves as a reflection on the use of online social work groups from social work practitioners’ point of view at this critical juncture.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-03-15T10:28:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872821989796
       
  • Social work and COVID-19: A gap in Nigeria’s intervention

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      Authors: Prince Agwu, Uzoma Okoye
      First page: 761
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      It is highlighted in some parts of the world that several professionals, including social workers, are involved in interventions against COVID-19. This, however, appears not to be so in Nigeria, as social workers are said to be suboptimally involved. Through telephone interviews, the views of six healthcare workers and six social workers were sought on the inclusion and efforts of Nigerian social workers in contributing to COVID-19 interventions. After a thematic analysis of data, results show that social workers are missing in the intervention process, especially at the front line. Hence, this article recommends the need for active involvement of social workers in public health concerns in Nigeria, as their roles will be relevant to complementing the efforts of mainstream health workers.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-03-15T10:27:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872820980799
       
  • Impacts of COVID-19 on refugees and immigrants in the United States: A
           call for action

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      Authors: Maryam Rafieifar, Mitra Naseh, Miriam Potocky, Michaela L Zajicek-Farber, Wooksoo Kim, Beatriz Padilla, Miguel Reina Ortiz, Jasiel A Lopez
      First page: 771
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 crisis has increasingly exerted a disproportionate impact on the lives of migrant populations. A group of interdisciplinary migration experts convened a round table in June 2020, to discuss the numerous challenges faced by immigrants, refugees, and migrants in the United States. The discussion revealed many social inequities, including insufficient financial and social resources, non-existent or minimal health supports, lack of or inadequate access to community supports, and social and racial discrimination, among other difficulties. To promote social justice and encourage research, the ensuing essay is a call for action to stimulate and build knowledge about social work and public health issues as they relate to the needs of immigrants, refugees, and migrant populations in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-03T11:05:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211017964
       
  • Clinical intervention with autistic adolescents and adults during the
           first Two months of the COVID-19 pandemic: Experiences of clinicians and
           their clients

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      Authors: Sarah J Southey, Kevin P Stoddart
      First page: 777
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This article describes clinical experiences of therapists with autistic clients during early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic while engaged in remote intervention in Canada. The authors polled their team of mental health clinicians through an email questionnaire and infused their own practice experiences to summarize mental health themes, and adaptation to technology-based intervention. Clinicians shared responses to the pandemic and reported on their transition to remote intervention.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-11T07:20:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211012462
       
  • Interdisciplinary Bridging Response Teams in the COVID-19 outbreak aid
           provision in China

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      Authors: Zhihong Yu, Wenjie Duan, Lirui Jiang, Zhen Yuan, Yansi Kong, Jingying Wang
      First page: 783
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This essay provides a brief introduction of a social-worker-led interdisciplinary work model and its operating process which is inspired by the well-known Holistic Model of Spirituality. The Interdisciplinary Bridging Response Team(IBRTs) model was applied to communities, centralized isolation sites, and shelter hospitals in Wuhan. A survey of 316 clients after 53 days of service revealed that the mental and physical health of most clients improved. Moreover, compared to the early days of the pandemic, most clients’ social relationships were strengthened. Nevertheless, the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL)-BREF scores show that this service was more effective for uninfected rather than infected people.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-07-22T05:23:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211021145
       
  • Coparenting autistic children during COVID-19: Emerging insights from
           practice

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      Authors: Sarah Southey, Rae Morris, Michael Saini
      First page: 790
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Globally, parents and caregivers of children with autism have been particularly impacted by the recent changes due to COVID-19. Reduced access to schools, community supports, and therapeutic services makes parenting more challenging during the pandemic, and especially for parents with children with autism and who are experiencing family breakdown. There remains little guidance to assist coparenting autistic children during COVID-19 after separation and divorce. This brief paper summarizes emerging issues arising in clinical practice to offer recommendations for social work practice.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-05-28T09:25:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00208728211013881
       
  • Embedding preventive lawyering principles in preventive social work as a
           response to clients with complex problems in the post-Covid-19 era: An
           opinion piece

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      Authors: Michal Segal
      First page: 796
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Social workers are facing complex requests from clients coping with multi-system life problems resulting from the Covid-19 pandemic. Such requests require broad knowledge and innovative approaches. Macro-level Preventive Social Work, a new model based on preventive lawyering and social working, focuses intervention to minimize future problems created by the pandemic.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-05-20T07:53:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872821996756
       
  • Providing virtual suicide prevention groups for people experiencing
           suicidality: Pivoting service delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Yvonne Bergmans, Krystal Kellington, Tanya Smith, Amanda Pond, Mikayla Goving, Emily Shelton, Chantelle Sayegh, Dwight Syms, Anya Perivolaris
      First page: 801
      Abstract: International Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Skills for Safer Living is a 20-week group intervention for people with recurrent suicide attempts. This article details how it pivoted from in-person to virtual groups due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Concerns of privacy, client safety, and how to deliver the program virtually are explored, along with lessons learned.
      Citation: International Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-08-05T05:36:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0020872821996781
       
 
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