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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 243 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACOSS Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
African Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Argumentum     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Australian Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Bakti Budaya     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
British Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 104)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Care Management Journals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Social Work Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Comunitania : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ConCienciaSocial     Open Access  
Contemporary Rural Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Critical and Radical Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Critical Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Critical Social Work : An Interdisciplinary Journal Dedicated to Social Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuadernos de Trabajo Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Developmental Child Welfare     Hybrid Journal  
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
ECI Interdisciplinary Journal for Legal and Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
European Journal of Social Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Families in Society : The Journal of Contemporary Social Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Geopolitical, Social Security and Freedom Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Global Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access  
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Indonesian Journal of Guidance and Counseling     Open Access  
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Care and Caring     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 69)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Islamic Counseling : Jurnal Bimbingan Konseling Islam     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Janus Sosiaalipolitiikan ja sosiaalityön tutkimuksen aikakauslehti     Open Access  
Journal for Specialists in Group Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Journal of Baccalaureate Social Work     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Care Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Community Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Comparative Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Family Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Forensic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Rights and Social Work     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 395)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 235)
Journal of Public Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 205)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Jurnal Guidena : Journal of Guidance and counseling, Psychology and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Leidfaden : Fachmagazin für Krisen, Leid, Trauer     Hybrid Journal  
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access  
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nordisk välfärdsforskning | Nordic Welfare Research     Open Access  
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Partner Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 238)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Policy Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Prospectiva : Revista de Trabajo Social e Intervención Social     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psikopedagogia : Jurnal Bimbingan dan Konseling     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Qualitative Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Qualitative Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Research on Social Work Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revista Brasileira de Tecnologias Sociais     Open Access  
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Katálysis     Open Access  
Revista Serviço Social em Perspectiva     Open Access  
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
SER Social     Open Access  
Service social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Serviço Social & Sociedade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Sexualidad, Salud y Sociedad (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access  
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 2)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Social Care and Neurodisability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 213)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.3
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 69  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 8 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 0144-333X - ISSN (Online) 1758-6720
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • Orality, literacy and the “great divide” in cultural values

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hamid Yeganeh
      Abstract: Building on the “Great Divide” thesis (Goody, 1977; Ong, 1982), this study analyzes the conceptual relationships between the two main communication modes (orality/literacy) and cultural values. The study adopts a purely conceptual approach to connect orality and literacy with nine cultural dimensions adopted from Kluckhohn and Strodtbeck’s (1961), Hall’s (1976) and Inglehart’s (1997) frameworks. The analyses suggest that orality is associated with values such as high-context communication, poly-chronic time, public space proxemics, collectivism, hierarchical social structure, subjugation, past orientation, religiousness/traditionalism and survival cultural dimensions. Literacy is associated with opposing values, including low-context communication, mono-chronic time, private space proxemics, individualism, egalitarian social structure, dominance, future orientation, secularity/rationality, and self-expression cultural dimensions. The paper relies on modernization theory to explain the socio-economic implications and organizes the nine pairs of cultural dimensions according to the great divide between orality and literacy. Theoretically, this study conceptualizes orality and literacy, analyzes their salient differences and examines their relationships with cultural values. While many studies have tried to explain the differences in cultural values from an economic perspective, this study offers an alternative view of cultural values’ variations across the world.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-07-05
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-04-2021-0088
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • State transformations and welfare models: the significance of the return
           

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Gemma Ubasart-González, Analía Mara Minteguiaga
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to examine the relation between estate transformations produced during the governments of the Citizen Revolution (CR) in Ecuador (2007-2017) and welfare regime transformations. The CR’s project registers an array of specificities that make it a relevant case study to understand it. Among them, it articulated the transformation of the development model with a comprehensive state reform: emphasized both the modernization of the state and the productive structure, and the creation of the basic pillars of a welfare state. The ambitious project materialized in an ambivalent manner, revealing accomplishments and limitations. The recovery of resources for the state, the efficient organization of resources, decentralization and deconcentration processes, public administration transformations and policy de-corporatization processes accompanied and even propelled important achievements in the social sphere in terms of decommodification, stratification, commodification and defamiliarization. Ecuador’s starting point, as a small and impoverished country with pubic and communal goods and services dismantled through neoliberal reforms, was quite precarious. But, progress was made. Beyond the identified limitations, its accomplishments must be highlighted because they are novel in comparison to other progressive government experiences, especially in the context of Central Andean countries. This article vindicates the need to link state transformation processes to welfare regime transformations, as well as the academic literature that informs both fields. The description of what took place in Ecuador in the field of social welfare during the ten years of the CR continues to confirm the theoretical potential of the concept of welfare regime with the necessary translations and appropriations that allow for the analysis of countries in the region. It enables an approach to a more theoretically and methodologically elusive object that is at the same time tremendously potent in analytical terms and in its contributions to social transformations. An object that alludes to areas gravely affected during neoliberal hegemony, linked to public institutionality, state capacity and state autonomy. This is why everything that affects the state and the management of public goods and services must be incorporated into the analysis.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-06-29
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-10-2020-0484
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Longer working lives – what do they mean in practice – a case
           of the Baltic countries

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      Authors: Jolanta Aidukaite, Inga Blaziene
      Abstract: The article seeks to contribute to a better understanding of older people's situation in the labour market in three Baltic countries – Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. Three Nordic countries are taken as a reference point to compare the countries in order to better understand the situation from a comparative point of view. The article asks the questions: Does a longer working life for older people contribute to their better economic situation' How satisfied are they with a longer working life and their working conditions' Do they experience any discrimination in the labour market because of their age' In order to understand the situation of older people in the labour market, the authors employ welfare state models and the Active Ageing Index. The welfare state models help us to understand the context in which the working life of older people is taking place. The Active Ageing Index helps to gain a better understanding of the employment domain of active ageing. The analysis is based on several Europe-wide data sources: statistics on earnings from Eurostat database, information on income, job prospects, occupational safety and health, training, working life perspectives from the European Working Conditions Survey as well as a special survey, conducted by the authors, of Lithuanian, Latvian and Estonian residents aged 50 years and older. Analysis conducted reveals that in the Baltic countries older employees, although actively participating in the labour market, face unfavourable material, physical and psychological situation in the labour market more frequently than their younger colleagues. The findings show that the most important factors influencing older employees' decision to stay longer in the labour market in the Baltic countries are linked mostly to welfare state-related issues, i.e. financial benefits, healthcare, possibility to reconcile work and family obligations. These welfare state-related issues are even more important for those who are going to stay longer in the labour market after reaching the retirement age. This article contributes to a better understanding of older (50+) people's situation in the labour market. It suggests that, while the increasing employment of older people increases the Active Ageing Index and is generally viewed positively, in some countries with less developed welfare states high employment rates of older employees, although providing them with an additional means of livelihood, do not ensure a higher quality of life and, on the contrary, act as a factor reducing the quality of work and, at the same time, the quality of life.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-06-22
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-02-2021-0049
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Eldercare in Japan, transnational care labor, and emerging welfare regimes

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      Authors: Deborah J. Milly
      Abstract: This article analyzes recent Japanese efforts to recruit care labor from seven Asian countries to identify the relative contributions to migrants and their respective countries' health systems. Besides considering the factors affecting migration from, and benefits to, sending countries, it asks how differences in the role of public and private actors may matter. The study uses two stages of analysis. The first uses quantitative and qualitative data for seven countries that send care labor migrants to Japan to identify differences in benefits for individual migrants and health care systems in the sending countries. The second stage examines recent initiatives for funding care worker training in Japan to assess the relative impacts of different public-private cooperative arrangements, especially in terms of Vietnam. In addition to general migration policy mechanisms provided by the destination country, bilateral relationships and foreign assistance, along with economic, demographic and health care conditions in the origin countries, contribute to the relative benefits of migration. Among countries supplying care labor to Japan, Vietnam is obtaining the most benefits for its health care system in return. Responding to central concerns surrounding care labor migration, the article compares across countries sending care workers to a single country. The comparison highlights a constellation of factors that contribute the greatest benefits. The article identifies how different types of public and private relationships can influence this process. The study provides observations applicable to other welfare states developing care labor migration relationships.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-06-07
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-10-2020-0485
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The elusive promise of universal social protection: the case of the Greek
           general minimum income (GMI)

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      Authors: Noëlle M. Burgi, Eleni Kyramargiou
      Abstract: The need to alleviate poverty and achieve the United Nations (UN) 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through Universal Social Protection (USP) mechanisms is a high priority for governments and international organisations (IOs). This paper focuses on the recent introduction of a general minimum income (GMI) in Greece, in the context of the international diffusion of governing expertise. It examines whether the “universal” scheme being implemented constitutes a paradigm shift likely to offer solutions to the country's previous fragmented and unjust welfare system, and to problems the society has faced since the 2010s depression. The paper uses critical grounded theory, with data gathering through iterative field observations and semi-structured interviews. Results highlight the elusiveness of USP normative promises: rather than enhancing people's effective freedoms to act as self-determining agents, USP pushes the poor to adapt to current degraded socio-economic conditions. Participation in the shadow economy is a structural feature of USP; it is implicitly tolerated insofar as it is regarded, in the words of the World Bank (WB), an “engine for growth”. This constitutes an institutional and governance challenge for the implementation and expansion of social welfare programmes and could compromise the 2030 SDGs Agenda. While research to date has examined the “modernisation” of the Greek welfare system in a national or comparative perspective, it adds to the literature by framing the study in the field of global social policy, shedding light on the discrepancies between internationally designed mechanisms and the normative aims of USP.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-06-04
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-11-2020-0497
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Pioneering anti-poverty policies in Brazil and Mexico: ambiguities and
           disagreements on conditional cash transfer programs

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      Authors: Carla Tomazini
      Abstract: Focusing on the conditional cash transfers (CCTs) first created and implemented in Brazil and Mexico, this article takes a new look at the factors facilitating the creation of these innovative policies. In order to shed light on the continuous struggles that are faced when pioneering, formulating and adopting these anti-poverty policies, the authors analyze three types of ambiguities: axiological, partisan and electoral. Based on a gradual institutional change approach within the advocacy coalition framework, the authors conduct a qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews, official public administration archives and newspapers. This article demonstrates that advocacy coalitions (for human capital, basic income and food security) and the quest for electoral gains are viable contexts for exploring the complex processes involved in setting up CCTs, of which Brazil's Bolsa-Família and Mexico's Progresa-Oportunidades-Prospera (POP) provide emblematic examples. The findings contribute to comparative social policy research and institutional change analysis. The coalitions and ambiguous consensuses studied here expand the perspectives with a more detailed understanding of the chaotic processes involved in developing social policies.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-06-02
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-10-2020-0465
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Testing the link between psychological contract, innovative behavior and
           multidimensional well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Anushree Karani, Revati Deshpande, Sunita Mall, Mitesh Jayswal
      Abstract: The study investigates the impact of psychological contract breach on employees' innovative behavior and well-being (happiness, work engagement and mental well-being) who are working from home during this COVID-19 pandemic situation. Drawing on social information processing (SIP) and job-demand resource (JD-R) theory, job stress was proposed as a mediator explaining this relationship. Data were collected via a structured questionnaire through Google Docs from 258 respondents working at different capacity in Indian organizations. The study includes those respondents who are working from home during COVID-19 pandemic situation. The hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling (SEM). Psychological contract breach was negatively impacting innovative behavior and well-being. Job stress mediated the relationship between psychological contract breach and innovative behavior as well as well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic situation and especially for those who are working from home only. The data for the study were collected from the employees working from home during this COVID-19 pandemic situation was cross-sectional. The study implied or spoke about the unmet expectations leading to reduced innovative behavior harming the organization's effectiveness and it also reduces well-being which harms the individual in the era of social and financial uncertainty. The novel contribution of the study is integrating SIP and JD-R theory during the pandemic situation. The results highlighted meticulous empirical evidence which answers the question that how the unmet expectations cause a detrimental effect on the employees as well as the organizations in this COVID-19 pandemic situation.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-05-12
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-02-2021-0032
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The influence of sociodemographic behavioural variables on health-seeking
           behaviour and the utilisation of public and private hospitals in Ghana

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      Authors: Awinaba Amoah Adongo, Jonathan Mensah Dapaah, Francess Dufie Azumah, John Onzaberigu Nachinaab
      Abstract: Several studies have described health-seeking behaviour within the context of various diseases, the health status and age group. However, knowledge on patient health-seeking behaviour in the use of public and private hospitals and socio-demographic characteristics in developing countries is still scarce. This paper examines the influence of socio-demographic behavioural variables on health-seeking behaviour and the use of public and private health facilities in Ghana. Quantitative research approach uses the modified SERVQUAL dimension as a data collection tool. Descriptive statistics with Pearson's chi-square test were conducted to determine the relationship between socio-demographic behavioural variables and health-seeking behaviour of patients using public and private hospitals. The results showed that there is a significant relationship between the socio-demographic characteristics (sex, marital status, education, level of income) and the health-seeking behaviour of patients in regard to the utilisation of public and private health facilities (p 
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-05-11
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-03-2021-0068
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The impact of civil liberties, global health security, median age and
           population size on the spread of COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2)

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      Authors: Habtamu Legese, Wondmagegn Biru, Frezer Tilahun, Henock Semaw
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of civil liberties, global health security, median age and population size on the spread of COVID-19 across the globe. This study was done by taking data from 166 different countries from the Economist Intelligence Unit, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, World Bank, Johns Hopkins University and United Nations Population Division (UNPD). After conducting all the necessary standard econometric tests, the study was analyzed using the ordinary least squares (OLS) regression. The finding of the study indicated that COVID-19 tests per million people (LTT/PM), Population Size (LPOP), Civil Liberty Index (CLI) are statistically significant and positively affect the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases; on the other hand, the Health Security Index (HSI) negatively affects the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases. In emergency circumstances, the government ought to have a special responsibility to align civil rights with the protection of public health cautiously. However, measures to restrict civil liberties must be proportionate. Besides other variables, the study included and considered civil liberties as a significant factor to affect the spread of COVID-19, which is a new contribution to the existing body of knowledge in the field.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-05-10
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-01-2021-0018
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • COVID-19 induced impact on informal migrants in Bangladesh: a qualitative
           study

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      Authors: Md. Salman Sohel, Babul Hossain, Md. Kausar Alam, Guoqing Shi, Rubaiyat Shabbir, Md. Khaled Sifullah, Most. Monowara Begum Mamy
      Abstract: This study intends to explore the impact of occupation and income on informal migrants in the face of COVID-19 induced lockdown in Bangladesh and their coping strategies to survive the pandemic situation. The study adopted a qualitative research design in which four urban areas were chosen purposively from various parts of Dhaka city. The authors conducted 21 semi-structured in-depth interviews, four FGDs and eight months over participant observation for achieving study objectives. The four stages of data analysis used a thematic approach in the interpretive phenomenological analysis. The results showed that respondents were massively affected due to loss of income and occupation in the period of induced lockdown. Besides, most people lost their earning sources entirely in this amid pandemic which bound them starvation in the mealtime along with several dynamic complications. The findings also revealed that they followed some surviving strategies such as taking loans, reducing expenses, consuming less food, selling land, jewelry, and goods, relatives and neighbor support, and government relief. Although these strategies somewhat supported them to struggle with the situation, their livelihood features became fragile immensely. The findings will be an important guiding principle for the policymakers, aid organizations and development practitioners to prepare development policies for vulnerable informal migrants in developing countries like Bangladesh. This is the first study that explores the informal migrants’ occupation and income during COVID-19 induced lockdown in Bangladesh. This research also highlights coping strategies of the informal migrants to survive the pandemic situation.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-05-07
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-02-2021-0046
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Do social capital and networks facilitate community participation'

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      Authors: Mudit Kumar Singh, James Moody
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to find theoretical and practical linkages between social capital, network and community participation. The study examines the role of popular social capital and its forms in shaping community participation under the influence of socioeconomic status of individuals. The paper uses household survey data (N = 135) from select north Indian villages to assess the role of social capital and individuals’ networks (measured through their network size) in participation. The participation is measured in terms of attendance and vocal participation. The study finds significant evidence that the networks do not play a uniform role in collective participation. The elitist form of social capital exists in the community which can leverage the networks to their benefit, whereas many people, despite large network size, cannot actively participate. Social capital and networks are not entirely conducive for collective participation and favours a few in the community. Additionally, networks do facilitate information flow but do not help in achieving active engagement. Hence, the peer effect is not truly reflected in vocal participation all the time, especially in local governance context. The conclusion of the study is based on small sample size from seven villages. Nonetheless, in light of the supporting literature available, it provides useful insights and triggers important questions that need microscopic analysis under the macroscopic umbrella of social capital. On policy fronts, takeaway from this paper can be used for policy and law formulation for lower strata of the society such as labour law formulation and labour behavioural practices in community participation. The research findings can be utilized for the emerging applications of social networks in understanding local governance and community engagement in developing societies. This research has used a novel field experiment conducted by one of the authors himself. The empirical assessment of social capital and networks in local governance can be replicated elsewhere to study participation in other societies as well. In terms of policy, the research underscores the need of using social capital notion while assessing the community engagement in local governance.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-05-05
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-01-2021-0022
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Understanding the link between government cashless policy, digital
           financial services and socio-demographic characteristics in the MENA
           countries

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      Authors: Amari Mouna, Anis Jarboui
      Abstract: To help inform the debate over whether socio-demographic characteristics are related to the use of digital technologies, the authors investigated the effects of age, gender, education, income and being in the workforce on changes in using financial digital services using panel data collected in the MENA countries during 2017. This study aims to identify the impact of government policy on the determinants of financial inclusion and digital payment services in the MENA region. The authors use microdata from the 2017 Global Findex database on MENA countries to perform probit estimations. The paper focuses on the role of technology adoption by government authorities in extending financial inclusion and digital payment around different people. The authors find that poorer people (and, by association, less educated people) and the young (but less so the elderly) are disproportionately excluded from the financial system. Results confirm that better collaboration between the government and the financial sector can help to develop digital financial inclusion through the technology adoption channels. The study confirms the significant impact of the government cashless policy in advancing financial inclusion in the MENA countries, with potentially wider applicability to other developed economies. Policies to advance mobile money innovations could stimulate financial inclusion by promoting digital transaction services. The role of government authorities is imperative to harness the beneficial and sustainable gains from digitizing remittances and transfers to promote a cashless economy. Financial inclusion promotes equality through a broadening of the system and government cashless policy can be a major catalyst for greater financial inclusion. It helps in the overall economic development of the underprivileged population and contributes to poverty reduction.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-05-03
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-12-2020-0544
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Social stigma in time of COVID-19 pandemic: evidence from India

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      Authors: Barsa Priyadarsinee Sahoo, Avanish Bhai Patel
      Abstract: The stigmatisation of COVID-19 patients or suspected cases is a matter of grave concern across the world, including India. Today, COVID-19 patients or suspected cases are being stigmatised or labelled as “corona carrier” and “corona spreader” because of which they are facing social rejection, mental torture, abusive behaviour and violence in the society. The objectives of the present study are to examine the nature of stigma construction in Indian society during COVID-19 pandemic and to explore its outcome on the well-being of corona-affected people. The study uses content analysis method to explain the COVID-19 stigma. The data have been collected from various Indian newspapers and magazines. The researchers have analysed the content of the news items related to social stigma which were collected from March to September 2020. The study finds that COVID-19 patients or suspected cases are insulted and discriminated rudely by their family members and neighbours, and in many cases, they are not allowed to enter the house or the neighbourhood. The study has also pointed out that many COVID-19 patients or suspected cases have committed suicide as a result of being stigmatisation. Finally, the study explores that this social stigma is spreading due to fake news, lack of awareness and fear of corona infection. This is an original paper which is based on content analysis. The present study focuses on the social stigma in Indian society during COVID-19. Basically, the present study has applied the theory of Erving Goffman which is based on stigma to examine the nature and problem of social stigma during COVID-19. The study has found that there are three types of social stigma during the corona pandemic: self-made stigma, family-made stigma and society-made stigma.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-04-30
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-01-2021-0012
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • A cross-national investigation into the effects of religion on gender
           equality

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      Authors: Hamid Yeganeh
      Abstract: This study aims to analyze the effects of religion on gender equality at the national level. The study distinguishes between the concepts of religiosity and religious affiliation and introduces a measure of religious diversity. The study defines religiosity and gender equality as multidimensional concepts and relies on a wide range of secondary data from credible sources such as the World Value Survey, the United Nations, Gender Gap Report and the World Economic Forum to analyze the effect of religious factors on gender equality in more than 70 countries. The analyses show that after controlling for the effects of socio-economic development, religiosity tends to impede gender equality. It is found that Muslim and Hinduism affiliations are negatively and Protestant affiliation is positively associated with gender equality. Furthermore, Catholicism and Eastern Orthodox affiliations and religious diversity do not significantly affect gender equality. At the theoretical level, this study distinguishes between religious affiliations and religiosity and relies on the modernization theory to offer valuable insights into the relationship between religion and gender equality. This study's findings could serve managers and policymakers in dealing with gender disparities in different spheres of social life at the practical level.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-04-30
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-10-2020-0479
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Migration policies and practices at job market participation: perspectives
           of highly educated Turks in the US, Canada and Europe

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      Authors: Cihan Aydiner, Erin Rider
      Abstract: This study aims to clarify the labor market participation of highly educated Turks who moved or were exiled to the Western countries after the July 15th, 2016 Coup attempt in Turkey. These recent Turkish flows create a compelling case for researching higher education connections and the administration of justice in migration policies/practices related to highly educated people's job market participation. This study aims to expand the discussion on migration policies, practices, job market participation, how highly skilled migrants perceive them in various contexts and understand the complexity of highly educated migrants' incorporation into destination countries and their perspectives and lived experiences with policy practice. The primary source of the data is the semi-structured 30 interviews with the highly educated Turkish immigrants and refugees in Western countries, which enables comparative data from individuals of the same origin. The qualitative data have been transcribed, coded and analyzed according to the grounded-theory design from this vulnerable community. The high education was determined as graduation from 4-years colleges, which was recognized by destination countries. Our methodological tools were driven by the obstacles to collect data from politically sensitive, forced, or exiled migrants. First, this article challenges the assumption that incorporating job market participation is a smooth process for highly educated migrants who moved to Western countries. Second, highly educated immigrants tried to reach their previous statuses and life standards as fast as possible by working hard, making sacrifices and developing innovative strategies. The immigrants in Europe have faced greater obstacles with policies while participating in the job market. Third, the importance of networking and the active usage of social media platforms to communicate with other immigrants in similar situations facilitated the job market participation and job preferences of highly educated migrants. Fourth, while fast job market participation experiences of immigrants in Northern America were increasing their positive feelings regarding belonging, people who have similar skillsets in Europe experienced more problems in this process and felt alone. The research results may lack generalizability due to the selected research approach. Further studies are encouraged to reach more population for each country to compare them. Consequently, higher education may be a more vital decision point in migration policies and practices. This study contributes to a better understanding of these factors by showing the perspectives and experiences of highly educated migrants comparatively. Thus, it broadens the discussion about migration policies and job market participation of highly educated migrants. Building on this work, the authors suggest more studies on the temporary deskilling of highly educated migrants until they reach re-credentialing/education or training to gain their former status. First, while most studies on immigrants' labor market participation and highly educated immigrants focus on voluntary migrants, this study examines underrepresented groups of involuntary migrants, namely forced migrants and exiled people, by focusing on non-Western Muslim highly educated Turks. Second, the trouble in the Middle East continues and regimes change softly or harshly. There is a growing tendency to examine these topics from the immigrants' perspective, especially from these war-torn areas. This article adds to this discussion by stating that rather than forced migration due to armed conflict, the immigrants from Turkey – the non-Arab Muslim state of the Middle East – are related to political conditions. Lastly, drawing on the relationship between social change in the origin country and migration and addressing the lack of reliable and comparative data, this study focuses on same origin immigrants comparatively in eight different countries.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-04-29
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-02-2021-0044
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Social exclusion in Pakistan: an ethnographic and regional perspective

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      Authors: Zahid Pervaiz, Shahla Akram, Sajjad Ahmad Jan
      Abstract: This paper is an attempt to analyze the nature and extent of social exclusion across regions, ethnolinguistic groups and different professions in Pakistan. By using household level data of Pakistan Social and Living Standard Measurement Survey, the authors have constructed Social Exclusion Index (SEI) as well as multidimensional deprivation scores across of the households. SEI has been developed by using multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) whereas multidimensional deprivation scores have been calculated by following the methodology proposed by Alkire and Foster 2011. In total nine household level indicators related with living standards, education and health have been used for this purpose. In next step the relationship of different household characteristics such as profession of household head region of residence and ethnolinguistic identity has been explored with SEI and multidimensional deprivation scores. The empirical results of our analysis show that even after controlling for the income of household, SEI and multidimensional deprivation scores have been found to be significantly different across different professions, different regions and different linguistic groups. This confirms the prevalence of social exclusion in Pakistani society. Compensatory government policies are suggested as an option to cope with the problem of social exclusion.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-04-07
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-01-2021-0001
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Does culture influence our ways in handling COVID-19'

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      Authors: Elia Oey, Benjamin Suwito Rahardjo
      Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has hit all nations across the globe since the beginning of 2020. As the whole world is connected ever than before, the virus has spread very fast and affected almost all nations worldwide. Despite facing a common enemy, each nation reacts and manages the virus differently. The research studies how culture influences the way nations and society choose different approaches towards the pandemic. The study uses classical cultural dimension by Hofstede and links them with three conflict management styles “integrating”, “avoiding” and “competing” in analysing three main measurements of the pandemic (test rate, case rate and death rate). The study analyses data from 116 countries and clusters them using a combination of agglomerative hierarchical clustering (AHC) and K-means clustering. The study shows there are six nation clusters with different ways of handling COVID-19, driven by their underlying dominant culture dimension. It shows that individualistic culture combined with high indulgence dimension makes fatality worse, while nations with collectivism culture or uncertainty avoidance culture are better off, especially if accompanied with restraint dimension or long-term orientation. The originality of the research lies in linking Hofstede cultural dimension with modified Onishi's conflict management style in analysing how different cultures and nations manage the COVID-19 pandemic.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-04-06
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-02-2021-0051
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Lessons from the pandemic: climate change and COVID-19

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      Authors: David Heath Cooper, Joane Nagel
      Abstract: This article examines US official and public responses to the COVID-19 pandemic for insights into future policy and pubic responses to global climate change. This article compares two contemporary global threats to human health and well-being: the COVID-19 pandemic and climate change. We identify several similarities and differences between the two environmental phenomena and explore their implications for public and policy responses to future climate-related disasters and disruptions. Our review of research on environmental and public health crises reveals that though these two crises appear quite distinct, some useful comparisons can be made. We analyze several features of the pandemic for their implications for possible future responses to global climate change: elasticity of public responses to crises; recognition of environmental, health, racial, and social injustice; demand for effective governance; and resilience of the natural world. This paper examines public and policy responses to the coronavirus pandemic for their implications for mitigating and adapting to future climate crises.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-02-26
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-07-2020-0360
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • How are emotions about COVID-19 impacting society' The role of the
           political elite and grassroots activism

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      Authors: Tommaso Gravante, Alice Poma
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the role of emotions in the polarization that emerged during the first months of the pandemic. So, the authors will analyze the social response of two opposing social actors: political elites that have minimized the risks of the pandemic and grassroots groups that have promoted mutual support for vulnerable people suffering from the various effects of the pandemic. For the analysis, the authors will primarily refer to Hochschild's proposal and the recent literature on emotions and protest. The method is to analyze official statements by politicians from the UK, USA, Mexico, Brazil, Spain and Italy and the social responses that have emerged from different mutual support groups and solidarity networks in those countries, as well as in Chile and Argentina. The authors will show how the conflicting responses can exacerbate social polarization in our societies. This polarization goes beyond the political spectrum, and in some cases even social classes, and reaches into the realms of values, emotions and practices. The authors will also show how the response from grassroots activism makes it possible to overcome guilt, shame and other emotions of trauma, among other things. An analysis of the emotional dimension of two opposing responses to the pandemic will show how these responses have a deep impact on society, ranging from demands for values and practices that legitimize a status quo, to discussing, breaking away from or overcoming social behavior based on individualism and social determinism.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-02-19
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-07-2020-0325
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Impact of precarious employment on retirement planning for young workers
           and their parents: the case of Hong Kong

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      Authors: Ka Ki Chan, Tat Chor Au-Yeung
      Abstract: Retirement protection has been widely debated in Hong Kong over two decades. The debate about the relationship between social insecurity and retirement protection, and provoked consideration of a choice between a rights-based universal retirement system and means-tested protection for senior citizens are still contested. This study aims to explore the understanding and behaviours of young workers regarding retirement planning, their difficulties and worries with the implementation of providing support for their parents' retirement. This was an exploratory study to target young workers aged 20–34 years to participate. Qualitative data presented in this study were drawn from 16 young workers. Seven were female and nine were male young workers. The research found that young workers who have a relatively low level of income, particularly for non-standard workers and the self-employed, both are likely to find difficulties to contribute to their own retirement planning and their parents' retirement with the emerging problems of job insecurity and instability. Young working people in lower socio-classes have further limited choices and control over their own retirement planning, as well as providing support for their parents' retirement that may cause a breach of intergenerational contract. With the increasing number of young workers with precarious employment or unemployment, this study has contributed to a shift in views regarding intergenerational contracts, particularly in the need to support other generations of family members in a contemporary Hong Kong society.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-02-12
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-07-2020-0265
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Life-course patterns of new working-class youth in Russia

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      Authors: Tatiana Gavrilyuk
      Abstract: This article aims to explore the dominant normative patterns that establish the timing and order of life events, determining the desirable life strategies for working-class youth in modern Russia. Exploring the interrelationship between new working-class studies and life-course studies, this research combines the consideration of life course as a structurally organised integrity with a phenomenological perspective on the study of life strategies. The empirical basis of research consists of a survey of 1532 young working-class representatives living in the Ural Federal District of Russia and biographical in-depth interviews with 31 of them. The study resulted in persisting significance and values of traditional life-course structures while showing that the current social conditions do not allow for this life strategy to be fulfilled. Young workers choose adaptation and survival life strategies that restrict the realisation of their professional and cultural potential. The obtained data have confirmed the presence of some worldwide tendencies, such as the dispersion of events during transition to adulthood, a combination of schooling and full-time work and an earlier career start of working-class representatives. The sequencing and timing of life-course events of Russian working-class youth is an original research topic. The present study proposes and substantiates the notion of the new working class and criteria for its definition.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-02-11
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-09-2020-0425
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Retirement pathways and pension inequality in China: a grounded theory
           study

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      Authors: Qi Wang, Virpi Timonen
      Abstract: Existing research focuses on the pension systems and reforms in China from a macro-level and financial perspective. The expectations of mid-life Chinese people regarding their retirement and pensions have been ignored to date, and this research set out to address this lacuna. The application of qualitative research methods is relatively novel in Chinese social science. As a grounded theory (GT) study, the research reported here deployed semi-structured interviews to investigate middle-aged Chinese women's and men's perceptions of their pensions and retirement. In total, 36 interviews were conducted, following the constructivist GT method. The data point to disparities between the choices and perceptions of individuals on the one hand and the official assumptions underlying the current pension regime on the other hand. Research participants had varying interpretations of the inequality in retirement incomes in China, the main division being between enterprise workers and public-sector employees. Although there are in principle rigidly fixed retirement ages for men and women in contemporary China, the phenomena of early retirement and working post-retirement are increasing. There are trade-offs between work/retirement and family needs, which influence the choices of middle-aged citizens. Retirement pathways are increasingly individualised, reflecting broader patterns of individualisation and inequality in China.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-02-09
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-09-2020-0454
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The impact of war followed by forced displacement on women and children:
           how Syrian mothers perceive their experiences

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      Authors: Fakir Al Gharaibeh, Justine O'Sullivan
      Abstract: This research aimed to describe and examine the effects of war followed by forced displacement on Syrian mothers and their children in terms of Reuben Hill's Family Stress Theory and identify essential elements to consider in social work practice with this population. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 Syrian mothers living in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). A thematic analysis at both a semantic and latent level was completed. A case study – “Noor” – was developed to offer insight into one Syrian woman's experiences and response to war-related stressors and displacement. The findings from the analysis of the interviews and case study indicated that for Syrian families displaced by conflict the traumas of war were compounded by ongoing and multiple emotional and practical stressors, with ongoing experiences of “loss” being the significant stressor. Giving context to these findings highlights the demand and impost on the host countries, in this study, the UAE, to continue their significant humanitarian efforts to Syrian families. These findings will assist social workers, humanitarian organisations and their staff and others working with Syrian families, to respond more effectively. There is no research in evidence in the professional literature that addresses the effects of war on displaced Syrian families in terms of Reuben Hill's Family Stress Theory.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-02-09
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-11-2020-0508
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • A case study of Nagas of Nagaland on the issues toward gender justice

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      Authors: Purlemla Longkumer, Humayun Bokth
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to examine the various cultural practices and social relations, which mediates and position men and women among the Ao Nagas of Nagaland and highlight the various barriers and challenges faced by the Ao Naga women by examining the traditional practices. The various data used in this paper incorporate both primary and secondary data. The information gathered through secondary data includes books and journals and reports. On the other hand, the primary data include unstructured interview, case studies and oral history on the basis of field experiences. Findings suggest that, Ao Naga women's subordinate position to men can be traced back not only to the prevailing customary laws and tradition but also include a number of factors in their societal affairs which include village formation, where men played a prominent role and thereby, the traditional political seat in the village is denied to women till today. Further, women were kept out of the institution of morung known as Ariju in Ao dialect, where men acquired leadership skills. The strong prevalence of inheritance rules, clanship, succession is held very much intact which seems to affect women's lives to a great extent, along with strong ideologies whereby Naga men are given more honor due to the contributions in safeguarding of village during head hunting days. This high status is enjoyed till today and widely accepted among the people. A deep unequal power sharing among man and woman thus seems to exist in the Ao Naga society. This research article gives a detailed insight of the Ao Naga women bounded in the domains of customary laws and traditional beliefs.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-02-03
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-10-2020-0478
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Amazing numbers and bottom rankings: the reporting of nursing home
           resident user surveys in the press

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      Authors: Elisabeth Carlstedt, Håkan Jönson
      Abstract: Media reporting is one of many circumstances that nursing homes have to relate to, because of the reputational risks. The aim of this article is to investigate media representations of Swedish nursing homes in relation to reports on an annual national user survey. The empirical data consist of 381 Swedish newspaper articles about the survey results. The questions guiding the analysis were: what messages on nursing homes are communicated, and how are claims organized in order to appear factual' The data show that press reports focus on comparisons of care units' survey results, eldercare representatives' explanations of the results, and what improvements will be made in order to do better in the next year's survey. With their use of truth-making rhetoric, press articles construct survey results as credible and valid, thus mirroring user perceptions and ultimately nursing home quality. The selection of nursing home representatives' comments equally reinforces the validity of claims. Given nursing homes' problems with demonstrating success, the authors argue that media reports on the user survey is a way for eldercare organizations to achieve results in an otherwise resultless field, and while media reports might be seen as prompting change in nursing home care, what is ultimately achieved is the legitimation of a costly survey with low response rate.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-02-02
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-07-2020-0266
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Reframing everyday life. Implications of social distancing in Italy

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      Authors: Riccardo Pronzato, Elisabetta Risi
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the measures of social distancing and home confinement have been perceived and experienced in the Italian socio-cultural context, how they reshaped everyday life and which are their social implications. The study was exploratory and interpretative in nature and a qualitative research design was adopted accordingly. A total of 60 in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted. Research findings highlight the fact that the boundaries of everyday practices have been completely reframed during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown in Italy. Informants show that scarcity of personal spaces, intertwined with the collapse of the boundaries between private and professional life, and also the lack of physical contact, resulted in a complex management of different social roles and in a stress overload. There are no prior studies that critically analyse the lived experiences of individuals during the lockdown and the impact of home confinement on their meaning-making processes. This paper sheds light on the reframing of everyday life, thereby enhancing our understanding of a novel issue that is of primary concern for social scientists.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-02-02
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-07-2020-0350
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Understanding organisations for a post-growth era: contributions from an
           epistemic analysis

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      Authors: Mónica Ramos-Mejía, Sebastián Dueñas-Ocampo, Isabella Gomati de la Vega
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to uncover the ways in which companies either reproduce or challenge the growth-based roots of the social imaginary, in order to inform the degrowth debate at the firm level. This paper offers an epistemic analysis of the ways companies organise, revealing underlying conceptions of organisations' identities and their corresponding ways of organising. The epistemic analysis derives four conceptual findings allowing the authors to suggest ways of organising in a socio-environmental future not driven by economic growth. The paper suggests new research avenues to study alternative worldviews in organisations. This paper creatively contributes to the discussion about alternatives to the current unsustainable economy with a special focus on the micro level, where businesses act as a vital driving force for economic growth.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-01-19
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-06-2020-0251
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Making #blacklivesmatter in universities: a viewpoint on social policy
           education

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      Authors: Bindi Bennett, Jioji J. Ravulo, Jim Ife, Trevor G. Gates
      Abstract: The purpose of this viewpoint article is to consider the #BlackLivesMatter movement within the Aboriginal Australian struggle for equality, sovereignty and human rights. Indigenous sovereignty has been threatened throughout Australia's history of colonization. We provide a viewpoint and recommendations for social policy education and practice. We provide commentary and interpretation based upon the lived experience of Black, Indigenous and Other People of Color (BIPOC) co-authors, co-authors who are Allies, extant literature and practice wisdom as social policy educators. Universities are sources of knowledge production, transmission and consumption within society. We provide critical recommendations for what social policy education within universities can address human rights and the #BlackLivesMatter movement. Culturally responsive inclusion for BIPOC has only just begun in Australia and globally within the context of the #BlackLivesMatter movement. This paper adds critical conversation and recommendations for what social policy programs might do better to achieve universities' teaching and learning missions.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-01-19
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-11-2020-0512
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Exiting poverty: a systematic review of U.S. postsecondary education and
           job skills training programs in the post-welfare reform era

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      Authors: Sehun Oh, Diana M. DiNitto, Yeonwoo Kim
      Abstract: This study aimed to (1) systematically identify evaluation studies of U.S. active labor market programs (ALMPs) focusing on postsecondary education and job skills training for low-income individuals with employment barriers (hereinafter, Human Capital Development [HCD] programs) since the U.S. federal welfare reform of 1996, and (2) provide a synthesis of common strategies used by programs that reported post-program earnings higher than poverty thresholds. Using Population, Intervention, Comparison, and Outcomes (PICO) criteria endorsed by the Cochrane Collaboration, we identified evaluation studies of HCD programs from seven electronic databases and experts' suggestions. Using data (e.g., post-program earnings, main types of services) extracted from the included studies, we describe common strategies used by the programs reporting earnings above the poverty level. Of 877 studies identified from an initial search, 10 studies met our inclusion/exclusion criteria and thus were included in the final sample. Findings showed that HCD programs reporting earnings above the poverty level for a family of three were characterized by (1) curriculums targeting specific job sectors and occupations, (2) local employers' involvement in developing curriulums and providing work opportunities and (3) post-program job retention and career advancement services. The present study used a systematic review approach to fill gaps in research regarding HCD-focused ALMPs in the U.S. post-welfare reform era by identifying common strategies the effective programs used to help participants obtain employment and exit poverty. Findings may inform the design and implementation of employment programs that will help low-income individuals with employment barriers acquire marketable knowledge and job skills, and thus increase their economic self-sufficiency via improved employment outcomes.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-01-06
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-09-2020-0429
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Regulating religion in a time of COVID-19 pandemic in Indonesia: context,
           dynamics, and implication

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      Authors: Max Regus
      Abstract: This study aims to perform a systematic review of the dialectics and telematics strategy for regulating religion during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study also analyzes some important issues related to religions, state, and society. A critical literature review was performed to complete this study, using media, institutional, national, and international reports, as well as recent and previous studies during the COVID-19 pandemic. Religion was one of the social entities that had a crucial effect on the COVID-19 pandemic. The new system in the form of social distancing affects its performance. Furthermore, the response of religion in Indonesia is unique when its status is considered as the largest Islamic country in the world. Therefore, this study attempts to analyze and demonstrate the dynamics of relationships between actors, religion, and state in the process and strategy of religious regulation. This study was carried out using a single methodological approach. This study provides input to both religion and the state (government) in building a synergy of constructive responses to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. It provides input to society in understanding the critical intersection between religion, state, and society. This may be the first academic study that analyzes the problems of the process of regulating religion in the context of COVID-19.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-01-01
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-07-2020-0321
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • A strategy is necessary. The policy–client conflict within different
           relational asymmetries: a comparison at the street-level

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Daniela Leonardi , Rebecca Paraciani , Dario Raspanti
      Abstract: This study aims to investigate the role of relational asymmetries in influencing the coping strategies adopted by frontline workers to deal with the policy–client role conflict. A comparative analysis of three different services highlights the role of the service relationships characteristics in explaining similarities and differences in the strategies adopted by street-level bureaucrats (SLBs). The research is based on the secondary analysis of three case studies conducted in Italy: the reception system for homeless people, the job brokerage service in the public employment service and the dispute settlement procedure in the labour inspectorate. The results underline the interaction between the characteristics of the service relationship and the different coping strategies adopted to deal with the policy–client conflict. The contribution of this study is threefold. Firstly, the authors focus on the influence of the characteristics of the service relationship in terms of agency resources over SLBs’ strategies to face with users’ expectations. Secondly, the authors intend to discuss these issues analysing SLBs not only as agents with individual preferences. Thirdly, the research design allows the authors to return to the street-level bureaucracy theory its comparative essence, proposing a comparative strategy with an explorative intent.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-10-18
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-07-2021-0188
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Does flexible work arrangements decrease or increase turnover
           intention' A comparison between the social exchange theory and border
           theory

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      Authors: Mung Khie Tsen , Manli Gu , Chee Meng Tan , See Kwong Goh
      Abstract: More companies embrace flexible work arrangements (FWA) as one of their employee retention strategies, yet its effectiveness is not consistent. Generally, past researchers use the social exchange theory to explain how FWA lowers turnover intention, while the rest adopts the border theory to justify why FWA can be ineffective. Here, the authors compare the competing theories for the first time to differentiate the theoretical reasoning of three forms of FWA (flex time, flex leave and homeworking). Two mediators (organisational commitment and work−family conflicts) are chosen to represent the mechanism of each theory. The authors employ the latest wave of the International Social Survey Program (ISSP) Work Orientation Module from 2015. Based on nationally representative data from 35 nations and 17,604 participants, the authors employed simple mediation and parallel double-mediation models via bootstrapping procedures to investigate the theoretical reasoning behind each FWA. The results indicate that organisational commitment and work−family conflicts as significant mediators in all models, supporting both theories. The authors first tested each mediator in separated models. In models concerning the social exchange theory, all FWA lead to increased organisational commitment before lowering turnover intention, implying the beneficial outcomes of FWA. However, findings also support the border theory's perspective where flex time and homeworking increase turnover intention through heightened work−family conflicts. The parallel double-mediation further suggests that all three FWA forms have their unique theoretical framework, impacting turnover intention differently. Both the social exchange theory and border theory are well-developed theories but grounded on different theoretical reasoning. This is the first paper that compares both theoretical perspectives in the context of FWA. It offers a new perspective in explaining the inconclusive effectiveness of FWA and provides future researchers a more integrated interpretation and prediction of FWA's impact on turnover intention.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-10-04
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-08-2021-0196
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Modelling the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on South African livelihoods

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      Authors: Benjamin Aye Simon , Isaac Khambule
      Abstract: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-induced declining economic prospects and accompanying economic shocks present socioeconomic vulnerabilities for developing economies at the tranches of poverty, unemployment and minimal social security. South Africa is one of the countries that have the most precarious societies in developing nations due to the triple challenges of unemployment, poverty and inequality. As such, this paper investigates the impact of the pandemic on South African livelihoods. This paper uses secondary data obtained from the National Income Dynamics Study – Coronavirus Rapid Mobile Survey (NIDS-CRAM) Wave 1 dataset to analyse the impact of COVID-19 on South African livelihoods. The findings reveal that COVID-19 amplified the country's poor and vulnerable population's socioeconomic conditions because of the stringent Level 5 lockdown regulations that barred low-income households from making a livelihood. It further revealed that low-income households, who are the least educated, Black African, female and marginalized, were disproportionally socioeconomically affected by losing the main household income. The research is limited in that it used secondary quantitative data that relied on a telephonic survey during the COVID-19 lockdown period. This study offers a policy suggestion that increasing social grants during the pandemic will not have any significant impact on the livelihoods of many South Africans unless distributional inequalities are reduced. The government needs to develop welfarist policies to protect the most vulnerable in society to limit the socioeconomic impact of pandemics and take proactive policy measures to reduce unemployment and income inequalities in the country. The paper contributes to understanding the precarious nature of low-income households.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-09-28
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-04-2021-0099
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Lessons from abroad for funding long-term care in England: a prospective
           policy transfer perspective on official documents

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      Authors: Martin Powell
      Abstract: Many governments stress the importance of “learning from abroad”. An analysis of official documents over a period of some 20 years examines learning from abroad in the case of funding long-term care in England through the lens of prospective policy transfer. The paper analyses the eight “official” documents in England that examined funding LTC from 1999 to 2019. It uses interpretive content analysis in a deductive approach that focuses on both manifest and latent content. Only four of the eight documents gave more than a token level of attention to other nations, and of the remaining four, none fully satisfied the criteria or followed the recommendations of prospective policy transfer. Moreover, a rather limited pool of lessons from other nations is examined. Much of the material is rather descriptive, with limited explicit attention towards goals, problems, settings and policy performance, and a clear recommendation explicitly associated with a clear lesson or policy recommendation is rare. This is the first analysis of the eight official documents that have discussed funding long-term care in England.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-09-28
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-06-2021-0154
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Can risk communication in mass media improve compliance behavior in the
           COVID-19 pandemic' Evidence from Vietnam

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      Authors: Pham Tien Thanh , Le Thanh Tung
      Abstract: During the COVID-19 pandemic, mass media play a vital role in containing the outbreak of the virus by quickly and effectively delivering risk communication messages to the public. This research examines the effects of risk communication exposure on public understanding and risk perception of COVID-19 and public compliance with health preventive measures. Data from Vietnam during COVID-19 social distancing and path analysis model are used for empirical analysis. This analysis finds that exposure to risk communication in mass media encourages public compliance directly and indirectly through the mediating roles of public understanding and risk perception. Further investigations also find that exposure to risk communication in both online media and traditional media facilitates public compliance. In addition, exposure to risk communication in online media only raises public risk perception, whereas exposure to risk communication in traditional media only raises public understanding. This research implies that traditional and online media should be combined to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of government risk communication work. This research is among the first attempts that examine the role of mass media (both traditional and online) in enhancing public compliance with preventive measures directly and indirectly through the mediating roles of public risk perception and understanding.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-09-21
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-05-2021-0122
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Workplace preparedness for an ageing workforce: a case study

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      Authors: Valerie Egdell , Gavin Maclean , Robert Raeside , Tao Chen
      Abstract: For many nations, their workforces are ageing. The purpose of this paper is to explore the concerns and attitudes of employers to employing older workers and what information they require. A questionnaire survey of workplaces was undertaken in the Fife region of Scotland, which in economic and demographic terms is representative of wider Scotland and other nations in Northern Europe. Descriptive analysis was undertaken to give insight into concerns and actions taken regarding ageing workforces. Most workplaces perceive more advantages to employing older workers than challenges. Many have adapted training and work practices, but many have not. The majority surveyed believe that existing policies and strategies are sufficient. This points to the need for national and local government and employer associations to become more active to persuade workplaces to better manage future workplaces. Generalisability is problematic and the small sample restricted the scope of statistical analysis. The authors were unable to judge the severity of how an ageing workforce impacts on workplace performance, as employers found it difficult to conceptualise and identify the impact of ageing from market and economic pressures. Resulting from population ageing the workforce of many societies are becoming older, this will impact on workplace relations and the social identity of those over the age of 50 years. Little research has been undertaken to assess workplaces awareness of, and how to adapt to, an ageing workforce, and research is required to inform and guide management strategy of employers.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-09-21
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-07-2021-0175
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Predictors and effects of scientific knowledge

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      Authors: Jasna Milošević-Đorđević , Duško Kljajić , Jelena Sladojević Matić , Živojin Đurić
      Abstract: Scientific knowledge has been a topic of interest for scholars for a long time; however, its impact on scientific decision- making and determining trust is severely underresearched. This study is aimed at determining the relationship between cultural and social attitudes and scientific knowledge and the impact of knowledge on trust in scientists in general. The authors conducted a face-to-face survey, drawing from a nationally representative sample of the adult Serbian population (N = 1,451). The authors tested the following parameters: a. the levels of scientific knowledge within the Serbian population; b. social and cultural values as predictors of scientific knowledge and c. the effects of scientific knowledge on trust in scientists. The analysis shows a moderate level of scientific knowledge, predominantly positive public attitudes towards scientists. The authors found that scientific knowledge indeed predicts trust in scientists on various issues, and so do cultural and social worldviews, both directly and even more significantly through the mediation of scientific knowledge. This is the first attempt to assess the level of scientific knowledge among the Serbian public and evaluate its, as well as other factors', influence on public attitudes toward scientists in a time when trusting experts is of great relevance.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-09-14
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-06-2021-0159
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Community work practices against children poverty in Southern Italy.
           Exploring experiences and perspectives in local welfare

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      Authors: Emanuela Chiodo
      Abstract: This paper has a dual purpose: on one side, it analyzes what types of solidarity and social relations are implemented as social support resources applied to actions aiming at the empowerment of children living in poverty. On the other, it investigates on the role of the community in the governance of local welfare practices and its ability to produce social innovations for municipal policies in favor of children and adolescents. Proximity, flexibility, generativity and territoriality are just some of the features that – in the framework of the scientific debate – characterize the social work in areas of social disadvantage. In the framework of the debate, this paper presents a qualitative research on the social ties and educational practices promoted and implemented by nonprofit organizations that attempt to counteract educational poverty and social exclusion of children and adolescents in the eastern peripheral neighborhoods of Naples, one of the poorest cities in the South of Italy. The results of the analysis reveal a capacitating and generative role of the actions applied to social and educational practices for children and adolescents and their families in poor neighborhoods and peripheral areas; a role that is, however, also useful for community social policies targeting children and adolescents. Among local welfare policies enhancing community resources, such practices have indeed become an active resource of subsidiarity; they also ensure wider rights and empowerment for children and adolescents who live in poor communities and for their families as well. More recent studies focusing on the role of social ties in deprived context and impoverishment processes, demonstrated that nonprofit organizations operate as crucial actors fostering inclusion and social cohesion, by means of “elective participation”; this guarantees access to protection and recognition resources that are an integral part of the social support these organizations provide in their areas of intervention. Despite the wide debate on the key role of the Third Sector in territorial welfare policies, further empirical studies on the role of these organizations in poor neighborhoods of the cities of the south of Italy are necessary. The value of this article is an attempt to provide to bridge this gap.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-09-09
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-04-2021-0077
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Constructing the “good” mother: pride and shame in lone mothers'
           narratives of motherhood

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      Authors: Madeleine Leonard , Grace Kelly
      Abstract: This paper aims to explore how lone mothers define “good” mothering and outlines the extent to which feelings of pride and shame permeate their narratives. The empirical data on which the paper is based is drawn from semi-structured interviews with 32 lone mothers from Northern Ireland. All the lone mothers resided in low-income households. Lone mothers experienced shame on three levels: at the level of the individual whereby they internalised feelings of shame; at the level of the collective whereby they internalised how they perceived being shamed by others in their networks but also engaged in shaming and at the level of wider society whereby they recounted how they felt shamed by government agencies and the media. While a number of researchers have explored how shame stems from poverty and from “deviant” identities such as lone motherhood, the focus on pride is less developed. The paper responds to this vacuum by exploring how pride may counterbalance shame's destructive and scarring tendencies.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-08-31
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-06-2021-0151
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • “If you fulfill your promise, I will be an asset for you”: exploring
           the relationship between psychological contract fulfillment and individual
           ambidexterity

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      Authors: Anushree Karani , Mitesh Jayswal , Rasananda Panda , Payal Trivedi
      Abstract: Healthcare is a vital sector in any economy, and the healthcare industry employees should be treated well. Work policies and practices shape the psychological contract (PC) of an individual. The purpose of this paper is to explore healthcare employees' PC fulfillment from the lenses of work practices and how it affects their ambidextrous behavior (explorative and exploitative activities). This study follows a mix-method research design. First, the authors conducted telephonic interviews to enlist the PC fulfillment items, and after checking the reliability and validity, the authors conducted the survey using a descriptive research design. The sampling method was snowball sampling, where 786 respondents from 6 hospitals were surveyed, and AMOS (analysis of a moment structures) 20 was used for the structural equation modeling (SEM). For the healthcare sector employees, a sense of belongingness has contributed the highest in exploration activities followed by work–life balance, rewards and managerial support. Work–life balance has contributed highest in exploitation activities, followed by a sense of belongingness, teamwork and managerial support. The study offers important implications for researchers and employers of the healthcare sector and highlights the significance of the PC fulfillment, leading to the employees' ambidextrous behavior. There was no prior work that had empirically proved the relationship between PC fulfillment and ambidextrous behavior. In the study, an attempt was made to identify the healthcare industry's work practices and how that is associated with explorative and exploitive ambidextrous behavior. The paper instigates the imperative deliberation on PC fulfillment and ambidextrous behavior for healthcare sector employees.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-08-31
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-06-2021-0164
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Beyond multidimensional poverty: challenges of measurement and its link
           with social policy in Mexico

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      Authors: Oscar A. Martínez-Martínez , Brenda Coutiño , Araceli Ramírez-López
      Abstract: Comprehensive poverty measures are increasingly gaining importance since people's deprivations and needs cover aspects beyond income. For this reason, the goal of this article is to propose a methodology to measure poverty that includes objective social deprivation, income deprivation and subjective social deprivation, using Mexico City and its municipalities as the study context. In order to show areas of intervention of public policies, the authors discuss the dimensions and indicators used in the multidimensional measurement. Using the Social Welfare Survey (N = 2,871), the authors measure poverty with the Alkire-Foster methodology. The applied concept of poverty includes objective and subjective deprivations, and income. The interaction between objective and subjective deprivations shows that income, social cohesion, built environment and public insecurity are important areas for the redesigning of public policies. The employed method to measure poverty emphasizes the relevance of including subjective deprivations in interaction with objective deprivations and income. It evidences the need for the implementation or strengthening of public policies.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-08-30
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-01-2021-0021
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Religiosity, employee empowerment and employee engagement: an empirical
           analysis

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      Authors: Chijioke Nwachukwu , Helena Chládková , Richard Selase Agboga , Hieu Minh Vu
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to enhance our understanding of the connection between religiosity, employee empowerment and employee engagement. Drawing on the social exchange theory, a framework of hypotheses is developed that focusses on religiosity, employee empowerment and their impact on employee engagement. This research employed a quantitative survey and data obtained from 232 adults working in companies in Accra Ghana. The results suggest that religiosity dimensions (extrinsic and intrinsic) have a counterbalancing effect on employee engagement dimensions (intellectual and affective). Employee empowerment predicts both intellectual and affective engagement. This study has some limitations which provide opportunities for more research. First, the study is cross-sectional and focusses on employees in selected companies in Accra Ghana. More so, the participants were a convenience, majorly men (only 28% were women). This limits the generalisability of the findings and our confidence in ascertaining the “cause” and “effect” in the relationship. The present paper used a quantitative research approach; mixed method may provide in-depth insight into the subject. The study examined the direct relationship between religiosity, employee empowerment and employee engagement. Future research should explore how the effect of religiosity and employee empowerment on a relevant outcome changes according to other organisational characteristics. Organisations must develop more interest in religion's relevance and its impact on their employees' engagement. This should be done by providing the necessary platforms for employees to practice their religion. There is the likelihood of lack of engagement when an organisation fails to consider employee religious orientation or attempts to unduly regulate employees' religiosity. Empowering work environment can promote a higher level of employee engagement. It is obvious that empowered employees are focussed, energetic, enthusiastic and have positive disposition to work. These positive attitudes lead to a higher level of engagement which fosters productivity and overall organisational performance. This study could contribute to the literature on religiosity, employee empowerment and employee engagement in the Ghanaian context. Therefore, there is a need to keep employees engaged and enhance productivity. This study underpins the importance of religiosity and employee empowerment in fostering employee engagement and productivity in the Ghana work setting.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-08-30
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-03-2021-0060
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Hybridization in a kibbutz industry structure: an Israeli case study

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      Authors: Yaffa Moskovich
      Abstract: This article analyzes a kibbutz factory and seeks to understand its unique hybrid structure following privatization, comparing it with that of other kibbutz industries in Israeli society. The research used qualitative investigation, including interviews and document analysis practice. The study describes hybrid model that is based on conflicting logic, as the kibbutz industry contains both communal and familial principles and bureaucratic and business features. This case study succeeded in striking a balance between the two conflicting logics through sound managerial policy adapted for the sake of communal interests. This typology can be applied to other business organizations that underwent organizational changes as well. The authors developed an alternative hybrid organization typology capable of describing new trends in kibbutz industry.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-08-27
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-02-2021-0050
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Locating Central and Eastern European emerging welfare regimes: is the
           youth welfare citizenship typology useful'

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      Authors: Anna Broka , Anu Toots
      Abstract: The authors’ aim is to establish the variance of youth welfare citizenship regimes in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and to revisit the applicability of the regime approach to the emerging welfare regimes (EWRs). The empirical analysis follows the descriptive case study strategy aiming to discover diversity of youth welfare citizenship patterns. The case selection is made within the CEE country group, which includes countries in Central Europe, the Baltics, Eastern Europe and Southeast Europe, all sharing the communist past. The subdivision of these countries in reference to the welfare states can be made via the European Union (EU) membership based on the assumption that EU social policy frameworks and recommendations have an important effect on domestic policies. We included countries which are in the EU, i.e., with a similar political and economic transition path. There were three waves of accession to the EU in CEE countries. In the first wave (2004), all the Baltic countries, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland, Hungary and Slovenia joined. In the second wave (2007), Romania and Bulgaria joined. Finally, Croatia joined the EU in 2013. Altogether 11 CEE countries are the EU members today, the remaining CEE countries are non-EU members and thus are excluded from the current research. Those countries which are part of the EU share similarities in social and economic reforms during the pre-accession period and after in order to reach a comparatively similar system with other member states. So, in terms of casing strategy these six countries can be named as emerging welfare regimes (EWRs) evolving transformations across different public policy areas. Handpicking of six countries out of 11 relies on the assumption that the Anglo-Saxon welfare system characteristics are more evident in the Baltic countries (Aidukaite, 2019; Aidukaite et al., 2020; Ainsaar et al., 2020; Rajevska and Rajevska, 2020) and Slovenia, while in Bulgaria and Croatia certain outcomes reflect the Bismarckian principles of social security (Hrast and Rakar, 2020; Stoilova and Krasteva, 2020; Dobrotić, 2020). This brings important variety into our analysis logic. Last but not least, we juxtapose six CEE EWR countries under analysis with six mature welfare regime countries representing different welfare regime types. Those mature welfare regime countries (Finland, Sweden, France, Germany, Italy, UK) are not an explicit object of the study but help to put analysed CEE EWR cases into larger context and thus, reflect upon theoretical claims of the welfare regime literature. The authors can confirm that the EWR countries can be rather well explained by the welfare citizenship typology and complement the existing knowledge on youth welfare regime typology clusters in the Western Europe. Estonia is clustered close to the Nordic countries, whereas Latvia, Lithuania, Croatia and Slovenia are close to the Bismarckian welfare model despite rather flexible, non-restricted educational path, universal child and student support. Bulgaria is an outlier; however, it is clustered together with mature Mediterranean welfare regimes. Former intact welfare regime clusters are becoming more diverse. The authors’ findings confirm that there is no any intact cluster of the “post-communist” welfare regime and Eastern European countries are today “on move”. Altogether 11 CEE countries are the EU members today. The remaining CEE countries are non-EU members and thus are excluded from the current research. Those countries which are part of the EU share similarities in social and economic reforms during the pre-accession period and after in order to reach a comparatively similar system with other member states. At least one CEE country was chosen based on existing theoretical knowledge on the welfare regime typology (Anglo Saxon, Beveridgean, Bismarckian) for the Post-communist country groups. In the social citizenship dimension we dropped social assistance schemes and tax-relief indices and included poverty risk and housing measures. Youth poverty together with housing showed rather clear distinction between familialized and individualised countries and thus, made the typology stronger. In the economic dimension the preliminary picture was much fuzzier, mainly due to the comprehensive education in the region and intervention of the EU in domestic ALMPs (and VET) reforms. The authors added a new indicator (pro-youth orientation of ALMP) in order better to capture youth-sensitivity of policy. The authors included a working poverty measure (in-work poverty rate) in order to reflect labour market insecurity as an increasing concern. Yet, the analysis results were still mixed and new indicators did not help locating the regime types. In order to improve the validity of the youth welfare citizenship regime economic dimension, Chevalier's (2020) model may also be worth revisiting. The authors argue that this dichotomy is not sufficient, because inclusive type can have orientation towards general skills or occupational skills (i.e. monitored or enabling citizenship clusters), which is currently ignored. Chevalier (2020) furthermore associates inclusive economic citizenship with “coordinated market economies” (referring to Hall and Soskice, 2001), which seems hardly hold validity in the Nordic and at least some CEE countries.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-08-23
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-04-2021-0104
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • In God we trust…and Caesar too' Evaluating the link between
           religiosity and trust in government

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      Authors: Nicholas Creel
      Abstract: The study aims to establish that religiosity has a positive link with government trust, making the secularization trend all the more likely to further erode this already fragile resource. Through the use of data from the World Values Survey and European Social Survey the link between religiosity and trust in government is examined. Religiosity and trust in government are positively linked in aggregate data. The analysis is based on aggregated data, not individual countries, and religiosity is a complex concept to measure. Secularization will have a long-term negative effect on government trust. Low levels of trust in government in the West are likely here to stay, or even worsen, as populations continue to secularize. With less trust in government, it will be more difficult to govern effectively. The author has not yet seen a full test on how secularization will impact trust in government. In fact, this study makes clear that the trend goes a long way explaining why trust in government has been falling in the developed world for decades.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-08-19
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-06-2021-0156
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Individuals' waste separation practice in a relationship with social
           bonds: a case study of Hanoi, Vietnam

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      Authors: Thi Kim Nhung Nguyen
      Abstract: The paper aims to ascertain whether residents in Nguyen Du ward still sort their waste at source following the end of the 3R project that ended in 2009. Additionally, this paper aims to explore the relationship between waste separation practices and social bonds. The Travis Hirschi theory of social control was applied, together with the mixed method research design which included a structured questionnaire survey. Twelve semi-structured interviews were also conducted with residents and the data processed by SPSS software, using Chi-Square test, Independent-Samples t-test and Pearson's correlation analysis. A proportion of respondents has continued practicing waste separation since the 3R project ended. The study also indicated that the greater the involvement in family and neighborhood activities the more the participants were likely to practice waste separation. The small sample size limits the extent to which the most influential factors can be determined and therefore the degree to which the findings can be generalized. The study includes implications for rerunning the waste separation programs for households as together with community campaigns to improve individuals' attachment and commitment and thus their participation in pro-environmental behaviors. To the author’s knowledge, this is the first study to take a sociological approach to investigate factors affecting household waste separation, which has attracted little attention in previous studies. Useful information is also provided to local authorities for a policy-making process to implement effective domestic waste policies.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-08-11
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-07-2021-0184
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • India's tryst with Modi-fare 2014–19: towards a universalistic
           welfare regime

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      Authors: Keerty Nakray
      Abstract: This paper examines India’s tryst with welfare/dis-fare with a specific focus on Modi Sarkar's (2014–2019) dirigiste style reforms. In the welfare regime research, Esping-Andersen (1990) classified advanced economies into three ideal-types of liberal, conservative-corporatist and social-democratic welfare states by government-led welfare provisions and levels of decommodification. The classical typology discussions include countries such as India which is classified as informal-insecurity regime due to a large informal economy with no social security for workers. Based on theoretical standpoints of the political economy of welfare states, comparative historical institutionalism and critical junctures this article examines Modifare has expanded formal welfare to its citizens. The article uses crisp-set analysis to examine the social policy developments under Modi's regime in India. This paper examines if the centre-right Modi government did bring about a radical departure from UPA I and II lacklustre welfare approach to the more strategic use of welfare reforms as a political weapon on a national scale. It concludes that Modi-fare falls short in being transformatory. The article is an original contribution to the field of comparative welfare regimes.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-08-09
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-12-2020-0531
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The distributional impact of tax and benefit systems in five African
           countries

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      Authors: Katrin Gasior , Chrysa Leventi , Michael Noble , Gemma Wright , Helen Barnes
      Abstract: The paper aims to assess the effects of taxes and benefits on inequality and poverty in five African countries: Ghana, Mozambique, South Africa, Uganda and Zambia. The authors use newly developed micro-simulation models to analyse the distribution and composition of incomes. The study's results suggest that income-based measures result in higher levels of poverty and inequality than consumption-based measures. The country with the most effective system in terms of reducing income inequality and poverty is South Africa; in Ghana, the tax-benefit system was found to have the smallest impact on inequality. The systems of Uganda, Mozambique and Zambia were estimated to have no poverty-reducing properties; many individuals remain largely unaffected by them as they are too poor to pay direct taxes, and benefits are very modest and narrowly targeted. While consumption data are crucial for measuring poverty, income data are becoming vital for assessing the extent to which tax-benefit policies achieve redistribution in economies where own-consumption is becoming less significant and the share of people in employment is increasing. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first study where poverty and inequality are measured in both terms, for several African countries in a common framework.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-07-29
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-01-2021-0008
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The exclusion of migrants and refugees from welfare programs in Austria:
           the “legitimizing explanations” across different policy areas

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Irene Landini
      Abstract: The present article deals with the topic of migrants’ exclusion from welfare benefits in European host countries from the angle of the research on the so-called “welfare chauvinism” (Andersen and Bjørklund 1990, p. 212). More specifically, it explores the political justifications behind welfare chauvinism in the policy debate surrounding some recent chauvinist-oriented social policies. Drawing on that, the article develops a theoretical argument to generate expectations about how politicians use different types of justifications. The fundamental proposition is that the chauvinistic arguments used are shaped by the different types of social programs, i.e. either universal or means-tested programs. Qualitative content analysis of several selected parliamentary debates in the period 2017–2019 in Austria is carried out. In order to improve the efficiency of the research, the author relies on MAXQDA, an advanced piece of software for qualitative data analysis, to code the qualitative data and analyze them. The author prefers this to other similar programs as it is considered a valid and reliable tool within the academic research world. The article points out that programs design works as an explanatory factor to highlight variations of welfare chauvinist arguments. It develops for the first time a theoretical argument explaining the presence and variation of welfare chauvinist arguments based on social programs design.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-07-29
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-10-2020-0486
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • “I am OK when you are with me” – Understanding the well-being and
           innovative behavior in the digitized workspace

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      Authors: Anushree Karani , Swapnil Abhishek Mehta
      Abstract: The study aimed at understanding the relationship between supervisor and coworker support, psychological contract fulfillment, work engagement, well-being (different forms) and innovative behavior in the digitized workspace during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Data were collected via a structured questionnaire through Google Docs from 239 respondents working in the sales department of the consumer durable industry through snowball sampling. Supervisor and coworker support was positively contributing to psychological contract fulfillment. Further, psychological contract fulfillment was positively contributing to work engagement. Along with innovative behavior, four forms of well-being, i.e. emotional, psychological, workspace and life were studied as outcome variables. Work engagement positively contributes to innovative behavior and well-being. The study examined the relationship between various organizational variables in consumer durable industry. Future work should involve studying the effect in other industries and functional areas. The study examined how the supervisor and coworker act as an enabler in fulfilling the psychological contract in the digitized workspace. Organizations also understand the importance of work engagement in maintaining well-being and innovative behavior. The paper initiates the important debate on well-being and innovative behavior in the digitized workspace for the sales employees of the consumer durable industry.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-07-26
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-05-2021-0127
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Processes of normative regulation in spaces of “solidarity economy”: a
           comparative case study analysis

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      Authors: Ana Margarida Esteves
      Abstract: This research article addresses the role of processes of normative regulation, driven by distinct approaches to collective action and underlying narratives of social change, in the construction of “solidarity economy” initiatives as parallel spatialities to that of the mainstream economy. This article is based on a comparative case study analysis, informed by aspects of the Grounded Theory and Extended Case Study methods, of an ecovillage, an alternative commercialization network and an “integral cooperative”. The analysis is illustrated with fieldwork data on food production, commercialization and consumption, given its centrality in the construction of human livelihoods and lifeworld. The resulting conceptual framework identifies three methodologies of normative regulation: Prefigurative social technologies and capitalizing upon power and reputation to exert influence over other economic actors; being part of a wider class-based emancipatory political project; mobilizing online peer-to-peer platforms and community currencies to construct an alternative institutionality. This article constitutes an exploratory analysis. Further research, based on the application of mixed methodologies to larger samples, will further expand the setup and applicability of these concepts. This analysis will allow scholars and practitioners alike to gain a deeper understanding of how different approaches to collective action, based on distinct structural standpoints and narratives of change, constitute alternative economic spatialities to those of the mainstream economy. The comparative approach used in this article, as well as the resulting concepts, have the potential of contributing to the convergence of “solidarity economy” strategies between initiatives and movements with different approaches to collective action, therefore contributing to improve their capacity to exercise influence upon incumbent institutional regimes, as well as promote socio-economic change. This article aims to bridge a significant gap in the understanding of how “solidarity economy”-based parallel spatialities emerge and coexist with the mainstream economy: It analyses how processes of normative regulation result from narratives of change with distinct approaches to collective action, based on the standpoint of actors located differently within structural power relations.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-07-26
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-12-2020-0540
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Unearthing the response pattern of COVID-19 research in social sciences

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      Authors: Vibhav Singh , Surabhi Verma
      Abstract: The sudden onset of COVID-19 has brought about a watershed moment in the current research across all disciplines. As it has impacted almost all aspects of human existence, academicians are aggressively trying to understand the phenomenon from multidisciplinary perspectives. In this regard, the present study attempts to provide an in-depth understanding of academia's response pattern in the field of social sciences using a grounded theory literature review and bibliometric analysis. The present study analyzed 395 research articles on the pandemic phenomenon, yielding five main themes and 11 sub-themes. The emergent research themes are global impact on public health, the influence of COVID-19 on workplace functioning, global governance in COVID-19, research ethics in scholarly works and the influence of COVID-19 on demography. Drawing from these themes, the authors provide propositions, policy implications and future research directions.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-07-06
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-04-2021-0094
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Family relations of middle-aged citizens in contemporary urban China: a
           grounded theory approach

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Qi Wang
      Abstract: Although the Chinese nation is undergoing rapid modernisation and urbanisation, there remains widespread interest in some traditional familial arrangements and practices, particularly in the intergenerational context. This paper discusses the family relations of urban middle-aged citizens in present-day China. This study employed the grounded theory method to investigate family relations among middle-aged citizens in urban China based on data obtained via semi-structured interviews with 34 participants. A grounded theory coding strategy was used for data analysis. The analysis revealed evidence of a transformation towards downward solidarity, with decreasing intergenerational co-residency; that is, the traditional norm of adult children providing support to their older parents is rapidly losing popularity. However, middle-aged and older citizens continue to support their adult children by helping them purchase real estate and assisting with childcare activities. The findings suggest the existence of intergenerational inequality. Policymakers should acknowledge this phenomenon and provide the younger generation with enough support to improve the wellbeing of the country's middle-aged and older population. The transformation towards downward solidarity implies a new intergenerational relationship in contemporary China, in which many young people rely on financial and functional support from their older parents. Meanwhile, traditional norms continue to exist despite greater downward solidarity among the younger generation. In other words, old and new norms simultaneously exist.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-09-14
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-06-2021-0163
      Issue No: Vol. 41 , No. 13/14 (2021)
       
  • Does the immigration issue divide the left’s attitudes towards social
           welfare' A study on public support of social benefits and services in
           the Nordic countries

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Laura Häkkilä , Timo Toikko
      Abstract: The paper presents a study on whether citizens’ immigration attitudes shape their attitudes towards social welfare in three Nordic countries. The main analysis was performed using linear regression analysis. Data were retrieved from the eighth round of the European Social Survey (2016). The data cover the Finnish, Norwegian and Swedish respondents (N = 5,021). The analyses indicate that citizens’ immigration attitudes are associated with their social welfare attitudes. The more positive the attitudes towards immigration are, the more positive the attitudes toward social welfare will be. Further, people in the political Left have more positive attitudes towards social welfare compared to those in the political Right; but, the immigration issue is more divisive of the political Left’s opinion than that of the Right. Public opinion research has its limitations because behind an individual’s opinion there are many hidden factors. An individual may also have different opinions depending on the dimensions of the welfare state. If the immigration issue reduces the support for social welfare among the political Left, it may reduce the legitimacy of the Nordic social policy because the support of the political Left has traditionally been in favour of the universal principles of the welfare state. The association of the immigration issue and social welfare attitudes has been broadly studied; but, the interaction of the immigration issue and political opinion on social welfare attitudes is less studied.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-08-27
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-05-2021-0139
      Issue No: Vol. 41 , No. 13/14 (2021)
       
  • A descriptive analysis of three-generation households and mothers'
           employment in Japan, 2002–2019

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Rie Miyazaki
      Abstract: This article aims to explore how Japanese women with younger children changed their commitment to the labour market between 2000 and 2019 by comparing mothers in three-generation and nuclear family households. Japan currently has the highest ageing rate in the world at nearly 30%. Since the 1990s, employment flexibilization and women's labour market participation have proceeded in parallel, and the conservative family values of the patriarchy and gender division of labour that have provided intergenerational aid for care within households have been shrinking, by conducting a descriptive analysis of the Labour Force Survey (LFS). This study identified that a conspicuous increase in part-time employment among mothers in both household types and a decrease by half in the working mother's population in three-generation households. These results suggest that the function of inter-generational assistance by multi-generation cohabitation, which was once thought to be effective in helping working mothers with younger children, is declining. A study examining the transformation of mothers' employment behaviour differences between three-generation households and nuclear family households is rare. This paper makes a new contribution to the research regarding the grandparents' caregiving, household types and mothers' employment.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-08-10
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-04-2021-0075
      Issue No: Vol. 41 , No. 13/14 (2021)
       
  • The effect of parental roles on mental health outcomes of unemployment: a
           gender perspective

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Concetta Russo , Alessandra Decataldo , Marco Terraneo
      Abstract: This paper aims to investigate the extent to which family roles and settings can mediate the impact of unemployment on psychological well-being among Italian households. Using the European Health Interview Survey data for 2015, the authors adopt linear regression models to evaluate the effect of family settings on the mental health outcomes of unemployment, in particular on the likelihood of developing depression. The latter is measured using the internationally validated Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-8). Since the gender gap in occupation has not ceased to exist in Italy, special attention is paid to the differences between males and females in the workforce. The results suggest that involvement in parental roles has a moderating influence on unemployment mental health outcomes among both men and women, although it has a higher effect on the female workforce. Moreover, the study shows that “not living far from the family of origin” could be considered a crucial moderating factor for both gender categories. The novelty of this paper lies in its consideration of the implications the social definition of gender roles may have on gender-related expectancies and attributions in life domains, such as work and family.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-07-16
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-04-2021-0093
      Issue No: Vol. 41 , No. 13/14 (2021)
       
  • Negative emotional consequences of labour market activation policies for
           long-term unemployed young adults in Finland

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Sami Ylistö , Hanna-Mari Husu
      Abstract: This article deals with the negative emotional consequences of active labour market policies (ALMPs) for long-term unemployed young adults in Finland. Although such policies may have positive effects, an exploration of their negative impacts reveals their problematic side effects. We explore various aspects of ALMP interventions that prevent individuals from gaining such positive outcomes and thus reduce their motivation to invest in the policies. Drawing on the affect theory of social exchange, we understand that individuals seek positive rewards from social interactions. Our data is taken from life course interviews with unemployed people aged 20–31 in central Finland in 2012–2013. We find three factors linked to ALMPs that diminish participants' emotional well-being: experiences of unfairness, lack of control and a mismatch between ALMPs and clients' needs. By paying attention to aspects of labour market policy that diminish emotional well-being, it is possible to build more functional policies that better meet the needs of long-term unemployed individuals. This study fills a significant gap in the literature, because there is limited research on unintended negative outcomes of ALMP activation.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-07-09
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-02-2021-0039
      Issue No: Vol. 41 , No. 13/14 (2021)
       
  • International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy

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