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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 277)
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 139)
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 127)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 110)
Violence and Victims     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
British Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Qualitative Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Advances in Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Research on Social Work Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Clinical Social Work Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Family Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
The Milbank Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Qualitative Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Social Work & Social Sciences Review     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Critical and Radical Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Asian Journal of Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Public Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Critical Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Policy Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 13)
Social Work Education: The International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Contemporary Rural Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Community Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Families in Society : The Journal of Contemporary Social Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Forensic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Partner Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Service social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Care Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Social Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Work With Groups     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Global Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
African Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australian Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Care Management Journals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
ACOSS Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Comparative Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Third Sector Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sociedade e Estado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 2)
African Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Social Work and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geopolitical, Social Security and Freedom Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Human Rights and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal for Specialists in Group Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Groupwork     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Islamic Counseling : Jurnal Bimbingan Konseling Islam     Open Access  
Tidsskriftet Norges Barnevern     Full-text available via subscription  
Tidsskrift for velferdsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for omsorgsforskning     Open Access  
Nordisk välfärdsforskning | Nordic Welfare Research     Open Access  
Socialinė teorija, empirija, politika ir praktika     Open Access  
Revista Serviço Social em Perspectiva     Open Access  
ConCienciaSocial     Open Access  
Bakti Budaya     Open Access  
Voces desde el Trabajo Social     Open Access  
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access  
Janus Sosiaalipolitiikan ja sosiaalityön tutkimuksen aikakauslehti     Open Access  
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Leidfaden : Fachmagazin für Krisen, Leid, Trauer     Hybrid Journal  
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Prospectiva : Revista de Trabajo Social e Intervención Social     Open Access  
International Journal of Care and Caring     Hybrid Journal  
Volunteer Management Report     Full-text available via subscription  
Social Work / Maatskaplike Werk     Open Access  
Argumentum     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Guidance and Counseling     Open Access  
Trabajo Social Global - Global Social Work     Open Access  
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
unsere jugend     Full-text available via subscription  
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Trabajo Social     Open Access  
Developmental Child Welfare     Hybrid Journal  
Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri     Open Access  
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access  
Soziale Passagen     Hybrid Journal  
Tempo Social     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Global Social Policy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.313
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 35  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1468-0181 - ISSN (Online) 1741-2803
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Introduction: COVID-19: Lessons for gender-responsive recovery and
           transformation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sarah Cook, Silke Staab
      Pages: 172 - 179
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Volume 22, Issue 1, Page 172-179, April 2022.

      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T09:05:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181221079086
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Global Social Policy Digest 22.1: Old problems in a Corona context

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 207 - 235
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Volume 22, Issue 1, Page 207-235, April 2022.

      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T09:02:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181221079098
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Is the ILO’s governance system fit for the 21st century'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Cindy Berman
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T10:14:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181221094952
       
  • ‘Labour is not a commodity’: A gentle reminder

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Fabiola Mieres, Christiane Kuptsch
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T10:12:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181221094934
       
  • A long duree perspective on the ‘Future of Work’ debate in the ILO: A
           response and analysis in response to paper by Vincente Silva

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dorothea Hoehtker
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T10:11:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181221094926
       
  • Access to the Disability Allowance in the Maldives: National coverage and
           factors affecting uptake

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Shaffa Hameed, Lena Morgon Banks, Sofoora Kawsar Usman, Hannah Kuper
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Disability-targeted cash transfers are increasingly used by governments in low- and middle-income countries as a tool to address poverty and exclusion among people with disabilities. However, in many settings, accurate estimates of coverage and an understanding of factors affecting uptake are needed for effective delivery. This study explores coverage of the Disability Allowance in the Maldives, an unconditional, non-means tested cash transfer (2000 MVR or US$130 per month) and factors affecting uptake. It uses mixed methods, combining data from a nationally representative population-based survey with qualitative research among people with disabilities who are and are not receiving the Disability Allowance. This research found that 25.6% of people with disabilities across the Maldives are receiving the Disability Allowance. Coverage was lowest for women, older adults, people living in the capital (Malé), wealthier households and people with sensory impairments. Factors affecting uptake included lack of information about the programme, perceptions of disability and eligibility criteria, geographical and financial factors, and stigma.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T06:34:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181221084854
       
  • Inclusive statistics: A disaggregation of indicators by disability status
           and its implications for policy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sophie Mitra, Jaclyn Yap, Justine Hervé, Wei Chen
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Disability has received limited attention on the global data and social policy scene. There are few global data portals or indices tracking the socioeconomic situation of persons with disabilities. Global social policy initiatives tend to focus on disability benefits, while other social policies may impact the situation of persons with disabilities. The absence of internationally comparable data and tools to measure disability could explain this lack of attention until recently. Given progress with respect to measuring disability, this article set out to find out if human development indicators can be disaggregated by disability status using census and mainstream survey data and, if they can, consider what such disaggregation reveals regarding the socioeconomic situation of persons with disabilities and derive implications for social policies. Disability status is measured through self-reports of functional difficulties (e.g. seeing, hearing). For 19 low- and middle-income countries, the median prevalence stands at 13% among adults aged 15 years and older, and at 28% among households. We could disaggregate a range of human development indicators across disability status for all countries. There are consistent inequalities associated with disability, particularly in terms of educational attainment, employment population ratio, multidimensional poverty, and food security. At the same time, we find that not all persons with functional difficulties experience deprivations. Results in this article on the prevalence of functional difficulties and their association with socioeconomic deprivations show that disability should be central to social policies globally. More data collection, research, and policy work are needed to curb the inequalities associated with disability.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-05-09T02:49:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181221077866
       
  • Patterns of compliance with COVID-19 preventive measures among the public
           in Qatar and Kuwait

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      Authors: Noora Lari, Noor Al-Thani
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Policy responses to the COVID-19 pandemic are assessed by documenting the public’s perception, knowledge, and adherence to preventive behaviors to mitigate the spread of the virus. Using an online survey administered in both Qatar and Kuwait, this article examines the associated state-mandated compliance measures experienced by citizens and expats during the outbreak of COVID-19. The survey measured public attitudes, behavioral responses, and compliance with state-mandated preventive measures. The study showed that individuals were well informed about the pandemic, yet controversy exists concerning compliance with control measures to contain the virus, which continue to be challenged on the basis of multiple individual-level factors. These findings raise the imperative need to call for governments’ transparent communications with the public regarding information disclosure measures to gain public attention and trust, which are essential to strategic planning success.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T06:18:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181221092682
       
  • To comply or to be committed' Public procurement and labour rights in
           global supply chains

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      Authors: Detlef Sack, EK Sarter
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Violations of fundamental labour rights have been a problem in global supply chains for decades. Recently, public procurement is increasingly used to regulate labour standards in global chains. Based on previous research on private actors, which distinguished between compliance-focused and commitment-focused enforcement strategies, this article discusses the problems and means of enforcing respect for labour rights in global supply chains. By applying this distinction to public procurement, this article develops a concept of enforcement styles for public procurement as a tool to regulate labour in global supply chains.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-04-23T10:31:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211070987
       
  • A ‘north star’ in governing global labour migration' The ILO and
           the Fair Recruitment Initiative

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Katharine Jones
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      In 2014, the International Labour Organization (ILO) launched the Fair Recruitment Initiative (FRI) with the aim of tackling labour exploitation widely associated with the recruitment of low-wage migrant workers. To date, scholars have largely neglected the ILO’s role in developing ‘fair recruitment’ as a mechanism of global social policy. In response, this article analyses the ILO’s harnessing of fair recruitment to the global governance of migration. Through engaging in significant knowledge production activities, the ILO has promoted ‘fair recruitment’ as a new norm, generating consensus from these partners, despite its absence from international legal standards. In utilising multiple and varied tools, the article argues that the FRI is an example of the ‘coordinated governance’ which the ILO has had to pragmatically resort to in externally and internally challenging environments, and regardless of whether states have ratified its main convention on recruitment, C181. However, as of 2022, the concept of fair recruitment remains a muted challenge to the hegemonic precarity and inequalities associated with international labour migration in the 21st century.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T10:37:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181221084792
       
  • The ILO World Employment Program research agenda on development and
           migration

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jill Jensen
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      The International Labour Organization (ILO) seeks to build consensus for a ‘fair migration agenda’ while linking development goals with the rights of migrant workers across national borders. Since the main drivers of international migration are employment-related, this is a topic of extreme concern for the readers of this special issue. Given the differences between nations and regions – between labor sending and labor receiving countries – promoting such an agenda is complicated, and ILO labor standards apply almost exclusively to workers crossing international borders. Nations aim to provide opportunities for their citizens, and international movement, in the words of an ILO specialist in migration from years ago, remains a second-best option compared to securing decent work at home. The challenge is how to nurture opportunities in countries that lack the resources and capital but have ample numbers looking for remunerative work. This article evaluates an historical example of attention to both development and migration in the 1970s and 1980s. Linking the dynamics of domestic migration, economic growth, and the structure of labor markets in poorer nations, I evaluate two important concepts that stemmed from research of this era: surplus labor and basic human needs. Through review of historical documents, including archival material and a multiplicity of reports, papers, and strategy guidelines, I seek to describe ILO projects and proposals meant to deal, simultaneously, with poverty, migration, and development.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T05:51:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181221079202
       
  • Inequality in labour market opportunities for people with disabilities:
           Evidence for six Latin American countries

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mónica Pinilla-Roncancio, Mauricio Gallardo
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      In Latin America, approximately 70 million individuals live with a disability. Although global evidence suggests that people with disabilities are one of the poorest groups and present lower employment rates, the evidence for Latin America is still weak. This article aims to contribute to the literature by estimating and analysing the levels of employment opportunity for persons with disabilities in six countries in Latin America (Chile, Bolivia, Mexico, Peru, Colombia, and Costa Rica). Using household survey data, we measure inequality of opportunities using the Paes de Barros approach and compare the probability distributions of being employed for people with disabilities according to different individual characteristics. This research makes several contributions to the literature. First, it analyses and compares the characteristics of persons with disabilities in six countries of the region. Second, it is the first paper in the region that computes and compares the levels of employment opportunities for persons with disabilities, using the Human Opportunity Index. Third, it analyses which are the main aspects contributing to the levels of employment opportunities for persons with disabilities in each of the countries. The main results of the study reveal that people with disabilities face high levels of inequality of employment opportunity compared with people without disabilities in the six countries. Peru shows the lowest disadvantage, with higher coverage of opportunities for people with disabilities. Colombia and Costa Rica were the countries where this group presents the largest disadvantages to be employed. In addition, women with disabilities and people with disabilities living in rural areas have a lower probability of being employed compared with people without disabilities. These findings reveal that policies in the region aiming to include this group in the labour market have not been effective, and there is a necessity to guarantee the proper labour inclusion of this group.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-04-06T04:50:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211070201
       
  • Towards an understanding of mobility in social policy research

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      Authors: Cecilia Bruzelius, Isabel Shutes
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Over recent years, there has been increasing attention to migration in social policy research. Uniting this research has been a focus on cross-national migration, and predominantly immigration. In the meantime, the relationship between human mobility and social policy at other scales and sites has gained much less attention. This is in spite of the salience of multiple forms of mobility and measures for restricting, facilitating or promoting mobility not confined to the territorial borders of the nation-state. This article proposes an alternative mobility perspective for social policy research that moves us beyond the limitations of current migration approaches. To do so, we draw on interdisciplinary mobilities theory and research. Empirically, we apply a mobility perspective to examine how systems of social provision are shaped by and shape mobility and immobility, in restricting, facilitating or promoting the movement of people. We argue that such an approach allows us to frame and address questions that place mobility and immobility as central to the social relations of welfare, advancing our understanding of how social policies can reduce or reinforce the inequalities of mobility.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-04-05T11:54:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181221085477
       
  • The International Labour Organisation as nodal player on the pitch of
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nicola Piper
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      This article assesses the role of the International Labour Organisation (ILO) as a player within the multi-actor sphere of global migration governance. The aim is to analyse the ILO’s leadership within this sphere that is characterised by shifting dynamics between rules-based and rights-based approaches as a result of the multiplication of actors and, given its normative predisposition, the effects on the ILO’s ability to advance migrant workers’ labour rights. The article is premised on the assumption that the promotion of a rights-based approach to labour migration via the ILO’s decent work agenda depends upon the presence of effective and proactive governing institutions as well as appropriate regulation. Contemporary scholarship highlights the importance of organisational networks across multiple sites and levels of policy making in order to achieve change. The situation of the highly precarious migrant workforce involved in the construction of the physical infrastructure for the Football World Cup 2022 in Qatar demonstrates the particular challenges posed by an unfavourable institutional environment. This leads to the argument that stratified organisational networks at the intersection of various institutional nodes are required to keep shifting the goalpost – and the ILO is one such node. The conception of global governance as nodal provides an understanding of how such networks can generate multi-directional and concerted action across various organisational actors and over time, contributing to the advancement of migrants’ labour rights.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-04-01T06:32:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211065240
       
  • Assembling an international social protection for the migrant: Juridical
           categorization in ILO migration standards, 1919–1939

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      Authors: Leila Kawar
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      This article applies a history of knowledge perspective to interwar International Labour Organization (ILO) efforts to produce generalized international instruments for governing migrant labor. The historical analysis explores what it meant in the interwar context to devise ‘an international common law of the emigrant’. It focuses particular attention on the process through which juridical techniques formalized a distinction between ‘migration for employment’ and ‘migratory movements of indigenous workers’. Foregrounding the constructed nature of these categories highlights the underlying race-based notions that informed interwar ILO standard-setting frameworks. More broadly, tracing the knowledge-making processes through which seemingly objective categorical distinctions have been constructed and reconstructed opens space for questioning and potentially rethinking the functionally differentiated normative frameworks through which global policymaking approaches human mobility today.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-03-26T05:46:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211052921
       
  • Reaching people who are marginalized in major disability policy reform

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      Authors: Karen R Fisher, Sandra Gendera, Rosemary Kayess
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Policy changes often aim to improve the access of socially marginalized people who face systemic, social and personal barriers to the support they need. A major policy reform in Australia was the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), which was introduced to meet the country’s human rights obligations. NDIS is publicly funded to allocate individual funding packages to 10% of people with disability and facilitates access to mainstream services for all people with disability. Support services are intended to be entitlements, consistent with a human rights framework. Predictably, the most marginalized people remain under-represented in both packages and mainstream access, including people with psychosocial disability who are at risk of homelessness. A 2-year project was conducted to familiarize people with disability and service providers who have contact with them about how to access support. People with Disability Australia managed the project as action research with university researchers. The research used interviews to study how to improve access. People with disability were advisors to the governance and research design. The findings were that it took many months for people with disability and the organizations that support them to trust the project staff, understand the relevance of disability to their lives, and to take steps to seek their entitlements to support. Some implications for policy are conceptual in terms of the policy language of disability, which alienates some people from the services to which they are entitled. Other implications are bureaucratic – the gap between homeless and disability organizations means that they prioritize people’s immediate needs and people who are easier to serve, rather than facilitating sustainable support. A global social policy implication is that specialized interventions to advocate for the rights of marginalized people with disability and to demonstrate how to engage with them remains a priority while gaps between service types persist.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-03-08T01:22:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181221075558
       
  • Reproduction, discipline, inequality: Critiquing East-Asian
           developmentalism through a strategic-relational examination of
           Singapore’s Central Provident Fund

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      Authors: Joe Greener, Eve Yeo
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      The five ‘developmentalist’ welfare states of East Asia (South Korea, Singapore, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Japan) have been presented as successful projects of economic progress, positively aligning citizen-interests with business objective. Utilising Jessop’s Strategic-Relational Approach (SRA), we analyse the Central Provident Fund (CPF), Singapore’s ‘forced savings’ social policy which organises housing, healthcare, education and retirement. Through a myriad of eligibilities/ineligibilities, Singapore’s CPF administers desired social behaviours while sustaining a series of inequalities supporting certain classed and gendered interests over others. Our analysis breaks down the CPF into three social relational orientations: (1) heteronormative familial responsiblisation, (2) labour market activation and (3) class reproduction. The article highlights the function of CPF in institutionalising conservative and pro-market political interests. CPF reproduces material inequalities and fashions behaviours conducive with the dominant accumulation strategy while discouraging those which are not, privileging some interests over others.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-03-04T12:44:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211059971
       
  • GSP Editorial 22.1: What is (successfully) “social” in global social
           policy and how does it diffuse'

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      Authors: Alexandra Kaasch
      First page: 3
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T12:04:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181221079099
       
  • A gendered UBI proposal for the new Chilean constitution (or why being a
           surfer is not the same as being a caregiver)

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      Authors: Alejandra Zúñiga-Fajuri, Fuad Hatibovic, José Manuel Gaete
      First page: 8
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Chile has become the first country in the world where an equal number of men and women will draft the new Constitution due a parity law that was passed in March 2020. In addition, this historic opportunity will take place during one of the worst health pandemics in recorded history, COVID-19, which has revealed deep gender inequalities. The new Chilean Constitution, drafted with gender parity, will have a unique opportunity to grant a right to a universal basic income (UBI), which has been targeted to address some of the worst consequences of the pandemic: the increase in poverty, unemployment, and vulnerability of women. This article reviews the theories developed to justify a UBI and the feminist critics who argue that not all UBI is equally advantageous to women. The misconception that a ‘morally neutral’ model is sufficient and women-friendly disregards the way in which it encourages stereotypes that feminists have fought for centuries. We argue for the development of public policies with a gender focus, especially the right to a ‘gendered UBI’. This means a UBI that meets two basic requirements: first, that every citizen or resident be guaranteed the same amount of income from birth; second, that caregivers be provided with management rights to turn the UBI into a compensatory income that can also promote changes in gender roles, encouraging men to become caregivers.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-04-11T05:03:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211048126
       
  • Building back better' Rethinking gender and recovery in the time of
           COVID-19

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      Authors: Kaira Zoe Alburo-Cañete
      First page: 180
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-04-09T06:42:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181221079087
       
  • Following a moving target on a global scale: Gender data collection during
           COVID-19

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      Authors: Silke Staab, Constanza Tabbush
      First page: 184
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-03-24T01:58:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181221079088
       
  • Pandemic, informality and women’s work: Redefining social protection
           priorities at WIEGO

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      Authors: Rachel Moussié, Laura Alfers
      First page: 190
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-03-24T02:00:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181221079089
       
  • Seizing the opportunity to do things differently: Feminist ideas, policies
           and actors in UN Women’s ‘Feminist Plan for Sustainability and Social
           Justice’

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      Authors: Juliana Martínez Franzoni, Sarah Cook
      First page: 196
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-03-24T02:01:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181221079096
       
  • COVID-19 and the gender paradox

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      Authors: Julia Smith
      First page: 202
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2022-04-09T05:47:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181221079097
       
  • Co-creating changes to achieve decent work conditions in the New Zealand
           fishing industry

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      Authors: Ani Kartikasari, Christina Stringer, Guye Henderson
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      In 2014, New Zealand enacted the Fisheries (Foreign Charter Vessels and Other Matters) Amendment Act in response to ongoing labour abuses on board South Korean vessels in New Zealand’s foreign charter vessel sector. Importantly, the legislation expresses the universality of the International Labour Organization’s Decent Work Agenda: all member countries must pursue policies based on the strategic objectives of equality, dignity, safe working conditions and that workers are protected from exploitation. The Act was in response to the identification of widespread labour abuses in this sector. In June 2011, the extent of the abuses came to light when 32 Indonesian crewmen of the Oyang 75 walked off their vessel. In this paper, we explore how a range of stakeholders worked organically to bring about change. We do this qualitatively by combining semi-structured interview (with over 160 Indonesian migrant crewmen between 2011 and 2017), observation and document analysis. We analyse our data through the lens of participatory action research which provides a framework to document the processes of who was involved, the cycles of change, what was achieved in each cycle, and importantly the platform for change. Specifically, we look at how stakeholders – the crew themselves, their advocates, academics, non-governmental organisations, journalists, activists, among others – all played a part in achieving legislated protections.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-07-30T09:50:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211026182
       
  • The ILO and the future of work: The politics of global labour policy

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      Authors: Vicente Silva
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      In the late 2010s, the future of work gathered attention from the most influential actors in global social governance. The International Labour Organization (ILO), since 2015 and in the context of its Future of Work Initiative, aimed to position itself in the discussion by putting this issue at the centre of their activities for its centenary (2019). The normative and conceptual approach developed by the ILO in this initiative was named the ‘human-centred agenda’, aimed to align technological change with decent work and social justice. Although preliminary scholarly works have seen these efforts as a humanistic and pro-worker ‘countermovement’, a deeper analysis of the ideas and interests involved in the Future of Work Initiative reveals a different, more complex picture. This article studies the creation of the human-centred agenda led by the ILO secretariat and the Global Commission on the Future of Work, and how it was further negotiated and modified by the social partners in the making of the Centenary Declaration in 2019. In particular, it shows how business at the ILO and right-wing populist governments, in tandem, reoriented the human-centred agenda towards a pro-employer perspective, thus framing social and labour policy as a tool for adapting the workforce to technological change. It concludes with some reflections about the consequences of these developments for the ILO’s position in global governance.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-03-30T07:15:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211004853
       
  • The revolution will not be randomized: Universal basic income, randomized
           controlled trials, and ‘evidence-based’ social policy

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      Authors: Malte Neuwinger
      First page: 27
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Organizations in various countries have launched large-scale randomized field experiments to evaluate the empirical effects of basic income. Surprisingly, scholars have paid only scarce attention to the way basic income experiments are actually run. To address this shortcoming, I present three case studies of basic income experiments in the Netherlands, Spain, and the United States. I ask: Why do experiments’ designs only remotely resemble the ‘paradigmatic’ model of basic income they are in fact interested in – universal, unconditional, individual payments, no means tests, and no work requirements' Interviewed researchers identify three types of constraints that prevent basic income experiments from successfully testing basic income – politics, money, and the law – which I explain through the mechanism of ‘boundary work’ between science and politics. I conclude by cautioning against overstated expectations about the policy impact of both current and future basic income experiments.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T05:15:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211010102
       
  • Breaking out of the policy enclave approach to child labour in sub-Saharan
           African agriculture

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      Authors: Rachel Sabates-Wheeler, James Sumberg
      First page: 46
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      This article is framed by the tension between a substantial universalising framework of global instruments on workers’ rights and child labour on one hand, and their outsourced implementation through the social policy enclaves of transnational corporations on the other hand. It uses the concept of ‘social policy enclaves’ to explore this tension and how it might be resolved to the benefit of children who work in African agriculture. To do this, the article steps back from dominant discourses around child labour, and examines how a re-framing of children’s involvement in African agriculture, from labour to work, might enhance understanding of the forms, prevalence, drivers and dynamics of their involvement in work that is harmful. A deeper understanding of these issues should help to inform a revitalised universal approach to social policy in respect to children’s work.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-02-17T09:34:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468018121991813
       
  • Unemployment insurance in the Global South since 1950: Drivers of policy
           adoption

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      Authors: Herbert Obinger, Carina Schmitt
      First page: 67
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Until 1945, Western countries were the only ones to have introduced unemployment insurance programs. Since their adoption was extremely controversial, almost all Western nations introduced income support for the unemployed only in the wake of national emergencies such as war and economic depression. This article examines the determinants of program adoption in the Global South, which commenced after the Second World War. With the exception of military conflict, we find that the introduction of unemployment insurance was shaped by factors deviating from the driving forces of program adoption in the Western world. More specifically, we provide evidence that international factors such as war, the activities of the ILO and policy diffusion were more important than domestic factors.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-10-08T08:46:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211049654
       
  • 25 years of averting the old age crisis in Eastern Europe

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      Authors: Nikola Altiparmakov, Milan Nedeljković
      First page: 84
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      The influential World Bank Averting the old-age crisis study profoundly influenced pension policies around the globe, but nowhere more so than in Eastern Europe. While Western Europe dismissed radical carve-out pension privatization initiatives, Eastern European countries with similar Pas-As-You-Go legacies pursued World Bank reforms hoping to increase retirement incomes, spur economic growth, and hedge political risks inherent in public systems. However, 25 years later, reversals are taking place in all reforming countries, ranging from outright dismantling of mandatory private pension funds to their scaling-down and moving to voluntary participation. Empirical evidence presented in this article suggests that carve-out privatization failed to accelerate economic growth, while private pension funds turned out to be dynamically inefficient and inferior to PAYG systems they were intended to replace. We argue that the carve-out approach is the root cause of inherent economic and fiscal tension between public and private pension pillars. We identify a minimum set of Pareto improving reform adjustments that address the most pressing sources of economic inefficiencies and political instability by undoing the carve-out financing. The suggested re-reforms would be a first step in enabling private pension funds in Eastern Europe to become a meaningful supplement to existing PAYG benefits, in line with typical pension practices in Western Europe.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-05-19T05:20:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211014152
       
  • Trusting relationships, learning bureaucrats: International organizations
           and early-stage policy diffusion

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      Authors: Ozsel Beleli
      First page: 103
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the diffusion of the conditional cash transfer (CCT) model to Turkey and Indonesia, and the role of World Bank bureaucrats in these cases of early-stage diffusion. The article finds that learning, and not coercion or emulation, is the primary mechanism of policy diffusion in both cases. This learning was mediated by the World Bank bureaucrats even before the CCT model gained mainstream acceptance inside the World Bank. The findings from these two cases suggest World Bank bureaucrats to be engaging in domestic policy processes not by ‘powering’ but by participating in the national bureaucrats’ ‘puzzling’. The findings also underline the importance of trusting relationships between international and national bureaucrats in these policy processes. More broadly, the article makes the case for conceptualizing international organizations (IOs) as organizations with heterogeneous staff who play more nuanced and contingent roles in policy diffusion processes than is commonly conceived.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-05-14T04:53:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211012975
       
  • Policy, fast and slow: Social impact bonds and the differential
           temporalities of mobile policy

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      Authors: Rebecca Grimwood, Tom Baker, Louise Humpage, Jacob Broom
      First page: 122
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Governments are increasingly intrigued by the possibility of harnessing the private ‘social investment’ market to finance the delivery of social services. One social investment initiative in particular – Social Impact Bonds (SIBs) – has spread extensively within the global North. This article investigates the transnational mobility of SIBs by exploring the adoption and implementation of SIBs in New Zealand. It considers SIBs as a case of ‘fast policy’, a concept that describes both the increasing rapidity of policymaking and the proliferation of ‘best practice’ policy models. Although the model was adopted relatively quickly in New Zealand, implementation spanned a number of years following various complications and setbacks, echoing experiences in other places. This article seeks to extend conceptions of policy mobility and fast policy by arguing for both fast and slow temporalities of policy movement, contending that while adoption of mobile policies tends to be rapid, implementation can follow a much more gradual pace as they mediate, and are mediated by, local political, institutional and ideological factors.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-03-02T10:17:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468018121997809
       
  • Exploring the politicisation and territorialisation of adult social care
           in the United Kingdom: Electoral discourse analysis of state-wide and meso
           elections 1998–2019

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      Authors: Paul Chaney
      First page: 141
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      In the face of a global demographic shift, an aging population and a ‘crisis’ in adult social care (ASC), this study analyses over 3000 pledges on ASC in political parties’ manifesto discourse following the United Kingdom’s move to a multi-level electoral politics in 1998/1999. Although often overlooked, attention to this formative phase of social policy-making reveals the discursive political antecedents of welfare interventions. The analysis shows a major increase in issue-salience and party politicisation of ASC policy. The discourse reveals political cleavages on welfare mixes and policy framing, and sub-state resistance to central government policies. Against the backdrop of the international rise of devolved governance, the present case is of wider international significance because it illustrates how the transition from state-wide to (quasi-)federal electoral practices gives rise to new territorial dynamics in the electoral discourse of welfare provision; in turn, promoting territorialisation, pressure for welfare state expansion and the rise of ‘sub-state’ welfare regimes.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-04-23T06:47:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211008141
       
 
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