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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 243 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACOSS Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
African Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Argumentum     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Australian Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Bakti Budaya     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
British Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 104)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Care Management Journals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Social Work Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Comunitania : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ConCienciaSocial     Open Access  
Contemporary Rural Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Critical and Radical Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Critical Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Critical Social Work : An Interdisciplinary Journal Dedicated to Social Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuadernos de Trabajo Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Developmental Child Welfare     Hybrid Journal  
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
ECI Interdisciplinary Journal for Legal and Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
European Journal of Social Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Families in Society : The Journal of Contemporary Social Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Geopolitical, Social Security and Freedom Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Global Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access  
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Indonesian Journal of Guidance and Counseling     Open Access  
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Care and Caring     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 69)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Islamic Counseling : Jurnal Bimbingan Konseling Islam     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Janus Sosiaalipolitiikan ja sosiaalityön tutkimuksen aikakauslehti     Open Access  
Journal for Specialists in Group Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Journal of Baccalaureate Social Work     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Care Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Community Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Comparative Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Family Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Forensic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Rights and Social Work     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 394)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 235)
Journal of Public Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 205)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Jurnal Guidena : Journal of Guidance and counseling, Psychology and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Leidfaden : Fachmagazin für Krisen, Leid, Trauer     Hybrid Journal  
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access  
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nordisk välfärdsforskning | Nordic Welfare Research     Open Access  
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Partner Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 239)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Policy Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Prospectiva : Revista de Trabajo Social e Intervención Social     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psikopedagogia : Jurnal Bimbingan dan Konseling     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Qualitative Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Qualitative Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Research on Social Work Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revista Brasileira de Tecnologias Sociais     Open Access  
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Katálysis     Open Access  
Revista Serviço Social em Perspectiva     Open Access  
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
SER Social     Open Access  
Service social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Serviço Social & Sociedade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Sexualidad, Salud y Sociedad (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access  
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 2)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Social Care and Neurodisability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 212)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Global Social Policy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.313
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 36  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1468-0181 - ISSN (Online) 1741-2803
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • Editors’ Note

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tuba Agartan, Sarah Cook, Alexandra Kaasch, Nicola Piper, Marianne Ulriksen
      Pages: 185 - 185
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Volume 21, Issue 2, Page 185-185, August 2021.

      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-08-04T10:39:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211008666
      Issue No: Vol. 21, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Introduction: Global eco-social policy: Contestation within an emerging
           policy era'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alexandra Kaasch, Robin Schulze Waltrup
      Pages: 319 - 322
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Volume 21, Issue 2, Page 319-322, August 2021.

      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-08-04T10:42:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211019152
      Issue No: Vol. 21, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Uncovering different degrees of eco-social policy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dunja Krause
      Pages: 332 - 334
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Volume 21, Issue 2, Page 332-334, August 2021.

      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-08-04T10:38:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211019165
      Issue No: Vol. 21, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Promoting decent work, advancing social justice in the ecological
           transition

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Moustapha Kamal Gueye
      Pages: 339 - 343
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Volume 21, Issue 2, Page 339-343, August 2021.

      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-08-04T10:38:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211019168
      Issue No: Vol. 21, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • The challenge and promise at the intersection of environmental and social
           policies: How the World Bank established a policy framework that fully
           integrates environmental and social concerns

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Charles E. Di Leva
      Pages: 344 - 348
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Volume 21, Issue 2, Page 344-348, August 2021.

      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-08-04T10:40:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211019170
      Issue No: Vol. 21, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Global Social Policy Digest 21.2: Turning the tide in the battle against
           COVID-19'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 349 - 377
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Volume 21, Issue 2, Page 349-377, August 2021.

      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-08-04T10:39:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211008665
      Issue No: Vol. 21, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Unemployment insurance in the Global South since 1950: Drivers of policy
           adoption

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Herbert Obinger, Carina Schmitt
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Until 1945, Western countries were the only ones to have introduced unemployment insurance programs. Since their adoption was extremely controversial, almost all Western nations introduced income support for the unemployed only in the wake of national emergencies such as war and economic depression. This article examines the determinants of program adoption in the Global South, which commenced after the Second World War. With the exception of military conflict, we find that the introduction of unemployment insurance was shaped by factors deviating from the driving forces of program adoption in the Western world. More specifically, we provide evidence that international factors such as war, the activities of the ILO and policy diffusion were more important than domestic factors.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-10-08T08:46:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211049654
       
  • Social resilience and welfare systems under COVID-19: A European
           comparative perspective

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      Authors: José António Correia Pereirinha, Elvira Pereira
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      COVID-19 and the corresponding economic lockdown and income loss for large segments of population was something unexpected for all European countries, and their welfare systems were not prepared to protect their citizens from such threats. Social resilience is becoming used in disaster risk analysis, and preferred to that of vulnerability, to refer the ability of the social entities to respond to such challenges, enabling them to cope and adjust to adverse events. It has been more recently used in the context of the European Union (EU) about COVID-19, regarding the creation of the Recovery and Resilience Facility, intended to mitigate the economic and social impact of the coronavirus pandemic. The global nature of this pandemic makes possible and relevant a deeper understanding of social resilience at different levels of analysis: international, national, local and individual/household levels. This article aims to contribute to this by proposing a set of indicators of social resilience in face of COVID-19, supported in a theoretical framework developed herein, and comparing the performance of a selection of EU countries with distinct welfare system configurations, with different roles played by the government, the market, the social organizations and the families. Using comparable statistical data at macro level and data concerning the responses of government to the economic and social effects of the pandemic, we produce a synthetic index of social resilience, combining resilience on coping and resilience on adapting. We relate the differences found in coping and adapting with the welfare system configurations of these countries.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-10-05T06:27:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211012946
       
  • Social protection responses by states and international organisations to
           the COVID-19 crisis in the global South: Stopgap or new departure'

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      Authors: Lutz Leisering
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Macro events like the Great Depression in the 1930s and the Second World War have triggered new departures in social policy. What about the COVID-19 pandemic and the attendant socio-economic crisis' This article analyses the social protection measures taken by governments in the global South in response to the crisis, the social protection concepts developed by international organisations, and the overall strategies of the organisations in view of future shocks. The finding is that while the measures taken by governments expectedly have just been stopgap measures of a transitory nature, international organisations are aspiring to future-oriented policies and present a range of concepts for the time after the crisis. However, these are old concepts from pre-COVID-19 times, and the main strategy is to expand rather than reform the old models, even though the international organisations themselves identify new forms of poverty and structural inequalities. Moreover, the organisations do not provide conclusive evidence of their strategy’s viability; the strategy rather reflects a belief in social progress. All in all, the crisis has hardly been used as a window of opportunity for generating new ideas of social protection. Rather, the crisis has revealed the flimsy nature of widespread thinking about building social protection in the global South. Conceptually, the article draws on world society theory, conceiving of the pandemic as a global macro event.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-07-30T09:51:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211029089
       
  • Co-creating changes to achieve decent work conditions in the New Zealand
           fishing industry

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      Authors: Ani Kartikasari, Christina Stringer, Guye Henderson
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      In 2014, New Zealand enacted the Fisheries (Foreign Charter Vessels and Other Matters) Amendment Act in response to ongoing labour abuses on board South Korean vessels in New Zealand’s foreign charter vessel sector. Importantly, the legislation expresses the universality of the International Labour Organization’s Decent Work Agenda: all member countries must pursue policies based on the strategic objectives of equality, dignity, safe working conditions and that workers are protected from exploitation. The Act was in response to the identification of widespread labour abuses in this sector. In June 2011, the extent of the abuses came to light when 32 Indonesian crewmen of the Oyang 75 walked off their vessel. In this paper, we explore how a range of stakeholders worked organically to bring about change. We do this qualitatively by combining semi-structured interview (with over 160 Indonesian migrant crewmen between 2011 and 2017), observation and document analysis. We analyse our data through the lens of participatory action research which provides a framework to document the processes of who was involved, the cycles of change, what was achieved in each cycle, and importantly the platform for change. Specifically, we look at how stakeholders – the crew themselves, their advocates, academics, non-governmental organisations, journalists, activists, among others – all played a part in achieving legislated protections.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-07-30T09:50:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211026182
       
  • Protecting livelihoods in the COVID-19 crisis: A comparative analysis of
           European labour market and social policies

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      Authors: Anika Seemann, Ulrich Becker, Linxin He, Eva Maria Hohnerlein, Nikola Wilman
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      This article provides a comparative study of the labour market and social policy measures introduced in light of the COVID-19 crisis in Denmark, France, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom between March 2020 and January 2021. Its main aim is to understand whether the crisis response has changed the structures of the welfare states concerned. Focusing in particular on the differences regarding the crisis measures taken for individuals in ‘standard employment’ and ‘non-standard workers’ in each country, it argues that, although extensive temporary protection instruments were introduced for both groups during the crisis, these did not lead to an immediate convergence as regards these groups’ social protection. Rather than changing the underlying structures of welfare systems, many of the measures in fact highlighted the specific vulnerabilities of large segments of Europe’s labour markets. States have, however, granted social compensation at unprecedented levels, which could result in improved infrastructures and a clearer understanding of the responsibility of the welfare state in future emergencies.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-06-07T05:12:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211019281
       
  • Social protection responses to COVID-19 in Africa

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      Authors: Stephen Devereux
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Most African countries implemented measures to contain the spread of COVID-19 during 2020, such as restrictions on business activity and travel, school closures and stay-at-home lockdowns for several months. These restrictive policies had adverse economic and social consequences that triggered a follow-up wave of expansionist public interventions intended to mitigate these effects. ‘Shock-responsive’ social protection measures included increased benefits to existing beneficiaries (vertical expansion) and registration of new beneficiaries on existing programmes (horizontal expansion). These approaches had the advantages of being quick and administratively simple, but the disadvantage of bypassing people who were made most vulnerable by COVID-19, notably retrenched and informal workers with no access to social insurance. On the other hand, setting up new humanitarian relief or temporary social assistance programmes was slow and susceptible to targeting errors and corruption. COVID-19 also prompted a reassessment of the social contract regarding social protection, with some governments recognising that they need to become better coordinated, more inclusive and rights-based.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-06-02T04:58:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211021260
       
  • Pandemic, lockdown and the stalled urbanization of welfare regimes in
           Southern Africa

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      Authors: Lena Gronbach, Jeremy Seekings
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      While Covid-19 caused few fatalities across most of Africa – with the notable exception of South Africa – the indirect economic effects were substantial, especially in urban areas. International organizations encouraged governments to expand their provision, especially for the urban poor. South Africa extended temporarily its already considerable system of social protection and introduced new implementation systems. Elsewhere, governments that had hitherto appeared ambivalent about social protection resisted major reforms, even on a temporary basis. In Zambia, the government committed considerable resources to small farmers but ignored almost entirely cash transfers to the poor. Botswana provided food parcels but did not expand its social grant programmes. The shock of Covid-19 in Southern Africa did not prove to be a ‘critical juncture’: Powerful pro-reform coalitions did not form to shift governments onto new policy paths. National governments were generally reluctant either to introduce programmes that were targeted on the urban poor specifically or to allow countrywide emergency programmes to become permanent. The crisis thus did not lead to any clear ‘urbanisation’ of welfare regimes in the region, despite the disproportionate effect of the crisis on the urban poor.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-05-31T04:54:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211013725
       
  • Taking stock of COVID-19 policy measures to protect Europe’s elderly
           living in long-term care facilities

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      Authors: Lorraine Frisina Doetter, Benedikt Preuß, Heinz Rothgang
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      The current COVID-19 pandemic has come to impact all areas of life involving the health, psycho-social and economic wellbeing of individuals, as well as all stages of life from childhood to old age. Particularly, the frail elderly have had to face the gravest consequences of the disease; while reporting measures tend to differ between countries making direct comparisons difficult, national statistics worldwide point to a disproportionate and staggering share of COVID-19 related mortality coming from residential long-term care facilities (LTCFs). Still, the severity of the impact on the institutionalized elderly has not been uniform across countries. In an effort to better understand the disparities in impact on Europe’s elderly living in LTCFs, we review data on mortality outcomes seen during the first wave of the pandemic (months March to June 2020). We then set out to understand the role played by the following two factors: (1) the infection rate in the general population and (2) member state adherence to policy recommendations put forth by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) targeting the LTC sector. Regarding the latter, we compare the content of national policy measures in six countries – Austria, Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Spain and Sweden – with those of the ECDC. Our findings establish that infection rates in the general population accounted for most of the variation in mortality among member states, however adherence to EU policy helped to explain the residual variation between cases. This suggests that in order to best protect the institutionalized elderly from infectious disease of this kind, countries need to adopt a two-pronged approach to developing measures: one that aims at reducing transmission within the general population and one that specifically targets LTCFs.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-05-24T04:05:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211013717
       
  • 25 years of averting the old age crisis in Eastern Europe

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      Authors: Nikola Altiparmakov, Milan Nedeljković
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      The influential World Bank Averting the old-age crisis study profoundly influenced pension policies around the globe, but nowhere more so than in Eastern Europe. While Western Europe dismissed radical carve-out pension privatization initiatives, Eastern European countries with similar Pas-As-You-Go legacies pursued World Bank reforms hoping to increase retirement incomes, spur economic growth, and hedge political risks inherent in public systems. However, 25 years later, reversals are taking place in all reforming countries, ranging from outright dismantling of mandatory private pension funds to their scaling-down and moving to voluntary participation. Empirical evidence presented in this article suggests that carve-out privatization failed to accelerate economic growth, while private pension funds turned out to be dynamically inefficient and inferior to PAYG systems they were intended to replace. We argue that the carve-out approach is the root cause of inherent economic and fiscal tension between public and private pension pillars. We identify a minimum set of Pareto improving reform adjustments that address the most pressing sources of economic inefficiencies and political instability by undoing the carve-out financing. The suggested re-reforms would be a first step in enabling private pension funds in Eastern Europe to become a meaningful supplement to existing PAYG benefits, in line with typical pension practices in Western Europe.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-05-19T05:20:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211014152
       
  • Trusting relationships, learning bureaucrats: International organizations
           and early-stage policy diffusion

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      Authors: Ozsel Beleli
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the diffusion of the conditional cash transfer (CCT) model to Turkey and Indonesia, and the role of World Bank bureaucrats in these cases of early-stage diffusion. The article finds that learning, and not coercion or emulation, is the primary mechanism of policy diffusion in both cases. This learning was mediated by the World Bank bureaucrats even before the CCT model gained mainstream acceptance inside the World Bank. The findings from these two cases suggest World Bank bureaucrats to be engaging in domestic policy processes not by ‘powering’ but by participating in the national bureaucrats’ ‘puzzling’. The findings also underline the importance of trusting relationships between international and national bureaucrats in these policy processes. More broadly, the article makes the case for conceptualizing international organizations (IOs) as organizations with heterogeneous staff who play more nuanced and contingent roles in policy diffusion processes than is commonly conceived.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-05-14T04:53:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211012975
       
  • Returning home empty handed: Examining how COVID-19 exacerbates the
           non-payment of temporary migrant workers’ wages

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      Authors: Laura Foley, Nicola Piper
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      The crisis unleashed by COVID-19 has profoundly impacted the world of work, with many workers losing their jobs or with insufficient safety measures in place for those still in work. Migrant workers are among the precarious workforce that is employed in particularly affected sectors where they have been subjected to labour rights’ violations for a long time. The pandemic has further exposed and exacerbated the exploitation of migrant workers in particular, as evident from the widespread occurrence of the non- or underpayment of wages for work that has been carried out. Despite the efforts made in recent years at the global level to arrive at a common framework to regulate international labour migration in accordance with international human and labour rights’ standards, little progress has been achieved on the issue of wage theft. This article analyses the reasons why the institutional architecture in place is ineffective to tackle the settlement of outstanding wage claims. We use the concept of access to justice as a starting point and steer our examination towards global advocacy as epitomised by a concerted campaign by an alliance between civil society organisations (CSOs) and global union confederations, which calls for the implementation of a justice mechanism for repatriated migrant workers. Our analysis is specifically centred on low-wage migrants on temporary, employer-tied contracts as illustrated by the South Asia–Middle East/Gulf migration corridor.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T10:37:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211012958
       
  • The revolution will not be randomized: Universal basic income, randomized
           controlled trials, and ‘evidence-based’ social policy

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      Authors: Malte Neuwinger
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Organizations in various countries have launched large-scale randomized field experiments to evaluate the empirical effects of basic income. Surprisingly, scholars have paid only scarce attention to the way basic income experiments are actually run. To address this shortcoming, I present three case studies of basic income experiments in the Netherlands, Spain, and the United States. I ask: Why do experiments’ designs only remotely resemble the ‘paradigmatic’ model of basic income they are in fact interested in – universal, unconditional, individual payments, no means tests, and no work requirements' Interviewed researchers identify three types of constraints that prevent basic income experiments from successfully testing basic income – politics, money, and the law – which I explain through the mechanism of ‘boundary work’ between science and politics. I conclude by cautioning against overstated expectations about the policy impact of both current and future basic income experiments.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T05:15:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211010102
       
  • Exploring the politicisation and territorialisation of adult social care
           in the United Kingdom: Electoral discourse analysis of state-wide and meso
           elections 1998–2019

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      Authors: Paul Chaney
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      In the face of a global demographic shift, an aging population and a ‘crisis’ in adult social care (ASC), this study analyses over 3000 pledges on ASC in political parties’ manifesto discourse following the United Kingdom’s move to a multi-level electoral politics in 1998/1999. Although often overlooked, attention to this formative phase of social policy-making reveals the discursive political antecedents of welfare interventions. The analysis shows a major increase in issue-salience and party politicisation of ASC policy. The discourse reveals political cleavages on welfare mixes and policy framing, and sub-state resistance to central government policies. Against the backdrop of the international rise of devolved governance, the present case is of wider international significance because it illustrates how the transition from state-wide to (quasi-)federal electoral practices gives rise to new territorial dynamics in the electoral discourse of welfare provision; in turn, promoting territorialisation, pressure for welfare state expansion and the rise of ‘sub-state’ welfare regimes.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-04-23T06:47:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211008141
       
  • Confronted with COVID-19: Migrant live-in care during the pandemic

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      Authors: Michael Leiblfinger, Veronika Prieler, Mădălina Rogoz, Martina Sekulová
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      In the spring 2020, measures introduced across Europe to limit the spread of COVID-19 included, among others, the temporary closure of borders. For Romanian and Slovakian live-in carers, this meant they were no longer able to commute between the Austrian households they work in and their respective countries of origin. Due to the relatively short cyclical rotas of 2–4 weeks, travel restrictions heavily affected cross-border live-in care between the three countries, which makes them a particular case for studying the effects of pandemic-related measures on transnational care arrangements. Drawing on media reports, relevant laws and policies, and interviews with representatives of care workers’ interests, the article examines how live-in care as a whole and care workers in particular were affected by the pandemic and related policy responses such as specific travel arrangements and financial incentives for workers. It shows that while live-in carers were deemed critical workers and essential for the long-term care system, the inequalities and dependencies already existing in transnational care arrangements were deepened. Care workers’ wants, needs and interests were subordinated to the interests of care recipients, agencies and sending and receiving countries.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-04-09T07:06:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211008340
       
  • The ILO and the future of work: The politics of global labour policy

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      Authors: Vicente Silva
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      In the late 2010s, the future of work gathered attention from the most influential actors in global social governance. The International Labour Organization (ILO), since 2015 and in the context of its Future of Work Initiative, aimed to position itself in the discussion by putting this issue at the centre of their activities for its centenary (2019). The normative and conceptual approach developed by the ILO in this initiative was named the ‘human-centred agenda’, aimed to align technological change with decent work and social justice. Although preliminary scholarly works have seen these efforts as a humanistic and pro-worker ‘countermovement’, a deeper analysis of the ideas and interests involved in the Future of Work Initiative reveals a different, more complex picture. This article studies the creation of the human-centred agenda led by the ILO secretariat and the Global Commission on the Future of Work, and how it was further negotiated and modified by the social partners in the making of the Centenary Declaration in 2019. In particular, it shows how business at the ILO and right-wing populist governments, in tandem, reoriented the human-centred agenda towards a pro-employer perspective, thus framing social and labour policy as a tool for adapting the workforce to technological change. It concludes with some reflections about the consequences of these developments for the ILO’s position in global governance.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-03-30T07:15:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211004853
       
  • Policy, fast and slow: Social impact bonds and the differential
           temporalities of mobile policy

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      Authors: Rebecca Grimwood, Tom Baker, Louise Humpage, Jacob Broom
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Governments are increasingly intrigued by the possibility of harnessing the private ‘social investment’ market to finance the delivery of social services. One social investment initiative in particular – Social Impact Bonds (SIBs) – has spread extensively within the global North. This article investigates the transnational mobility of SIBs by exploring the adoption and implementation of SIBs in New Zealand. It considers SIBs as a case of ‘fast policy’, a concept that describes both the increasing rapidity of policymaking and the proliferation of ‘best practice’ policy models. Although the model was adopted relatively quickly in New Zealand, implementation spanned a number of years following various complications and setbacks, echoing experiences in other places. This article seeks to extend conceptions of policy mobility and fast policy by arguing for both fast and slow temporalities of policy movement, contending that while adoption of mobile policies tends to be rapid, implementation can follow a much more gradual pace as they mediate, and are mediated by, local political, institutional and ideological factors.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-03-02T10:17:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468018121997809
       
  • Breaking out of the policy enclave approach to child labour in sub-Saharan
           African agriculture

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      Authors: Rachel Sabates-Wheeler, James Sumberg
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      This article is framed by the tension between a substantial universalising framework of global instruments on workers’ rights and child labour on one hand, and their outsourced implementation through the social policy enclaves of transnational corporations on the other hand. It uses the concept of ‘social policy enclaves’ to explore this tension and how it might be resolved to the benefit of children who work in African agriculture. To do this, the article steps back from dominant discourses around child labour, and examines how a re-framing of children’s involvement in African agriculture, from labour to work, might enhance understanding of the forms, prevalence, drivers and dynamics of their involvement in work that is harmful. A deeper understanding of these issues should help to inform a revitalised universal approach to social policy in respect to children’s work.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-02-17T09:34:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468018121991813
       
  • Editorial: Advances in regional and Southern social policies: Between the
           social question and social investment

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      Authors: Alexandra Kaasch
      First page: 186
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-04-22T12:47:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211008669
       
  • Perceived welfare deservingness of needy people in transition countries:
           Comparative evidence from the Life in Transition Survey 2016

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      Authors: Dimitri Gugushvili, Martin Lukac, Wim van Oorschot
      First page: 234
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Transition to the market economy and the related restructuring of welfare systems has produced new vulnerabilities in the formerly communist countries of Eastern Europe and Central Asia while simultaneously aggravating the existing ones. Given the limited fiscal capacities of the transition countries, this brings to the fore the issue of which of the new and old vulnerable groups of people are considered to be deserving of public support. Using data from the third round of the Life in Transition survey (2016), this article explores the perceived welfare deservingness of five groups: the elderly, the disabled, the unemployed, the working poor and families with children. We find that with some exceptions, the hierarchy of deservingness of these groups is similar to that systematically identified in Western welfare states. However, there is also a large variation in the deservingness levels across countries, some of which appear to be related to the differences in the levels of economic development. We also find that in transition countries, individual self-interest and ideological predispositions largely have the same effects on people’s deservingness perceptions as those found in Western welfare states in previous studies.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-02-03T05:57:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468018121989520
       
  • Sustainable welfare: Independence between growth and welfare has to go
           both ways

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      Authors: Milena Büchs
      First page: 323
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-05-31T05:11:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211019153
       
  • Operationalizing sustainable welfare and co-developing eco-social policies
           by prioritizing human needs

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      Authors: Jayeon Lindellee, Johanna Alkan Olsson, Max Koch
      First page: 328
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-06-09T07:56:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211019164
       
  • A systemic socio-ecological recovery from Covid-19

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      Authors: William Hynes
      First page: 335
      Abstract: Global Social Policy, Ahead of Print.
      New economic thinking and acting through a systemic approach could outline policy alternatives to tackle the global-scale systemic challenges of financial, economic, social and environmental emergencies, and help steer our recovery out of the current crisis. A systemic recovery requires an economic approach that balances several factors - markets and states, efficiency and resilience, growth and sustainability, national and global stability, short-term emergency measures and long-term structural change. To achieve this, we need to think beyond our policy silos, comprehend our interconnections, and build resilience into our systems.
      Citation: Global Social Policy
      PubDate: 2021-06-07T04:38:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14680181211019166
       
 
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