A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
The end of the list has been reached or no journals were found for your choice.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Developmental Child Welfare
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2516-1032 - ISSN (Online) 2516-1040
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Attachment of young foster children

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Delphine West, Frank Van Holen, Camille Verheyden, Laura Gypen, Johan Vanderfaeillie
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      Family foster care is the option of choice in case of out-of-home placements in Flanders, resulting in rising numbers of family foster care placements. As a number of the foster children experienced traumatic events and all of them were separated from their primary caregivers, concerns can be raised about the quality of attachment between foster children and their foster carers. Additionally, international research regarding associated factors with attachment quality is scarce and inconclusive and to our knowledge, Flemish research into this matter was non-existent. The sample of this research consisted out of 68 young foster children and their foster mothers. The attachment behavior was scored by the foster mothers on the Attachment Insecurity Screening Index. The mean for the total Attachment Insecurity Screening Index was non-clinical, but significantly higher than the mean of the norm group, this points to foster mothers perceiving more insecure attachment behavior in the relationship with their foster children. The rates for insecure attachment were comparable to the regular population. Parenting stress and problem behavior were positively associated with insecure attachment scores and, negatively with self-reported sensitivity of foster mothers. These factors were entered in a multiple linear regression model. This model shows that higher levels of parenting stress and more behavior problems were associated with higher insecure attachment scores. We recommend to pay sufficient attention to the attachment relationship of foster children and their foster carers, parenting stress and behavior problems by monitoring them regularly and providing additional support and interventions when these are indicated.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2022-09-23T10:46:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032221129287
       
  • Insights into turning points from the perspective of young people with
           out-of-home care experience: events, impact and facilitators of change

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Louise Roberts, Jonathan Scourfield, Heather Taussig
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      Young people with experience of out-of-home care have usually faced significant adversities whilst growing up. Adults aged 18–22 from a Western US state, who were part of a longitudinal study and originally recruited when in out-of-home care, were asked whether they had experienced a major turning point that changed the way they thought about something or how they behaved. Four in five reported having had such a turning point and the vast majority saw theirs as positive. A qualitative overview is provided of themes from these responses. Turning points were linked to actions and achievements, positive relationships and resources, and personal reflection. Reference was made to both objective and subjective change and turning points arising both from specific events and from extended processes. Some seemingly mundane events and interactions had a powerful impact. The findings suggest the on-going potential for care-experienced children and young people to have turning points, despite past adversity and current challenges. Opportunities need to be offered to support the development of agency, bolster self-esteem and aspiration, and offer reassurance, so that in the event of future adversity, care-experienced young people might have the personal resources to navigate and create meaning.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2022-08-28T03:36:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032221118910
       
  • The key role of education for Flemish care leavers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Laura Gypen, Delphine West, Lara Stas, Camille Verheyden, Frank Van Holen, Johan Vanderfaeillie
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      Research consistently shows that both foster- and residential care leavers achieve lower levels of educational qualification in comparison to the general population. However, in Western society, education remains an important gateway to success in employment, income and housing opportunities. This study explores and predicts educational achievement of care leavers in Flanders and investigates the effect of educational attainment on other outcomes (employment, income and housing). The study involves 220 care leavers (both family foster care (n = 138) and residential care (n = 82)). Data was collected using a self-reporting questionnaire touching multiple domains. The participants of the study (77 male, 143 female) are between 21 and 27 years old. Both foster- and residential care leavers achieve significantly lower qualifications, earn less and more often experience homelessness than their peers from the general population. Residential care leavers achieve lower qualifications and are more often unemployed than foster care leavers. Multiple regression analyses indicate that the level of qualification is a key factor in determining the results on employment, income and education. More placements and less support during the time in care are significantly associated with lower educational achievements. This lower qualification brings significantly higher risks of unemployment, financial- and housing obstacles in the long term. It is therefore important to support young care leavers in attaining their qualification, therefore providing equal opportunities in our society. Policy makers should focus on increased support regarding education during the time in care. School- and placement changes should be minimized, and society ought to invest in psychological support during placement.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2022-08-28T03:17:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032221124330
       
  • The protective role of internal/external factors on Covid-19 related
           stressors among resource parents

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sarah Zak, Elena Gallitto, Elisa Romano
      First page: 177
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      Background: The Covid-19 pandemic has had detrimental effects on almost everyone worldwide, but one particularly vulnerable group are resource parents (foster and kinship) and the young people in out-of-home care. Resource parents have experienced the same increases in pandemic-related stressors as other parents but have the added challenge of caring for a young person involved with child welfare. There are, however, various possible protective factors that have been found to positively influence families during times of stress. Methods: We examined how internal (family functioning/resilience and emotion regulation) and external (parent/child welfare worker relationship and social supports) resource parent protective factors are related to the degree of perceived stressors experienced due to the pandemic. A sample of 47 resource parents from the province of Ontario (Canada) caring for a young person between 4 and 17 years old completed an online questionnaire. Results: Multiple regression analyses showed that a higher quality relationship between resource parents and child welfare workers was associated with lower perceived pandemic-related stressors. Higher parent emotion regulation was also found to be associated with a significant decrease in resource parents’ perceived stressors. Conclusion: Overall, resource parents experienced an increase in pandemic-related stressors. However, both internal and external protective factors could be associated with a decrease in experienced stressors. Impact: This study used a strengths-based approach and showed the importance of a positive resource parent and child welfare worker relationship as well as effective parental emotion regulation strategies during times of stress.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T05:25:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032221100232
       
  • Predictors of parental stress and family function one year after rapid
           unprepared return: A preliminary analysis from five nations

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Amanda H Howard, Ian Forber-Pratt, Nicole G Wilke
      First page: 192
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, some governments issued mandates requiring that residential care providers rapidly return children and youth to family. The goal of the present study was to assess outcomes in a sample of families experiencing rapid unprepared return. Specifically, we sought to evaluate the placement stability, assess support services provided to families, and examine how services received impacted parental stress and family functioning. Participants and Setting: 115 families who had experienced rapid unprepared return across five nations, including Ethiopia, India, Kenya, Mexico, and Uganda. Using a quantitative design, results examined (1) placement stability, (2) services received, and (3) the impact of services on family wellbeing. Data revealed the majority of families were still intact after 1 year. More robust support services were associated with lower parental stress and better family functioning. Occupational/financial support, such as financial assistance and job training, and material support, such as home repairs and food assistance, were vital to family wellbeing 1 year following rapid unprepared return. Rapid unprepared return creates risks to families and children, and should not be continued or repeated. However, emergency situations, government mandates or unexpected crises may force conditions for rapid unprepared return. For families that have experienced rapid unprepared return, intensive support and appropriate case management can improve the likelihood of positive outcomes and improve family wellbeing.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T12:54:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032221118379
       
  • Carer perceptions of a specialist mental health service for children and
           young people in care

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kathryn Eadie, Kelly Moss, Judith Burton
      First page: 204
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction: Children and young people in care are a key client group for child and youth mental health services. A collaborative approach to addressing the complex and long-term needs of children or young people in care is essential and carers who support these children or young people are vital team members of this collaboration. Method: This research surveyed carers over a 4-year period to gather feedback about a specialist mental health service. 277 carers responded to the Carer Perceptions Survey. Participants were mainly foster (65%) and kinship (17%) carers. However, residential workers (13%) and biological parents (5%) also responded to the survey. A thematic analysis was undertaken with responses to open-ended questions about most liked aspects of the service and ideas for service improvement. Results: Themes included support for carers, communication between carers and staff, personal attributes of staff, working in collaboration, accessibility to the service, and carer training. Carers expressed their appreciation of staff who provided support in collaborative and respectful ways and valued staff who listened to their experiences and ideas. In addition, carers expressed interest in receiving more information and training about how best to support the mental health of children and young people in their care. Conclusion: Effective mental health services for children and young people in care require clinical staff that foster respectful engagement and facilitate collaboration with carers in all aspects of care.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T04:44:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032221105301
       
  • Cognitive flexibility moderates the association between maltreatment and
           emotion regulation in residential care children of the middle childhood
           period

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Laetitia Mélissande Amédée, Laurence Cyr-Desautels, Houria Bénard, Katherine Pascuzzo, Karine Dubois-Comtois, Martine Hébert, Célia Matte-Gagné, Chantal Cyr
      First page: 217
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to examine, in a sample of residential care children, the moderating role of cognitive flexibility in the association between maltreatment and emotion regulation competencies. The sample included 69 children aged 8 to 12 and their group home educator as their primary caretaker. Educators completed questionnaires evaluating child emotion regulation competencies and cognitive flexibility. Child history of maltreatment and sociodemographic data were collected on the basis of the children’s child protective services files. Moderation analyses showed that the effect of child maltreatment on emotion regulation was only present for children with high levels of cognitive flexibility, such that the less children experienced severe maltreatment, the more they showed emotion regulation competencies. Children with low cognitive flexibility displayed lower levels of emotion regulation regardless of their maltreatment history. These results suggest that focusing on cognitive flexibility when intervening with children in residential care could help strengthen their emotion regulation competencies, which may prevent further maladaptive behaviors.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T01:18:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032221100233
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.200.137.63
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-