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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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Developmental Child Welfare
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2516-1032 - ISSN (Online) 2516-1040
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Carer perceptions of a specialist mental health service for children and
           young people in care

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kathryn Eadie, Kelly Moss, Judith Burton
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction: Children and young people in care are a key client group for child and youth mental health services. A collaborative approach to addressing the complex and long-term needs of children or young people in care is essential and carers who support these children or young people are vital team members of this collaboration. Method: This research surveyed carers over a 4-year period to gather feedback about a specialist mental health service. 277 carers responded to the Carer Perceptions Survey. Participants were mainly foster (65%) and kinship (17%) carers. However, residential workers (13%) and biological parents (5%) also responded to the survey. A thematic analysis was undertaken with responses to open-ended questions about most liked aspects of the service and ideas for service improvement. Results: Themes included support for carers, communication between carers and staff, personal attributes of staff, working in collaboration, accessibility to the service, and carer training. Carers expressed their appreciation of staff who provided support in collaborative and respectful ways and valued staff who listened to their experiences and ideas. In addition, carers expressed interest in receiving more information and training about how best to support the mental health of children and young people in their care. Conclusion: Effective mental health services for children and young people in care require clinical staff that foster respectful engagement and facilitate collaboration with carers in all aspects of care.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T04:44:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032221105301
       
  • Cognitive flexibility moderates the association between maltreatment and
           emotion regulation in residential care children of the middle childhood
           period

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      Authors: Laetitia Mélissande Amédée, Laurence Cyr-Desautels, Houria Bénard, Katherine Pascuzzo, Karine Dubois-Comtois, Martine Hébert, Célia Matte-Gagné, Chantal Cyr
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to examine, in a sample of residential care children, the moderating role of cognitive flexibility in the association between maltreatment and emotion regulation competencies. The sample included 69 children aged 8 to 12 and their group home educator as their primary caretaker. Educators completed questionnaires evaluating child emotion regulation competencies and cognitive flexibility. Child history of maltreatment and sociodemographic data were collected on the basis of the children’s child protective services files. Moderation analyses showed that the effect of child maltreatment on emotion regulation was only present for children with high levels of cognitive flexibility, such that the less children experienced severe maltreatment, the more they showed emotion regulation competencies. Children with low cognitive flexibility displayed lower levels of emotion regulation regardless of their maltreatment history. These results suggest that focusing on cognitive flexibility when intervening with children in residential care could help strengthen their emotion regulation competencies, which may prevent further maladaptive behaviors.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T01:18:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032221100233
       
  • The protective role of internal/external factors on Covid-19 related
           stressors among resource parents

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      Authors: Sarah Zak, Elena Gallitto, Elisa Romano
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      Background: The Covid-19 pandemic has had detrimental effects on almost everyone worldwide, but one particularly vulnerable group are resource parents (foster and kinship) and the young people in out-of-home care. Resource parents have experienced the same increases in pandemic-related stressors as other parents but have the added challenge of caring for a young person involved with child welfare. There are, however, various possible protective factors that have been found to positively influence families during times of stress. Methods: We examined how internal (family functioning/resilience and emotion regulation) and external (parent/child welfare worker relationship and social supports) resource parent protective factors are related to the degree of perceived stressors experienced due to the pandemic. A sample of 47 resource parents from the province of Ontario (Canada) caring for a young person between 4 and 17 years old completed an online questionnaire. Results: Multiple regression analyses showed that a higher quality relationship between resource parents and child welfare workers was associated with lower perceived pandemic-related stressors. Higher parent emotion regulation was also found to be associated with a significant decrease in resource parents’ perceived stressors. Conclusion: Overall, resource parents experienced an increase in pandemic-related stressors. However, both internal and external protective factors could be associated with a decrease in experienced stressors. Impact: This study used a strengths-based approach and showed the importance of a positive resource parent and child welfare worker relationship as well as effective parental emotion regulation strategies during times of stress.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T05:25:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032221100232
       
  • The voices of parents in child protective services: A qualitative analysis
           of families’ struggles with COVID-19

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      Authors: Karmen Toros, Asgeir Falch-Eriksen
      First page: 97
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      The pandemic of the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has affected children and families worldwide, disrupting their daily lives and well-being. A small-scale study involving 13 parents in Child Protective Services in Estonia was conducted using in-depth, semi-structured interviews to explore parents’ experiences with COVID-19 and its impact on their families’ well-being. The findings indicated that one of the areas most impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic was schooling, as the implementation of remote schooling often created tensions and conflicts at home. Parents reported regression in daily functioning, attributing this to the lack of supportive services during lockdown and additional distress resulting from increased workload at home and problems with balancing home and work life. Parents were exhausted by the various problems caused by the pandemic and questioned their ability to provide their children the support they needed. Discontinuation of services intensified existing challenges for both parents and children. Furthermore, a lack of trust in Child Protective Services was identified, serving as a barrier to asking for help in times of crisis.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T01:58:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032221094045
       
  • Childhood neglect and its implications for physical health, neurobiology
           and development—A scoping review of the literature

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      Authors: Annette L Jackson, M. Frederico, H. Cleak, B. D. Perry
      First page: 114
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      There is much evidence of the many risks posed by childhood neglect. A scoping review of the literature found 467 articles on 345 studies from 38 countries reporting a large number of problems for children and adults associated with childhood neglect. After describing the broader scoping review, this paper presents findings specific to physical health, neurobiology and development. Across different neglect sub-types, different populations and different research methods, the weight of research demonstrates substantial risk from neglect including, at the most extreme, fatal outcomes for children. Physical health problems associated with neglect cover many health areas including the cardiovascular, respiratory and central nervous systems for children and adults. Studies from neuroscience have also shown wide-ranging atypical neurobiological structures and networks following different neglect sub-types especially for children exposed to institutional neglect. Similarly, studies have reported many developmental outcomes associated with neglect especially related to cognitive development. Physical health, neurobiology and general development are interrelated in healthy childhood and in the presence or aftermath of childhood neglect.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T07:44:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032221088042
       
  • What makes summer camp therapeutic for siblings separated by out-of-home
           care' Associations from counselor ratings of program implementation to
           youth-reported outcomes

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      Authors: Jeffrey Waid, Armeda Wojciak
      First page: 136
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      Recognition of the developmental importance of sibling relationships has resulted in the proliferation of programs and services for siblings in out-of-home care. Empirical support is limited to a small number of these programs, however; and the mechanisms through which sibling-focused programs work to promote youth outcomes remains largely unexplored. To address this gap in research, the current study examined associations from counselor ratings of program implementation to youth-reported outcomes at Camp To Belong, a manualized camp-based reunification program for siblings separated by out-of-home care. Paper and pencil surveys were administered to 655 youth and 236 counselors at 11 camps operating in the U.S.A. during one camp season. Youth completed pre-test post-test measures of individual resilience, sibling support, sibling conflict, and post-test measures of belonging. Counselors completed post-test measures rating the enabling environment of the camp setting, the activities and events offered at camp, counselor satisfaction with program implementation, and critical events counselors observed at camp. A series of generalized linear models examined associations from the four dimensions of program implementation to each of the four youth-reported outcomes. Significant associations were observed from the program implementation domains to youth belonging and resilience, but not to sibling conflict or sibling support. Associations were observed in both expected and unexpected directions, illuminating the complexity of ways in which sibling-focused programs may affect the well-being of youth in out-of-home care. Insights and recommendations to inform future research and practice with siblings in out-of-home care are provided.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2022-04-24T01:45:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032221093409
       
  • Caregiver-specific factors and orphanage-context factors contributing to
           maltreatment of children in institutional care: A multi-level analysis of
           24 orphanages in Tanzania

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      Authors: Getrude Mkinga, Anette Kirika, Mabula Nkuba, Simeon Mgode, Mira Huth, Tobias Hecker
      First page: 154
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      Background: High rates of maltreatment and low caregiving quality in institutional care settings have been identified in various low-and middle-income countries. Many studies have focused on children living in institutions. Objective: This study investigates the prevalence of maltreatment, caregiver-specific, orphanage-context factors, and their relation to maltreatment of orphans from the caregivers’ perspective. Participants and setting: In this cross-sectional study, 227 caregivers (67% female) with a mean age of 36.84 years (SDage = 12.89) of 24 childcare centres in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania participated. Methods: The primary outcome was the maltreatment of children assessed through structured interviews of caregivers. Further information on individual (like work-related stress) and structural variables (working conditions) was gathered. Results: Caregivers’ work under extreme and exhausting conditions, with very high caregiver-child ratios, low salaries, and almost no possibility to recover. Results also showed significant differences in the maltreatment level and structural and individual factors (e.g., payment and days of entitlement) between the orphanages. Caregiver’s positive attitudes towards violence ( ƒ2attitudes = 0.19) and difficulties in the relationship with children ( ƒ2relationship = 0.05) significantly predicted maltreatment with moderate and small effects. Conclusions: The overall poor working conditions highlight the urgent need to reduce the caregivers’ burden. In addition to this, addressing caregivers’ positive attitudes and improving their interaction competencies with children may be a starting point to prevent maltreatment of children. Further investigation of structural factors contributing to maltreatment is essential to develop recommendations for the improvement and re-organization of childcare institutions.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T04:02:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032221099979
       
 
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