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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 201 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Sociedade e Estado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Soziale Passagen     Hybrid Journal  
Tempo Social     Open Access  
The Milbank Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Third Sector Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Third World Planning Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Tidsskrift for omsorgsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for velferdsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskriftet Norges Barnevern     Full-text available via subscription  
Trabajo Social Global - Global Social Work     Open Access  
unsere jugend     Full-text available via subscription  
Violence and Victims     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 69)
Voces desde el Trabajo Social     Open Access  
Volunteer Management Report     Full-text available via subscription  
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Developmental Child Welfare
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2516-1032 - ISSN (Online) 2516-1040
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Evaluating the impact of attachment and trauma training for
           children’s social care teams

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Siana Fflur, Rebecca Pepper, Katherine Donnelly, Samantha Halstead, Kirsty Campbell, Lynn McDonnell
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      Embedding attachment- and trauma-informed knowledge and skills throughout the services that support children and families who have experienced developmental trauma is vital to meeting the needs of this population. The current pilot study provides provisional data regarding the impact of training delivered by the Gwent Attachment Service to increase awareness and use of attachment- and trauma-informed working across social care teams within Gwent. The training package comprised two-days’ training plus six skill development sessions (SDS) delivered to 274 staff within 21 social care teams within Gwent. Staff self-rated their knowledge of, confidence in, and worries about working in an attachment- and trauma-informed way at three time points; pre-training, post-training and post-skill sessions. Statistical analyses revealed significant increases in staff knowledge and confidence pre-post training, plus a significant decrease in worries pre-post training. Whilst a significant decrease in knowledge and confidence, and significant increase in worries was seen between post-training to post-SDS, the final post-SDS ratings remained significantly improved compared to pre-training. Whilst preliminary given the current study limitations, such findings suggest that the current training and SDS programme successfully improved and maintained knowledge, confidence and level of worry regarding attachment- and trauma-informed working. They also demonstrate the feasibility of National Health Service-based teams delivering such training to improve the service offered to children and families affected by developmental trauma, in keeping with the values of prudent healthcare and taking a whole-systems approach to addressing the needs of this population.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T07:07:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032241230977
       
  • Cumulative risk exposure is associated with increased risk for PTSD but
           not depression or anxiety. Results from a UK clinical sample of children
           and adolescents

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      Authors: David Turgoose, Simon Wilkinson, Mark Shevlin, Thanos Karatzias
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundChildhood adversity can include traumatic experiences and exposure to other risk factors; consistently predicting poorer psychosocial outcomes in adulthood. Relatively little research has investigated the impact of cumulative risk exposure in childhood. Using data collected in a specialist clinical setting, we investigated the associations between risk exposure, psychopathology and psychosocial functioning.MethodParticipants were children attending the Attachment and Trauma service at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London (N = 132, M = 10.25, SD = 3.35). Data was collected via routine clinical practice during multi-disciplinary assessments. Data was collected on developmental and trauma history, psychopathology, and functioning (CGAS), using standardised measures, clinical interviews, and observations.ResultsAll children had experienced at least one risk factor, with 78% reporting multiple exposures, including witnessing interpersonal violence (52%), neglect (48%), and physical abuse (42%). Other risk exposures included exposure to alcohol (17%) and substances (24%) in-utero, as well as social risk factors such as multiple foster placements in some cases. In this sample, 65% of children met criteria for at least one psychiatric diagnosis (Anxiety = 31%, PTSD = 28%, Depression = 8%). High levels of functional impairment were found, with 52% of children falling into the highest categories of ‘obvious’ or ‘severe’ problems. Multiple risk exposure significantly predicted PTSD (OR 9.64 (1.1, 83.7)), but did not predict anxiety, depression, or functional impairment.ConclusionThis study highlights the rates of cumulative risk exposure in this clinical sample. The findings demonstrate the importance of detailed and accurate clinical assessments in ascertaining trauma histories in children with known histories of adversity and maltreatment. There are implications for assessment and treatment, such as the importance of clear guidelines on treating PTSD in children with complex trauma histories.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T02:45:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032241230980
       
  • Placement stability and family support after government-mandated rapid
           return: A two-year follow-up

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      Authors: Nicole Gilbertson Wilke, Delia Pop, Amanda Hiles Howard
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      During the COVID-19 pandemic, multiple governments around the world implemented directives that mandated residential care providers to rapidly reunite thousands of children and youth with their families. Organizations were faced with expedited timelines for the reunification process, limited ability to prepare children and families, and restricted capacity to support and monitor families in-person due to lockdown measures. As such, there was significant concern regarding stability of placements, and well-being of the children and families affected by the abrupt and unprepared reunification process. This study examined data from 16 non-government organizations (NGOs) impacted by rapid return mandates in six nations (Kenya, Uganda, India, Ethiopia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Mexico). NGOs were serving 15,978 children in residential care at the time of the mandates. NGOs had an average of 21.87 days (SD = 9.87) to return children to families. Most NGOs felt children and families were inadequately prepared for reunification. After two years, NGOs were in contact with 90% of the children who had been rapidly returned. Of those children, 56% remained in their family placement. Families who received more types of family strengthening services were more likely to remain intact. Concerningly, 2 years following the rapid return mandates, the NGOs in this study were collectively serving a higher number of children in residential care than prior to rapid return mandates. This suggests that rapid return mandates did not seem to decrease the number of children in residential care long-term. Data-informed recommendations for practice are discussed.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2024-01-06T01:03:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032231219268
       
  • Adoptive parents’ satisfaction with child and adolescent mental services
           and their mental health concerns over time: A question of fit'

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      Authors: Matt Woolgar, Carmen Pinto, Rafael A. González
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      Little is known about adoptive parents’ experiences of and satisfaction with statutory child and adolescent mental services (CAMHS) in the UK, nor of parental concerns about their adopted children’s mental health and well-being. Ninety-eight adoptive parents completed an online survey about their satisfaction with services as well as their mental health concerns for their child currently and retrospectively at the point of adoption. Parental concerns were diverse, and many overlapped with issues that CAMHS could normally help with. Attachment was the primary concern initially, but this decreased over time in placement; while challenging behaviour was the highest rated current concern, along with aspects of general functioning such as peer relations, social skills and education. Unexpectedly, trauma was a relatively low concern at both timepoints. There were very high levels of dissatisfaction with CAMHS, evident across questions of access, engagement and quality of services, all at levels much higher than typically reported by general samples. Adoptive parents’ substantial dissatisfaction with CAMHS occurred despite an apparent fit between many parental concerns and the kinds of services typically offered in CAMHS. There remains a significant challenge to develop a shared understanding between parents and services of adopted children’s needs, especially given the absence of data about adopted children’s mental health and wellbeing problems.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2023-12-19T12:37:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032231221727
       
  • Effectiveness of a video-feedback intervention to promote positive
           parenting for foster children

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      Authors: Delphine West, Lara Stas, Frank Van Holen, Laura Gypen, Johan Vanderfaeillie
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      Foster children are at risk for developing disorganized attachment relationships (Van den Dries et al., 2009; Vasileva & Petermann, 2018) and behavioural problems (Goemans et al., 2015; Vanschoonlandt et al., 2012). Video-feedback Intervention to promote Positive Parenting and Sensitive Discipline – Foster Care/Adoption (VIPP-FC/A) is an intervention aimed at improving sensitive parenting in order to promote secure attachment relations and reduce behavioural problems. In this study, a Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) was used in order to examine the effectiveness of VIPP-FC/A in a Flemish foster care sample (n = 100), using questionnaires at three measurement moments. The hypothesis was that VIPP-FC/A would increase foster mothers’ sensitive parenting and decrease the externalizing behavioural problems and insecure attachment behaviour of the foster children and parenting stress of the foster mothers. The intervention effects on these four outcome variables were analysed by constructing four multilevel models. After controlling for the baseline measurement, there was no significant main effect of condition for sensitive parenting, externalizing problems, insecure attachment behaviour and parenting stress. There was however a significant effect of condition and age on insecure attachment behaviour: within the group of youngest foster children (under 30 months), children in the intervention group scored lower insecure attachment scores than children in the control group. Additionally, there was a significant effect of condition and type of foster care on externalizing behaviour problems. In the group of children placed in kinship foster care, children in the intervention group had lower external behavior scores than children in the control group.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2023-12-11T04:56:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032231220922
       
  • Gender-specific trajectories of offending from adolescence until age 40
           among individuals with experience of out-of-home care: A national cohort
           study

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      Authors: Lars Brännström, Anna-Karin Andershed, Bo Vinnerljung, Anders Hjern, Ylva B. Almquist
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      It is well-known that experiences of out-of-home care (OHC; foster-family care and residential care) are linked to criminal behavior. Less is known how criminal activity in the OHC population develops over the life course and to what extent such development is characterized by desistance or persistence. Using population-based longitudinal register data for more than 740,000 Swedish men and women, of which around 2.5% have experience of OHC, followed until age 40, results from group-based trajectory modelling and multinomial regression suggest that OHC-experienced individuals with various timing and duration of placement, especially men first placed as teenagers, have substantially elevated likelihood for persistent offending compared to peers without OHC experience. However, most OHC-experienced followed pathways characterized by desistance. Our findings have implications for understanding the dynamics of offending in OHC populations and underscores the necessity for interventions that can prevent the onset of criminal careers, as well as disrupt or modify the ongoing paths of offending within this disadvantaged group of individuals.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2023-11-17T11:38:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032231217265
       
  • Exploring online experiences, cyberbullying and wellbeing for young people
           looked after in Wales: An analysis of the school health research network
           2017/18 survey

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      Authors: Louisa M. Roberts, Sophie Wood, Cindy Corliss, Rebecca Anthony
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      For young people the online world affords creative, entertainment and socialisation opportunities but also poses risks including cyberbullying, grooming and harmful content. Little is known about online experiences of care-experienced young people, a vulnerable group who may benefit from online experiences but may be at increased risk online. This cross-sectional study used data from 11- to 16-year-olds in Wales from the School Health Research Network (SHRN) Student Health and Wellbeing Survey 2017/18 (n = 103,971). Cyberbullying, face-to-face bullying and other online experiences were analysed. The prevalence of these experiences and associated mean wellbeing scores were compared for young people in care (n = 1,921) and not in care (n = 83,551), controlling for socio-demographic variables gender, ethnicity and year group. Higher numbers of young people in care were involved in cyberbullying, bullying, sharing explicit images, problematic social media use and regular contact with online only friends. These online experiences were associated with lower mean wellbeing scores. Lower numbers of young people in care had access to smartphones and social networking sites from age 12, and lower numbers were regularly in online contact with close friends and a wider peer group. These online experiences were associated with higher mean wellbeing scores. Young people in care appear to be less involved with online experiences that positively impact wellbeing and more involved in online experiences that negatively impact wellbeing. Promoting positive online experiences and education around problematic social media use may be particularly valuable in helping young people living in care develop healthy, safe and positive online lives.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2023-09-30T03:08:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032231204967
       
  • Timing of higher education completion in out-of-home care experienced
           individuals: On schedule or delayed'

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      Authors: Hilma Forsman, Lars Brännström
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      It is well known that individuals with out-of-home care (OHC) experience tend to have lower educational attainment than their peers in young adulthood, and a number of interventions have been implemented to increase their higher education outcomes. However, the timing of their higher education completion, and whether they experience educational recovery over the life course, is largely unknown. Using longitudinal Swedish data from a birth cohort of more than 13,000 individuals, this study examined OHC experienced individuals’ chances of having a higher education, here defined as a record of postsecondary education of two years or more, in midlife (age 50) and whether the timing of completion differs between them and a group of individuals who had child welfare contact (CWC) without being placed, and a group of general population peers. Results from multivariable logistic regressions corroborated prior findings that individuals who have been placed in OHC were less likely to have completed higher education compared to their general population peers. However, among those who did, they were more likely to have completed it later in life. Overall, there were no differences between the OHC group and the CWC group, both groups may thus not only benefit from specific support but also from more general inclusive education policies that allow for life-long learning.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2023-09-29T10:16:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032231197228
       
  • A systematic review and meta-analysis of the type and prevalence of mental
           health disorders and symptoms among children living in residential care

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      Authors: Meryl F. Westlake, Saul Hillman, Asa Kerr-Davis, Andrei Viziteu, Miriam Silver, Dominika Dykiert
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      Research suggests that among all children living in social care, those in residential care have the highest mental health need. This systematic review and meta-analysis is the first to establish the type and prevalence of mental health disorders and symptoms among children in residential care. A systematic search of PsycINFO, MEDLINE, Scopus, Web of Science Core Collection, ASSIA, IBSS and grey literature databases from January 1989 to July 2022 was conducted (N = 11, 246). Articles were eligible for inclusion where they: (1) included a sample living in residential provision similar to that provided in the UK, (2) used standardised screening tools or psychiatric assessments, using diagnostic classification systems, and (3) reported prevalence estimates. Pooled prevalence estimates were calculated using random-effects meta-analysis. 21 articles with prevalence rates for a total of 4287 children, adolescents and young adults were included. Almost half the children had symptoms indicative of a probable mental health disorder (46%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 35–58). Externalising problems (49%; 95% CI 34–65), were more common than internalising problems (39%; 95% CI 26–53) and prevalence rates for conduct disorder (34%; 95% CI 17–55), depression (26%; 95% CI 18–35), emotional symptoms (17%; 95% CI 8–28), and somatic symptoms (14%; 95% CI 8–20) were estimated. The findings provide evidence that the prevalence of mental health disorders and symptoms are particularly high among children in residential care. These pooled estimates should be interpreted with caution due to high heterogeneity and further epidemiological research is needed to guide policy in different countries.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2023-09-23T04:28:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032231202256
       
  • Greenlandic children placed in out-of-home care: The lack of involvement
           and participation in one’s own life

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      Authors: Bonnie Jensen
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      In Greenland, more than four times as many children are placed in out-of-home care (OHC) as in comparable countries in the Nordic region. This article is based on qualitative interviews with 38 children placed in residential institutions and shows the children’s own experiences of this and the degree to which they were involved in decisions concerning their own lives. The results of the article point to five main findings. First, the interviewed children usually didn’t know why they were placed in institutional care. Secondly, they didn’t know how long they could stay where they lived. Thirdly, the children expressed a wish for more committed staff. Fourthly, the children missed their families, not least because they were often placed far away from home and only had the opportunity to see their families a few times a year. And finally, around half of the children were satisfied to live in the residential institution they’d been placed in. The results are analysed and discussed in a phenomenological framework of recognition theory and participation theory.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2023-09-21T12:21:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032231202252
       
  • The quality of collaboration with child welfare scale (Q-CCW): Development
           and validation

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      Authors: Jeff Gau, Karen Zilberstein, Adam Brown, Meme English
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      Collaborations in child welfare are crucial for addressing complex needs and improving outcomes for children and their families. In this study we aimed to develop and validate the Quality of Collaboration with Child Welfare (Q-CCW) scale to assess working relationships between providers and child welfare workers. The scale was developed to assess four attributes of collaboration: quality of the working relationship, responsiveness, joint understanding, and communication. Following its construction, the scale was administered to a sample of 208 participants, including mental health clinicians, foster/kinship parents, and lawyers/evaluators. Exploratory factor analysis revealed a one-factor solution, indicating a unified construct of quality collaboration, that demonstrated reliability. The Q-CCW can facilitate the measurement and improvement of collaborations in child welfare, thereby contributing to enhanced service delivery and positive outcomes for children and families.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2023-09-08T11:02:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032231202254
       
 
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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 201 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Sociedade e Estado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Soziale Passagen     Hybrid Journal  
Tempo Social     Open Access  
The Milbank Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Third Sector Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Third World Planning Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Tidsskrift for omsorgsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for velferdsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskriftet Norges Barnevern     Full-text available via subscription  
Trabajo Social Global - Global Social Work     Open Access  
unsere jugend     Full-text available via subscription  
Violence and Victims     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 69)
Voces desde el Trabajo Social     Open Access  
Volunteer Management Report     Full-text available via subscription  
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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