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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 201 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Sociedade e Estado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Soziale Passagen     Hybrid Journal  
Tempo Social     Open Access  
The Milbank Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Third Sector Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Third World Planning Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Tidsskrift for omsorgsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for velferdsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskriftet Norges Barnevern     Full-text available via subscription  
Trabajo Social Global - Global Social Work     Open Access  
unsere jugend     Full-text available via subscription  
Violence and Victims     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Voces desde el Trabajo Social     Open Access  
Volunteer Management Report     Full-text available via subscription  
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Developmental Child Welfare
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2516-1032 - ISSN (Online) 2516-1040
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • Prevalence and Predictors of Prescription of Family-Focused Treatment in
           Child Welfare

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Andrew M. Winters, Alton Nathan Verbist, Becky F. Antle, Crystal Collins-Camargo, Ashley R. Logsdon, Lisa Purdy
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      Engaging families in the behavioral health assessment process for child welfare-involved youth is a best practice standard in obtaining vital information about the context affecting their safety, permanency, and wellbeing. As family functioning plays a role in successful reunification for youth out-of-home care (OOHC), family engagement may also increase the likelihood of buy-in, clinical treatment participation and outcomes. The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between standardized assessment domains of child and family needs and the prescription of family-focused treatment. Results suggest that there were overall low rates of prescription of family-focused treatment. There were significant differences in the prescription of family-focused treatment based on youth identified trauma, behavioral, emotional and family needs. Despite the impact of family functioning on placement, the low rate of prescribed family-focused treatment may reflect barriers such as communication and collaboration between providers, distance between family and placement, or a siloed approach to treating children in OOHC separate from their families. Approaches to address these barriers are discussed.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2022-11-30T03:41:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032221142602
       
  • Insights into turning points from the perspective of young people with
           out-of-home care experience: events, impact and facilitators of change

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Louise Roberts, Jonathan Scourfield, Heather Taussig
      First page: 237
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      Young people with experience of out-of-home care have usually faced significant adversities whilst growing up. Adults aged 18–22 from a Western US state, who were part of a longitudinal study and originally recruited when in out-of-home care, were asked whether they had experienced a major turning point that changed the way they thought about something or how they behaved. Four in five reported having had such a turning point and the vast majority saw theirs as positive. A qualitative overview is provided of themes from these responses. Turning points were linked to actions and achievements, positive relationships and resources, and personal reflection. Reference was made to both objective and subjective change and turning points arising both from specific events and from extended processes. Some seemingly mundane events and interactions had a powerful impact. The findings suggest the on-going potential for care-experienced children and young people to have turning points, despite past adversity and current challenges. Opportunities need to be offered to support the development of agency, bolster self-esteem and aspiration, and offer reassurance, so that in the event of future adversity, care-experienced young people might have the personal resources to navigate and create meaning.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2022-08-28T03:36:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032221118910
       
  • The key role of education for Flemish care leavers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Laura Gypen, Delphine West, Lara Stas, Camille Verheyden, Frank Van Holen, Johan Vanderfaeillie
      First page: 253
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      Research consistently shows that both foster- and residential care leavers achieve lower levels of educational qualification in comparison to the general population. However, in Western society, education remains an important gateway to success in employment, income and housing opportunities. This study explores and predicts educational achievement of care leavers in Flanders and investigates the effect of educational attainment on other outcomes (employment, income and housing). The study involves 220 care leavers (both family foster care (n = 138) and residential care (n = 82)). Data was collected using a self-reporting questionnaire touching multiple domains. The participants of the study (77 male, 143 female) are between 21 and 27 years old. Both foster- and residential care leavers achieve significantly lower qualifications, earn less and more often experience homelessness than their peers from the general population. Residential care leavers achieve lower qualifications and are more often unemployed than foster care leavers. Multiple regression analyses indicate that the level of qualification is a key factor in determining the results on employment, income and education. More placements and less support during the time in care are significantly associated with lower educational achievements. This lower qualification brings significantly higher risks of unemployment, financial- and housing obstacles in the long term. It is therefore important to support young care leavers in attaining their qualification, therefore providing equal opportunities in our society. Policy makers should focus on increased support regarding education during the time in care. School- and placement changes should be minimized, and society ought to invest in psychological support during placement.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2022-08-28T03:17:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032221124330
       
  • Attachment of young foster children

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Delphine West, Frank Van Holen, Camille Verheyden, Laura Gypen, Johan Vanderfaeillie
      First page: 270
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      Family foster care is the option of choice in case of out-of-home placements in Flanders, resulting in rising numbers of family foster care placements. As a number of the foster children experienced traumatic events and all of them were separated from their primary caregivers, concerns can be raised about the quality of attachment between foster children and their foster carers. Additionally, international research regarding associated factors with attachment quality is scarce and inconclusive and to our knowledge, Flemish research into this matter was non-existent. The sample of this research consisted out of 68 young foster children and their foster mothers. The attachment behavior was scored by the foster mothers on the Attachment Insecurity Screening Index. The mean for the total Attachment Insecurity Screening Index was non-clinical, but significantly higher than the mean of the norm group, this points to foster mothers perceiving more insecure attachment behavior in the relationship with their foster children. The rates for insecure attachment were comparable to the regular population. Parenting stress and problem behavior were positively associated with insecure attachment scores and, negatively with self-reported sensitivity of foster mothers. These factors were entered in a multiple linear regression model. This model shows that higher levels of parenting stress and more behavior problems were associated with higher insecure attachment scores. We recommend to pay sufficient attention to the attachment relationship of foster children and their foster carers, parenting stress and behavior problems by monitoring them regularly and providing additional support and interventions when these are indicated.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2022-09-23T10:46:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032221129287
       
  • Comparisons of outcomes between different age groups attending a
           specialist mental health service for children and young people in care

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kathryn Eadie, Hannah Galloway, Christel M. Middeldorp
      First page: 288
      Abstract: Developmental Child Welfare, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: Children and adolescents in care experience higher rates of mental illness. No studies have looked at differences in treatment effect amongst age groups for children/young people in care accessing mental health services. This study aims to determine if age is associated with outcomes for children and adolescents in care receiving treatment from a specialist mental health service in Queensland, Australia. Method: This 5-year retrospective cohort study consisted of a sample of 1338 children and adolescents in care aged 0–17 with pre- and post-treatment data. The Children’s Global Assessment Scale (CGAS) and the Health of the Nations Outcome Scale for Children and Adolescents (HoNOSCA) were used to assess functioning and mental health outcomes. Results: Data analysis revealed significant differences between the age groups. Age 0–4 also showed significantly greater improvement on a number of domains when compared with older age groups, including overactivity and attention, scholastic and language skills, emotional symptoms, peer relationships, and family life and relationships. Conclusion: This study demonstrated positive outcomes for all ages, yet better outcomes for the younger age groups in a cohort of children and adolescents in care attending a specialist mental health service. It highlights the importance of providing mental health interventions to children/young people in care, particularly age 0–4. Further, it calls for validated measures for young children to be utilised across mental health services to aid research in this area and optimise outcomes for this vulnerable population.
      Citation: Developmental Child Welfare
      PubDate: 2022-10-14T01:07:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25161032221128614
       
 
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