A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
The end of the list has been reached or no journals were found for your choice.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal of School Social Work
Number of Followers: 9  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2161-4148
Published by New Prairie Press Homepage  [17 journals]
  • Moving Beyond Trauma: Activating Resilience to Support Our Most Vulnerable
           Youth

    • Authors: JoAnne Malloy et al.
      Abstract: It is well-documented that exposure to toxic stress in childhood is associated with impaired social, emotional, behavioral, and neuro-biological development that often results in an inability to develop healthy relationships, learning difficulties, poor emotional regulation, and impaired problem-solving skills. Further, youth who grow up in unsafe environments or are subjected to structural inequality are faced with challenges over which they have no control. Using a positive, future-oriented, and trauma-responsive perspective while intentionally building resilience can effectively engage and support youth who have experienced toxic stress to overcome feelings of hopelessness and achieve positive outcomes. This paper includes a thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews with several youth who have experienced significant adversity as they participate in an intervention designed to support them to articulate, develop, and pursue their goals for transition from adolescence to adulthood. The paper includes a description of how systems and individualized interventions can build resilience, and the need for further research of the impact of relationship-based, person-centered approaches on the perspectives and outcomes of youth and young adults who have experienced significant trauma.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Jun 2024 06:45:06 PDT
       
  • Using Data to Make Evidence Informed Decisions in School Social Work

    • Authors: Robert Lucio et al.
      Abstract: Effectively supporting school social workers (SSW) in using data to make evidence informed decisions can be challenging for many reasons. This study examines how SSW utilize data across each step of the data engagement framework and, explores the confidence level of SSW in identifying data as well as specific types of data being utilized in the school setting. Data were collected though mixed-methods survey items with social workers in one district in central Florida asking about the different ways in which SSW were engaged with data usage. Results from the study indicate that SSW felt more comfortable in identifying interventions and their ability to intervene than having the right data, making meaning of data, or evaluating the impact of their interventions. These themes were further explored using the qualitative items which identified specific aspects of data engagement including identification of the right data, accessing data, interpreting results, deciding interventions, monitoring implementation and how SSW learn about interventions.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Jun 2024 06:41:22 PDT
       
  • Examining School Social Work Certifications across the Midwest States

    • Authors: Robert Lucio et al.
      Abstract: School social workers are increasingly being recognized and employed in schools across the country to promote critical avenues of system-wide school-based support. However, limited research has explored state certification standards of school social workers to understand the implications on practice efficacy and roles to improve the overall capacity of practitioners. In this study, we examine licensing standards and practice across 13 Midwest states, leveraging key partners in each state of interest. Findings reveal a large variation in SSW preparation, certification, and licensing standards. Aspects discussed in the results include, degree requirements, preparation programs, state endorsement, pathways to licensure, evaluation components, board of education requirements, and direct service implications. We discuss the implications of our findings and delineate the complexities, inconsistencies, and outline strategies for future research. As schools increasingly come to rely and depend on school social workers, we must work to build consistency in state requirements, solidify training standards, and strive to build efficacy and strength of the field.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Jun 2024 06:41:13 PDT
       
  • Under Their Wing: A Case Study of Caring Adults Who Support Homeless Youth

    • Authors: Christina L. Helfrick
      Abstract: Despite many risk factors, few interventions exist to support youth who are homeless. Theories of resilience and social capital offer support for the development of a school-appointed, homeless, student advocate program. However, these theories do not offer a process or description of activities or qualities of an advocate. This case study is used as an initial step in intervention development. A one-time, focus-group was utilized as a purposeful sample of individuals experienced with supporting homeless youth will be used to create a framework for practice. This study asked the following questions: What is a programmatic framework for a school-appointed homeless advocate program' And what are the qualities and activities of advocate for homeless youth' The findings indicate that what is most important is the qualities that the advocate possesses: who they are, rather than what they do. A framework was developed that demonstrates that the qualities of the individual are the foundation of the advocate, and these qualities cause them to activate others and complete activities focused on the youth, to increase the well-being of the homeless youth.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Jun 2024 06:35:06 PDT
       
  • School Social Workers and Extracurricular Activities: The Unanswered
           Questions About Potential Role Conflict

    • Authors: Jeffrey McCabe et al.
      Abstract: Abstract School social workers respond to students’ mental health needs from an education training perspective that defines set professional role boundaries in service provision that may differ from the multiple roles teachers have with students. One of those perspectives is a recognition of what may happen if a boundary crossing was to occur in a dual relationship with a client. Teachers are encouraged to take on a secondary role with students by coaching athletics or advising a club. Taking on dual roles with students has led to both increased job satisfaction and concerns regarding burnout for teachers. There is an absence of information that exists on what the experience has been of school social workers taking on secondary roles with students. Not having guidance for school social workers who elect to oversee extracurricular activities led the authors to explore what is the intended mission for the practice of school social work, how the existing literature on dual relationships may apply to school settings, and the findings from research conducted with teachers who take on dual roles with students. The recommendations provided are a need for data to establish what experience school social workers have with managing secondary roles and to not preclude school social workers from extracurricular activities when their presence can be of benefit to students and the school if dual relationships are properly managed.
      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jul 2023 08:01:08 PDT
       
  • Mental Health Problems among Elementary School Students Mandated to
           e-Learning: A COVID-19 Rapid Review Caveat

    • Authors: Renée M. D'Amore et al.
      Abstract: Extended lockdowns during the COVID-19 pandemic mandated millions of students worldwide to e-learning and by default made many of their parents proxy homeschool teachers. Preliminary anecdotal, journalistic and qualitative evidence suggested that elementary school children and their parents were probably most vulnerable to this stressor and most likely to experience mental health problems because of it. We responded with a rapid review of 15 online surveys to estimate the magnitude of such risks and their predictors between 2020 and 2021. The pooled relative risk of mental health problems among school children and their parents was substantial (RR = 1.97). Moreover, this synthetic finding did not differ significantly between 10 child mental health outcomes (primarily measures of anxiety or depression) and five parental stress outcomes. Such risks to children and parents were incrementally greater among Latinx (RR = 1.81) and Black families (RR = 2.50) than among non-Hispanic White families (RR = 1.58) in the USA. Finally, such risks in the West (RR = 2.12) were observed to be greater than those in the East (RR = 1.36). Grave risks were experienced worldwide, but the pandemic once again clarified for the world that such structural violence, in this instance, in elementary school systems, was much more prevalent and virulent among Black and Brown families in places like the USA. Educational practice implications, future research and pandemic preparedness needs are discussed.
      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jul 2023 08:01:07 PDT
       
  • Social Work Educators’ Perceptions of School Social Work Leadership –
           What are the Characteristics that Make a Leader'

    • Authors: Christine Vyshedsky
      Abstract: Social workers in school settings are uniquely poised to propose and implement proactive solutions to climate stressors, but they may not capitalize on this opportunity to lead. This study explored the perceptions of Masters’ level social work educators, who set the tone and expectations for school social workers through curricula, towards the inclusion of leadership-related skills within school social work curriculum. A survey of educator administrators (n = 75) at Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) accredited institutions examined leadership as defined through a combination of two proposed definitions for social work leadership, delineated by Holosko, 2009 and Hopson & Lawson, 2011; findings revealed no relationship between the perceived importance of the inclusion of social work leadership skills and any components of leadership except for the ability for school social workers to collaborate. Results support a need for further exploration and definition of leadership in school social work, with the aim of empowering practitioners and reducing role ambiguity.
      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jul 2023 08:01:06 PDT
       
  • Moving Beyond Trauma: Activating Resilience to Support Our Most Vulnerable
           Youth

    • Authors: JoAnne Malloy et al.
      Abstract: It is well-documented that exposure to toxic stress in childhood can contribute to impaired social, emotional, behavioral, and neuro-biological development that often results in learning difficulties, poor emotional regulation, an inability to develop healthy relationships, and impaired problem-solving skills. Further, youth who grow up in unsafe environments or are subjected to structural inequality are faced with challenges over which they have no control. Using a positive, future-oriented, and trauma-responsive perspective while intentionally building resilience can effectively engage and support youth to overcome feelings of hopelessness and achieve positive outcomes. This paper includes a qualitative study of protective factors as identified by youth who participated in an intervention designed to support them to articulate, develop, and pursue their goals for transition from adolescence to adulthood. The paper includes a description of how a youth-driven planning and social support intervention can build resilience and promote a positive, future orientation. The study also emphasizes the need for further research about the impact of relationship-based, person-centered approaches on building resilience and improved outcomes for youth and young adults who have experienced significant trauma.
      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jul 2023 08:01:05 PDT
       
  • Dimensions of hope and the school environment: Results from a school-wide
           needs assessment at an urban high school

    • Authors: James P. Canfield et al.
      Abstract: Objectives: Various aspects of hope can play a major role in how students from urban locales perceive their school environment. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between various dimensions of hope and the school environment as perceived by adolescents at an urban high school. Methods: Data from a school-wide needs assessment measuring urban adolescents’ perceived hope and perceptions of the school environment were analyzed. Results: The analysis from regression models indicate that the dimensions of hope variables can be predicted by perceptions of the school environment. Conclusion: Overall, the urban adolescent hope domains of Spirituality, Personal Agency, Education, and Caring Connections all proved to be important elements correlated with the school environment. Implications of these findings for future research and practice are discussed
      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jul 2023 08:01:04 PDT
       
  • Therapist, Intermediary or Garbage Can' Examining Professional Challenges
           for School Social Work in Swedish Elementary Schools

    • Authors: Maria Kjellgren et al.
      Abstract: The overall aim of this article is to describe and analyse critical components that influence the role and performance of school social workers in the Swedish elementary school. Special attention will be paid to aspects related to formal regulations, professional self-understanding, and SSWs’ role in the interplay between professional domains involved in elementary school.The data collection was conducted through four semi-structured qualitative focus group interviews with a total of 22 School Social Workers (SSWs) in four different regions in Sweden during the latter part of 2019.The results reveal three main challenges for the SSW: 1. To navigate in a pedagogic and medical arena within a multidisciplinary team, 2. To manage ambiguity without formal regulations and in unclear settings and leadership, and finally, 3. To negotiate tasks at different levels, with a health promotional and preventive focus. The SSW ends up, mainly, in remedial work with individual children. The results also disclose SSWs hold a vague professional self-understanding position with little formal mandate to perform their work. We suggest that national guidelines for SSWs be developed, and that a common base of knowledge and education be established.
      PubDate: Thu, 26 Jan 2023 14:45:38 PST
       
  • Perceptions and Practices in School Social Worker-Teacher
           Interprofessional Collaboration

    • Authors: Stacy A. Gherardi et al.
      Abstract: School social work requires significant skills for interprofessional collaboration, especially collaboration with teachers. While the value of such skills is increasingly recognized in fields such as healthcare, there has been limited attention to assessing or supporting interprofessional practice in education. This exploratory mixed-methods study analyzed survey data from 264 school social workers across the United States in order to understand their perceptions of teachers as collaborators and their practices relating to collaboration with teachers. Barriers to collaboration were also identified. Data suggested that school social workers had positive perceptions of teachers as collaborators generally, but saw limitations in the training and support of teachers to effectively respond to non-academic concerns; time and support for collaboration were identified as significant barriers to collaborative practice.
      PubDate: Fri, 16 Dec 2022 08:15:45 PST
       
  • Assessing Differential Item Functioning and Differential Test Functioning
           in an Academic Motivation Scale using Item Response Theory methods

    • Authors: Gerald J. Bean
      Abstract: Social work researchers and practitioners who use measurement instruments to make data-informed decisions need to ensure those decisions are based on items and scales that are free from possible bias or undesirable differential functioning. In this study, we provide an example of how a set of Item Response Theory (IRT) statistical methods and tools can be used by social work measurement researchers to assess differential item (DIF) and scale (DTF) functioning. For the example, we explored the possible race, gender, and family composition differential functioning of a scale—the Academic Motivation Scale (AMS)—developed for use by school social workers. The data used in this analysis were collected from 3,221 seventh grade students in multiple school districts in a large urban mid-western U.S. county. We used IRT methods and a multiple-step framework to assess possible race, gender, and family composition DIF/DTF. Results indicated there was minimal race, gender, or family composition differential functioning at both the item and scale level. While the AMS is recommended for use by school social workers, further research is needed to examine possible DIF/DTF by other factors such as parent involvement and family background, gender identity, sexual preference, and cultural attributes and ethnic factors.
      PubDate: Fri, 16 Dec 2022 08:15:44 PST
       
  • Assessing Texas School Social Work Practice: Findings from the First
           Statewide Conference Survey

    • Authors: Xiao Ding et al.
      Abstract: AbstractAims: To examine the characteristics, perceived barriers, special student populations, and school-based tasks performed by Texas's school social workers in comparison to other Specialized Instructional Services Providers (SISP) professionals in schools.Methods: A convenience sample from a survey of 212 school social workers and school services providers from the Texas School Social Workers Conference. The survey was developed using previous surveys and practice knowledge and assessed (a) demographics, (b) characteristics of school social work practice, (c) types of tasks, (d) special population served, (e) types of barriers), and (f) the tools and training that are most needed.Results: The roles of Texas School social workers are similar to school social workers nationally. There were significant differences between the roles, tasks, and barriers to practice for school social workers than other SISP providers. School social workers more frequently served on the frontlines with high-needs students and special populations, assisted teachers in classroom management and contributed to in-service training for the school than other SISP professionals.Practice Implications: School social workers make significant and sustained contributions to K-12, public schools, magnet schools, and charter schools. School social workers play a key role in serving a school’s high-needs students and specialized populations; better implementation of state standards, professional development, and opportunities for networking are needed.
      PubDate: Fri, 16 Dec 2022 08:15:43 PST
       
  • The Shalem Counselling Assistance Plan for Students (CAPS): Delivering
           Social Work Services to Faith-Based School Systems

    • Authors: Mark Vander Vennen et al.
      Abstract: In Ontario, Canada, non-Catholic faith-based schools do not receive provincial government funding but are funded primarily by families of students and through fundraising. As a result, historically school-based provision of counselling or school social work resources to students has been the exception rather than the rule, as this has typically been considered an adjunct resource. A new initiative was launched in the province of Ontario in 2011 to address this gap, the Counselling Assistance Plan for Students (CAPS). CAPS was premised on another novel idea, a Congregational Assistance Plan, which itself grew out of concepts derived from Employee Assistance Programming that has roots dating back to the 19th century in Canada. While CAPS has parallels to Student Assistance Programming (SAP), which exists throughout the United States, development of SAP has not taken hold in Canada. This article examines the origins of CAPS, its development, and the nature of assistance it has provided to the schools that have been early adopters.
      PubDate: Fri, 04 Nov 2022 09:25:40 PDT
       
  • Leadership in School Social Work: Implications for Promoting the
           Preparedness of Tomorrow’s Practitioners

    • Authors: Yasmine Perry et al.
      Abstract: Current research suggests that leadership skills in the field of school social work are valuable and needed. However, these skills are not always clearly outlined by governing entities as a result of little examination and research. This article examines differences of perceptions toward and engagement in professional leadership skills among school social work practitioners across the United States (N = 686). Using descriptive and multivariate methods, this paper examines practitioner perceptions toward and engagement in school-based leadership and what this leadership looks like in today’s schools. Findings call for educators and practitioners to advocate for the incorporation of leadership training, culturally sensitive cross-discipline collaboration, and preparedness guidelines in both generalist bachelor- and master-level social work curricula in which students are trained to work in school settings. Moreover, access to training and availability of resources pertaining to leadership appear to be a point of concern. Implications for social work practice, education, and research are discussed.
      PubDate: Fri, 04 Nov 2022 09:25:39 PDT
       
  • Attending to Attention: A Systematic Review of Attention and Reading

    • Authors: Sarah M.R. Eisensmith et al.
      Abstract: Background: Extensive research has conclusively linked inattention to poor reading performance. The process by which this relation occurs remains somewhat undefined, which makes it difficult for practitioners to identify key intervention targets. Objectives: This systematic review will synthesize current peer-reviewed research on the developmental relationship between inattention and reading. The primary aim of this review was to describe how inattention negatively relates to the development of literacy from preschool through middle childhood. A secondary aim of this review was to summarize recent research on the potential differential relationship between attention and literacy among students overrepresented in ratings of inattention, including boys and students of color. Design and Methods: PsycInfo, Education Full Text, ERIC, and ProQuest Education, and Dissertations and Theses were searched, using a broad search string. The initial search resulted in 1,262 potentially relevant studies published since the most recent authorization of the Every Child Succeeds Act (i.e., from December 2015-2019) for review. Out of 1,262 citations found, 70 empirical studies were screened and assessed for eligibility, and 16 met the specific inclusion criteria. A coding sheet was then used to synthesize data from the included studies. Results: Among preschool and elementary school children, inattention, whether measured through observer ratings or performance tasks, has a consistent, negative impact on reading skills as reported both by teachers, standardized instruments, and classroom performance outcomes. Results point to multiple pathways through which inattention may have a negative impact on reading outcomes. Evidence points to a negative and direct effect of inattention on the development of and performance in reading concurrently and over time. Inattention may have an additional, indirect, and negative effect on reading performance through its negative impact on early literacy and cognitive skills, including phonological awareness and processing, vocabulary, and working memory. There is a lack of research on potential differential processes by which attention relates to reading among subgroups of children who are at elevated risk for poor literacy outcomes. Conclusions and Implications: Assessing for and intervening in early attention problems in preschool and kindergarten is essential to promote optimal reading outcomes for all students. There is an urgent need for future research to investigate potential differential processes in the relation between attention and reading performance for children who are at an elevated risk for reading problems. School social workers are especially prepared and located to address the interaction of child and classroom factors within schools that impede student performance in early grades and set up challenges for later success.
      PubDate: Fri, 04 Nov 2022 09:25:38 PDT
       
  • School-Based Mental Health Services for Racial Minority Children in the
           United States

    • Authors: Shinwoo Choi et al.
      Abstract: Racial minority children have been an underserved population and are particularly vulnerable due to limited access to community resources, especially mental health services. Schools have been noted as appropriate that environment to deliver services for underserved children (Blewett, Casey, & Call, 2004). However, little is known about the effectiveness of exiting school-based services targeting minority students. Therefore, this study reviewed past research regarding the effects of school-based mental health services (SBMHS) for racial minority children and analyzed the methodological and cultural features. By applying the Levels of Evidence-Based Intervention Effectiveness (LEBIE) scale and the cultural sensitivity criteria, the researchers examined whether existing SBMS were designed with rigor and cultural sensitivity. Our study analyzed the effects of SBMS with child-centered play therapy or resilience-building programs on mental illness of racial minority groups of children, such as increasing social connectedness and decreasing depressive symptoms. Our study findings implied that SBMS should be provided for students of color who have limited access to resources and health care services in their communities. School professionals also need to reach out in multiple contexts to students of color by understanding structural racism and oppression.
      PubDate: Wed, 16 Mar 2022 07:56:22 PDT
       
  • “Never give up.” Adjudicated girls’ school experiences and
           implications for academic success

    • Authors: Laura M. Hopson et al.
      Abstract: There is limited literature on best practices for promoting academic success for adjudicated girls. The goal of this qualitative study was to elicit information about the educational experiences of female juvenile offenders within a residential facility. Interviews with 10 girls and two teachers were audio-recorded and transcribed. Data were analyzed for narratives pertaining to success stories and challenges the girls faced in educational settings. Themes were: Barriers in school; Individual Characteristics that Promote Success; Coping Skills; Relationships that Promote Success; School Environments that Promote Success; Transitioning to Traditional Schools. Findings inform strategies to promote academic success for detained youth. The authors discuss implications for school social workers and other school-based behavioral health providers.
      PubDate: Wed, 16 Mar 2022 07:56:21 PDT
       
  • Partnerships to Address School Safety through a Student Support Lens

    • Authors: Summer G. Woodside et al.
      Abstract: School safety is a primary concern of school leaders, employees, parents, and a variety of community stakeholders. Attempts to mitigate and prevent school safety concerns often focus on strategies around school climate assessment, emergency communication, school safety plan development, and school resource officer employment (U.S. DHS et al., 2018). Involvement of key stakeholders, such as school social workers, school counselors, and school-based mental health professionals is emphasized in creating and assessing school safety in a wholistic manner. This article provides an overview of a Trainings to Increase School Safety grant program that was implemented with public school stakeholders through partnerships between a university and five public school districts in the Southeastern North Carolina region.
      PubDate: Wed, 16 Mar 2022 07:56:20 PDT
       
  • School Mental Health in Charters: A Glimpse of Practitioners from a
           National Sample

    • Authors: Jandel Crutchfield et al.
      Abstract: Charter schools are part of a global push for alternative governance models in public education. Even though U.S. charter schools enroll nearly 3.2 million children, little is known about school mental health (SMH) practice in charter schools. The current study was the first step in a line of inquiry exploring SMH and school social work practice in charter schools. Using cross-sectional survey research methods, the authors conducted brief one-time phone surveys with charter school social workers and counselors identified using a stratified random sampling strategy with national charter school lists. The final sample for analysis was 473 schools. Of these, 44.4% (n = 210) had a school social worker or counselor present at least one day per week, of whom 67 (30.5%) were school social workers. The school social work sample reported a number of job titles, including “school social worker” (67%) and many (13.4%) that were a variation of counselor (e.g., “behavioral counselor,” “social emotional counselor”). Half were employed by their school, five were employed by an outside organization contracted with the school and eight were employed by the school’s chartering organization. More than three-quarters (83%) had a master's degree in social work as their highest degree. Our findings provide a snapshot of the SMH and school social work workforce within the emerging practice setting of charter schools. Findings suggest that the SMH workforce may be professionally similar to those in traditional public schools, but with more flexibility for interprofessional collaboration, professional advocacy, and role definition. Other implications for research are also discussed.
      PubDate: Wed, 16 Mar 2022 07:56:19 PDT
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.200.194.255
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-
JournalTOCs
 
 

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
The end of the list has been reached or no journals were found for your choice.
Similar Journals
Similar Journals
HOME > Browse the 73 Subjects covered by JournalTOCs  
SubjectTotal Journals
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.200.194.255
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-