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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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Journal of Policy Practice and Research
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Online) 2662-1517
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Methods of Political Influence of Weak Interests Using the Example of the
           Reform Process of the Bundesteilhabegesetz (Federal Participation Act)

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      Abstract: Abstract People with disabilities and their associations should have the opportunity to participate in decision-making processes by following the principle of “nothing about us without us,” according to the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. This slogan was pursued as part of the reform process of the Federal Participation Act (Bundesteilhabegesetz) in Germany. Interest groups of people with disabilities (also referred to as “weak interests” in reference to association research) were intensively involved in various stages of the process. This article is based on results of a dissertation project that involved the process tracing method of the reform process of this new law. This paper takes a closer look at the methods of political influence used by interest groups of people with disabilities. Which activities were particularly effective in the context of the process considered here' What can other interest groups learn from the reform process of the Federal Participation Act about the direct use of power resources and lobbying' The power resource approach adapted to weak interests provides a basis, as do various lobbying activities, for demonstrating different ways in which weak interests influence the reform process. As the paper will show, the mix of different lobbying activities helped to assert some of their demands.
      PubDate: 2023-01-18
       
  • Sexual Identities and Political Protesting Among Social Work Students

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      Abstract: Abstract This study has three tasks. First, it establishes the extent in which current social work students engage in protest activities. Second, it analyzes the ways that a student’s sexual identity may impact their tendency to protest. Lastly, the work explores the reasons why sexual identity may impact protest inclinations. Data for this study were drawn from a 2019–2020 national sample of social work students (n = 811) throughout the USA with over 76 schools of social work represented. Findings suggest that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer students protested more frequently than heterosexual students as did students who had LGBQ friends, took or attended classes/activities on LGBQ topics, joined advocacy groups, and had an activist identity. After running several regressions, the increased activist activity of LGBQ students was mostly attributed to the fact that they felt a stronger commitment to being a person who works towards social change. A core tenant of social work is to address social injustice; often, this happens through some form of protest. This article explored a sexuality gap in protest behavior of social work students, while also examining other possible factors that may contribute to a gap in protesting behavior by using political distinctiveness theories to guide the exploration. Implications for social work education are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-12-17
       
  • Examining the Impact of Social Media Use, Political Interest, and
           Canvassing on Political Participation of the American Public During the
           2020 Presidential Campaigns

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      Abstract: Abstract The sample included 3503 Americans participating in political activities during the 2020 presidential election. This study rank ordered three political behaviors: political expression, political information seeking, and political influencing. The study used these items to construct a Political Participation Index (PPI) to measure the political participation levels of the American public. Using representative data from the 2020 American National Election Survey (ANES), this study examined the predictors of political engagement of the American people to fathom what aspects can galvanize political participation and identify factors that social workers and policymakers can influence through political interventions. Study results ranked political information-seeking activities high and rated political influencing activities at the bottom based on the political participation of the American public. Political interest and being canvassed emerged as the most influential predictors, followed by the political use of Facebook and Twitter. In addition to personal characteristics such as being white, age, and being married, political parties’ outreach was the least influential predictor. Results demonstrate the need for social workers and policymakers to promote political interest and canvass groups such as nonwhites, single, young voters, and the poor to advance political participation, a critical tool to address the imbalance.
      PubDate: 2022-12-13
       
  • “Piecemeal” Advocacy, Radical Accomplishments: Adding Normatizing to
           the Advocacy Toolbox

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      Abstract: Abstract Women’s rights advocates in Iowa successfully got state laws adopted in the late 1980s and in 2009 requiring gender balance on state and local boards and commissions, the only such laws in the USA. Through interview and archival methods, this paper uses a critical juncture framework to unveil how this was accomplished in part through a strategy underexplored in academic and practitioner literature—deradicalizing an issue through a series of “piecemeal” efforts. Small less controversial changes can build up to alter the status quo, making room for changes previously thought unaccomplishable. This study brings normatizing—the process of incrementally institutionalizing new norms—forward as a socialization strategy for social movement actors to intentionally consider employing in situations they encounter where political will on an issue is substantially lacking.
      PubDate: 2022-12-13
       
  • Politicized Social Work Future — A Quantitative Study Comparing Social
           Work Students’ Voluntary Political Participation in Austria, Germany,
           and Switzerland

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      Abstract: Abstract This quantitative study focuses on the political engagement of social work students by comparing the extent of voluntary political participation and the factors that influence this type of engagement among Austrian (n = 197), German (n = 2998), and Swiss students (n = 453). Findings indicate that Swiss students are most engaged in political activities, followed by Austrian and German participants. Consistent with the findings of previous scholarship, the results of this study show that social work students prefer to participate in passive activities rather than in active forms of political participation. The study identifies internal political efficacy, political ideology, political interest, membership, and the country of residence as main factors influencing voluntary political participation among social work students. Along with similarities among the countries, this article also identifies and discusses differences between the three countries. Finally, ideas for future research directions are discussed based on the findings of this study.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Whither Political Social Work'

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      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Commentary: Civic Engagement in the Post-2022 United States, Democratic
           Theory and Social Policy Practice

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      PubDate: 2022-11-30
       
  • “It Takes A Decent Amount of Courage”: The State of Civics Education
           in Social Work Programs in Germany

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      Abstract: Abstract There is an ongoing debate in German Social Work theory about whether Social Work is, can be, or should be a political profession. There are three opinions among scholars that answer either with a wholehearted “yes,” a skeptic “yes, but…,” and a resounding “no.” And even when the answer is yes, political activity of Social Workers is often described as “Einmischung,” which can be translated as “interference” or “meddling,” thus undermining the crucial role that Social Workers play in the welfare state. This debate affects not only academic discourse but also the education of Social Workers throughout Germany. There seem to be as many different approaches as there are schools of Social Work to teaching — or not teaching — civics and political skills to Social Work students — thus, political knowledge and interest, practical skills, preparation, and the ability to speak politically can differ dramatically among Social Workers — which, in turn, influences the ability and willingness for political action. This is also reflected in the low numbers of German Social Workers that are organized in unions. For my doctoral thesis, I have compared ten different Social Work curricula at as many Schools of Social Work in Germany. My goal was to find out whether and how future Social Workers are receiving — or are at least able to receive — training for political situations and political work, and whether the skills taught are those needed in practice. In the course of working on my dissertation, I let students of Social Work and Social Workers discuss my findings about “their” study program in focus groups and at the same time asked if the skills taught on paper are also the ones taught in reality — and whether they are the ones needed in practice. I wish to present my findings in this article.
      PubDate: 2022-11-21
       
  • What Motivates the Vote' Discrimination as a Moderator on Political
           Interest on Voting

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      Abstract: Abstract The purpose of this study is to explore the influence of political interest on voting and the moderating effect of discrimination in this relationship. Using the National American Asian Survey, Post-Election 2016 (N = 3617), we used binary logistic regression to examine the influence of political interest on voting behavior among a majority persons-of-color sample. We examined the moderating effect of everyday and major discrimination on the primary relationship using the interaction term and simple slope test. We demonstrate that political interest can positively predict voting (OR = 1.699, p < .001). Those interested in politics who experienced everyday (OR = 1.094, p < .05) and major (OR = 1.094, p < .05) discrimination were associated with an increased likelihood to vote. This study demonstrates the importance of empowering marginalized communities to develop political interest, and how discrimination plays an important role in increasing voting motives.
      PubDate: 2022-11-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-022-00069-y
       
  • Political Actions of Youth Workers

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      Abstract: Abstract The ability to act politically is supposedly one of the core competencies of youth workers in Germany. Surprisingly, there is little knowledge about political activities of youth workers in Germany and elsewhere. In this article, I address this research gap by questioning how youth workers act politically. I present findings from the qualitative research project “civic education in youth work” and provide insights into the narrated practices of the interviewed youth workers in their contact with local politics and authorities. Based on a reconstructive interpretation using the documentary method (Bohnsack in Documentary Method. In U. Flick (Ed.), The sage handbook of qualitative analysis (pp. 217–233). Sage, 2014; Nohl in Narrative interview and documentary interpretation. In R. Bohnsack, N. Pfaff, & W. Weller (Eds.), Qualitative Analysis and Documentary Method in International Education Research (pp. 195–217). Barbara Budrich, 2010), I am able to identify three different types of political practices of youth workers and their underlying implicit orientations. There are youth workers who are reluctant to engage politically, who engage only in the face of an immediate threat, or who engage politically as part of their professional role as youth workers.
      PubDate: 2022-09-27
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-022-00067-0
       
  • Gender Dynamics and The Political Recruitment of Social Workers

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      Abstract: Abstract This purpose of this study is to explore the gender dynamics in recruitment of social workers to run for public office. It was hypothesized that since most social workers—and social workers elected to public office—are women, that most social workers recruited to run for office would be women as well. Furthermore, it was hypothesized that recruitment would increase political ambition among men and women in social work, with a greater impact on women. Regarding research methods, the study utilized a sample (N = 2,316) consisting of randomly selected licensed social workers in 24 states and the District of Columbia. Data came from the National Study of the Political Participation of Licensed Social Workers (NSPPLSW). Chi-square tests were conducted, and logistic regressions were created using predictor variables measured with Likert scales. Cox–Snell pseudo-R2 was calculated as a goodness-of-fit measure. Results indicated that, despite being vastly outnumbered, men in social work are significantly more likely to experience political recruitment than women. This was true across all practice areas except community organizing. Additionally, contrary to hypotheses, recruitment was found to bolster political ambition equally in men and women in social work. Concluding remarks recommend increasing the effort among gatekeepers in political social work to recruit more women to run for office.
      PubDate: 2022-09-15
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-022-00066-1
       
  • Visitors not Welcome: Hospital Visitation Restrictions and Institutional
           Betrayal

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      Abstract: Abstract Healthcare organizations’ continued restrictions on hospital visitation during the COVID-19 pandemic can be considered a violation of the rights of hospitalized patients to receive family visitors. Despite expert opinion related to the safety of visitation and low risk of visitor transmission with appropriate monitoring and precautions, hospital visitation restrictions have continued beyond the initial crisis phase of the pandemic, with little transparency or inclusion of key stakeholders in the decision-making process. Particularly on critical care units, blocking access to family visitors can contribute to additional harm and trauma for care-dependent hospitalized patients and their families. Utilizing an institutional betrayal framework, the aim of this commentary on hospital ICU visitation policy is to provide a discussion of how hospitals who serve a care-dependent population have placed critically ill patients, families, and healthcare workers at risk for complex trauma. Hospital social workers should incorporate an integrated social work approach to advocacy efforts which address not only individual hospitalized patient service needs, but also the uneven power differential that can contribute to inequity in visitation, medical mistrust, and long-term community trauma. On the interprofessional ICU team, social workers can function as trauma informed systems experts, coordinating and facilitating supports to help patients and families cope with hospitalization, while also advocating within their institution and with elected officials for policy change to protect patient and family–centered visitation rights.
      PubDate: 2022-09-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-022-00063-4
       
  • Feminist Policy Analysis in a Post-Roe World: a Social Work Imperative

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      PubDate: 2022-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-022-00064-3
       
  • Service Providers as Street-Level Bureaucrats: Evidence of Rationing
           Services and Discriminating Among Clients in Northern Ghana

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      Abstract: Abstract This article employs Michael Lipsky’s Street-Level Bureaucrat framework to examine two discretionary practices — rationing services and client discrimination — adopted by service providers of the Ghana School Feeding Program (GSFP). The article’s primary focus is to demonstrate how these two discretionary practices impact the delivery of the GSFP. To achieve this objective, 25 in-depth semi-structured interviews with service providers of the GSFP were conducted. Through thematic analysis, the paper found evidence of service providers in Northern Ghana rationing services and discriminating among the clients of the GSFP as a coping strategy to the structural and financial challenges they encounter in their line of work. By presenting empirical evidence on the impact of discretionary practices on policy implementation, the paper underscores the critical role played by frontline staff in determining the success or failure of public programs. Thus, the paper contributes to public and social policy literature by bringing into focus developing countries’ experience in implementing social policy within a context of implementation challenges. This is important because most social policy research dwells a lot on cases from the Global North — this paper gives us further insights into policy implementation and confirms earlier research.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-022-00051-8
       
  • I Found My People: ISP and Me (and You')

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      PubDate: 2022-08-20
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-022-00065-2
       
  • Community and Private Sponsorship of Refugees in the USA: Rebirth of a
           Model

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      Abstract: Abstract President Biden has expressed support for restoring US global leadership on refugee resettlement after the Trump administration nearly dismantled the refugee program. The US Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP) is on the cusp of significant reform. By introducing community and private sponsorship as a key element of refugee policy, the program will increase capacity to resettle refugees while providing unique opportunities for direct public involvement in this process. This article traces the history of private sector involvement in the US refugee program and the re-emergence of community and private refugee sponsorship programs in recent years. We emphasize the significance of new efforts to promote “innovation” and private and civic engagement in US refugee resettlement. While the prospect of heightened public support for refugees is enhanced by this change, we also identify risks associated with this approach. As responsibility for welcoming refugees into US communities expands beyond the direct oversight of professional resettlement agencies to more diffuse (and often less experienced) community groups, it is incumbent to understand the potential consequences—positive and negative—of this policy shift.
      PubDate: 2022-08-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-022-00062-5
       
  • Strategies of Social Workers’ Policy Engagement—a Qualitative Analysis
           Among Swiss Social Workers Holding Elected Office

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      Abstract: Abstract While ethical documents all around the globe call upon social workers to actively participate in policymaking processes, there is little evidence of their actual engagement in this type of practice. In particular, the fact that social workers also engage in party-politics by running for or holding elected office has been neglected in most of the existing research. Therefore, this article focuses on this very specific route of policy engagement by examining strategies for influencing policymaking processes used by Swiss social workers holding political office. To do so, 31 social workers holding elected office in the German-speaking part of Switzerland were invited to write a book chapter in an edited volume. The authors were explicitly asked to describe in detail their strategies and methods for influencing policymaking processes, and to place social work issues on the political agenda. Based on a qualitative content analysis of the book chapters, the following strategies were identified: (1) bringing social work’s professional expertise into policymaking processes, (2) doing good and talking about it, (3) presenting facts and figures, (4) organizing the profession, (5) networking, and (6) “normalizing” policy engagement in social work. The findings suggest that political content should be strengthened in social work education and further promoted by professional associations. This would empower more social workers to run for political office and enable them to contribute their specific skills, knowledge, and expertise to policymaking processes.
      PubDate: 2022-06-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-022-00058-1
       
  • Policy Mapping of US Congressional Proposals on Climate Change: Informing
           Social Work Advocacy

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      Abstract: Abstract Climate change is a major threat to health and well-being, rendering it a critical social justice and policy issue for social work to address. Social workers have a window of opportunity to pursue federal policies that protect people, ensure basic needs, and advance social justice in the face of the climate crisis. This study aims to inform social work advocacy and action on climate change at the US congressional level. Policy mapping methodology is used to examine congressional trends (2011–2021) and the status and scope of climate-related proposals from the 116th US Congress (2019–2021) that also recognize socially vulnerable or minoritized groups. Forty-one proposals met the study criteria for the 116th US Congress. The most frequently identified groups were people in poverty or with low income, Indigenous or Tribal groups, and groups related to gender and women. Proposals varied in the extent of their focus on climate change, and 11 had some form of bipartisan support. Strategies for climate change mitigation tended to be more specific than for adaptation to it. Most proposals required federal appropriations, which may be a barrier to proposal progress. Given the unfolding climate crisis and its disproportionate harm to some groups more so than others, social workers should advocate for policies that equitably protect people in the face of climate change. Next steps for congressional advocacy can include raising awareness, calling for committee hearings, providing testimony at hearings, building relationships with Congressional representatives, and pursuing bipartisan support for legislation.
      PubDate: 2022-03-30
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-022-00055-4
       
  • Youth Detrimentally Affected by Exclusionary Immigration Policies: a Call
           to Action for Social Work Practice and Education

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      Abstract: Abstract The exclusionary immigration policies in the USA negatively impact the health and wellbeing of undocumented immigrant youth or those who have parents with undocumented status. This note briefly explains how these youth, who have already endured significant trauma and are at greater risk of poor outcomes, face hurdles in accessing prevention and intervention services mainly because of restrictive immigration policies. It further argues that such policies are in contrast to the core values of the social work profession and its mission to help meet the basic human needs of all people. Finally, social workers and educators are called to actively respond to those unmet needs through policy advocacy, direct service provision, and training the future and current workforce.
      PubDate: 2022-03-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-022-00053-6
       
  • The Effect of Work Requirements on Mental Health of Subsidized Housing
           Recipients: Evidence from the Housing Authority of Champaign County,
           Illinois

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      Abstract: Abstract This study examines the early effect of work requirements on mental health of subsidized housing recipients. The Housing Authority of Champaign County (HACC) enforced work requirements for working-aged and non-disabled recipients and supported their transition to work with case management services. In addition, non-compliance with work requirements might result in the loss of housing subsidy. We collected survey data 1 year prior to and 1 year following the implementation of HACC’s work requirements to compare changes in mental health measures between work-able recipients who were and were not subject to work requirements. We calculate the average treatment effects on the treated estimates obtained from difference-in-differences with propensity score matching to control potential bias stemming from unobserved time-invariant variables and support the model’s parallel trend assumption. Our main results show that, during the early phase of work requirements, impacted heads of households were predicted to increase depression scores and decrease hopefulness scores relative to changes in mental health measures of the matched control groups over the same period. Recipients’ mental health would play a critical role in the success of HACC’s self-sufficiency strategies, and therefore the housing authority may strengthen the transition of hard-to-employ recipients into the workforce by offering careful assessment and screening to identify recipients with serious mental health problems or other employment barriers and reinforcing their access to supportive health and social services.
      PubDate: 2022-03-09
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-022-00052-7
       
 
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