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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 201 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted by number of followers
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access  
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access  
Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift     Open Access  
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  

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Journal of Policy Practice and Research
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Online) 2662-1517
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Help-Seeking from Nonprofits and Social Networks During the Pandemic: A
           Qualitative Study

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      Abstract: Abstract Using a qualitative research design, this study explores help-seeking during the pandemic. It focuses on two potential sources of support beyond government aid: nonprofits and social networks. Thirty eight low-income families and individuals in New York City who lost either income or employment because of COVID-19 and were experiencing hardship were followed over the course of the pandemic, for a total of 69 interviews. We found that social support flourished during the pandemic with younger generations more likely to help older generations than vice versa. Similar to past studies, we found that people hesitated to ask for help from nonprofits because of practical barriers, whether because of lack of knowledge or prior use or faulty perceptions of who nonprofits served. Contrary to past studies which emphasize the role of stigma in refusing help, moral and ethical concerns played a larger role, as people, and, especially those experiencing hardship for the first time, considered their own need in relation to others. Suggestions are made as to how nonprofits can extended their reach, both during times of great peril and less stressful times.
      PubDate: 2024-02-07
       
  • Financial Access Policy Goals Pursued by the Consumer Financial Protection
           Bureau (CFPB) in Its Regulatory Function: 2011–2023

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      Abstract: Abstract Universal financial access, or the ability for all to open, afford, and continuously use beneficial and affordable financial products and services, eludes the USA. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) has an important role to play in facilitating financial access through its regulatory function. This paper investigated the policy goals pursued by the CFPB proposed and final rules related to basic financial products and services. The paper also examined the products and services, providers, and populations targeted. Rules proposed through its independent authority were also examined. Researchers conducted a policy mapping content analysis of all CFPB proposed and final rules from 2011 to 2023. Two researchers independently coded basic characteristics, and policy goals and illustrative mechanisms. Researchers compared codes and addressed discrepancies through consensus, and created new codes as needed. The policy goals that appeared most often were increasing consumer protection and promoting the functioning of the financial marketplace. Out of 24 proposed or final rules, the most common financial products or services addressed were remittances and debt collection, with their providers being the most commonly targeted providers by new rules. Few populations were specifically targeted by proposed or final rules. The CFPB independently proposed or finalized 16 new rules, most of which addressed the same policy goals. Rules finalized by the CFPB since its inception address some of the key financial access challenges. However, the CFPB could exercise its independent rule-making authority to further address financial access issues, particularly for financially vulnerable populations.
      PubDate: 2024-02-01
       
  • Domestic Violence Survivors and the Intermediate Appellate Courts

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      Abstract: Abstract Beginning in the 1970s, the “legalization” of domestic violence prevention was aimed at increasing the availability and severity of legal responses afforded to female survivors of domestic violence (Zorza, Journal Criminal Law & Criminology, 83:46 1992). To examine how these reforms developed and their effectiveness, we analyze cases dealing with domestic violence at the intermediate appellate courts over a 51-year period. Using these intermediate appellate court data, we examine the impact of shifting American mainstream legal thought on domestic violence, case and litigant characteristics, and policy era variables on the success of female survivors of domestic violence. This study used logistic regression to measure the impact of a state’s political context, case and litigant characteristics on the intermediate appellate courts. We used WESTLAWNEXT in each of the 50 states from 1965 to 2015 to identify cases where an intermediate appellate court dealt with domestic violence policy. The research shows that a female domestic violence litigant has a higher probability of success before the intermediate appellate court when her life is threatened, a protection order is involved, she is the appellee in the case, and the state intervenes on her behalf. This article highlights that judges are not acting like traditional politicians when deciding cases regarding domestic violence but are responding as concerned humans to human stimuli. These results suggest that when it comes to domestic violence against women, judges in the intermediate appellate courts are primarily concerned with ensuring that the law protects women who have experienced harm from an intimate partner.
      PubDate: 2024-01-22
       
  • 2023 MACRO United Conference: Executive Summary and Reflections

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      PubDate: 2023-12-20
       
  • Transitions

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      PubDate: 2023-12-15
       
  • Evidence-Based Policy Practice: Arguments, Counter-Arguments, Benefits,
           and Examples

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      Abstract: Abstract Despite decades of “acceptance of the need for evidence-based macro practice” the field has progressed remarkedly little. This commentary describes what are seen as possible reasons that macro researchers and practitioners have not been as eager or able to develop and disseminate evidence-based practices. Here, we focus on the arguments, counter-arguments, benefits, and examples of EBP in macro practice, and then narrow to the one area of policy practice. It ends with a call to action in several areas, including drawing from other fields’ literatures, filling in missing links in the EBP process, increasing our supply of theory-testing research, and writing a library of meaningful translational documents.
      PubDate: 2023-12-15
       
  • A Critical Framework for Analyzing the Impacts of Sub-Federal Immigration
           Policy in Post 9/11 United States

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      Abstract: Abstract Since September 11, 2001, local law enforcement has gained considerable de facto immigration enforcement authority. These federal-local partnerships have accelerated immigration enforcement practices and inspired a myriad of policies both supporting and resisting such partnerships. This extensive systematic qualitative literature review explores the role of local law enforcement in implementing immigration related policies. Three research questions are addressed: (1) How do local law enforcement agencies (LEAs) participate in immigration enforcement practices' (2) What might lead to some areas having more enforcement compared to other areas with less enforcement' (3) What factors might provide opportunities for empowerment, a sense of security, and/or security in the face of enforcement' Forty-three empirical research articles were identified through seven database searches and were analyzed with inductive coding. This review identifies three frameworks that shape local immigration policy, enforcement outcomes, sanctuary, and immigrant resistance and activism. These frameworks include demographic intensities, localized power structures, and institutionally formalized policy. These findings identify the inter-institutional processes underpinning local immigration policy, enforcement outcomes, sanctuary, and immigrant resistance and activism. By considering enforcement and sanctuary at multiple levels, educators and policy practitioners can better evaluate the efficacy of policy interventions and engage in advocacy efforts that support equitable social change that supports the safety of immigrant communities.
      PubDate: 2023-10-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-023-00094-5
       
  • Dangerous, Deserving, or Harmed: Understanding the Formation of
           Anti-Carceral Policy Attitudes Among Urban, Liberal Voters

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      Abstract: Abstract Why do many liberal voters in diverse, urban areas express racially egalitarian values but oppose anti-carceral policies that would weaken structural racism' How does this manifest particularly among people whose racial groups and neighborhoods experience the omission of targeting by the carceral state—voters in majority-white neighborhoods' Based on 28 canvassing interviews conducted in 2019 in Los Angeles County, this study shows one way that the omission of carceral state targeting produces ideological schema that bolster structural racism. Specifically, I demonstrate that non-Republican voters typically use four predispositions to make sense of their opinions on a proposed jail decarceration policy: (1) conceptions of criminalized people, (2) beliefs about the purpose and effects of the criminal legal system, (3) understandings of structural racism in the criminal legal system, and (4) racialized emotions. In the absence of carceral state targeting and coherent partisan ideology, these predispositions work together to structure three commonly used schema to formulate opinions towards anti-carceral policies: dangerous, deserving, or harmed. The geographically racialized omission of carceral state targeting thus allows for these voters to use ideological schemas that bolster the continued reproduction of carceral racism in their sense-making of anti-carceral policy proposals.
      PubDate: 2023-09-30
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-023-00093-6
       
  • Correction to: Reducing Poverty and Building Capacity—Perceived Child
           and Family Impacts of the Child Tax Credit Expansion

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      PubDate: 2023-09-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-023-00092-7
       
  • The Effect of Workforce Development Program Participation on Older Workers
           Aged 50 or Older in Georgia

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      Abstract: Abstract Historically, government workforce development programs have focused on younger individuals. The effectiveness of these programs for older workers aged 50 or older remains unclear. Therefore, this study examined the effect of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) programs in the state of Georgia on older workers. This study used WIOA performance data, including a total of 11,390 older workers between 2016 and 2020, and the American Community Survey (ACS) data. Descriptive analyses of two datasets examined participant demographics, training information, program participation outcomes, and older labor force characteristics in the state. WIOA programs were successful in serving two disadvantaged groups in employment, including older females and older Black participants. Despite a decrease in the number of older training participants over time, the most chosen training programs aligned with data on common occupations of the older workforce in the state. These programs improved the employability of older female participants but not for other disadvantaged older workers who were older in age or non-White individuals. The findings of this study emphasize the importance of addressing structural barriers to employment for older workers in employment transition, along with the improvement of the government workforce development programs.
      PubDate: 2023-09-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-023-00090-9
       
  • ECOWAS Youth Policy Monitoring and Evaluation Mechanisms: Evidence from
           Ghana

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      Abstract: Abstract This study focuses on regional organizations (ROs) specifically the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS). It assesses the monitoring and evaluation (M&E) mechanisms of the ECOWAS youth policy which was passed in 2008 for the 15 member states and how a member state like Ghana has incorporated it into the national youth policy/program. It utilized the African agency as an analytical framework based on understanding the “African solutions to African problems.” Data were obtained from multiple qualitative sources in a triangulation fashion: interviews, observations, documents and several secondary sources through a multisectoral and organizational approach. The data was analyzed thematically with major and sub-theme themes based on the main research question and other specific questions. The study found that Ghana has made a lot of efforts in integrating the ECOWAS youth policy into the national policies with many M&E mechanisms including the establishment of a data bank on youth activities and development. Another progress is the establishment of a youth ministry and other youth-based specialized agencies through public–private sector partnerships. It recommends that future research be adopted across countries and a longitudinal approach geared towards consolidating the ECOWAS youth policy and M&E mechanisms in member states.
      PubDate: 2023-08-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-023-00091-8
       
  • Bringing Human Needs Back into Policy Practice

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      PubDate: 2023-08-18
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-023-00088-3
       
  • Introduction to JPPR 4(3)

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      PubDate: 2023-08-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-023-00089-2
       
  • An Exploration of the Association of Police-Involved Killings of US
           Citizens and Police Reform Bills—A Punctuated Equilibrium Theoretical
           Application

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      Abstract: Abstract Since the highly publicized killings of unarmed and non-dangerous Americans, particularly African American men, at the hands of law enforcement, there has been heightened public scrutiny of police misconduct and calls for substantive reform. Recently, federal and state legislators began introducing police reform bills to curtail police misconduct leading to significant debate on whether reform efforts will be practical or effective. This study employed the punctuated equilibrium theoretical framework to examine the introduction of police reform bills in response to police-involved shootings from mid-2020 to early 2022 in Illinois, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, New York, and Ohio. The states were purposively chosen since nationally prominent police-involved killings occurred within them (e.g., George Floyd and Justine Damond). These states were compared with five states without a signaling event for context. This article underscores the effect(s) that punctuated instances of police violence/misconduct have on legislative activity. The study found that the incidents of police-involved shootings from mid-2020 to early 2022 increased the punctuated equilibrium properties of the introduction of police reform legislation. Results further indicated a significantly higher frequency of police-involved shootings and legislative activity in states with signaling events.
      PubDate: 2023-08-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-023-00086-5
       
  • Social Work in an Era of Reproductive Rights and Bodily Self
           Determination: Where Do We Go from Here'

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      PubDate: 2023-08-05
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-023-00087-4
       
  • #NotHereToo: Community Readiness to End Campus Sexual Violence in the Deep
           South

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      Abstract: Abstract This research uses the community readiness model (Oetting et al., 2014) developed by the Tri-Ethic Center at Colorado State University to gauge a southeastern mid-size university’s readiness to end sexual violence and propose practical action plans and policy recommendations to effectively address the problem. Using interviews from 10 stakeholders that represent law enforcement, student government, student organizations, mental health, prevention, and administration, we explored the following dimensions of readiness for change: community knowledge of the issue, knowledge of efforts to address the issue, leadership, resources, and community climate. Our findings indicate that on a scale of 1 to 9, the university is at a 4–5 with a mode of 4, indicating a readiness to change at the pre-planning stage. Results indicate a lack of communication around ongoing programming and research efforts associated with sexual violence on campus, a lack of knowledge of what constitutes sexual violence, and a reluctance to report. Prevention on this campus would need to start with streamlining communications about departmental programming efforts and increasing knowledge, dispelling myths, reducing stigma, and increasing the skills necessary to recognize and thus intervene in sexual violence. These efforts would most effectively be achieved with specific policies for implementation at the university, university accrediting bodies, and federal agencies.
      PubDate: 2023-07-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-023-00082-9
       
  • Reducing Poverty and Building Capacity—Perceived Child and Family
           Impacts of the Child Tax Credit Expansion

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      Abstract: Abstract This study aims to evaluate the perceived impact of the Child Tax Credit expansion on families’ physical, mental, and financial well-being utilizing rigorous qualitative methodology. Parents (n = 40, ages: 20–49 years, median income: $36,000–48,000/year) in the southeastern USA completed interviews in October–November of 2020 after they received 3–4 monthly Child Tax Credit payments. Parents were classified into two groups (e.g., household income above [n = 21] vs. below [n = 19] 200% of the federal poverty line) for qualitative inductive analysis. Pre-ECTC themes were mapped onto the Hidden Dimensions of Poverty Framework. Across income groups, the expansion positively impacted family relationships, reduced stress, and facilitated meeting routine needs (e.g., food, housing costs). Parents with low-income were empowered to purchase greater volumes of food and invest in quality-of-life improvements (e.g., child extracurricular programming, family outings) for their children. Parents expressed disappointment around the expansion’s termination in December of 2021. The expanded Child Tax Credit empowered families to improve their well-being and reduced financial and emotional burdens. Personal anecdotes of public experiences with policy change can have a significant impact on federal policy decision-making. Parents perceived the ECTC improved their family well-being and desired its maintenance. This unconditional income assistance may be a viable strategy to significantly improve quality of life, if sustained long term. The health impacts and the cost benefit of this policy change should be evaluated.
      PubDate: 2023-07-18
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-023-00085-6
       
  • Exploring the Role of Frontline Domestic and Family Violence
           “Advocate-Providers”: Can They Be Part of the National Policy Process
           in Australia'

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      Abstract: Abstract Drawing on findings from an Australian study, this article does two things. First, it discusses the neoliberal context and governance that affects the advocacy practice of grassroots human service organisations, supported by Fyall’s (2017) idea of “advocate-providers”, highlighting governmental barriers to advocacy influencing policy in the national Australian context of a conservative government. Second, the article focuses on frontline human services organisation workers’ voices for contributing to domestic and family violence policy development. Applying a feminist framework, the paper focuses on research that enabled expert views of frontline workers’ perspectives on a specific national social policy that surrounds their field of services. In presenting outcomes of a democratising feminist research process that sought to overcome the barriers for frontline domestic violence support practitioners to speak out and be heard by policymakers, the paper explores both how the participants felt excluded from the national policy process and their views of the policy they wanted decision-makers to hear. Data derived from frontline workers’ and managers’ perceptions of the relevance and effectiveness of Australia’s federal and state social policy approaches to reducing and addressing violence against women and their children are analysed.
      PubDate: 2023-07-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-023-00084-7
       
  • Political and Civic ParticipAsian of Asian Voters: Are There Gender
           Variations'

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      Abstract: Abstract Data were compiled from 1003 Asian Americans participating in the 2016 National Asian American Survey (NAAS). The study found a difference between males and females in political participation activities: contributing money to a candidate, political party, or campaign and discussing politics with family and friends. More males contributed money to a candidate, political party, or campaign (11.9% vs. 7.0%) and discussed politics with family and friends (50.5% vs. 42.3%) than females. The study found a difference between males and females in the following civic participation activities: working with others in their community to solve a problem, signing a petition in person, and signing an online or email petition. More males worked with others in their community to solve a problem (50.5% vs. 42.3%), signed a petition (15.4% vs. 10.3%), and signed an online or email petition (6.8% vs. 3.7%) than females. Women with higher income were 42.1% more likely to participate in political activities (OR = 1.421; p < 0.005) than women with lower income. Men with higher incomes were 31% more likely to participate in political activities (OR = 1.312; p < 0.001) than men with lower incomes.
      PubDate: 2023-06-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-023-00083-8
       
  • Correction to: Able‑bodied Characters and the Appeal of Medicaid
           Work Requirements in Arkansas

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      PubDate: 2023-02-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s42972-023-00078-5
       
 
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  First | 1 2        [Sort alphabetically]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 201 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted by number of followers
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access  
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access  
Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift     Open Access  
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  

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Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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