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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 201 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted by number of followers
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access  
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access  
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access  
Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift     Open Access  
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  

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International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2524-5236 - ISSN (Online) 2524-5244
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Preface to the Special Issue on Public Health Approaches to
           Prevent Child Maltreatment

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      PubDate: 2022-11-30
       
  • Rural Children’s Well-Being in the Context of the COVID-19 Pandemic:
           Perspectives from Children in the Midwestern United States

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      Abstract: Children in rural areas are more likely to experience a variety of risk factors that increase their vulnerability to physical and mental health disparities. Bronfenbrenner’s ecological model (1986) was used as a framework for understanding rural children’s perceptions and well-being within multiple interactive contexts during the COVID-19 pandemic. This phenomenological study was designed to explore rural children’s perceptions of their well-being and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on their contexts and well-being. This sub-study of the Children’s Understandings of Well-Being project followed the standard qualitative interview protocol with additional prompts related to the pandemic. Rural children (age 8 to 18, N = 72) from the Midwestern United States participated from March 2020 to November 2021 via teleconferencing. Phenomenological analyses of transcripts focused on the essence of children’s understanding of well-being and their perception of the impact of the pandemic on their contexts and well-being. Each transcript was coded by author 1 and verified by author 2, and discrepancies were identified, discussed, and resolved. The third author served as an external auditor to enhance trustworthiness. First-cycle coding focused on children’s specific references to well-being experiences during COVID-19. Second-cycle selective coding focused on specific well-being experiences and contexts that were impacted by COVID-19. These codes were used to develop two broad themes, “Well This Kinda Stinks, But We Just Adapt” and “Safety Means Something Different to Me Now.” The meaning of themes and subthemes are explored, with implications for researchers, practitioners, and policymakers.
      PubDate: 2022-11-24
       
  • “The Internet Is Keeping Me from Dying from Boredom”: Understanding
           the Management and Social Construction of the Self Through Middle-Class
           Indian Children’s Engagement with Digital Technologies During the
           COVID-19 Lockdown

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      Abstract:   This paper unpacks how everyday lives of urban middle-class children were mediated by digital technologies during the COVID-19 national lockdown in India. In contemporary India, children’s engagements with digital technologies are structured by their social class, gender, and geographical locations. The resultant disparities between “media-rich” and “media-poor” childhoods in India are stark (Banaji 2017). In this paper, we argue that the national lockdown in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic exposed India’s “media-rich” children to particular threats and obstacles. Based on semi-structured interviews and mapping exercises with 16- to 17-year-old urban middle-class young people, we explore how being confined to their homes for an extended period when their schools shifted to online delivery of teaching and learning; young people negotiated risks and sought digital opportunities in the management and social construction of the self (Callero 2003, 2014). While the majority of existing studies focus on societal anxieties around children’s digital media use, in almost a medicalized and pathological fashion, and its impact on parenting practices (Lim 2020; Livingstone and Blum-Ross 2020), we shift the attention to study this social phenomenon to help understand how children reflect on their engagement with technology and shape their own well-being through social construction of the self. Our findings demonstrate that children are reflexive users of digital technologies, as they navigate network failure issues, the demands of online classrooms, their own mental health and social relationships, and deploy the affordances of digital technologies to combat loneliness, nurture contact with friends, and explore educational and career resources. These strategies, in the management and social construction of the self, play out within the discourse of pedagogized middle-class childhood in India, which is imbued with notions of academic success and failure (Kumar 2016; Sen 2014). Media-rich middle-class young people’s management and social construction of the self, in the context of crisis and uncertainty, helps promote our understanding of the relationship between social structure, self-structure, and behavior choices, implications of this for child well-being, and reproduction of social inequality in society.
      PubDate: 2022-11-22
       
  • A Pan-European Review of Good Practices in Early Intervention Safeguarding
           Practice with Children, Young People and Families: Evidence Gathering to
           Inform a Multi-disciplinary Training Programme (the ERICA Project) in
           Preventing Child Abuse and Neglect in Seven European Countries

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      Abstract: Child maltreatment has detrimental social and health effects for individuals, families and communities. The ERICA project is a pan-European training programme that equips non-specialist threshold practitioners with knowledge and skills to prevent and detect child maltreatment. This paper describes and presents the findings of a rapid review of good practice examples across seven participating countries including local services, programmes and risk assessment tools used in the detection and prevention of child maltreatment in the family. Learning was applied to the development of the generic training project. A template for mapping the good practice examples was collaboratively developed by the seven participating partner countries. A descriptive data analysis was undertaken organised by an a priori analysis framework. Examples were organised into three areas: programmes tackling child abuse and neglect, local practices in assessment and referral, risk assessment tools. Key findings were identified using a thematic approach. Seventy-two good practice examples were identified and categorised according to area, subcategory and number. A typology was developed as follows: legislative frameworks, child health promotion programmes, national guidance on child maltreatment, local practice guidance, risk assessment tools, local support services, early intervention programmes, telephone or internet-based support services, COVID-19 related good practices. Improved integration of guidance into practice and professional training in child development were highlighted as overarching needs. The impact of COVID-19 on safeguarding issues was apparent. The ERICA training programme formally responded to the learning identified in this international good practice review.
      PubDate: 2022-11-15
       
  • The Development and Validation of a Child Safeguarding in Sport
           Self-assessment Tool for the Council of Europe

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      Abstract:    Abuse and interpersonal violence threaten participant safety and trust in sport. Many political and project activities have sought to promote safeguarding policies within national sporting structures. Despite this, implementation of safe sport policy measures has been lacklustre, and policy guidance is often disparate and sometimes contradictory. Against this background, the Council of Europe initiated the development of a safeguarding in sport self-assessment tool to assist national sport authorities in this crucial area. This tool addresses some of the gaps within safe sport policy guidance by summarising current good practices and offering policy guidance and legitimation. In the following Innovations article, we present our work developing the safeguarding self-assessment tool for national sport organisations in collaboration with the Council of Europe.
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
       
  • Youth Lens: Youth Perspectives on the COVID-19 Pandemic and its Impact on
           Well-being in an Urban Community

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      Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has greatly altered the lives of children and youth throughout the world, with significant implications for their long-term health and well-being. Children were largely excluded from the development and implementation of the various pandemic mitigation strategies and policies, yet their lives were significantly affected. This study sought to shed light on children’s perspectives and experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic, the various ways it impacted their health and well-being, along with the resources which allowed them to continue to flourish in the face of extreme hardship. We present a subset of findings regarding the COVID-19 pandemic from the Youth Lens study, with 65 youth (aged 10–18) from urban communities in Cleveland, OH, USA. We utilized a participatory methodology with youth, including the data collection techniques of photo voice, community mapping, group discussion, individual interviews, and journaling. This study highlights important and timely findings related to children’s well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic from the youth’s perspectives and underscores potential ways to address their challenges and concerns.
      PubDate: 2022-09-29
       
  • “I’m Glad That I Was Given a Second Chance to Live”: the Buffering
           Impact of Turning Points in the Lives of Young People with Foster Care
           Experience

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      Abstract: Young people with a history of out-of-home care placement are at risk for a host of adverse outcomes, yet many demonstrate resilience by young adulthood. One mechanism by which well-being may be achieved is through a turning point (TP). This study had two key questions: (1) What do TPs look like for care-experienced young adults' (2) Does having a TP buffer the impact of early adversity on young adult well-being' Participants (N = 166) were interviewed in pre-adolescence and again in young adulthood. Baseline measures of adversity (ACEs) and life satisfaction were associated with young adult life satisfaction. In young adulthood, participants were asked an open-ended question about having a TP and four fifths of participants stated that they had a TP. Although having a TP was unrelated to demographic factors, living situation histories, or type of maltreatment, a multiple regression predicting young adult life satisfaction found a significant interaction between having a TP and ACEs, over and above baseline control variables. In probing the interaction, there was no association between ACEs and life satisfaction for those with a TP; for those without a TP, however, there was a negative association between ACEs and life satisfaction. In conclusion, having a TP in adolescence seemed to buffer the impact of early adversity on later well-being among young adults with a history of out-of-home care. The nature of the TPs varied, but having any TP seemed to lead to maturation and realizations which may serve as protective factors while navigating the transition to adulthood.
      PubDate: 2022-09-24
       
  • Can Common Elements Support a Public Health Approach to Child
           Maltreatment'

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      Abstract: Despite ongoing reforms to child protection systems and calls for a greater focus on prevention and early intervention, demand on statutory services continues to grow across developed countries. The reasons for this are multiple and complex and include: (1) barriers that exist within service systems themselves; (2) the entrenched and interwoven nature of the drivers of child maltreatment and (3) limited access to programs that can be implemented at scale. This means that empirically supported interventions that can address child maltreatment are not widely available to support a public health response. Several innovations to address the aforementioned challenges draw on ‘common elements’ approaches. Common elements are the discrete techniques commonly found in programs supported by evidence. Over the last 30 years, the evidence base regarding therapeutic techniques for child maltreatment has remained relatively stable, yet there has been a significant increase in the number of evidence-based programs or protocols available. Many of these protocols consist of different combinations of the same therapeutic elements. The Institute of Medicine in the USA has recently called for further research into common elements for psychosocial interventions as an approach to widening access to empirically supported techniques. This article will explore whether common elements may assist in overcoming some of the challenges we are facing in ‘realising’ a public health response to child maltreatment. The potential benefits and limitations of the approach will be outlined, as well as the existing evidence base, and future directions for research and evaluation.
      PubDate: 2022-09-09
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00127-8
       
  • Using a Public Health Approach to Prevent Child Sexual Abuse by Targeting
           Those at Risk of Harming Children

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      Abstract: The evidence is clear that child sexual abuse is a public health concern internationally. Prevention of child sexual abuse requires a variety of interventions including those that stop individuals from either sexually assaulting a child or viewing sexually abusive online images. In contrast, most current approaches internationally focus on criminal justice strategies aimed at preventing reoffending rather than stopping the first offence. Additionally, and albeit there is a general paucity of relevant scholarship, there are few signs of countries adopting coherent, unified and evidence-based strategies to prevent individuals at risk of harming a child becoming actual or repeat offenders. The focus of interventions to date is largely on prevention at the tertiary end. Understanding and adopting an integrated public health approach represents an opportunity to incorporate a range of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention interventions and develop comprehensive prevention strategies at local, national, or international levels. A comprehensive approach to prevention targeted at stopping offending in the first place is required, and it needs to be able to recognise the complex nature of offending and the diversity therein. Research shows that those who harm children are diverse in their age and gender, the children they sexually abuse—intra-familial/extra-familial, prepubescent/pubescent, peer/younger children, male or female—and the type of abuse—contact, non-contact, or online. Preventing child sexual abuse is complex and requires more than an ad hoc collection of unrelated programs, if it is to succeed. This paper synthesises and integrates the disparate scholarly literature on the potential and actual perpetrators of child sexual abuse and responses to and prevention of such abuse. It recommends an increased focus on primary prevention within a comprehensive public health approach as a conceptual framework to prevent the occurrence of child sexual abuse. A systems approach is taken to develop the proposed conceptual framework.
      PubDate: 2022-09-09
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00128-7
       
  • The Implications of Leveraging Administrative Data for Public Health
           Approaches to Protecting Children: Sleepwalking into Quicksand'

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      Abstract: Critics are raising serious questions about who is “served” by statutory child protection systems if they utilize an intervention model based on reporting, investigation, and removal. Public health approaches present an innovative alternative, but how to get the right support and interventions to the right people at the right time remains challenging. The power of predictive analytics and big data is seductive, yet the risks of bolting on such tools to existing statutory services may serve only to reify or increase inequity and exclusion if they are used to target “vulnerable” children and families for interventions. The use of such new techniques within the framework of statutory child protection services may be like putting new wine into old wineskins. In keeping with a public health approach, the focus, in keeping with a public health approach, should be on the use of population-based data to deliver interventions of variable intensity, aimed at reducing the exposure of the population to risk factors for each of the forms of child abuse and neglect. The use of integrated systems of administrative data with associated sophisticated predictive analytics offers a panoptic view of the causes, complex interactions, consequences, and complications of child maltreatment and our responses to deal with it. Data linkage and predictive analytics have an important and useful role to play in public health approaches to child maltreatment and service delivery but require us to be mindful of amplifying increasing existing inequalities and not making matters worse for those we are trying to assist.
      PubDate: 2022-09-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00126-9
       
  • Using the Core Components of a Public Health Framework to Create a Child
           and Family Well-being System: Example from a National Effort, Thriving
           Families, Safer Children

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      Abstract: Thriving children require safe, stable, nurturing relationships and environments. When caregivers have the resources and support they need, at the appropriate time, and in culturally meaningful ways, they can structure environments and experiences for their children that optimize development. However, all too many caregivers and children experience trauma and adversity that consistently threaten such environments. The USA currently lacks a universal system of care and support for children and families leaving the child welfare system as the only option for many families to get help. This forces child welfare agencies to address problems and issues they are ill-equipped to address. In this paper, we review how a new national effort in the USA, Thriving Families, Safer Children is integrating the core components of a public health framework to create a child and family well-being system across the country. Case study examples are provided from 4 Thriving Families, Safer Children sites. Thriving Families, Safer Children sites are utilizing the core components of a public health framework to address social and structural determinants of health including systemic racism, with a strong focus on changing systems and contexts, through participatory methods of engaging those with lived expertise, to ensure the service context where families can get what they need, when they need it, with an emphasis on promoting race equity. Efforts to transform child welfare through the Thriving Families, Safer Children movement are aligned with the core components of a public health framework.
      PubDate: 2022-09-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00125-w
       
  • Supporting Fathers to Prevent Child Maltreatment: How Paid Family Leave
           and Child Care Subsidies Are Part of a Public Health Approach

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      Abstract: There are multiple components of a public health approach for preventing child maltreatment. One of these components is the question of who to intervene with. Fathers are an under-targeted and under-studied group for child maltreatment prevention. In this conceptual article, we describe a public health approach for intervening with fathers. Acknowledging financial stress as a key risk factor for child maltreatment among fathers, we explore two policy interventions that aim to increase economic support for families during the early years of a child’s life: paid family leave and child care subsidies. During the weeks following the child’s birth, paid family leave can promote child-father bonding and enable fathers to engage in more caregiving during a critical family transition. After paid family leave ends, child care subsidies can make child care affordable for families with low income, thereby promoting parents’ employment and earnings. We conclude by highlighting ways in which fathers can take an active role in preventing child maltreatment.
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00124-x
       
  • Barriers to Child Protection and Mental Health Service Provision for
           Trauma-Affected Youth in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

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      Abstract: In Tanzania, limited mental health service availability and structural flaws in child protection reporting and justice processes lead to significant underreporting of child victimization. A better understanding of help-seeking behaviors for trauma-affected youth and sociocultural barriers to help-seeking will inform screening, triage, and intervention design and inform policy-level child protection service processes, including linkages to health services. Participants included 30 youth (7–17 years) with trauma experiences and 15 child healthcare professionals (CHPs) with experience treating trauma-affected youth in Dar es Salaam, the most populous region in Tanzania. In-depth qualitative interviews explored (1) current help-seeking behaviors and (2) barriers to help-seeking for trauma-affected youth. Thematic analyses were conducted within an inductive qualitative approach. Four major themes emerged: (1) youth-reporting patterns of victimization and mental health needs, (2) child protection and mental health care system capacity in Dar es Salaam, (3) consequences of non-reporting, and (4) youth and CHP recommendations. Results highlight predictors of underreporting, leading to self-directed coping and increased risk of further traumatization. Multichannel interventions are needed to provide universal child rights education, promote child reporting and procedural justice, expand mental health care access and provision, and ultimately reduce traumatization in urban Tanzanian youth.
      PubDate: 2022-07-30
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00123-y
       
  • Child Maltreatment, Adverse Childhood Experiences, and the Public Health
           Approach: A Systematic Literature Review

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      Abstract: This study provides a systematic literature review of peer-reviewed research articles from 2011 to 2021 that examine child maltreatment or adverse childhood experiences from a public health perspective. Twelve articles met the inclusion criteria. The evidence was synthesized and reported following the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis procedure (PRISMA). Researchers sought to understand how current literature applies a public health approach to child maltreatment and adverse childhood experiences, as well as how that research addresses primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention of child maltreatment and adverse childhood experiences. The articles were categorized into one of the four steps of the commonly used public health model including surveillance; identification of risk and protective factors; development and testing of interventions; and implementation of effective prevention and control strategies. Two articles were also categorized outside of that model, with a focus on stakeholder engagement and collaboration. Some of the articles were categorized into multiple steps within the model. In addition, the articles encompass primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention strategies. Recommendations for policy, practice, and future research are included.
      PubDate: 2022-07-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00122-z
       
  • Fusing the Poverty-Aware Paradigm with Public Health Approaches to Protect
           Children: a Case Study of an Israeli Social Services Department

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      Abstract: This article aims to explore the potential contribution of incorporating the Poverty-Aware Paradigm for Child Protection—a critical framework for child protection policy and practice—with public health approaches to protecting children. It focuses on one Israeli social services department that embraced the Poverty-Aware Paradigm as an overarching framework for all levels of practice and specifically in the context of child protection. Based on an in-depth case study of the department’s child protection practice, the findings outline and describe the primary, secondary, and tertiary services and interventions through which the department addresses child maltreatment. These services and interventions are explored in light of Higgins and colleagues’ conceptualization of the six core components of public health approaches to preventing child maltreatment. This exploration points to the compatibly of the two frameworks and suggests three potential contributions of the Poverty-Aware Paradigm to the development of a public health approach. First, it offers a holistic and critical framework that focuses on a multidimensional analysis of child maltreatment and makes it possible to link tertiary responses to primary-level interventions. Second, it provides a firm ethical foundation rooted in a commitment to resisting social oppression and standing by parents, children, and their relationships. Third, it infuses relational concepts and practices into the policy and practice of public health approaches.
      PubDate: 2022-07-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00120-1
       
  • How Interviewers Navigate Child Abuse Disclosure After an Unproductive
           Start in Forensic Interviews

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      Abstract: Obtaining abuse disclosure from children in forensic interviews can be challenging for interviewers. The present study explored strategies interviewers used when children did not disclose abuse in response to the initial invitation to provide the interview purpose. The sample included 116 forensic interviews with 4- to 16-year-olds who ultimately disclosed abuse (85% sexual). Interviewer strategies were coded following the non-productive initial invitation until the point of children’s eventual disclosure. Four main types of strategies were found: re-phrasing the initial transition prompt, asking a follow-up question, introducing prior information, and using a minimal encourager (e.g., “Uh-huh”). Strategies were coded as high- or low-quality. Consistent with predictions, 85% of children’s disclosures followed high-quality strategies. In a cycle of effective communication, such interviewer strategies predicted informative child responses, which then led to subsequent high-quality interviewer strategies. Both interviewers and children demonstrated consistency in their question and response patterns, respectively. Coupled with additional exploratory sequential analyses of interviewer-child reciprocal communication and the prior research literature, the present data suggest practical ways that interviewers can break ineffective cycles of communication in the process of obtaining child abuse disclosures.
      PubDate: 2022-07-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00121-0
       
  • A Novel Strategy for Increasing Utilization of Earned Income Tax Credits
           and Reducing Adverse Childhood Experiences: The EITC Access Project

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      Abstract: EITC has positive impacts, including reduced mental health problems and stress, on parents and caregivers. These impacts also affect children. Notably, EITC is associated with decreased child maltreatment (Berger et al. Review of Economics of the Household, 15(4), 1345–1372, 2017; Biehl & Hill, 2018; Klevens et al. Public Health Reports (1974), 132(4), 505–511, 2017; Rostad et al. Child Maltreatment, 25(4), 393–397, 2020). In addition, in a study of financial literacy among IPV survivors, it was found that knowledge of EITC was limited (Postmus, 2011). Unfortunately, one in five families eligible for EITC does not receive it (Internal Revenue Service, 2019). The EITC Access Project involves a two-level strategy across 43 counties in the State of Michigan. Level 1 is a public health strategy, which includes culturally appropriate flyers and informational materials regarding EITC. Level 2 includes the community-education strategy but also includes one-on-one concentrated benefits advocacy. The benefits advocacy is layered into existing Parents As Teachers home visiting programs and involves motivational interviewing techniques, EITC information, and financial empowerment activities. Outcomes are expected to influence the provision of community education surrounding public benefits and the practice of home visiting. This manuscript describes the goals, objectives, and evaluation plan of the EITC Access Project.
      PubDate: 2022-06-30
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00119-8
       
  • Harsh Physical Discipline: Prevalence and Associated Factors Among Primary
           Caregivers of Pre-school Children in Ethiopia

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      Abstract: Harsh parental discipline is ineffective and potentially harmful to children, yet it is still common, particularly in many African countries. Culturally responsive education programs are needed to shift parenting practices in African countries, but there is limited baseline research to inform such efforts. This study’s objectives were to establish the baseline prevalence of harsh physical discipline practices among primary caregivers of pre-school children in Ethiopia and to identify associated factors to inform intervention efforts. The well-established Parent–Child Conflict Tactics Scale section on physical assault was translated and administered to primary caregivers of 1139 pre-school children aged 4–6 years sampled from four regions of Ethiopia. Trained interviewers also collected basic socio-demographic data. Based on caregiver report, 52.5% (n = 598) of the children had experienced harsh physical discipline and an additional 12.7% (n = 145) experienced moderate physical discipline in their lifetimes. After controlling for covariates, the factors significantly related to increased likelihood of harsh discipline were geographic region, female caregivers, lack of employment, at least moderate perceived social status, and non-Muslim religion. These data establish a baseline from which to evaluate the impact of future educational interventions designed to shift practices. Information about the correlates can be used to tailor such intervention efforts toward those most likely to use harsh discipline practices.
      PubDate: 2022-06-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00118-9
       
  • Correction to: Adolescent Mother Maltreatment Perpetrators’ Past
           Experiences with Child Protective Services

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      PubDate: 2022-06-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00117-w
       
  • Steven Walker: Children Forsaken: Child Abuse from Ancient to Modern Times

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      PubDate: 2022-05-30
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00116-x
       
 
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