A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  First | 1 2        [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 201 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Sociedade e Estado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Soziale Passagen     Hybrid Journal  
Tempo Social     Open Access  
The Milbank Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Third Sector Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Third World Planning Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Tidsskrift for omsorgsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for velferdsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskriftet Norges Barnevern     Full-text available via subscription  
Trabajo Social Global - Global Social Work     Open Access  
unsere jugend     Full-text available via subscription  
Violence and Victims     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Voces desde el Trabajo Social     Open Access  
Volunteer Management Report     Full-text available via subscription  
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

  First | 1 2        [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2524-5236 - ISSN (Online) 2524-5244
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Experiences of Children During the Pandemic: Scrutinizing Increased
           Vulnerabilities in Education in the Case of Turkey

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The lengthy time of school closure was one defining factor in understanding child well-being during the pandemic in a context where school as a relational space holds great importance for children, particularly those from a low socioeconomic background. Considering this significant aspect of lengthy school closure during the pandemic in Turkey, this article explores children’s experiences concerning their day-to-day access to education, digital inequalities, housing conditions, and changing context of relations with peers and teachers. The article also explores the meaning that children attribute to school as a relational space where they shape their intergenerational and generational relations. The absence of the school in children’s lives for almost 2 years has been a major source of longing for such significant childhood space. Following our earlier work on the children’s negotiation of well-being within the boundaries of the relational spaces of home and school, this article looks into how children negotiate their well-being in a pandemic environment where school as a relational space has changed its meaning and where children’s caretakers’ (teachers, parents, and other) vulnerabilities have also increased. The analysis draws on the qualitative fieldwork carried out with 50 children during the summer of 2020 in Turkey. We aim to reflect on the experiences from children’s perspectives within the boundaries of the constraints that the pandemic has generated. This article also discusses how COVID-19 has widened the gap and increased vulnerabilities among the already disadvantaged groups and gender in terms of available resources and their allocation as it is reflected in time use that portrays the meaning that children attribute to their own experience during the pandemic.
      PubDate: 2023-01-27
       
  • Disruption, Slowness, and Collective Effervescence: Children’s
           Perspectives on COVID-19 Lockdowns

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The COVID-19 pandemic represented not only a health crisis, but a social crisis for children, one that has disrupted notions of what a good childhood is. However, the longer-term implications of the pandemic are still to be seen, for children, their families and communities. This article is concerned with what these ongoing changes may be, based on a qualitative multi-stage study that asks children about their experiences of well-being before the pandemic, during lockdowns and post-COVID-19 lockdowns. This included asking seven children in online semi-structured interviews about what aspects of life brought on by COVID-19 restrictions they would like to see continue post-lockdown. We outline some of our findings. We describe new rituals and ways of organising time developed by children, facilitated by the use of digital technologies. We describe these new ways of managing time as task-based rather than rule-based, with children experiencing slowness of and greater control over their time. We found that lockdowns provided a possibility for children to assert a public agency through banal acts of sociability, for example, by conforming to public health measures such as mask-wearing and hand-washing. Whilst small acts, children discussed these in terms of being moral agents (protecting the safety of others) and as part of a larger civic attitude they observed around them. Thus, their acts can be seen as expressions of larger forms of social solidarity that contributed to a sense of collective effervescence.
      PubDate: 2023-01-16
       
  • Lessons for Child Protection Moving Forward: How to Keep From Rearranging
           the Deck Chairs on the Titanic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The Gary B. Melton Visiting Professorship was created to honor and celebrate the legacy of Dr. Melton and to encourage scholars and advocates to continue to build on his impressive body of interdisciplinary work on children’s rights, global approach to child health and well-being, and social frameworks of family and community. A collaboration of the Haruv Institute and the Kempe Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect at the University of Colorado, the Melton Lecture was designed to be interdisciplinary, with the inaugural professorship and lecture given by a pediatrician and an anthropologist. This set of award recipients encompassed Gary Melton’s concerns from the individual and family to the larger context of culture and community. In this inaugural Melton Lecture, we take as our starting point Gary Melton’s quote, “Child abuse is wrong….” On this, we all can agree. Agreement lessens in response to the second part of the quote, “…the nation’s lack of an effective response to it is also wrong….” Indeed, the field continues to grapple with long-standing issues on how to ensure an effective response to child abuse. We use this lecture to consider how to move toward an effective response without simply rearranging the deck chairs on a sinking ship.
      PubDate: 2023-01-13
       
  • Visibility and Well-Being in School Environments: Children’s Reflections
           on the “New Normal” of Teaching and Learning during the Covid-19
           Pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract  This paper aims to contribute to the theory on school-related well-being by applying a qualitative approach that focuses on children’s experiences during the Covid-19 pandemic and conceptualizes them as an epistemic opportunity to reconstruct aspects of school-related well-being from children’s perspectives. Within the framework of the multinational qualitative study Children’s Understandings of Well-being (CUWB), it conceptualizes well-being as a cultural construct and argues for including children’s voices in the process of knowledge production. By drawing on statements from online interviews with 11- to 14-year-old children from Berlin, Germany in spring 2021 during school lockdown and by using a discourse analytical approach, the paper outlines the findings on visibility as a central feature of well-being in school environments that children make relevant for experiences of agency, security, and self. Visibility in school is constructed as a medium of control that subjects their bodies to norms of the school, exposes the individual to the gaze of others, and provides security in the context of the digital sphere and its temptations. The paper argues to systematically include these reflections and assessments of new digital learning arrangements during the Covid-19 pandemic into theoretical concepts on school-related well-being.
      PubDate: 2023-01-12
       
  • Observations on a Half Century of Research at the Kempe Center

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2023-01-12
       
  • Developing an Ecological Model of Turnover Intent: Associations Among
           Child Welfare Caseworkers’ Characteristics, Lived Experience,
           Professional Attitudes, Agency Culture, and Proclivity to Leave

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Almost a quarter of the child welfare workforce leaves their job each year, and despite clarion calls over the decades, our insights into dynamics underlying turnover remain limited. Using survey data from 276 caseworkers in a midwestern state, this analysis explores an array of personality, stress, attitudinal, and perception measures and their association with three measures of turnover intent: thinking about quitting, intending to search, and intent to leave. Findings indicate that controlling for demographic factors, burnout, and confidence in decision support from agency leadership had consistent and strong associations with all three outcomes (positive for burnout; negative for decision support). In contrast, associations between conscientiousness, open-mindedness, secondary traumatic stress, and attitudes favoring family preservation over child safety varied in their significance, orientation, and strength depending on the outcome in question. Given that the most powerful and consistent predictors of turnover intentions are potentially malleable, these findings indicate that these are two important areas for agencies to consider developing interventions. Moreover, despite the commonalities, the finding that the three outcomes examined were associated with different predictors, suggests they may be distinguishing phases of contemplation and action along a pre-turnover continuum. Future research will explore the relative predictive validity of these scales.
      PubDate: 2023-01-11
       
  • Working Towards Prevention for Families At-Risk of Child
           Maltreatment—Meeting Families’ Needs through Community Response in
           Colorado

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract In the USA, there is a growing emphasis in child protective services (CPS) on prevention for families deemed at-risk of child maltreatment. The Colorado Community Response (CCR) program is one such effort in Colorado to support families to prevent future involvement with CPS. The CCR program is designed to meet family needs, with an explicit focus on economic self-sufficiency and stability. The pilot CCR program was implemented from 2014 through 2017 and evaluated to determine the effectiveness of CCR in preventing child welfare reinvolvement for participating families. By utilizing a pre-post design, it was found that for participating families, the short-term outcomes of protective factors and family functioning across 13 domains were enhanced. Using a matched comparison group, quasi-experimental design and long-term measures of child welfare re-involvement were found to be similarly impacted such that likelihood of subsequently founded assessments and out-of-home placements was significantly less for families who completed CCR services than their matched comparison counterparts. This study adds to a body of evidence that suggests programs and services that provide concrete and economic supports for families can be effective in preventing child welfare (re)involvement.
      PubDate: 2023-01-05
       
  • It Is Time to Focus on Prevention: a Scoping Review of Practices
           Associated with Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse and Australian Policy
           Implications

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a significant public health problem, impacting individuals, families and communities across the lifespan. This systematic scoping review aimed to identify practices associated with the prevention of CSA before it happens using the PRISMA method (Moher et al., 2009). Nine databases were searched for empirical literature, resulting in a sample of 47 articles addressing the prevention of child sexual abuse. A definition of CSA prevention and research questions were developed in consultation with subject matter experts to provide a conceptual guide for analysing available empirical and theoretical literature published between 2012 and 2022. Studies were excluded that reported on CSA education. Included articles were analysed to identify common elements of prevention approaches and the policy conditions enabling and constraining prevention. Three approaches were identified: (i) engaging and stopping those at risk of using sexually harmful behaviour; (ii) situational prevention in child- and youth-serving organisations; (iii) preventing the emergence of CSA by promoting healthy families and communities. The article also discusses policy settings that enable and constrain CSA prevention in Australia and identifies gaps in existing research.
      PubDate: 2022-12-22
       
  • The Added Value of Targeting Specific Risk Factors for Child Maltreatment
           in an Evidence-Based Home Visitation Program: a Repeated Single-Case Time
           Series Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The effects of home visiting programs to reduce child maltreatment are generally limited and warrant improvement. The present study, therefore, examined whether the effectiveness of a home visitation program in the Netherlands can be improved by adding specific intervention components targeting important risk factors for child maltreatment, namely parental stress, parental anger, and PTSD symptoms. Using a single-case experimental design, nine mothers were assessed weekly during 36 weeks of the Dutch home visiting program VoorZorg, comparing baseline, treatment (i.e., phase with added intervention components), and follow-up. Outcome effects were examined using statistical analyses on a group level and combining statistical and visual analyses on a case level for primary outcomes: perceived stress, parental anger, and PTSD symptoms, and secondary outcomes: risk of child maltreatment and parental sense of competence. As a group, mothers showed a reduction of anger in response to the additional components. No group effects were found for other outcomes. At an individual level, three mothers showed only positive effects, four mothers showed no intervention effects, and two mothers showed mixed effects (i.e., positive on some outcomes and negative on other). Consequently, the component targeting parental anger seems promising, because it can easily be implemented, but it is important to prevent any possible detrimental effects. Effects of the component targeting stress depended on the use of relaxation exercises, and therefore this component should be expanded in such a way that it is more feasible for mothers to implement it.
      PubDate: 2022-12-20
       
  • It’s Complicated: A Longitudinal Exploration of Young People’s
           Perceptions of Out-of-Home Care and Their Reflections on How to Change the
           Child Welfare System

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Few studies have systematically asked youth about their perceptions of placement in out-of-home care (OOHC), and no known longitudinal studies have explored how their perspectives change over time. In this mixed methods study, over 200 preadolescent children recently placed into OOHC were asked questions about the difficulty and helpfulness of placement and how their lives might be different had they not been removed. Participants were then asked these same questions when interviewed 10 years later as well as how they would change the child welfare system. At both ages, over 80% of participants reported that it was somewhat or very helpful to have been placed in OOHC. Although fewer young adults than pre-teens felt that their lives would have been better if they had never been removed from their homes, more young adults reported that it was very difficult to have been placed in OOHC. Many participants reported that they did not get enough information from their caseworkers and almost never had enough say about what happened to them while in OOHC. Demographic and psychosocial characteristics measured in both preadolescence and young adulthood were largely unrelated to ratings of placement in OOHC. Participant responses to the question about how they would change the child welfare system varied from “nothing” to impassioned responses about the need for change (e.g., better oversight, giving birth parents more time before removal, keeping siblings together). Data suggest, overwhelmingly, that the experiences of youth are nuanced and complicated, and they highlight the importance of youth voice in child welfare decision-making.
      PubDate: 2022-12-16
       
  • Primary Care and Behavioral Health Services Use Differ Among
           Medicaid-Enrolled Children by Initial Foster Care Entry Status

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Most children in foster care have poor health outcomes and high health care utilization. Health complexity influences health care utilization as well foster care placement. Health care utilization studies among children in foster care have not accounted for health complexity status and foster placement. A 7-year retrospective study linked Colorado child welfare and Medicaid administrative data for 30,164 Medicaid-enrolled children, up to 23 years old, who differed by initial foster care entry, to examine primary care and behavioral health (BH) utilization patterns from 2014 to 2021. Children entering care were matched with replacement to non-foster peers by age, sex, Medicaid enrollment patterns, managed care status, family income, and health complexity. We calculated weighted monthly average percentages of children with primary care and BH utilization by foster care entry, health complexity, sex, and age over 25 months relative to the month of foster care entry for the foster cohort or the reference month for non-foster peers. Children in the foster cohort had lower primary care but higher BH utilization relative to non-foster peers prior to the reference month. Primary care and BH use increased among children in foster care during and 12 months after the reference month, unlike matched comparisons. Primary care and BH utilization increased by health complexity but differed by foster care status and time. Foster care entry and health complexity produced distinct patterns of primary care and BH utilization. Given higher utilization among children in foster care, future investigation should explore health care quality and delivery factors.
      PubDate: 2022-12-14
       
  • Changing Physical Punishment Attitudes Using the Alternative Biblical
           Interpretation Intervention (ABII) Among First-generation Korean
           Protestants

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Empirical research suggests that physical punishment of children is ineffective and potentially harmful. However, in the USA, unlike most other Western democracies, physical punishment remains normative. This pattern is especially prominent among conservative Christians. Likewise, among Christian Korean immigrants, physical punishment is normative. The current study examined an intervention to change pro-spanking attitudes among a sample of 60 Korean adults (57% female; 43% male; Mage = 32.35) attending a theologically conservative Protestant church. Participants completed the attitudes toward spanking (ATS) scale and two measures of religious fundamentalism 4 weeks before the intervention. The intervention, which was created by the authors, focused on empirical research demonstrating the ineffectiveness and potential harm associated with spanking, along with progressive theological interpretations of Biblical teachings related to child discipline and spanking. Following the intervention, participants completed the ATS a second time. We hypothesized that the intervention would result in significant attitude change from pre- to post-intervention for both parents (n = 23) and non-parents (n = 37). Repeated measures ANOVA for ATS scores indicated a significant main effect for time (Mpre = 39.64, Mpost = 29.32), indicating that ATS scores decreased over time for both parents and non-parents. Time × parent status interaction was observed. Our findings indicated that positive attitudes toward physical punishment did indeed decline post-intervention, providing further evidence that pro-corporal punishment attitudes among conservative Christians are malleable when Christians are presented with progressive interpretations of Biblical scriptures sometimes used to justify corporal punishment, along with evidence on the ineffectiveness and potential harm of physical punishment (Miller-Perrin & Perrin, hild Abuse & Neglect, 71, 69–79, 2017; Perrin, Miller-Perrin, & Song, Child Abuse & Neglect, 71, 69–79, 2017).
      PubDate: 2022-12-08
       
  • The COVID-19 Pandemic and Quality of Life: Experiences Contributing to and
           Harming the Well-Being of Canadian Children and Adolescents

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The pandemic’s restrictive measures such as lockdowns, social distancing, and the wearing of masks transformed young people’s daily lives and brought up major concerns regarding children’s and adolescents’ well-being. This longitudinal mixed study aims to identify how different experiences contributed to children’s and adolescents’ well-being through different stages of the pandemic. The sample comprises 149 Canadian youth from Quebec who shared their experiences of the COVID-19 pandemic. Children and adolescents were met virtually for semi-directed interviews about their well-being at three measurement time (T1: May 2020 lockdown, T2: July 2020 progressive reopening, and T3: beginning of the second wave). At T3, they also completed a questionnaire measuring their quality of life. Our findings indicated that 22% reported a low level of well-being (N: 32), 66% a normal level of well-being (N: 90), and 18% a high level of well-being (N: 27). The comparative thematic analysis of the discourse of these three groups allows us to identify experiences that are favorable and unfavorable to the well-being of young people and to distinguish two configurations of interactions between children and their environment over the first year of the pandemic, namely that of young people who report a high level of well-being and that of those who report a worrying level of well-being. Results highlight the importance of activities, relationships, support, and representations of children and adolescents for their well-being in the pandemic context. Interventions and social measures to better support their well-being are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-12-07
       
  • A Novel Strategy for Increasing Utilization of Earned Income Tax Credits
           and Reducing Adverse Childhood Experiences: The EITC Access Project

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract EITC has positive impacts, including reduced mental health problems and stress, on parents and caregivers. These impacts also affect children. Notably, EITC is associated with decreased child maltreatment (Berger et al. Review of Economics of the Household, 15(4), 1345–1372, 2017; Biehl & Hill, 2018; Klevens et al. Public Health Reports (1974), 132(4), 505–511, 2017; Rostad et al. Child Maltreatment, 25(4), 393–397, 2020). In addition, in a study of financial literacy among IPV survivors, it was found that knowledge of EITC was limited (Postmus, 2011). Unfortunately, one in five families eligible for EITC does not receive it (Internal Revenue Service, 2019). The EITC Access Project involves a two-level strategy across 43 counties in the State of Michigan. Level 1 is a public health strategy, which includes culturally appropriate flyers and informational materials regarding EITC. Level 2 includes the community-education strategy but also includes one-on-one concentrated benefits advocacy. The benefits advocacy is layered into existing Parents As Teachers home visiting programs and involves motivational interviewing techniques, EITC information, and financial empowerment activities. Outcomes are expected to influence the provision of community education surrounding public benefits and the practice of home visiting. This manuscript describes the goals, objectives, and evaluation plan of the EITC Access Project.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Preface to the Special Issue on Public Health Approaches to
           Prevent Child Maltreatment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2022-11-30
       
  • Can Common Elements Support a Public Health Approach to Child
           Maltreatment'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Despite ongoing reforms to child protection systems and calls for a greater focus on prevention and early intervention, demand on statutory services continues to grow across developed countries. The reasons for this are multiple and complex and include: (1) barriers that exist within service systems themselves; (2) the entrenched and interwoven nature of the drivers of child maltreatment and (3) limited access to programs that can be implemented at scale. This means that empirically supported interventions that can address child maltreatment are not widely available to support a public health response. Several innovations to address the aforementioned challenges draw on ‘common elements’ approaches. Common elements are the discrete techniques commonly found in programs supported by evidence. Over the last 30 years, the evidence base regarding therapeutic techniques for child maltreatment has remained relatively stable, yet there has been a significant increase in the number of evidence-based programs or protocols available. Many of these protocols consist of different combinations of the same therapeutic elements. The Institute of Medicine in the USA has recently called for further research into common elements for psychosocial interventions as an approach to widening access to empirically supported techniques. This article will explore whether common elements may assist in overcoming some of the challenges we are facing in ‘realising’ a public health response to child maltreatment. The potential benefits and limitations of the approach will be outlined, as well as the existing evidence base, and future directions for research and evaluation.
      PubDate: 2022-09-09
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00127-8
       
  • The Implications of Leveraging Administrative Data for Public Health
           Approaches to Protecting Children: Sleepwalking into Quicksand'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Critics are raising serious questions about who is “served” by statutory child protection systems if they utilize an intervention model based on reporting, investigation, and removal. Public health approaches present an innovative alternative, but how to get the right support and interventions to the right people at the right time remains challenging. The power of predictive analytics and big data is seductive, yet the risks of bolting on such tools to existing statutory services may serve only to reify or increase inequity and exclusion if they are used to target “vulnerable” children and families for interventions. The use of such new techniques within the framework of statutory child protection services may be like putting new wine into old wineskins. In keeping with a public health approach, the focus, in keeping with a public health approach, should be on the use of population-based data to deliver interventions of variable intensity, aimed at reducing the exposure of the population to risk factors for each of the forms of child abuse and neglect. The use of integrated systems of administrative data with associated sophisticated predictive analytics offers a panoptic view of the causes, complex interactions, consequences, and complications of child maltreatment and our responses to deal with it. Data linkage and predictive analytics have an important and useful role to play in public health approaches to child maltreatment and service delivery but require us to be mindful of amplifying increasing existing inequalities and not making matters worse for those we are trying to assist.
      PubDate: 2022-09-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00126-9
       
  • Supporting Fathers to Prevent Child Maltreatment: How Paid Family Leave
           and Child Care Subsidies Are Part of a Public Health Approach

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract There are multiple components of a public health approach for preventing child maltreatment. One of these components is the question of who to intervene with. Fathers are an under-targeted and under-studied group for child maltreatment prevention. In this conceptual article, we describe a public health approach for intervening with fathers. Acknowledging financial stress as a key risk factor for child maltreatment among fathers, we explore two policy interventions that aim to increase economic support for families during the early years of a child’s life: paid family leave and child care subsidies. During the weeks following the child’s birth, paid family leave can promote child-father bonding and enable fathers to engage in more caregiving during a critical family transition. After paid family leave ends, child care subsidies can make child care affordable for families with low income, thereby promoting parents’ employment and earnings. We conclude by highlighting ways in which fathers can take an active role in preventing child maltreatment.
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00124-x
       
  • Child Maltreatment, Adverse Childhood Experiences, and the Public Health
           Approach: A Systematic Literature Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract This study provides a systematic literature review of peer-reviewed research articles from 2011 to 2021 that examine child maltreatment or adverse childhood experiences from a public health perspective. Twelve articles met the inclusion criteria. The evidence was synthesized and reported following the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis procedure (PRISMA). Researchers sought to understand how current literature applies a public health approach to child maltreatment and adverse childhood experiences, as well as how that research addresses primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention of child maltreatment and adverse childhood experiences. The articles were categorized into one of the four steps of the commonly used public health model including surveillance; identification of risk and protective factors; development and testing of interventions; and implementation of effective prevention and control strategies. Two articles were also categorized outside of that model, with a focus on stakeholder engagement and collaboration. Some of the articles were categorized into multiple steps within the model. In addition, the articles encompass primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention strategies. Recommendations for policy, practice, and future research are included.
      PubDate: 2022-07-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00122-z
       
  • Fusing the Poverty-Aware Paradigm with Public Health Approaches to Protect
           Children: a Case Study of an Israeli Social Services Department

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract This article aims to explore the potential contribution of incorporating the Poverty-Aware Paradigm for Child Protection—a critical framework for child protection policy and practice—with public health approaches to protecting children. It focuses on one Israeli social services department that embraced the Poverty-Aware Paradigm as an overarching framework for all levels of practice and specifically in the context of child protection. Based on an in-depth case study of the department’s child protection practice, the findings outline and describe the primary, secondary, and tertiary services and interventions through which the department addresses child maltreatment. These services and interventions are explored in light of Higgins and colleagues’ conceptualization of the six core components of public health approaches to preventing child maltreatment. This exploration points to the compatibly of the two frameworks and suggests three potential contributions of the Poverty-Aware Paradigm to the development of a public health approach. First, it offers a holistic and critical framework that focuses on a multidimensional analysis of child maltreatment and makes it possible to link tertiary responses to primary-level interventions. Second, it provides a firm ethical foundation rooted in a commitment to resisting social oppression and standing by parents, children, and their relationships. Third, it infuses relational concepts and practices into the policy and practice of public health approaches.
      PubDate: 2022-07-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00120-1
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.236.80.119
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-