A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  First | 1 2        [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 201 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Sociedade e Estado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Soziale Passagen     Hybrid Journal  
Tempo Social     Open Access  
The Milbank Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Third Sector Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Third World Planning Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Tidsskrift for omsorgsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for velferdsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskriftet Norges Barnevern     Full-text available via subscription  
Trabajo Social Global - Global Social Work     Open Access  
unsere jugend     Full-text available via subscription  
Violence and Victims     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Voces desde el Trabajo Social     Open Access  
Volunteer Management Report     Full-text available via subscription  
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

  First | 1 2        [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2524-5236 - ISSN (Online) 2524-5244
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Can Common Elements Support a Public Health Approach to Child
           Maltreatment'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Despite ongoing reforms to child protection systems and calls for a greater focus on prevention and early intervention, demand on statutory services continues to grow across developed countries. The reasons for this are multiple and complex and include: (1) barriers that exist within service systems themselves; (2) the entrenched and interwoven nature of the drivers of child maltreatment and (3) limited access to programs that can be implemented at scale. This means that empirically supported interventions that can address child maltreatment are not widely available to support a public health response. Several innovations to address the aforementioned challenges draw on ‘common elements’ approaches. Common elements are the discrete techniques commonly found in programs supported by evidence. Over the last 30 years, the evidence base regarding therapeutic techniques for child maltreatment has remained relatively stable, yet there has been a significant increase in the number of evidence-based programs or protocols available. Many of these protocols consist of different combinations of the same therapeutic elements. The Institute of Medicine in the USA has recently called for further research into common elements for psychosocial interventions as an approach to widening access to empirically supported techniques. This article will explore whether common elements may assist in overcoming some of the challenges we are facing in ‘realising’ a public health response to child maltreatment. The potential benefits and limitations of the approach will be outlined, as well as the existing evidence base, and future directions for research and evaluation.
      PubDate: 2022-09-09
       
  • Using a Public Health Approach to Prevent Child Sexual Abuse by Targeting
           Those at Risk of Harming Children

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The evidence is clear that child sexual abuse is a public health concern internationally. Prevention of child sexual abuse requires a variety of interventions including those that stop individuals from either sexually assaulting a child or viewing sexually abusive online images. In contrast, most current approaches internationally focus on criminal justice strategies aimed at preventing reoffending rather than stopping the first offence. Additionally, and albeit there is a general paucity of relevant scholarship, there are few signs of countries adopting coherent, unified and evidence-based strategies to prevent individuals at risk of harming a child becoming actual or repeat offenders. The focus of interventions to date is largely on prevention at the tertiary end. Understanding and adopting an integrated public health approach represents an opportunity to incorporate a range of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention interventions and develop comprehensive prevention strategies at local, national, or international levels. A comprehensive approach to prevention targeted at stopping offending in the first place is required, and it needs to be able to recognise the complex nature of offending and the diversity therein. Research shows that those who harm children are diverse in their age and gender, the children they sexually abuse—intra-familial/extra-familial, prepubescent/pubescent, peer/younger children, male or female—and the type of abuse—contact, non-contact, or online. Preventing child sexual abuse is complex and requires more than an ad hoc collection of unrelated programs, if it is to succeed. This paper synthesises and integrates the disparate scholarly literature on the potential and actual perpetrators of child sexual abuse and responses to and prevention of such abuse. It recommends an increased focus on primary prevention within a comprehensive public health approach as a conceptual framework to prevent the occurrence of child sexual abuse. A systems approach is taken to develop the proposed conceptual framework.
      PubDate: 2022-09-09
       
  • The Implications of Leveraging Administrative Data for Public Health
           Approaches to Protecting Children: Sleepwalking into Quicksand'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Critics are raising serious questions about who is “served” by statutory child protection systems if they utilize an intervention model based on reporting, investigation, and removal. Public health approaches present an innovative alternative, but how to get the right support and interventions to the right people at the right time remains challenging. The power of predictive analytics and big data is seductive, yet the risks of bolting on such tools to existing statutory services may serve only to reify or increase inequity and exclusion if they are used to target “vulnerable” children and families for interventions. The use of such new techniques within the framework of statutory child protection services may be like putting new wine into old wineskins. In keeping with a public health approach, the focus, in keeping with a public health approach, should be on the use of population-based data to deliver interventions of variable intensity, aimed at reducing the exposure of the population to risk factors for each of the forms of child abuse and neglect. The use of integrated systems of administrative data with associated sophisticated predictive analytics offers a panoptic view of the causes, complex interactions, consequences, and complications of child maltreatment and our responses to deal with it. Data linkage and predictive analytics have an important and useful role to play in public health approaches to child maltreatment and service delivery but require us to be mindful of amplifying increasing existing inequalities and not making matters worse for those we are trying to assist.
      PubDate: 2022-09-06
       
  • Using the Core Components of a Public Health Framework to Create a Child
           and Family Well-being System: Example from a National Effort, Thriving
           Families, Safer Children

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Thriving children require safe, stable, nurturing relationships and environments. When caregivers have the resources and support they need, at the appropriate time, and in culturally meaningful ways, they can structure environments and experiences for their children that optimize development. However, all too many caregivers and children experience trauma and adversity that consistently threaten such environments. The USA currently lacks a universal system of care and support for children and families leaving the child welfare system as the only option for many families to get help. This forces child welfare agencies to address problems and issues they are ill-equipped to address. In this paper, we review how a new national effort in the USA, Thriving Families, Safer Children is integrating the core components of a public health framework to create a child and family well-being system across the country. Case study examples are provided from 4 Thriving Families, Safer Children sites. Thriving Families, Safer Children sites are utilizing the core components of a public health framework to address social and structural determinants of health including systemic racism, with a strong focus on changing systems and contexts, through participatory methods of engaging those with lived expertise, to ensure the service context where families can get what they need, when they need it, with an emphasis on promoting race equity. Efforts to transform child welfare through the Thriving Families, Safer Children movement are aligned with the core components of a public health framework.
      PubDate: 2022-09-02
       
  • Supporting Fathers to Prevent Child Maltreatment: How Paid Family Leave
           and Child Care Subsidies Are Part of a Public Health Approach

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract There are multiple components of a public health approach for preventing child maltreatment. One of these components is the question of who to intervene with. Fathers are an under-targeted and under-studied group for child maltreatment prevention. In this conceptual article, we describe a public health approach for intervening with fathers. Acknowledging financial stress as a key risk factor for child maltreatment among fathers, we explore two policy interventions that aim to increase economic support for families during the early years of a child’s life: paid family leave and child care subsidies. During the weeks following the child’s birth, paid family leave can promote child-father bonding and enable fathers to engage in more caregiving during a critical family transition. After paid family leave ends, child care subsidies can make child care affordable for families with low income, thereby promoting parents’ employment and earnings. We conclude by highlighting ways in which fathers can take an active role in preventing child maltreatment.
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
       
  • Barriers to Child Protection and Mental Health Service Provision for
           Trauma-Affected Youth in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract In Tanzania, limited mental health service availability and structural flaws in child protection reporting and justice processes lead to significant underreporting of child victimization. A better understanding of help-seeking behaviors for trauma-affected youth and sociocultural barriers to help-seeking will inform screening, triage, and intervention design and inform policy-level child protection service processes, including linkages to health services. Participants included 30 youth (7–17 years) with trauma experiences and 15 child healthcare professionals (CHPs) with experience treating trauma-affected youth in Dar es Salaam, the most populous region in Tanzania. In-depth qualitative interviews explored (1) current help-seeking behaviors and (2) barriers to help-seeking for trauma-affected youth. Thematic analyses were conducted within an inductive qualitative approach. Four major themes emerged: (1) youth-reporting patterns of victimization and mental health needs, (2) child protection and mental health care system capacity in Dar es Salaam, (3) consequences of non-reporting, and (4) youth and CHP recommendations. Results highlight predictors of underreporting, leading to self-directed coping and increased risk of further traumatization. Multichannel interventions are needed to provide universal child rights education, promote child reporting and procedural justice, expand mental health care access and provision, and ultimately reduce traumatization in urban Tanzanian youth.
      PubDate: 2022-07-30
       
  • Child Maltreatment, Adverse Childhood Experiences, and the Public Health
           Approach: A Systematic Literature Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract This study provides a systematic literature review of peer-reviewed research articles from 2011 to 2021 that examine child maltreatment or adverse childhood experiences from a public health perspective. Twelve articles met the inclusion criteria. The evidence was synthesized and reported following the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis procedure (PRISMA). Researchers sought to understand how current literature applies a public health approach to child maltreatment and adverse childhood experiences, as well as how that research addresses primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention of child maltreatment and adverse childhood experiences. The articles were categorized into one of the four steps of the commonly used public health model including surveillance; identification of risk and protective factors; development and testing of interventions; and implementation of effective prevention and control strategies. Two articles were also categorized outside of that model, with a focus on stakeholder engagement and collaboration. Some of the articles were categorized into multiple steps within the model. In addition, the articles encompass primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention strategies. Recommendations for policy, practice, and future research are included.
      PubDate: 2022-07-25
       
  • Fusing the Poverty-Aware Paradigm with Public Health Approaches to Protect
           Children: a Case Study of an Israeli Social Services Department

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract This article aims to explore the potential contribution of incorporating the Poverty-Aware Paradigm for Child Protection—a critical framework for child protection policy and practice—with public health approaches to protecting children. It focuses on one Israeli social services department that embraced the Poverty-Aware Paradigm as an overarching framework for all levels of practice and specifically in the context of child protection. Based on an in-depth case study of the department’s child protection practice, the findings outline and describe the primary, secondary, and tertiary services and interventions through which the department addresses child maltreatment. These services and interventions are explored in light of Higgins and colleagues’ conceptualization of the six core components of public health approaches to preventing child maltreatment. This exploration points to the compatibly of the two frameworks and suggests three potential contributions of the Poverty-Aware Paradigm to the development of a public health approach. First, it offers a holistic and critical framework that focuses on a multidimensional analysis of child maltreatment and makes it possible to link tertiary responses to primary-level interventions. Second, it provides a firm ethical foundation rooted in a commitment to resisting social oppression and standing by parents, children, and their relationships. Third, it infuses relational concepts and practices into the policy and practice of public health approaches.
      PubDate: 2022-07-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00120-1
       
  • How Interviewers Navigate Child Abuse Disclosure After an Unproductive
           Start in Forensic Interviews

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Obtaining abuse disclosure from children in forensic interviews can be challenging for interviewers. The present study explored strategies interviewers used when children did not disclose abuse in response to the initial invitation to provide the interview purpose. The sample included 116 forensic interviews with 4- to 16-year-olds who ultimately disclosed abuse (85% sexual). Interviewer strategies were coded following the non-productive initial invitation until the point of children’s eventual disclosure. Four main types of strategies were found: re-phrasing the initial transition prompt, asking a follow-up question, introducing prior information, and using a minimal encourager (e.g., “Uh-huh”). Strategies were coded as high- or low-quality. Consistent with predictions, 85% of children’s disclosures followed high-quality strategies. In a cycle of effective communication, such interviewer strategies predicted informative child responses, which then led to subsequent high-quality interviewer strategies. Both interviewers and children demonstrated consistency in their question and response patterns, respectively. Coupled with additional exploratory sequential analyses of interviewer-child reciprocal communication and the prior research literature, the present data suggest practical ways that interviewers can break ineffective cycles of communication in the process of obtaining child abuse disclosures.
      PubDate: 2022-07-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00121-0
       
  • A Novel Strategy for Increasing Utilization of Earned Income Tax Credits
           and Reducing Adverse Childhood Experiences: The EITC Access Project

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract EITC has positive impacts, including reduced mental health problems and stress, on parents and caregivers. These impacts also affect children. Notably, EITC is associated with decreased child maltreatment (Berger et al. Review of Economics of the Household, 15(4), 1345–1372, 2017; Biehl & Hill, 2018; Klevens et al. Public Health Reports (1974), 132(4), 505–511, 2017; Rostad et al. Child Maltreatment, 25(4), 393–397, 2020). In addition, in a study of financial literacy among IPV survivors, it was found that knowledge of EITC was limited (Postmus, 2011). Unfortunately, one in five families eligible for EITC does not receive it (Internal Revenue Service, 2019). The EITC Access Project involves a two-level strategy across 43 counties in the State of Michigan. Level 1 is a public health strategy, which includes culturally appropriate flyers and informational materials regarding EITC. Level 2 includes the community-education strategy but also includes one-on-one concentrated benefits advocacy. The benefits advocacy is layered into existing Parents As Teachers home visiting programs and involves motivational interviewing techniques, EITC information, and financial empowerment activities. Outcomes are expected to influence the provision of community education surrounding public benefits and the practice of home visiting. This manuscript describes the goals, objectives, and evaluation plan of the EITC Access Project.
      PubDate: 2022-06-30
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00119-8
       
  • Harsh Physical Discipline: Prevalence and Associated Factors Among Primary
           Caregivers of Pre-school Children in Ethiopia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Harsh parental discipline is ineffective and potentially harmful to children, yet it is still common, particularly in many African countries. Culturally responsive education programs are needed to shift parenting practices in African countries, but there is limited baseline research to inform such efforts. This study’s objectives were to establish the baseline prevalence of harsh physical discipline practices among primary caregivers of pre-school children in Ethiopia and to identify associated factors to inform intervention efforts. The well-established Parent–Child Conflict Tactics Scale section on physical assault was translated and administered to primary caregivers of 1139 pre-school children aged 4–6 years sampled from four regions of Ethiopia. Trained interviewers also collected basic socio-demographic data. Based on caregiver report, 52.5% (n = 598) of the children had experienced harsh physical discipline and an additional 12.7% (n = 145) experienced moderate physical discipline in their lifetimes. After controlling for covariates, the factors significantly related to increased likelihood of harsh discipline were geographic region, female caregivers, lack of employment, at least moderate perceived social status, and non-Muslim religion. These data establish a baseline from which to evaluate the impact of future educational interventions designed to shift practices. Information about the correlates can be used to tailor such intervention efforts toward those most likely to use harsh discipline practices.
      PubDate: 2022-06-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00118-9
       
  • Correction to: Adolescent Mother Maltreatment Perpetrators’ Past
           Experiences with Child Protective Services

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2022-06-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00117-w
       
  • Holding It Together' Professional Perspectives on the Role of
           Relationships when Relocating Young People due to Extra-familial Harm

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract When young people come to harm in extra-familial contexts, professionals may move them a distance from their home community to protect them, and in doing so disrupt relationships in which they have encountered harm. However, relocations can also fracture young people’s protective relationships with family, peers, and professionals; relationships that have been positioned as targets for intervention in cases of extra-familial harm. The extent to which these relationships are considered during relocations is under-explored. Utilising semi-structured interviews with 16 social work professionals in England and Wales, we assessed their accounts of using relationships prior to, during, and following relocations in cases of extra-familial harm. Three themes emerged: using relationships during relocations to provide consistency, to collaborate, and to create safety. Professional accounts prioritised young people’s relationships with practitioners, over relationships with families, peers, and their wider communities, when using/seeking opportunities to offer consistency and to collaborate on safety plans. They also depicted a struggle to engage with the complex web of family, peer, and community relationships associated to young people’s protection in both their home communities and those they had been moved to; relationships that were critical for creating safety. Implications for practice and future research are discussed, highlighting the potential merits of offering integrated research and practice frameworks that hold together young people’s relationships with families, peers, communities, and professionals, in response to extra-familial harm.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-021-00106-5
       
  • Steven Walker: Children Forsaken: Child Abuse from Ancient to Modern Times

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2022-05-30
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00116-x
       
  • The Housing Pathways and Experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait
           Islander Youth as They Transition from out of Home Care in Victoria and
           Western Australia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract It is well established that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people are over-represented in Australian child protection and out-of-home care systems. Despite this, there has been limited analysis of their exit from care pathways. This study, based on interviews with 10 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth from Victoria and Western Australia (who were a sub-set of a larger study of 34 care leavers), examined their transition experiences and outcomes in relation to accessing stable and affordable housing. While all care leavers spoke of poor or non-existent transition planning, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participants were more likely to report incidences of homelessness and more complex experiences in a range of areas. Importantly, the group identified a need for culturally appropriate service models which built on and enhanced cultural and kinship connections.
      PubDate: 2022-04-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00115-y
       
  • Teaching Professionals about Trauma-Informed Practice for Children and
           their Families: a Toolkit for Practitioners

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Trauma-informed care has become the gold standard for treating children and families who have been exposed to traumatic events. However, it is not always clear to practitioners what such care involves. This article describes a training program for professionals designed by the Haruv Institute in Jerusalem, Israel, which teaches the elements of trauma-informed interventions. The program includes theoretical knowledge regarding trauma and its effects on children and parents and parenting, as well as skills that may be employed when working with this population. It is presented as a toolkit whose various elements may be added to the professional’s therapeutic repertoire. This training program has been well received and, for many, is considered a “game changer” regarding how professionals see their therapeutic role. However, it often creates a need for more intensive training in some of the elements of the intervention, such as talking with children about trauma, psycho-educational groups, and interventions that promote emotional regulation. Thus, the trauma-informed training program may be seen as a base to which additional, more advanced training modules may be added.
      PubDate: 2022-03-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00114-z
       
  • The Neglect of Children: Food for Thought and Action

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract This commentary highlights several challenges concerning the conceptualization of child neglect and the approach to this prevalent problem, with the goal of stimulating further thought and hopefully action. Examples include consideration of potential harm, the role of culture, intentionality, and new forms of neglect related to new knowledge of children’s needs. Assessment of possible neglect, interviewing children, use of motivational interviewing, and the importance of identifying families’ strengths are additional issues. Finally, the commentary addresses alternative response systems, resilience, prevention, and advocacy. We suggest ways to tackle these challenges.
      PubDate: 2022-02-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-022-00113-0
       
  • Child Abuse Evaluations at the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Kigali
           (CHUK): Medical Education and Experience

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Child maltreatment is a poorly recognized phenomenon worldwide, and many pediatric healthcare professionals do not receive adequate training in child abuse and neglect evaluations. In response to the paucity of child maltreatment literature on low- to middle-income countries, this study aims to determine the education and training needs of medical professionals at the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Kigali (CHUK) with respect to child abuse and neglect identification, investigation, evaluation, and case management. Data collection took place in July and August 2019 at CHUK in Kigali, Rwanda. A mixed-methods approach was employed, including semi-structured qualitative interviews with sixteen healthcare professionals (3 pediatricians, 7 pediatric residents, 2 nurses, and 4 social workers) at CHUK and a systematic chart review of child maltreatment cases evaluated at the hospital from July 2015 to July 2019. Interviews with professionals revealed perceived gaps in training regarding child maltreatment case evaluation, reporting, and management. Study participants noted the need for standardized, hospital-wide protocols for the handling of confirmed abuse and neglect cases as well as expanded curriculum on the topic throughout professional education. Chart reviews demonstrated inconsistent and sparse documentation of maltreatment cases in hospital records. In conjunction with our findings, we provide informant-based suggestions for the improvement of child abuse and neglect case management at CHUK,  including consistent training modules, inter-departmental collaboration, and systematic documentation. Beyond the hospital, participants widely agreed that child maltreatment awareness and prevention measures should be implemented at the community level with professionals from CHUK getting involved in local efforts.
      PubDate: 2022-01-20
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-021-00107-4
       
  • Rethinking Child Maltreatment: Children’s Perceptions of Physical and
           Emotional Maltreatment—Initial Findings

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The definition of child maltreatment (CM) has a direct impact on operationalization in research, on practice, and on policy formulation. While children are the main focus of the field of CM, it seems that their voices are rarely heard and that they have been excluded from the research and the process of formulating the definition of CM. The current study strives to bring to the forefront the general population of children’s perception of physical and emotional maltreatment and to gain an understanding regarding the differences and similarities of children’s perceptions and the current professional and academic perceptions of the phenomenon. Data was collected from 4 and 6th graders in 30 different schools in Israel: 21 Jewish schools and 9 Arab schools. In total, 2,536 children responded to a questionnaire composed of closed questions only and rated which parental behaviors are considered physical or emotional maltreatment. The research findings clearly indicate that children are reliable and important sources of knowledge regarding the phenomenon of CM. It seems that while they differentiate between parental discipline and CM in a similar way to the current professional view, they view the severity of CM—especially emotional maltreatment—in a way that differs from the common professional views. Moreover, the research shows that there are differences in the severity perceptions among different subgroups of children, for example, Arab and Jewish children and boys and girls.
      PubDate: 2022-01-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-021-00108-3
       
  • Child Maltreatment in Asian American and Pacific Islander Families: The
           Roles of Economic Hardship and Parental Aggravation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Parents face various stressors in their daily lives, and their child discipline practices are likely to be affected by the stressors. Existing research suggests that parental stress is a significant contributor to child maltreatment, but more research is needed, particularly among Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) families. This study examined the relationship between economic hardship and aggravation in parenting and three types of child maltreatment (i.e., psychological aggression, physical assault, and neglect) in AAPI families through secondary data analysis of a longitudinal de-identified data set. This study analyzed a sample size of 146 AAPI children, with mothers as the primary caregiver. Economic hardship was positively associated with psychological aggression (β = 3.104, p < .01) and physical assault (β = 1.803, p < .05). Aggravation in parenting was positively associated with neglect (β = 0.884, p < .05). The findings suggest that AAPI parents are more likely to use certain child maltreatment methods when they experience specific stressors. Researchers and practitioners should consider the various stressors that AAPI families face and how other social or economic challenges can compound these stressors.
      PubDate: 2022-01-08
      DOI: 10.1007/s42448-021-00111-8
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.201.95.84
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-