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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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Global Social Welfare
Number of Followers: 6  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Online) 2196-8799
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • The Burden of Teenage Alcohol Consumption in Andhra Pradesh State,
           India—Epidemiology and Social Context

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      Abstract: Aim To determine the prevalence and factors that predict alcohol consumption behavior among teenagers in Andhra Pradesh state, India. Subjects and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 1030 teenagers aged 13–19 years selected by multi-stage random sampling. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect demographic information including questions about alcohol use, type of alcohol consumed, and age at first exposure to alcoholic beverages, frequency and duration of consumption, amount of alcohol consumed, and reasons for drinking and parental education and their habits. IBM SPSS version 25.0 was used to analyze the data (IBM Corp., Armonk, New York). Chi-square was used to determine the relationships between the variables. The link between alcohol use and associated variables was analyzed using binary logistic regression. Results The prevalence of alcohol use was about 30%, and the mean age of initiation of alcohol use was 15.52 + 2.08 years. The results of the Chi-square test revealed an association between alcohol consumption and age, gender, place of residence, socioeconomic status, tobacco use, and parental education (p < 0.05). Interestingly, family history of alcohol consumption, i.e., 176 (31.7%) had no significant association with alcohol use habit (p = 0.220). On regression analysis, the proportion of alcohol consumption was higher with the increase in age (OR = 1.612, CI = 1.394–1.864), male gender (OR = 4.958, CI = 2.902–8.470), urban residents (OR = 0.067, CI = 0.032–0.139), higher socioeconomic status (OR = .058, CI = .024–.140), tobacco users (OR = 0.054, CI = 0.026–0.113), and poor educational status of parents (OR = .240, CI = .122–.471). Conclusions The findings could help guide the development of a comprehensive, evidence-based, and consensus-driven national alcohol control policy to lessen the burden of teenage alcohol consumption.
      PubDate: 2022-10-03
       
  • The Effect of Structural Gender Inequality Revealed in Small for
           Gestational Age

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      Abstract: Background This study proposes that being small for gestational age (SGA) is not only an important indicator for neonatal health but also could be a consequence of gender inequality. Low birth weight (LBW) has been widely used as a measurement for adverse birth outcomes, whereas much less attention has been given to the use of small for gestational age (SGA). Despite the importance and worldwide acknowledgement of promoting gender equality and women’s empowerment to improve maternal and infant health, previous studies on SGA have focused on nutritional status, social and medical infrastructures, and socioeconomic status. The impact of structural violence against women on SGA has not been explored sufficiently. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effect of gender inequality on SGA, using the Gender Inequality Index (GII). Methods A total of 106 low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) from the most recent three global datasets—Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), the UN Development Programme (UNDP), and World Bank—were assessed. Results Findings from generalized linear model analysis suggest that significant links exist between years of potential life lost (YLL) from SGA and gender inequality, maternal health status, and country level of income. Conclusions Our findings advance the understanding of the role of gender inequality on SGA and reiterate the importance of considering structural violence in maternal and infant health research. These associations can support the message of designing public health and socioeconomic development as well as creating campaigns to promote gender equality in efforts to advance maternal and infant health and to prevent adverse birth outcomes across the globe.
      PubDate: 2022-09-28
       
  • Recounting the Blessings and Curses of Living with a Disability: The
           Experiences of Persons with Visual and Physical Impairment in Accra

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      Abstract: Abstract Studies on the living conditions of persons with disability (PWD) in Ghana largely highlight the nonconformity between the physical environment and one’s physical appearance. Even though these studies offer an opportunity to explore the living conditions of PWD’s, they rarely focus on PWD’s interpretation of how their disability influences the enjoyment of various opportunities. Employing an exploratory research design, this study engaged 28 visually impaired and 22 physically challenged persons from the Accra Metropolitan Assembly. Audio tapes from interviews were transcribed and coded using MaxQDA. Thematic analysis was used, and findings from the study revealed that onset of disability did not entirely present a challenge as some recorded an increased sensitivity in other sense organs which played a critical role in discovering artistic skills. Consequently, experienced challenges were inclined to their social interactions which are fuelled by the inability of Ghanaian dialects to project PWDs as valuable members of society. A consultative educational framework by the National Council for Persons with Disability (NCPD) will be needed to overhaul society’s impression and status accorded to the disability community.
      PubDate: 2022-09-12
       
  • Agriculture Productivity and Farmers’ Health in Tanzania: Analysis
           on Maize Subsector

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      Abstract: Abstract In recent years, concerns over farmers’ health and productivity have drawn great attention due to the global agenda on food security and the eradication of extreme poverty. Moreover, studies have proven that, the shortage of food in developing countries has been largely connected to climate change, but no study has examined to what extent diseases have affected agricultural productivity in these countries. This paper, therefore, examines the effects of farmers’ health on agricultural productivity focusing on Tanzania’s maize subsector using panel survey data 2019/20. The paper employed Ordinary least Square and Two Stage Least Square (2SLS) to address the endogeneity of health variables in productivity equation. Findings revealed that major illnesses among farmers in Tanzania were malaria (27%), HIV/AIDS (22%), cholera (18%), typhoid (15%), schistosomiasis (9%), non communicable diseases (6%) and the side effects of agricultural chemical inputs (3%). Additionally, having contracted diseases, farmers’ productivity has been lowered significantly and differently across all diseases such as HIV/AIDS (66.8%), malaria (56.3%), cholera (25.1%), typhoid (11.75%), non communicable diseases (29%) and schistosomiasis (1.4%). This paper recommends that agricultural development programs in developing countries should take into account the improvement of rural health care services. Moreover, due to the economic characteristics of most of the rural farmers, the study recommends for the establishment of subsided famers’ health insurance schemes in order to reduce the burden of diseases affecting farmers’ welfare.
      PubDate: 2022-09-02
       
  • Impacts of COVID-19 on the Coping Behaviours of Canadian Women
           Experiencing Intimate Partner Violence

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      Abstract: Background Strict public health measures central to slowing the spread of COVID-19 have, unintentionally, exacerbated risks for women experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) while impeding their usual coping strategies. The goal of this study was to understand how coping was influenced by COVID-19 for women who have experienced IPV and identify changes in coping strategies and gaps that need to be addressed to support coping. Methods A qualitatively driven, sequential, cross-sectional design, where quantitative data informed and was embedded within qualitative data collection, was used to explore the experiences of IPV (CAS-R-SF scale) and coping (Brief-COPE scale) specific to IPV of 95 Canadian women. A subset of 19 women was invited to complete an interview exploring coping strategies identified within the survey to contextualize and validate these findings. Results Survey data subjected to quantitative content analysis identified ten themes, all of which were explored in semi-structured interviews. Thematic interview findings included (1) influence of COVID-19 on coping, (2) coping during COVID-19, and (3) needed coping strategies. Conclusion COVID-19 had important impacts on the experiences and coping strategies of women who experience IPV. To better support this population in pandemic circumstances, in-person services should be prioritized with an emphasis on accessible and empathetic care. Public health measures in response to COVID-19, and the eventuality of future pandemics, should aim to be gender- and violence-informed.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Household and Regional Determinants of Child Stunting in Rural Mexico

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      Abstract: Abstract While the national prevalence of child stunting has been decreasing, Mexico has yet to reduce stunting equitably across rural and indigenous communities. We estimated the prevalence and distribution of child stunting in children aged < 5 years by rural and urban areas as well as described and compared the household factors associated with child stunting in both settings. We used data on 3910 children aged < 5 years from the latest nationally representative health and nutrition Mexican survey (2018–2019). We found evidence that child stunting in Mexico has plateaued, halting the successful decline that had been observed in previous decades and being a pervasive marker for health inequities. We identified higher odds for child stunting among rural areas (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.81, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12–2.91), and in rural indigenous households (AOR 2.08, 95% CI 1.38–3.13). Household education was the only consistent protective factor against stunting across rural/urban settings (AOR 0.35, 95% CI 0.17–0.72; AOR 0.45, 95% CI 0.21–0.96, correspondingly). Policy-makers, researchers, and stakeholders need to aim efforts toward implementing evidence-based, culturally sensitive, and sustainable policies and interventions at rural areas mostly in the southern region and among rural indigenous households, including a strong component to achieve higher household education.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Overweight Syndrome, a Deviation from Normalcy: a Multiple Risk Factor
           Analysis Among Reproductive Age Group (15–49) Women in Indian Context

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      Abstract: Background Nowadays, overweight is one of the major human health concerns in all developed, developing, and underdeveloped nations. Women belonging to the reproductive age group with overweight syndrome always remain at higher risk and susceptible to multifaceted short- and long-term adverse health consequences for themselves as well as for their children. Methods A total of 256,226 ever married reproductive age group women were included in this study. The women whose BMI cut-off is above 25 kg/m2 were considered as over-weighted women. Descriptive statistics along with bivariate association and multivariable logistic regression analysis were performed to examine the likelihood of household and individual-level factors on overweight syndrome among the reproductive age group of women in India. Result The prevalence of overweight phenomena among reproductive age group women is nearly 15% in India. Odds of being overweight were higher among the women who reside at urban areas (AOR: 1.22; P: < 0.001; 95% CI: 1.19–1.26), belonging from non-Hindu communities (AOR: 1.48; P: < 0.001; 95% CI: 1.43–1.53) and living with high standard of life and highly educated (AOR: 1.69; P: < 0.001; 95% CI: 1.61–1.77). Family size (AOR: 0.93; P: < 0.001; 95% CI: 0.91–0.94) and no. of living children is negatively associated with overweight phenomena. Conclusion In recent years, the prevalence of overweight syndrome among reproductive women is significantly increasing in India. Necessary intervention and strategies such as health education, awareness programme and regular monitoring of the nutritional status must be encouraged with urgent care to accomplish the overweight phenomena.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • A Case Study of Community-based, Cross-sectoral Crisis Response to the
           COVID-19 Pandemic: Serving Racialized Immigrant Communities

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      Abstract: Abstract Crises—such as the COVID-19 pandemic—bring about myriad problems in magnitude (severity), dynamism (quality), and urgency (timing). Collaborative models that bring together actors from both the public and private sector have thus emerged for institutionalized and community-based crisis response. Such models aim particularly to reach vulnerable, hard-to-reach communities, such as racialized immigrant communities that are among those disproportionately impacted at times of crisis. This paper presents a case study of a community-based, cross-sectoral collaborative formed to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic and specifically targeting immigrant communities. Findings inform a conceptual framework that illustrates the integration of two spheres of service: crisis supports, characterized by a short-term approach, broad-based reach and general objectives; and settlement supports, characterized by their long-term approach, trust relations and targeted objectives, such as language supports and culturally appropriate outreach.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Financial Capability and Asset Building Curriculum for Social Work
           

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      Abstract: Abstract Social workers serve individuals and communities experiencing socio-economic and financial exclusion. However, research indicates that social work practitioners often lack the preparation, knowledge, skills, and attitudes to tackle clients’ increasingly complex financial problems. Currently, the Kenyan social work curriculum does not offer content to support financial decision-making, self-sufficiency, and advocacy for financially excluded communities. This lack of knowledge has left graduating social workers with minimal tools to inform clients’ financial decision-making and address their personal financial issues. Focusing on Technical and Vocational Training Institutes in Kenya, this paper provides a critical review of the gaps inherent in the current social work curriculum in equipping certificate and diploma students with the tools required to foster client and personal financial well-being. Informed by the multiple public actors engaged in Kenya’s higher education system, we argue that a renewal of the social work curriculum is needed to incorporate content responsive to the needs of local communities. Guided by the financial capability framework and social development theory, we propose three overarching curricula goals, and recommend learning outcomes and measurable competencies aligned with the lived realities of social work students in middle-level colleges and the clients they serve.
      PubDate: 2022-08-26
       
  • Comparative Analysis on Communicable and Non-Communicable Diseases on
           Catastrophic Spending and Impoverishment in Tanzania

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      Abstract: Abstract The question of whether communicable or non-communicable diseases have higher economic effects on households is rarely explored from the global to local level despite of their significant contribution in increasing household catastrophic spending and impoverishment. To shed light into this, therefore, this paper comparatively examines the economic effects of communicable and non-communicable diseases in Tanzania by the use of Tanzania Panel Survey data of 2019/2020 which has been used to analyze different parameters to provide needful information. The empirical analysis employed probit, two-stage residual inclusion (2SRI), and control function approachf (CFA) helpful in controlling endogeneity issues. Findings showed that, comparatively, non-communicable diseases have higher economic effects in endangering households into catastrophic spending and impoverishment comparing to communicable diseases. Conclusively, neglecting developing countries to fights against multiplicative effects of these diseases alone will result in killing their economies since most of these countries depend on donors and household as a means of healthcare financing. However, this paper recommends for global initiatives in reducing the burden of disease by funding on palliative care costs and enhancing the availability of affordable health insurance schemes to reduce household economic burden.
      PubDate: 2022-08-26
       
  • Physical Violence Against Women by Their Partner: A Latent Class
           Measurement and Causal Analysis from Rural Counterparts of Dakshin
           Dinajpur District, India

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      Abstract: Background This study examined a hypothesised relationship between a couple’s behavioural and cultural attitudes and the severity of physical partner violence among the ever-married women (aged 15–49) who inhabited rural parts of Dakshin Dinajpur district, West Bengal, India. Method A total of 182 sample women were included in the final causal path model which was one form of advanced Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) approach. This study also accounted for some latent construction models based on some allied indicator variables before establishing the final causal path model. Direct effects, indirect effects (mediation effect) in connection with direct effects and total effects of the exposures were estimated to test the hypothesised model. Result Results revealed that wives’ violence supporting attitudes (standardise β, 0.10; P < 0.001), partner’s domineering attitudes (standardise β, 0.29; P < 0.001), patriarchal family norms (standardise β, 0.39; P < 0.001), communication dysfunction (standardise β, 0.53; P < 0.001) and introvert attitudes (standardise β, 0.17; P < 0.001) all are some positive predictors for severe physical partner violence. Patriarchal family norms mediating with partner’s domineering attitudes can increase (standardise β, 0.55; P < 0.001) the severity of physical partner violence. In addition, an indirect positive association also has been established between wives’ introverted attitudes in combination with communication dysfunction (standardise β, 0.43; P < 0.001) on the severity of physical partner violence. Conclusion The study findings suggest that more socialization, life-long learning and skill development, stimulating positive behavioural attitudes and strengthening voice and representation for rural women are very much required to break the contemporary undesirable ambience.
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
       
  • Correction to: Family Factors and Gender Norms as Protective Factors
           Against Sexual Risk‑Taking Behaviors Among Adolescent Girls in Southern
           Uganda

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      PubDate: 2022-08-19
       
  • From Social Protection to Personal Protection: Implications for an
           

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      Abstract: Abstract Without a mandatory retirement age, many informal workers are exploring diverse ways of ensuring their well-being as they age. This exploratory study focuses on the retirement plans of workers in Ghana’s informal sector to inform interventions to ensure their well-being. Findings from 35 in-depth interviews among self-employed informal workers in Adum-Kumasi, the largest hub of Ghana’s informal work, highlight that retirement planning is centred on self-protection through investment in economic and non-economic activities. The study contributes to the discourse on extending social protection coverage to informal work settings. It further recommends an integrated policy framework for social protection to cover a broad range of domains that are important for the well-being of informal workers in later life.
      PubDate: 2022-08-18
       
  • Victimization by Multiple Perpetrators of Intimate Partner Violence:
           Seeking its Factors via the Multiple Disadvantage Model

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      Abstract: Abstract The applied model—the multiple disadvantage model—examined factors related to victimization by multiple perpetrators of intimate partner violence (IPV). The sample was 3226 women completing the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey. Logistic regression results showed likelihood of victimization by multiple IPV perpetrators to be associated negatively with being married/cohabiting, relatives’ helpfulness, friends’ helpfulness, mental health professionals’ helpfulness, mental health, and age, while being associated positively with education level, IPV perpetration by current partner, telling informal support about IPV, duration of limitation of activities due to health/mental health, telling professionals about IPV, and perpetrator’s substance use. The findings’ implications include a need to raise survivors’ and service providers’ awareness of effects of victimization by multiple IPV perpetrators.
      PubDate: 2022-08-12
       
  • Family Factors and Gender Norms as Protective Factors Against Sexual
           Risk-Taking Behaviors Among Adolescent Girls in Southern Uganda

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      Abstract: Abstract Adolescent girls and young women are at a higher risk for HIV infection stemming from barriers to accessing comprehensive sexual health education, unequal cultural, social, and economic statuses, limited access to education and health care services, and gender-based violence. This makes adolescent girls susceptible to high-risk sexual behaviors. This study examines the protective role of family, social support factors and gender norms against sexual risk-taking behaviors among secondary school adolescent girls in Uganda. Baseline data from the National Institute of Mental Health-funded Suubi4Her study were analyzed. A total of 1260 girls aged 14–17 years and enrolled in the first or second year of secondary school were recruited across 47 secondary schools. Hierarchical linear regression models were conducted to determine the role of family, social support factors and gender norms on sexual risk-taking behaviors. Results indicate that traditional gender norms, family care and relationships, and social support were all associated with lower levels of sexual risk-taking intentions—a proxy for engaging in sexual risk behaviors. Findings point to the need to develop family level support interventions to equip adolescent girls with adequate sexual health-related knowledge and skills to facilitate safer sexual practices and reduce high-risk sexual-taking behaviors, as they develop and transition into young adulthood.
      PubDate: 2022-08-11
       
  • Perceptions Regarding Education as a Way to Improve Living Conditions in
           Mexico: a Qualitative Exploration

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      Abstract: Abstract This study explores perceptions about educational attainment as a way to improve living conditions in Mexico. We focus specifically on two questions: (1) What are people’s perceptions towards educational attainment and improved living conditions'; and (2a) Do these perceptions differ by the level of education attained; (2b) Do these perceptions differ by gender' The research draws upon data from semi-structured interviews (N = 247) that were conducted in four Mexican states with different levels of social welfare: Mexico City, Tamaulipas, State of Mexico, and Oaxaca. The interviewees were selected using the snowball method and other eligibility criteria such as level of education and age (17 years and older), and the data were analyzed using a thematic analysis approach. The findings show that respondents with lower levels of education saw education as a means to securing better jobs and better outcomes in other spheres of their lives. Contradictory sentiments were expressed by respondents in the graduate education group, while some respondents in this group saw educational attainment as a way of ensuring access to well-paying jobs and better welfare other indicated that education does not always guarantee a change in their socioeconomic status. As expected, a strong link between educational attainment and improved living conditions was reported by respondents in the highly educated group. Implications for policy and gendered interventions are suggested.
      PubDate: 2022-08-10
       
  • Welfare Effects of Financial Inclusion Services in Ghana: A Comparative
           Analysis of Mobile Money and Other Financial Services

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      Abstract: Abstract The study examines the effects of financial inclusion services—mobile money and other alternative financial service options—on consumption expenditure and poverty status by employing the augmented inverse probability weighted (AIPW) estimator to address selection bias and unobserved heterogeneity in the adoption of these services. Using a nationally representative survey data in Ghana, the results show that adoption of financial inclusion services increases household consumption expenditure and also decreases the probability of being poor. Specifically, the effects are larger for adoption of other alternative financial service options relative to adoption of mobile money services. Estimating the interaction effects shows that there are complementarities between adoption of mobile money and other alternative financial service options. The results also show considerable heterogeneity with effects largely observed in male-headed households compared to female-headed households. The results suggest that adoption of financial inclusion services could serve as welfare improvement strategies in developing countries and draw policy attention to the gendered welfare effects.
      PubDate: 2022-08-06
       
  • Locked Down: Economic and Health Effects of COVID-19 Response on Residents
           of a South African Township

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      Abstract: Background Little research has examined how pandemics affect residents in under-resourced communities. This study investigated how COVID-19 and lockdown policies affected residents of Alexandra, one of Johannesburg, South Africa’s lowest-income townships. Methods We conducted a telephone survey May 11–22, 2020, while the lockdown and alcohol ban were in effect, of a spatially stratified sample of 353 adult Alexandra residents drawn randomly from voter registration, credit card application, and prior studies’ sampling frames. We examined economic consequences; health experiences, including COVID-19 exposure and mental health symptoms; alcohol use; and personal experiences with violence. Results Respondents were aged 18 to 89 and 47% female. About 70% of those employed before the lockdown were no longer working. Over half of households lost at least one source of income. About 50% of respondents reported stockpiling food. A majority reported price rises and declines in availability of food. Smaller percentages reported such changes for other items. Over 80% reported stress or anxiety, or depression due to the pandemic. The prevalence of past-week alcohol use fell from over 50% before the lockdown to less than 10% during the lockdown. Self-reported physical violence victimization increased. Discussion COVID-19 and the lockdown disrupted Alexandra residents’ lives through unemployment, lost income, mental health problems, and increased violence. The differences between these outcomes and those in more advantaged communities deserve investigation. Research should also seek to identify tailored responses to effectively address the challenges of marginalized communities that often have limited resources to deal with pandemics and policies to contain them.
      PubDate: 2022-08-03
       
  • Barriers to Help-Seeking for Domestic Violence in Kyrgyzstan: Perspectives
           of Criminal Justice, Social, Health, and Educational Professionals

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      Abstract: Purpose Research with survivors of domestic violence (DV) suggests that most do not seek supportive services from formal organizations. The purpose of this study is to understand the structural and legal barriers that prevent survivors of DV from seeking help in Kyrgyzstan from the perspectives of professionals within the areas of law enforcement, judicial system, social, health, and educational sectors working directly with survivors. Methods We conducted 20 semi-structured interviews and 8 focus groups with 83 professionals who are employed as domestic violence or legal advocates, psychologists, healthcare providers, educators, and law enforcement officials who had worked with the survivors of DV in their current positions. We analyzed the data using a multistep strategy derived from grounded theory methods. Results The findings of the study highlighted six structural barriers: (1) financial dependence on the abuser, (2) stigma and shame of seeking help, (3) few crisis centers and rigid acceptance criteria for temporary protection, (4) the normalization and societal acceptance of abuse, (5) a lack of property rights for women, and (6) distrust of formal services. The participants indicated five legal barriers, including the following: (1) insufficient sanctions for abusers, (2) unclear provisions and inadequate enforcement of law, (3) a low likelihood of prosecution, (4) poor procedures, stereotypes of survivors, and revictimization during investigations, and (5) protection for abusers who work in positions of power. Conclusions The structural and legal barriers that survivors face when seeking help are formidable challenges that will require extensive support from professionals working in the fields of criminal justice, social work, and public health. Findings suggest that both short-term and longer-term interventions that require sustainability of prevention efforts are necessary to address barriers to help-seeking identified in the study.
      PubDate: 2022-06-09
      DOI: 10.1007/s40609-022-00226-x
       
  • Exploring the Hierarchies: Multilevel Correlates of Child Mortality in
           Nigeria and Implications for Interventions

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      Abstract: Abstract This study examined the multilevel correlates of childhood mortality among women (aged 15–49 years) in Nigeria using pooled data from the 2003, 2008 and 2018 Nigeria Demographic and Health Surveys. This study considered 25,685 women who stated that they never lived outside their communities. Descriptive and multilevel regression analyses were performed. About 38% of the women reported losing at least a child. The individual-level correlates of childhood mortality were age, age at first birth, years of education, marital status and ethnicity. Household variables such as number of male children ever born (aIRR = 1.031; 95% CI = 1.026–1.036; p = 0.001), no bed net (aIRR = 1.052; 95% CI = 1.011–1.094; p = 0.012) and using biomass/charcoal (aIRR = 1.223; 95% CI = 1.013–1.475; p = 0.036) were positively associated with childhood mortality while wealth index was negatively correlated with childhood mortality. At the community level, lower childhood mortality was observed in South South region (aIRR = 0.853; 95% CI = 0.767–0.949; p = 0.003), but it was higher in North East (aIRR = 1.143; 95% CI = 1.050–1.244; p = 0.002), North West (aIRR = 1.440; 95% CI = 1.318–1.574; p = 0.001) and South East (aIRR = 1.156; 95% CI = 1.028–1.300; p = 0.016) respectively. Higher childhood mortality was associated positively with community poverty (medium: aIRR = 1.107; 95% CI = 1.013–1.210; p = 0.024), low ownership of piped water (aIRR = 1.128; 95% CI = 1.047–1.215; p = 0.002) and problematic distance to health facility (aIRR = 1.046; 95% CI = 1.006–1.088; p = 0.025). There is a need for more interventions to tackle multilevel drivers of child mortality in Nigeria.
      PubDate: 2022-05-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s40609-022-00225-y
       
 
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