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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 201 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted by number of followers
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access  
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access  
Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift     Open Access  
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  

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Global Social Welfare
Number of Followers: 6  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Online) 2196-8799
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Narratives of Ghanaian Social Workers on Community Leaders’ Response
           to Child Maltreatment

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      Abstract: Abstract Communities play an important role in ensuring the well-being of children since child maltreatment often occurs at the micro level of society. Hence, there are several interventions organised using community child-protection models. However, there is a dearth of information on how leaders in the communities respond to child maltreatment. This paper, therefore, explored the narratives of social workers on the type of community leaders and how they respond to child maltreatment. This is to provide empirical evidence for community programme design and engagement for child protection practitioners to ensure the best outcomes for children. The study presents narratives from in-depth interviews with 15 social workers in the Ashanti region of Ghana on how community leaders respond to child maltreatment. The findings indicate that different types of community leaders are involved in ensuring punitive actions are taken against perpetrators but the actions are focused on internal resolutions and victim compensation rather than legal redress. These have implications for social workers, as families who value monetary redress are less likely to inform the state of any child maltreatment. Therefore, social workers have to intensify community engagement and education by highlighting the consequences of less punitive actions against perpetrators of child maltreatment. It is also recommended that children must be empowered to disclose child maltreatment concerns regardless of their relationship with the perpetrator.
      PubDate: 2024-04-06
       
  • Associations Between Social Deprivation, Cognitive Heath, and Depression
           among Older Adults in India: Evidence from the Longitudinal Aging Study in
           India (LASI)

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      Abstract: Background Cognitive health declines with age and is directly linked to biological changes as people age. However, socioeconomic factors play an essential role in the level and change of cognitive health and the onset of depression in older adults. This study attempts to assess the association between social deprivation, cognitive health, and depression among older persons in India. Data and Methods The Longitudinal Aging Study in India (LASI) Wave One, collected in India between 2017 and 2018, was used for this study. Several measures, including education, wealth quintile, working status, and living arrangements, were included in the Social Deprivation Index (SDI), constructed using hedonic weights. The hedonic weights were calculated using the standardized coefficients from the ordered probit regression by taking self-rated life satisfaction as the dependent variable. The Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale was used to assess depressive symptoms. Multiple logistic regressions established the association between poor cognitive health, depressive symptoms and SDI.. Results The descriptive findings reveal that 31.7% of people with high social deprivation have poor cognitive health compared to only 8.1% of people with lower social deprivation. Furthermore, 60.5% of people with higher social deprivation have depressive symptoms compared to 25.8% of people with lower social deprivation. Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) using multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that individuals with high social deprivation are 2.31 times likelier to be in poor cognitive health and 3.58 times more likely to experience depressive symptoms compared to individuals with low social deprivation after adjusting for socio-economic and demographic characteristics. Conclusion The findings suggest that high social deprivation is associated with depression and cognitive health decline. Policymakers and planners should devise policies for elderly people to reduce social isolation and include leisure activities in their daily lives. Free health insurance and specialist care for the elderly can relieve the stress of paying for their healthcare at older ages and improve their mental and cognitive health.
      PubDate: 2024-03-20
       
  • Quality of Life and Its Impact on Morbidity Among the Ageing Population: A
           Case Study of a District of India

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      Abstract: Abstract Quality of life (QOL) is a crucial indicator of health or morbidity status among the ageing population as well as humans. The ageing population is significantly vulnerable to different types of morbidity. The present study focuses on determining the Quality of Life among the ageing population and its influences on different types of morbidity in Koch Bihar district, India. The study is based on a primary household survey. A total of 510 households are surveyed for this study. The WHOQOL-BREF scale was used, and analysis was done using STATA software. Four binary logistic models are used to identify the impact of QOL on morbidities among the ageing population. The mean QOL score was maximum in the environmental health domain (53.3 ± 14.78), followed by psychological health (48.8 ± 13.78), and lowest in the social relationships domain (48.82 ± 13.78). Better physical health domain score was found among the young-old ageing population. Psychological health was better among Hindus and persons from nuclear families, whereas the male, urban ageing population had a better environmental domain. Psychological domain score was significantly better among the urban female Old-old ageing population, who are from the OBC caste and Hindu religion. Morbidity is classified into three categories, i.e., communicable diseases, non-communicable diseases (NCDs), and disability. NCDs have a high prevalence rate among the ageing population. The present study revealed that Quality of Life (QOL) significantly influences morbidity among the ageing population.
      PubDate: 2024-03-18
       
  • United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 10.2: Analysis of Social
           Inequality in Ghana

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      Abstract: Abstract The study aims at Ghana’s efforts to address inequalities and achieve SDG 10.2 by 2023. It explores Sustainable Development Goal 10.2 on social inequality using Ghana’s Livelihood Empowerment Against Poverty (LEAP). Many low/middle-income countries have focused on poverty and made efforts to eradicate/reduce poverty, but little progress in reducing the inequality gap. Many poor/needy persons/vulnerable persons are excluded from having access to assets across different dimensions and as such realising this goal by 2030 seems almost impossible. Through a qualitative research design, the article used primary and secondary data. The findings revealed the vulnerable in society like the aged, persons living with disabilities, women, and children suffer greater disparity in terms of opportunities like basic services, education, and health. Again, it highlighted Ghana’s effort to reduce inequalities by empowering the underprivileged across social and economic lines to access the necessities of life through various social intervention programmes. Findings revealed these programmes require the coordinated effort of the government and other establishments to implement them within the Ghanaian context. LEAP was identified as a commendable intervention programme that selects vulnerable individuals to reduce the inequality gap. The study recommends that the government make provisions for other funds to cover large-scale the underprivileged in need.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • From Social Protection to Personal Protection: Implications for an
           

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      Abstract: Abstract Without a mandatory retirement age, many informal workers are exploring diverse ways of ensuring their well-being as they age. This exploratory study focuses on the retirement plans of workers in Ghana’s informal sector to inform interventions to ensure their well-being. Findings from 35 in-depth interviews among self-employed informal workers in Adum-Kumasi, the largest hub of Ghana’s informal work, highlight that retirement planning is centred on self-protection through investment in economic and non-economic activities. The study contributes to the discourse on extending social protection coverage to informal work settings. It further recommends an integrated policy framework for social protection to cover a broad range of domains that are important for the well-being of informal workers in later life.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Substance Abuse Among Elderly in India: Evidence Based on Study on Global
           Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE) Wave 1

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      Abstract: Background Population aging is a common phenomenon in developing countries. The prevalence of substance abuse among elderly is becoming an increasingly significant public health concern. The objective of this study is to examine alcohol and tobacco consumption patterns among elderly population in India and the various factors influencing them. Materials and Methods The present study used Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE) Wave 1 data. Data analysis involved bi-variate and multivariate analysis to examine association between outcomes and explanatory variables, while logistic regression was applied to analyze determinants of substance abuse among elderly in India. Results The findings indicate that elderly population of age group 60–64 years were more likely to consume alcohol compared to other age group, with the highest prevalence among the poorest wealth quintiles and lowest among richer ones. Among all the states, Maharashtra exhibited the highest percentage of alcohol users, while Assam had the highest proportion of tobacco users in comparison to the other states. Conclusion The Indian government must address the hidden epidemic of elderly substance abuse by increasing awareness and strengthening public health facilities. Policies and programs should focus on raising awareness and addressing the hazardous effects of substance abuse.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Social Support for South African Caregivers of Children Living with
           Perinatally Acquired HIV

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      Abstract: Abstract Caregivers of youth living with perinatally acquired HIV often face many demands in providing for their children. While there is increased attention towards the needs of their youth, social support for these adults is largely understudied. Longitudinal data from three waves of caregiver interviews (n = 316) from an RCT entitled the VUKA Family Program were used. This is a psychosocial family intervention based in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Mixed-effect multilevel linear modeling was used across time points (baseline, posttest, follow-up). A significant difference in social support was found between the intervention and control groups at posttest (B = 0.107, p < 0.05) but not at the follow-up stage. Age was negatively associated with social support (B =  − 0.003, p < 0.05). Findings indicate an intervention effect in social support reported by caregivers that faded once the intervention ended. This intervention presents a potential approach to supporting caregivers of youth with perinatally acquired HIV.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Unique Contribution of Maternal Factors and Its Association with Anemia
           Among Under 5 Children in Indian Context

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      Abstract: Background The prevalence of anemia among children in India has increased by 8.5% from 2015–2016 to 2019–2021. This study examines the district-wise spatiotemporal distribution of anemia among children in India and also emphasizes the association of childhood anemia with maternal socio-demographic and health characteristics and nutritional dietary intake behaviors. Methods Data were extracted from the fifth round of the National Family Health Survey, held in 2019–2021. A total of 183,855 children were included in this present study. Description of data, the test of association, and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to find out the association. Thematic maps and appropriate cartographic techniques were used to illustrate the state-wise and district-wise prevalence of anemia in children. Result The spatial distribution of anemic children shows that the highest prevalence of anemia in children was found in Gujarat and Madhya Pradesh, while the least prevalence was recorded in Meghalaya and Kerala. Mothers who did not have the habit of consuming fruits (AOR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.05–1.26; P < 0.001) and fish (AOR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.15–1.21; P < 0.001) were more likely to give birth to anemic children than mothers who consumed occasionally. Higher odds of anemic children were found among mothers who habitually consumed soft drinks (AOR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.06–1.19; P < 0.001). Conclusion The findings suggest that a priority-based comprehensive health program should be implemented to reduce the prevalence of childhood anemia, with a focus on states with higher prevalence rates such as Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, and Punjab. Several measures should be adopted, including conducting education and awareness campaigns to educate mothers about the importance of a balanced and nutritious diet.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Role of Demographic and Socio-economic Factors for Influencing on
           Utilization of Maternal Health Care Services Among the Scheduled Tribe
           Women: An Experience from the EAG States of India

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      Abstract: Abstract Maternal health is a significant public health issue in India’s Empowered Action Group (EAG) states. Reducing maternal mortality is greatly helped by the proper use of maternal health care services. In the EAG states of India, the study intended to investigate how socio-economic and demographic factors affect maternal health care services for women who belong to scheduled tribes (ST). Data for the study have been primarily gathered from the fifth round of the National Family Health Survey in the years 2019–2021 and 17,870 women from scheduled tribes who were in the age range of 15–49 and had at least one live birth in the 5 years before to the survey were included in the sample. The Social Ecological Model (SEM) has been utilized to identify socio-economic and demographic determinants at various levels for utilizing maternity health care services among women from scheduled tribes. The findings of this study reveal that several socio-economic and demographic characteristics at the personal and interpersonal, social and community, and organizational and policy levels were consistently highly influenced by the use of maternal health care services. Full antenatal care of women has been significantly affected by several factors, including higher maternity age (OR = 1.21, CI: 0.998–1.484), higher education (OR = 1.22, CI: 0.964–1.551), working women (OR = 1.41, CI: 1.079–1.839), age at first birth over 18 years (OR = 1.36, CI: 1.151–1.604), higher birth order (OR = 0.78, CI: 0.670–0.899), exposure to mass media (OR = 1.53, CI: 1.368–1.705), and distance to health facilities (OR = 0.91 CI: 0.820–1.003). Significant factors that have influenced delivery by skilled birth attendants included higher education (OR = 2.62 CI: 1.729–3.982), older age at first birth (OR = 1.28, CI: 1.121–1.472), mass media exposure (OR = 1.46, CI: 1.305–1.623), higher wealth quintile (OR = 2.92, CI: 1.949–4.379), and health insurance (OR = 1.70, CI: 1.530–1.895). Maternity age (OR = 1.33, CI: 1.045–1.696), working women (OR = 1.32, CI: 0.959–1.818), and place of rural residence (OR = 0.73, CI: 0.571–0.932) are the factors influencing the use of postnatal check-ups. The study sought to identify the specific socio-economic and demographic components that substantially impact the use of maternal health services among women from scheduled tribes in India’s EAG states. In order to improve maternity care services, the study recommended that the government pay attention to better access to maternal health care services and design appropriate health care policies among the socio-economically disadvantaged and demographic vulnerabilities of women in the scheduled tribe community.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Changes in Socioeconomic Inequalities in Unintended Pregnancies Among
           Currently Married Women in India

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      Abstract: Background Despite the consistent prevalence of unintended pregnancies in India and its adverse impact on maternal and neonatal mortality, the literature discussing socioeconomic inequality remains scarce. This study aims to assess the change in wealth-related inequalities in unintended pregnancy in India from 2005-2006 to 2019-20 and to quantify the contribution of various factors towards inequality. Methods The present study analyzed cross-sectional data from the third and fifth rounds of the National Family Health Survey (NFHS). The information on fertility preferences and pregnancy intention of most recent live birth during the five years preceding the survey was collected from eligible women. The concentration index and Wagstaff decomposition were used to analyze wealth-related inequality and the contributing factors. Results Our results show that the prevalence of unintended pregnancy has declined in 2019-20 to 8% from 22% in 2005-2006. With the increase in education and wealth status, unintended pregnancy decreases significantly. The results of the concentration index depict that unintended pregnancy is more concentrated among the poor than the rich in India, and the individual’s wealth status has the highest contribution to unintended pregnancy inequality. Other factors like mothers' BMI, place of residence and education also contribute majorly to the inequality. Conclusions The study results are critical and increase the need for strategies and policies. Disadvantaged women need education and family planning information, plus access to reproductive health resources. Governments should improve accessibility and quality of care in family planning methods to prevent unsafe abortions, unwanted births, and miscarriages. Further research is needed to investigate the impact of social and economic status on unintended pregnancies.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Association Between Socio-Demographic Factors and Perceived Social Support
           Among Elderly in Siwan¬†District, Bihar, India

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      Abstract: Background The subjective perception and assessment of support originating from family, friends, and significant others are reflected in perceived social support, which refers to the perceived availability and adequacy of social connections. The purpose of this study was to investigate perceived levels of social support and to ascertain the link between perceived social support and the socio-demographic factors that influence it. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study used a sample of 476 elderly people in Siwan district, Bihar, India, who were 60 years of age or older. A structured questionnaire with a multistage sampling procedure was used to collect the data during the period 2021–2022. The 12-item multidimensional scale of perceived social support was used to measure the information regarding perceived social support. The association was examined using a bivariate statistical technique, and the impact of the explanatory variables on the outcome variable was examined using a multivariate statistical technique. Results Families provided the most social support for the respondents, while significant others provided the least. The findings demonstrated a strong statistically significant association between age, types of house, social caste, and wealth status and perceived social support. Multiple linear regression results showed that that ages 70–79 years (β = − 1.74, 95% CI (− 3.05, − 0.44), p ≤ 0.01), other backword class (β = 2.24, 95% CI (0.58, 3.90), p ≤ 0.01), general category (β = 2.08, 95% CI (0.08, 4.07), p ≤ 0.05), and medium wealth status (β = 3.25, 95% CI (1.85, 4.65), p ≤ 0.001), and rich wealth status (β = 2.05, 95% CI (0.30, 3.80), p ≤ 0.05) had a statistically significant effect on perceived social support among elderly. Conclusion The study’s overall conclusion was that older people’s well-being can be improved by providing them more social support, especially from family members other than themselves. As interpersonal risk rises, social support should be bolstered to maximize their happiness. The State must update the policies and procedures in place to fullfil the complex physical, psychological, and emotional needs of the aging population.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • The Role of Maternal Care Services on Feeding Practices Among Under Five
           Children in India, Nepal and Bangladesh

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      Abstract: Background In South Asia, one in two children under the age of five are stunted or wasted due to malnutrition, which affects one in three children globally. There are close linkages between maternal health care services and child feeding practices which needs to be investigated. Materials and Method The present study analyzed two rounds of Demographic Health Surveys cross-sectional data carried out between year 2005 and 2016 in three selected South Asian countries viz. India, Nepal, and Bangladesh respectively. This study is based on children under 5 years of age which are nested within mothers aged 15–49 years. Inferential statistical analysis like Chi-square was used to test the association, and regression model was used to analyze the effect of mother’s Maternal and Child Health care services utilization on the child’s feeding score after controlling for socio-economic and demographic factors. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of utilization of maternal care services on child feeding practices in India, Nepal, and Bangladesh. Results Our result shows that mother's secondary or higher level of education, more than four-antenatal care visits, and deliverying in a health facility was associated with a higher chance of child feeding practices. Multivariate linear regression revealed that education, antenatal care visits, and postnatal care visits had positive and significant effect on child feeding, while mothers who were 15–19 years of age were less likely to feed child. The results from this analysis imply that there are various regional and national influences on the determination of mothers’ practices on child feeding. Furthermore, there are other factors that indicate that mother’s practices are influenced by situational and time factors. Conclusion Overall, with multiple maternal and child health care contacts with the health system, there is an opportunity to promote child feeding practices. The study results are critical and emphasises the need for making strategies and policies for better nutritional outcome and child feeding practices. Disadvantaged women in terms of education, antenatal care, birth at a health institution, and postnatal visits must be targeted to improve child feeding practices.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Mediation Effect of Depression, Alcohol Consumption, and Household Food
           Insecurity to Intimate Partner Violence in Rural Counterparts of Dakshin
           Dinajpur District, West Bengal

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      Abstract: Abstract Intimate partner violence is defined as the intentional use of physical force or power against a woman in a relationship that leads to hurt, psychological harm, or death. The present study aims to identify the mediation role of a partner’s depression, alcohol consumption, and household food insecurity on women’s experience to intimate partner violence (IPV) physically. To fulfill the study objective, a community (Scheduled Caste and Scheduled tribe)-based cross-sectional survey was (n = 560) conducted in rural counterparts of Dakshin Dinajpur district, West Bengal, India. The result revealed that a household’s food insecurity and partner’s depression are not directly associated with women’s experience of intimate partner violence physically while the partner’s alcohol consumption behavior directly and significantly (standardized β: 0.31; 95% CI: 0.24–0.35; P < 0.001) associated with women’s experience to intimate partner violence physically. Moreover, household food insecurity (standardized β: 0.05; P < 0.001), poverty (standardized β: 0.05; P < 0.001), and partner’s depression (standardized β: 0.06; P < 0.001) are indirectly (mediated by partner’s alcohol consumption behavior) and significantly associated with women’s experience to IPV physically. Besides that household poverty, food insecurity and the partner’s depression had a direct implication on the partner’s alcohol consumption behavior. In short, alcohol consumption acts as a trigger for intimate partner violence. Rural parts of Dakshin Dinajpur district require a public awareness campaign to combat domestic violence, which should be spearheaded by state governments and civic societies. The increasing precariousness of domestic violence must be made known to the public and passersby. In addition to all this, the government must pay attention to how the people of rural areas can be improved economically.
      PubDate: 2024-02-15
      DOI: 10.1007/s40609-023-00324-4
       
  • Mobile Money and Financial Inclusion: The Role of Institutional Quality

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper investigates the role of institutional quality in the relationship between mobile money and financial inclusion in Ghana from 2014 to 2021. It uses annual data from the World Development Indicators database on a bundle of four financial inclusion variables (ATMs per 100,000 adults; the number of bank branches per 100,000 adults; deposit accounts with commercial banks per 1,000 adults ; and account ownership at a financial institution or with a mobile money service provider), six institutional quality indicators (i.e., rule of law, governance effectiveness, control of corruption, voice and accountability, regulatory quality, and political stability), and total volume of mobile money transactions in a year. The baseline regression was employed. The empirical results reveal that institutional quality and mobile money have a direct positive and significant effect on financial inclusion. Also, institutional quality plays a positive and significant moderating role in the relationship between mobile money and financial inclusion. Furthermore, mobile phone subscription, financial development, inflation, and GDPGR influence financial inclusion.
      PubDate: 2024-01-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s40609-023-00325-3
       
  • Risk and Protective Factors for Well-being and Barriers to Help-Seeking
           Among Arab-Speaking MENA Immigrants and Refugees in North America: A
           Scoping Review

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      Abstract: Abstract A study conducts a review of risk and protective factors for well-being and barriers to help-seeking among Arab-speaking MENA immigrants and refugees (IRs) in North America. Guided by Arksey and O’Malley’s Scoping Studies Methodological Framework, we use the Population, Concept, and Context (PCC) framework recommended by Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) for scoping reviews to establish eligibility criteria selecting for original peer-reviewed articles published in English between 1999 and 2022. The search utilizes five databases: PubMed, CINAHL Plus, PsycINFO, Academic Search Complete, and Family Studies Abstracts. A total of 47 sources were selected based on the study criteria. Common themes are extracted which generate the identification of key risk and protective factors for well-being and barriers to help-seeking among the target population. The risk factors identified are acculturative stress, prevalence and impact of domestic violence, migration trauma, and intergenerational conflict. Protective factors identified are social support, ethnic and religious identity, and supportive parental and school experiences. Barriers to help-seeking include sociocultural, organizational, legal, and economic factors. Implications for future research and practice with Arab-speaking MENA IRs in North America are discussed.
      PubDate: 2024-01-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s40609-023-00330-6
       
  • Correction to: Early Neonatal Mortality in India

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      PubDate: 2024-01-20
      DOI: 10.1007/s40609-024-00333-x
       
  • Exploring the Role of Perceived Social Support on Subjective Well-Being
           Among Youth in India

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      Abstract: Abstract The study investigates the relationship between an individual’s sense of well-being and various factors related to their social environment, including parental relationships, peer connections, and perception of support from friends, neighbors, and institutions in the community. The analysis was conducted using data from the Young Lives Study in India. The final analysis included a sample of 894 participants aged 21–22 years. The study’s results, obtained through an ordinal logistic regression model, revealed significant positive associations between subjective well-being and perceived support from friends (β = 0.23, p = 0.000) and government organizations (β = 0.15, p = 0.001). In other words, participants who perceived higher levels of support from their friends and government institutions also tended to have a higher sense of well-being. A significant positive association was also observed between continued education in youth and subjective well-being (β = 0.41, p = 0.009). These findings suggest that social support groups for youth, which provide opportunities to connect with others in their community, can contribute to their overall well-being. Additionally, the study highlights the importance of strengthening the outreach of existing government programs to support youth and promote higher education. By enhancing the availability and accessibility of these programs, the well-being of youth in the country can be positively influenced. Overall, this research emphasizes the role of social support networks and government initiatives in promoting the well-being of youth in India.
      PubDate: 2024-01-15
      DOI: 10.1007/s40609-024-00332-y
       
  • Early Neonatal Mortality in India

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      Abstract: Abstract There has been a substantial decline in infant and child mortality in the recent decade compared to the Neonatal mortality rate; this has consistently resulted in an increased contribution of neonatal deaths to overall infant mortality over the years. The present study systematically tries to assess the trends and determinants of early neonatal mortality in India using the two rounds of National Family Health Survey data (namely; NFHS-3 and 5). Data analysis was carried out using bivariate and multivariate and decomposition techniques. The prevalence of early neonatal mortality has declined from 3% in 2005 to 2.1% in 2019–2021. Results from regression and decomposition analyses attribute mother’s height, birth order and sex of the child, child weight at birth, caste, religion, wealth quintiles, place of delivery, media exposure, health insurance coverage, and region of the residence as the major contributing factors for the decline in early neonatal mortality. The findings of the study indicate the importance of further improving women’s education, mother’s age at first birth, reducing gender differentials, and improving other socio-economic development indicators to reduce newborn mortality.
      PubDate: 2024-01-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s40609-023-00326-2
       
  • The Effect of Healthcare Service Quality Dimensions on Patient
           Satisfaction Among Primary Care Settings in Nigeria

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      Abstract: Abstract This cross-sectional study examines the effects of service quality dimensions on patient satisfaction in primary care settings. A structured questionnaire based on five service quality dimensions of assurance, responsiveness, empathy, reliability, and tangibility was administered to 300 patients who had recently utilized care services in five selected primary healthcare facilities in Adamawa State, Nigeria. Structural equation model was used to assess the causal relationships between service quality dimensions and patient satisfaction. The measurement model specified the relationships between the latent constructs and their respective indicators. Several model fit indices were employed to evaluate the goodness-of-fit of the structural equation model. Common indices such as chi-square (χ2), comparative fit index (CFI), the Tucker-Lewis index (TLI), root-mean-square error of approximation (RMSEA), and standardized root-mean-square residual (SRMR) were used to assess how well the model fits the observed data. The results showed that each variable involved in the latent construct obtained from observed latent indicators had no significant effect on patient satisfaction. The estimates of patients’ perception of service quality delivery against patients’ satisfaction were not significant at the 5% level, indicating that the service deliveries at primary care in Adamawa State did not meet customer satisfaction. This suggests that there are no causal effects between patients’ perception of quality service delivery and their service satisfaction. Thus, patients perceived that the quality of services provided to them did not improve their satisfaction. The study concludes that there is no significant effect of service quality dimensions on patient satisfaction in Adamawa State Primary Care. The study suggests that policymakers and hospital administrators should take measures to improve the quality of services provided to meet patients’ expectations and improve their satisfaction.
      PubDate: 2024-01-05
      DOI: 10.1007/s40609-023-00329-z
       
  • Faith Healing Techniques in the Management of Sickle Cell Anaemia in
           Nigeria

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      Abstract: Abstract People living with sickle cell anaemia (SCA) tend to experience multiple sources of therapy complemented by self-care practices. In Nigeria, over 100,000 babies are born yearly with sickle cell anaemia. High prevalence of this disease in Nigeria is attributed to lack of adequate knowledge about it. Data exist on the role of Western medicine and traditional medicine in the management of several diseases including sickle cell anaemia but little is known about faith therapy. This study therefore examined faith healing techniques in the management of SCA outside the medical settings. Using Weber’s Social Action Theory and Health Belief Model as explanatory framework, qualitative data were obtained through snowball sampling technique which cut across seven local government areas (LGAs) of Osun State—Atakumosa West, Boripe, Osogbo, Ife East, Ifedayo, Ilesa West, and Ila. A total of twenty Key Informant Interview sessions were held while three case studies were generated from the respondents. The study revealed that treatment techniques include prayer, application of herbs, divination, and counselling. Poor adherence to treatment was noted to be due to emotional trauma being experienced by patients and caregivers. Prayer and counselling were effective therapy to manage the condition. Both Christian and Muslim clerics engaged used prayer and fasting as treatment techniques, even though they also recognized the need for modern medical services. Traditional healers diagnosed the disease with divination and applied herbs and charms as well as appease the perceived spirit causing the disease. The Muslim clerics also use herbs. Majority of the practitioners recognized that the problem of emotional trauma (the major threat to adherence to treatment and positive health outcomes) is best surmounted through prayer and fasting. In terms of treatment, the general trends thus entail combination of faith healing through prayer and fasting, spiritual consultation, and the practice of embracing modern medicine where SCA patients are referred to hospitals. This paper therefore concluded that culture and society provide the context for understanding the prevention and treatment of diseases.
      PubDate: 2024-01-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s40609-023-00323-5
       
 
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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 201 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted by number of followers
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access  
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access  
Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift     Open Access  
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  

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