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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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Clinical Social Work Journal
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.498
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 27  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-3343 - ISSN (Online) 0091-1674
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • EMDR with First-Generation College Students At-Risk of Facing a Forced
           Marriage

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      Abstract: Abstract In forced marriage cases, individuals and couples are coerced by emotional and physical violence into marriage and risk ostracization from their community. Often compounding these complexities are the challenges many forced marriage survivors additionally have as first-generation college students (FGCS), specifically when wanting to pursue an education that conflict with the marriage chosen for them by their families. However, there are limited studies and clinical interventions addressing the nature of forced marriage and its emotional and psychological impact on at-risk adult survivors and FGCS in the United States. Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy (EMDR), a trauma intervention targeting post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety symptoms including guilt and shame, may help at-risk forced marriage survivors and FGCS address these symptoms. I hypothesize that using EMDR as a clinical intervention may empower at-risk adult forced marriage survivors, including those who also identify as FGCS, to free themselves from taking responsibility for their families, prioritize their emotional needs, and work towards independence.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Social Workers’ Knowledge and Attitudes About Evidence-Based Practice:
           Differences Between Graduate Students, Educators, and Practitioners

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      Abstract: Abstract The implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) is increasingly being stressed as a responsibility of social work practitioners and social work educators. Clinical social work practitioners have been encouraged to use EBP to guide practice decision making, relying not only on research, but also considering the client’s preferences and the professional expertise of the practitioner. Despite this momentum, not every social worker utilizes EBP as a part of their work, citing barriers including lack of understanding, limited access to resources, and concerns about specific EBPs interfering with the therapeutic process. This article adds to the literature by describing results from research which examined differences in familiarity and attitudes about the implementation of EBP among three classes of social workers: social work graduate students, social work educators, and practitioners. Results indicated a statistically significant difference between groups in familiarity with EBP; graduate students reported significantly less familiarity with implementing EBP when compared to educators and practitioners. Additionally, graduate students and educators reported significantly more positive attitudes about using EBP when compared to practitioners. The field of social work and social work education needs to support social work students as they transition from the classroom to the workforce by providing ongoing education, support, and supervision around the implementation of EBP, while also encouraging social workers to learn skills to address any barriers. Recommended strategies for supporting the use of EBP in the field are shared.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Effects of Video-Guided Group vs. Solitary Meditation on Mindfulness and
           Social Connectivity: A Pilot Study

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      Abstract: Abstract Interest in mindfulness meditation continues to grow as accumulating evidence suggests mindfulness training encourages more positive functioning. However, basic questions about the conditions best suited for realizing mindful states remain unanswered. Prominent among these is whether a group mindfulness practice setting is more effective for novice meditators than a solitary practice setting. Answering this question has assumed new urgency due to the imposition of physical distancing measures designed to stop the spread of COVID-19. In a time of limited social contact, is a simulated group practice setting better than practicing alone' This preliminary study investigated whether environmental setting impacted mindfulness practice experience by examining the effects of three simulated meditation practice environments (1. group practice, 2. nature practice, and 3. solitary practice) on state mindfulness and perceived social connectivity in a sample of novice meditators. Significant differences emerged across the three simulated practice settings. Findings suggest watching others meditate while meditating appears to most effectively induce a state of mindfulness and strengthen feelings of social connectivity. This study supports traditional beliefs about the benefits of group mindfulness practice. These findings also have implications for social workers struggling to stretch limited resources to address growing mental health demands, especially during times of heightened social isolation due to COVID-19. If a simulated group practice confers the same cognitive benefits as solitary practice while also conferring social benefits, simulated group instruction may be preferable for therapeutic and economic reasons.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Mechanisms of religious trauma amongst queer people in Australia’s
           evangelical churches

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      Abstract: Abstract Christian communities teaching traditional theology and ethics, which treat diverse sexualities and gender expansive identities as sinful, can be places where faithful LGBTQIA + people are subject to spiritual abuse. This paper explores the complex dynamics and multilayered mechanisms of this abuse in Australian Evangelical Christianity. It is based on a qualitative research project using 24 semi-structured interviews with LGBTQIA + people who have spent two or more years in Evangelical church settings. The project found that participants were subject to mischaracterization and viewed as a moral threat, and consequently experienced erasure, social distancing, and suffered psychological trauma. The paper uses minority stress and micro-aggression theory to conceptualize these experiences and inform social work practice. It also shows the rich resilience and spiritual growth of participants who navigated trauma and sometimes emerged with a more nuanced and deeper faith. These findings will help queer people coming out in Evangelical churches to understand their experiences, and provide clinicians and others supporting people that have experienced spiritual trauma with conceptual tools and practical examples to aid in therapy and informal recovery settings.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • “There is Just a Different Energy”: Changes in the Therapeutic
           Relationship with the Telehealth Transition

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      Abstract: Abstract The therapeutic relationship (TR), including its therapeutic frame, is the foundation of the therapeutic endeavor. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic and the rapid transition to videoconferencing for therapeutic encounters, we employed a cross-sectional exploratory survey with 1490 respondents to understand how practitioners adapted to the changes. In this secondary analysis focused on the TR, we analyze the clinicians’ (N = 448) spontaneous narratives about facets of the TR. Temporally, we focused on how these adaptations occurred during the initial part of the pandemic before vaccination was available and while the TR was still adapting to teletherapy videoconferencing under the duress of pandemic crises. We find three broad themes: (1) It is a “much more remote relationship”; (2) The "connection…remains surprisingly strong"; and (3) It is “energetically taxing.” Each reflects clinicians’ views of the TR as altered, but surprisingly resilient. Although grateful for the safety of virtual therapeutic encounters, clinicians mourned the loss of an embodied encounter, experienced depletion of energy beyond Zoom fatigue, and nonetheless recognized their clients’ and their own abilities to adapt.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Bridges to Sobriety: Testing the Feasibility and Acceptability of a Mobile
           App Designed to Supplement an Adolescent Substance Use Disorder Treatment
           Program

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      Abstract: Abstract Adolescent substance use is a growing problem that causes a myriad of negative outcomes. Using substances during adolescence can lead to decreased executive functioning and is correlated with the top three causes of deaths for adolescents. Treatment options vary and the impact on outcomes are mixed, with engagement being of the most important indicators. Gaming is a popular activity among adolescents, and yet smartphone applications are relatively unexplored within substance use disorder treatment programs. This paper explores the feasibility and acceptability of implementing a mobile application as a supplement to existing adolescent substance use disorder treatment in a behavioral health agency in eastern Missouri. Feedback was received from staff and clients to assess feasibility and acceptability of implementation with barriers discussed. Results indicate there is promise with incorporation of smartphone-based applications into existing interventions and act as recommendations for other providers.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Context Matters: Differential Effects of Discrimination by Environmental
           Context on Depressive Symptoms Among College Students of Color

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      Abstract: Abstract Experiences with more subtle racism – which have been called microaggressions – have a host of negative effects on health, mental health, educational performance, and general well-being on people of color. In this study we draw on a longitudinal dataset of Black, Latinx, and Asian students in higher education and use the microaggression framework to distinguish between the types of reported subtle experiences with discrimination, including (1) classroom-based, or perceived discrimination or discomfort in the classroom; (2) microassaults, or verbal assaults; (3) discomfort, or perceived discomfort on campus because of race, (4) criminality, which refers to both being stopped by University police and (5) refusal to acknowledge intra-racial differences, which here describes experiences with intraracial microaggressions. Our findings explore (1) the differential effects of different types of microaggressions on symptoms of depression (2) intergroup differences in effects of microaggressions on depression and (3) the differential effects of different types of microaggressions over time.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Examining Racial Differences in Internalizing and Externalizing Diagnoses
           for Children Exposed to Adverse Childhood Experiences

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      Abstract: Abstract A substantial evidence base has established both that adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) deleteriously impact youth mental health outcomes and that racial biases in diagnosing youth are common among mental health professionals. However, the literature to date has hardly examined the relationship between ACEs and diagnostic disparities based on race. This study examines how racial disparities and ACEs contribute to childhood diagnoses of internalizing and externalizing disorders. Using data from the 2017 National Survey of Children’s Health, racial disparities in internalizing (i.e., depression, anxiety) and externalizing (i.e., behavioral/conduct problems) mental health diagnoses were analyzed using logistic regression. ACE score was a significant predictor of all three diagnoses and presented a dose–response relationship. Race was also found to be a significant predictor of diagnoses, as Black children were less likely to be diagnosed with anxiety or depression and more likely to be diagnosed with behavioral problems. Moreover, when examining racial disparities in mental health diagnoses by ACE score, the present study found that the severity of these disparities increased at higher ACE scores. Our study demonstrates that while ACEs are harmful for all children, providers’ identification of internalizing and externalizing disorders appears to occur differentially based on the race of the child they diagnose. These findings yield important insights about potential bias among healthcare providers, educators, and clinical social workers and warrant further research, training for professionals, and culturally responsive interventions. As such, we call on clinical social workers to lead the effort to address racial disparities within mental health services.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • A Systematic Review of African-Centered Therapeutic Interventions with
           Black American Adults

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      Abstract: Abstract While substantial theoretical literature and growing evidence support the benefits of employing African-centered approaches with Black youth, research examining the overall effectiveness of Culturally Sensitive Interventions with Black adults remains largely unexplored. Responsively, this review discusses the current scope of African-centered interventions with Black American adults. Using a comprehensive search of electronic bibliographic databases, we identified African-centered interventions studies completed in the United States. Six studies met the full inclusion criteria of our review. Findings support that ACIs are associated with positive outcomes in Black adults’ self-concept, cultural identity, emotional coping skills, and reduction of depressive symptoms. However, given the small number of studies and concerns regarding the heterogeneity in studies’ methodological rigor, we recommend additional research to expand our understanding of African-centered interventions to guide practice interventions with Black adult clients.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Demonstrating LGBTQ+ Affirmative Practice in Groups:: Developing
           Competence through Simulation-Based Learning

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      Abstract: Abstract Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and other sexual and/or gender minority (LGBTQ+) populations experience significant mental and behavioral health disparities. Social workers are uniquely positioned to address these vulnerabilities. However, clinical graduate education has not effectively promoted or taught competent practice with LGBTQ+ populations. This qualitative study details the foundational competencies required for affirmative practice in group therapy with LGBTQ+ populations and describes a simulation-based learning activity designed to develop these competencies in graduate students. The following themes were identified as critical to affirmative practice, as identified through student reflections on their simulation-based learning experiences: deeply engaging in a strengths-based stance, keeping the group in group therapy, avoiding the expert trap, and managing identity assumptions. Implications for clinical social work education and practice are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-08-16
       
  • Social Support Networks of Individuals with Depressive Disorders: A
           Cross-sectional Survey in Former Psychiatric Inpatients in Germany

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      Abstract: Abstract Depressive disorders are related to social withdrawal and a loss of social contacts. Moreover, a lack of social integration and social support are risk factors for relapse and rehospitalization. Despite the crucial role of social networks for mental health and social support, knowledge about the structure of social networks or how they promote social support in terms of coping with depressive disorders is scarce. The present study aims to analyze social support in people with depressive disorders using ego-centered social network analysis for formal description. Ninety-seven former psychiatric inpatients participated in the study. Network size and density, a small number of conflicts in the relationships of ego to alters, and the multiplexity of social support dimensions were associated with perceived social support—measured via Social Support Questionnaire (F-Soz-U-K-14). Considering relational ratios which correlated with perceived social support, five types of social support networks were differentiated by means of cluster analysis: (1) no social support, (2) professionally supported birth family, (3) the more the merrier, (4) concentrated support, (5) overchallenged nuclear family. More than each relational characteristic on its own, their co-occurring patterns as network types provide the very structures of social support. This underpins the crucial role of structural approaches and networking skills in social work practice. German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS): DRKS00011561. Trial registration date: 10. March 2017.
      PubDate: 2022-08-12
       
  • Here We Go!

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      PubDate: 2022-08-11
       
  • Differentiation of Self and Internal Distress: The Mediating Roles of
           Vulnerable Narcissism and Maladaptive Perfectionism

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      Abstract: Abstract Persons living in individualistic cultures with low levels of differentiation of self are prone to experiencing internal distress. The specific pathway by which this relationship occurs, however, has been minimally studied. We hypothesized that two psychological constructs which are related to differentiation of self—vulnerable narcissism and maladaptive perfectionism—would partially explain its negative outcomes. A serial mediation model supported the explanatory roles of vulnerable narcissism and maladaptive perfectionism in the relationship between differentiation of self and internal distress. This study draws attention to the contributing roles of vulnerable narcissism and maladaptive perfectionism for clinical social workers seeking to understand and alleviate the psychological distress commonly experienced by persons with low self-differentiation.
      PubDate: 2022-08-06
       
  • The Clinically Modified Buddhist Psychological Model for Social Work
           Practice and Self-care

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      Abstract: Abstract It is clear from the international social work literature that social workers experience high levels of stress and burnout due to the cognitive, emotional and physical demands of the profession. There are however no integrative theories, developed by social workers, on how this stress, burnout and its impact on the emotional and psychological well-being of social workers can be ameliorated and then improved. This article makes an original contribution to this literature by proposing the use of the clinically modified Buddhist psychological model, as a beneficial lens for understanding how to improve reflective practice in social work along with the feelings of stress, burnout, anxiety, low mood and well-being deficits that can result from social work practice. This paper will outline the rationale for the development of the clinically modified Buddhist psychological model, before outlining the theory itself and how it might support stress coping processes and reflective social work practice. This paper has significance for all social workers, social work students and social work educators, as it provides a theory which could help to inform improved reflective social work practice and self-care.
      PubDate: 2022-06-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-022-00849-9
       
  • Social Work Responses to Domestic Violence During the COVID-19 Pandemic:
           Experiences and Perspectives of Professionals at Women’s Shelters in
           Sweden

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      Abstract: Abstract This study explores how social work professionals at women’s shelters in Sweden experience, understand, and are responding to domestic violence under the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. A qualitative longitudinal research design was employed, and multiple semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 professionals at women’s shelters over a period of one year. The results are presented in three overall themes; (a) professional challenges due to increased needs, (b) professionals’ adjustments to new circumstances, and (c) professionals’ attributions regarding client barriers to help seeking. The results show diverse and changing experiences among the professionals as the pandemic progressed. Clients and professionals have shared the same collective trauma associated with the pandemic, which has affected the professionals’ understanding of and response to domestic violence. The professionals understand both clients and themselves as being more vulnerable and susceptible to risk under these new circumstances. Social work adjustments focused on maintaining contact, reducing risk and prioritizing safety, which had both positive and negative consequences for both clients and professionals. The study concludes that the professionals coped with the uncertainty they experienced during the pandemic by relying on both their previous knowledge and work experience of domestic violence and their experience of sharing trauma with clients.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-022-00833-3
       
  • Long-Term Effects of a Cult Childhood on Attachment, Intimacy, and Close
           Relationships: Results of an In-Depth Interview Study

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      Abstract: Abstract Cults are religious organizations requiring total commitment and submission from their members. They form a highly controlling environment with rigid structures to suppress individuality. Being born and raised within a cultic community has a significant impact on the life course of those affected. Especially after exit or exclusion, second generation ex-members commonly have to face different challenges. This study aimed to investigate these cultic childhood experiences and their long-term effects on the individual development and the further lives of those affected. Former cult members (n = 16) who were born and raised in cultic groups participated in an in-depth qualitative interview study. The findings indicate that growing up in a family belonging to a cult is often associated with serious restrictions, burdens and even traumatization. Later in life, this may lead to the development of self-esteem problems, mental disorders, and difficulties in intimate relationships. Individual life experiences should be taken into account when providing help for those who have grown up in a cult and managed to get out of it. Based on the study results, recommendations for psycho-social practice are presented in this paper.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-020-00773-w
       
  • The Mental Health Impacts of Successive Disasters: Examining the Roles of
           Individual and Community Resilience Following a Tornado and COVID-19

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      Abstract: Abstract Prior research has found that exposure to natural hazards and infectious disease are associated with adverse mental health outcomes. Less studied are the ways that individual-level and community-level resilience can protect against problematic mental health outcomes following exposure to successive disaster events. In the current study, we examine the role of individual and community resilience on mental health outcomes among 412 adults in Nashville, Tennessee exposed to an EF-3 tornado followed by the COVID-19 pandemic. Results found the cumulative impact of exposure to the tornado and COVID-19 was related to higher levels of PTS and depression symptoms. Individual resilience had a protective, inverse relationship with PTS and depression symptoms and mediated the relationship between community resilience and adverse mental health outcomes. Findings support the development of a multi-system disaster resilience framework that links individual resilience capacities to broader community resilience capacities to activate and sustain healthy adaptation following exposure to successive disasters.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-021-00830-y
       
  • Traumatic Stress and Homelessness: A Review of the Literature for
           Practitioners

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      Abstract: Abstract A growing body of evidence connects traumatic stress and homelessness, which illustrates the importance of trauma and-resiliency-informed care (TIC) to appropriately serve persons experiencing homelessness (PEH). This paper reviews the literature on traumatic stress, including the biology of trauma as well as psychosocial, environmental, and systemic factors. These areas of knowledge constitute necessary elements when designing systems of care for PEH in order to provide effective services, avoid re-traumatization, and create healing environments to foster resilience. The authors identify trauma-specific evidence-based therapies, and comprehensive programmatic approaches that stem from established trauma-informed core values. Practical applications of the reviewed literature are utilized to demonstrate how organizations can adopt a trauma and resiliency-informed approach, based on both the reviewed literature as well as the authors’ collective clinical experience. A key takeaway is an emerging consensus that service providers must consider trauma when designing and offering services to persons with a history of homelessness. The authors offer recommendations for future pathways to create outcome measurement tools for social service providers based on the theory of self-efficacy and using concrete, quantifiable variables.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-021-00824-w
       
  • The 15 Year Relay

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      PubDate: 2022-04-27
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-022-00846-y
       
  • The Use of Neuroscience in Interventions for Intimate Partner Violence
           (IPV): A Scoping Review

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper presents a scoping review of empirical studies on the incorporation of neuroscience into interventions for survivors of intimate partner violence. Using Arksey and O’Malley’s framework for scoping reviews, 13 articles were collected for this review. The results showed an overall paucity of research incorporating neuroscience into intimate partner violence interventions. The majority of the studies were conducted in North America, split between various fields of medicine, nursing, psychology, and social work, and were all published between 2013 and 2020, showing the timeliness of this topic. A majority of the studies used quantitative design, with fewer using qualitative or mixed methods design. While some articles described fully integrating neuroscience into study design, most articles highlighted its significance and called for a further examination of the role of neuroscience in this field. This paper offers suggestions for the inclusion of neuroscience into social work practice with those impacted by intimate partner violence.
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-022-00840-4
       
 
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