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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 201 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted by number of followers
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access  
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access  
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access  
Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift     Open Access  
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  

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Clinical Social Work Journal
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.498
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 28  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-3343 - ISSN (Online) 0091-1674
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • The Perceived Job Performance of Child Welfare Workers During the COVID-19
           Pandemic

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      Abstract: Abstract While the evidence on the adverse impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the well-being of frontline social workers is emerging, the research on the impact of the pandemic on their performance is scarce. The presented study explores how the relationship between work environment predictors and perceived stress explains the job performance of child welfare social workers during the pandemic using survey responses of 878 child welfare social workers. The findings revealed the mechanism through which environment predictors and perceived stress interacted in explaining job performance during a time of large-scale crisis. We found that C.W. social workers who experienced greater COVID-19-related service restrictions reported poorer job performance, that perceived stress disrupted workers’ supervision and autonomy, and that supervision and job autonomy protected C.W. social workers from the adverse effects of perceived stress and workload on their job performance. Conclusions included the importance of autonomy and supervision in mitigating job-related stressors and the need to adapt and enhance child welfare supervision during times of national crisis.
      PubDate: 2023-01-20
       
  • Exploring Shared Trauma in the Time of COVID: A Simulation-Based Survey
           Study of Mental Health Clinicians

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      Abstract: Abstract From fear of contracting the virus, isolation from physical distancing, to navigating lifework balance, the COVID-19 pandemic is expected to leave long-lasting psychosocial impacts on many. Shared trauma refers to similar psychological reactions to an extraordinary community event when experienced by both the clinicians and clients. We examined the experiences mong mental health clinicians in Canada and the United States (n = 196) in this online survey study during the second phase of the pandemic (Spring 2021). In addition to using traditional survey items (e.g., demographics, scales, and short answers), we also used video-recorded Simulated Clients (SC; i.e., professional actors) as a novel method to elicit the participants’ assessment of the SCs and the psychosocial impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Using shared trauma as a theoretical framework, we analyzed both quantitative and qualitative data. Quantitative results suggested that although these mental health clinicians certainly reported experiencing psychosocial impacts of the pandemic themselves, these shared experiences with client and general populations did not greatly impact how they understood the SCs. Qualitative results helped further contextualize the clinicians’ own personal and professional lives. Implications for clinical practice and further research related to shared trauma are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-12-15
       
  • Making Meaning of Homicide Through Intentionality and Action: The Findings
           of a Grounded Theory Study

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      Abstract: Abstract Homicide survivors struggle, often long-term, with a crisis of meaning that can complicate grief and undermine healing. This manuscript provides a magnification of Stage 3 of the Theory of Post-Homicide Spiritual Change (Theory of PHSC), a three-stage grounded theory of healing after homicide among 30 homicide survivors, developed by Johnson and Zitzmann (A grounded theory of the process of spiritual change among homicide survivors. OMEGA-Journal of Death and Dying, 81(1), 37–65. https://doi.org/10.1177/0030222818755285). Stage 1 of the Theory of PHSC occurs in the early aftermath of a murder and is characterized by a state of shock and disintegration of survivors’ belief systems. In Stage 2, survivors undergo an indefinite and stagnating process of grappling with a crisis of meaning. Some survivors eventually shift into the third stage of healing that is a focus of this manuscript. Abandoning their unanswered questions, they shift into a mode of making meaning focused on creating significance through intentional action. By providing a magnification of Stage 3 of the Theory of PHSC, this manuscript yield in-depth insights that can be used to help social work practitioners and other helping professionals harness the healing potential of meaning-making grounded in action and support survivors in regaining a sense of renewal and forward momentum in their lives.
      PubDate: 2022-12-08
       
  • Acknowledging Soul Loss from an Indigenous Perspective to Promote Healing
           in Prison

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      Abstract: Abstract People incarcerated in the United States suffer disproportionately higher rates of substance use and mental health diagnoses than the general population. Treatment as usual is not sufficient, as evidenced by extremely high recidivism rates. Established links between trauma, depression and criminal behavior make it apparent that incarcerated people have many vulnerabilities underlying their maladaptive behaviors. The author’s use of self and an Indigenous perspective illustrate the concept of soul loss, which is when a part of one’s vital essence fragments to escape the full impact of anguish from a traumatic event. Soul loss exacerbates shame, hopelessness, and an overall visceral sense of spiritlessness evidenced by feelings of emptiness and disconnection. Indigenous wisdom can provide a nuanced understanding of incarcerated individuals’ moral and emotional experiences. From this perspective, it is essential to balance head and heart wisdom for a holistic appreciation of the human experience. Addressing soul loss in a supportive therapeutic context promotes self-compassion, forgiveness, and the integration of fragmented parts for healing, ultimately reducing relapse and recidivism. This paper shares a journey of growth, demonstrating how clinicians may use integrative psychotherapy for people who are incarcerated to heal within the intersubjective space and themselves.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Knowledge and Skills for Social Workers on Mobile Crisis Intervention
           Teams

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      Abstract: Abstract Public outrage over police-involved deaths of people in mental health crisis has prompted governments to expand access to crisis services that partner police with social workers. Mobile Crisis Intervention Teams (MCIT) offer assessment and support for people in distress while averting escalation. Little attention has been given to the requisite competencies for social workers on MCITs. This narrative review, informed by crisis theory and the author’s experience as an MCIT social worker, provides a roadmap of knowledge and skills to familiarize practitioners, educators, and students with this growing intervention model. Social workers on MCITs should have the capacity to engage complex clients, de-escalate tension, assess for risk, plan for safety, provide brief addiction counselling, diffuse interpersonal conflict, link clients with community resources, advocate for change, challenge systemic racism, build constructive relationships, and document services with awareness of relevant legislation. The role of social workers on MCITs is multifaceted and requires attention to balancing client well-being, client safety, and community safety. The practice insights discussed in this article are relevant to preventing harm and loss of life while facilitating engagement between clients and mental health services.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-021-00823-x
       
  • How to be Yourself: Student Perspectives on Learning Use of Self

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      Abstract: Abstract Use of self is a core concept in the development of authentic social work and human services practice. For students with a history of adversity, learning how to integrate past adverse experiences into their use of self can be difficult. Adversity may have motivated many to enter the helping professions, but students may not always be sure how and when their adverse experiences can be integrated into their use of self. A qualitative survey of students from three different universities in South East Queensland, Australia, found that recognizing experiences of adversity and their impact could be an essential component in learning use of self. Further data was collected via interviews with 20 students at the primary researcher’s university. A grounded theory approach enabled qualitative data to be analyzed from 199 surveys and all interviews to explore how student experiences of adversity contributed to their understanding and development of use of self. By acknowledging past adversity, students described how they used a relational rather than a traditional dichotomous model of use of self in learning to be a practitioner. The outcomes of this study highlight the importance of formally acknowledging students’ own lived experiences of adversity and the importance of understanding use of self from a relational perspective for this cohort.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-020-00766-9
       
  • Revitalizing Alfred Adler: An Echo for Equality

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      Abstract: Abstract The work of Alfred Adler’s Individual Psychology arguably applies to contemporary social work practice and education. The tenets of Individual Psychology are reviewed in the context of a historical sketch of Adler's work as a medical doctor, psychoanalyst, and colleague of Freud. His eventual divergence from psychoanalysis to begin his own psychological and education movement which focused on social reform is emphasized. Individual Psychology is examined in detail including original case examples demonstrating his influence on and compatibility with contemporary social work theories. Empirical evidence is provided supporting present-day application of his theory. Adler serves as a much-needed example of a professional who successfully and simultaneously advanced both the micro and macro world of mental health. Adler's contribution deserves to be explicitly included in social work curricula.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-021-00793-0
       
  • Examining the Dose–Response Relationship: Applying the Disaster Exposure
           Matrix to Understand the Mental Health Impacts of Hurricane Sandy

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      Abstract: Abstract Disaster exposure is a strong predictor of survivor mental health following large-scale disasters. However, there is continued debate regarding how disaster exposure should be measured and quantified, as well as whether specific types of disaster exposure are more likely to influence certain mental health outcomes like psychological distress or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this article, we propose the Disaster Exposure Matrix to explain how specific types and levels of disaster exposure are associated with particular mental health outcomes. We use data from the Sandy Child and Family Health study—an observational cohort study of 1000 randomly selected New Jersey residents who were living in the nine counties most-affected by Hurricane Sandy (2012)—to examine how direct and indirect disaster exposure at both the individual and community levels influence the likelihood of experiencing psychological distress and probable PTSD in the two years after Hurricane Sandy. Weighted logistic regression models demonstrate that particular measures of individual-level direct and indirect exposure uniquely influence probable PTSD and psychological distress, respectively. Community-level indirect exposure is significantly associated with psychological distress but not with probable PTSD. Findings highlight the importance of specificity when measuring the effects of disaster exposure on mental health, including separating exposures that occur at the individual and community level, as well as distinguishing those that are experienced directly from the event from those that are indirect and experienced after the meteorological or geophysical event has passed.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-021-00814-y
       
  • The Unexpected Comfort of Feeling It All: A Support Group for Mothers of
           Autistic Adolescents Using the Lens of Ambiguous Loss

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      Abstract: Abstract Many parents experience grief and loss in response to their child receiving an autism diagnosis in early childhood. However, there is a dearth of research that considers if grief and loss are experienced by parents throughout their child’s adolescence and young adulthood. Further, there is a small but growing body of evidence suggesting that parents of autistic children may be living with ambiguous loss in particular, that is, a loss for which there is no closure or resolution. This case study introduces a peer group intervention utilizing an ambiguous loss framework that school social workers and other clinicians can adopt to support mothers of autistic adolescents who are struggling with ambiguous loss. Through the group process, the mothers developed deeper understanding, self-compassion, and effective coping strategies, resulting in a more resilient approach to the transition process and an enhanced capacity to plan for a meaningful adult life with their autistic child.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-022-00834-2
       
  • Engagement with a Multi-Component, Preventative Program to Reduce Child
           Maltreatment: Program Satisfaction and Acceptability

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      Abstract: Abstract The development and implementation of interventions to prevent child maltreatment (CM) is particularly challenging in view of the numerous stressors experienced by families within the child welfare system (CWS). Difficulties engaging families, particularly those who are most vulnerable, can lead to lower program dose and poorer outcomes. This qualitative study, conducted as part of a larger process evaluation, explored participant perspectives of a newly developed, multi-component, community-based intervention designed to reduce the risk of CM in families with young children. The study involved one-to-one interviews with a sub-sample of mothers (n = 12) recruited through statutory and community-based social work services. Several brief program satisfaction questionnaires were also completed by parents. Mothers reported a stronger parent–child bond and greater use of positive parenting strategies (e.g. improved communication and discipline strategies) following the intervention. Facilitator and group support emerged as strong themes throughout the interviews and were important factors in facilitating engagement and reducing drop-out. High levels of program satisfaction were also reported. The study findings demonstrate how a multi-component program, which combines an evidence-based treatment (EBT) with community-based supports, may offer a promising approach for social work practitioners in reducing CM and in better meeting the more complex needs of families within the CWS. However, a more thorough understanding of the factors which promote program engagement and retention, is crucial to maximizing the benefits of interventions designed to support more vulnerable families.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-021-00789-w
       
  • Emerging Elderhood: Transitions from Midlife

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      Abstract: Abstract As the number of older adults grows exponentially, social work and psychology practice must embrace a more nuanced appreciation of the aging process. Family life is evolving in unprecedented ways, leaving adults with new challenges and choices for how best to live out their lives. Adults may face difficult decisions and increased anxieties regarding their own health, concern for loved ones, and uncertainties about the future. The noteworthy trends associated with the “new adulthood” holds clinical significance and raises important questions for contemporary practice. Our collective clinical and research experience with older adults suggests a re-envisioning of the threshold from midlife to older adulthood as well as an expansion of clinical sensitivity to issues raised by clients. We conceptualize this transition period as Emerging Elderhood (EE) and propose key tasks, developmental opportunities, and suggestions for clinicians to guide clients toward adaptation and change.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-021-00791-2
       
  • Eating Disorder Symptoms, Non-suicidal Self-injury, and Suicidal Behavior
           are Associated Among College Men

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      Abstract: Abstract Research on eating disorders among men has been lacking. In particular, little research has investigated the ways in which eating disorders are associated with non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidal behavior among college men, despite preliminary support for their co-occurrence and high prevalence in this age group. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the associations between eating disorder symptoms, NSSI, and suicidal behavior among a large sample of college men (n = 14,964) from the 2017–2018 Healthy Minds Study. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted to obtain the associations between a positive eating disorder screen and NSSI, suicidal ideation, and a suicide attempt while adjusting for covariates and demographic variables. Among the sample, nearly 16% of participants screened positive for an eating disorder. Participants who reported any form of NSSI [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.45–1.88, p < 0.001] or suicidal ideation (AOR 1.36, 95% CI 1.16–1.58, p < 0.001) in the past 12 months had greater odds of screening positive for an eating disorder after adjusting for covariates and demographic variables. NSSI and suicidal ideation are accompanied by increased risk of eating disorder symptoms among college men. The interrelations of these harmful behaviors among college men should be taken into account to improve identification and intervention efforts.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-021-00831-x
       
  • Connecting Loose Ends: Integrating Science into Psychoanalytic Theory

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      Abstract: Abstract Freud wanted to be a scientist but fell short of this goal in several ways: first by attempting to make psychoanalysis consistent with Newtonian physics, second by not being rigorous with the scientific method, and finally, by responding to political and social needs. As a result, science did not welcome psychoanalysis into its fold. Fortunately, this is changing. In the years since Freud’s death, two science-based psychoanalytic theories have developed: attachment theory and affect theory. They are both measurable and supported by social psychology, neuroscience, and infant research. We will explore the central importance of affect as well as treatment implications. The work of Bowlby and Tomkins is complementary, and their integration leads to a more complete understanding of psychic phenomena. We will demonstrate how these theorists validate the work of Fairbairn and Winnicott, both of whom remained in the shadow of Freud. Our premise is that the theoretical differences are semantic, based in politics, and that we can bring these theories together should we acknowledge these differences. We will consider how Winnicott’s awareness and sensitivity to parental intrusion should be integrated with attachment theory. In doing so, we want to add to Bowlby’s idea of “secure attachment” and introduce the concepts of “secure enough detachment” and “secure enough attachment”. The former concept appreciates that not all psychic pain comes from abandonment and that privacy and space are profound emotional needs. The latter concept is an effort to move away from absolutistic taxonomy, a shortcoming of attachment theory.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-020-00774-9
       
  • Qualitatively Exploring Mental Health Attitude Changes among Emerging
           

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      Abstract: Abstract Emerging adult military members and veterans (MMV) are experiencing many transitions (e.g., adulthood, military). The sum of these changes can cause stress, anxiety, and mental health challenges. Stigma of mental health and treatment exists, and military populations are often not seeking or engaging in appropriate care. Recent research emphasizes the need to uncover mental health attitudes and self-stigma barriers regarding help seeking. We evaluated the impact of a single motivational-interviewing enhanced interview with 26 MMV, all who reported high risk substance use. In 75-minute interviews with the primary focus of discussing their experiences regarding mental health, substance use, and identity development, the interviewer incorporated motivational interviewing strategies (e.g., affirmations, complex reflections). Participants shared their developmental experiences, stressors transitioning, and barriers and stigma around mental health treatment. Participants completed a survey which included a variety of standardized measures and open-ended questions two weeks before and after the interview. Qualitative follow-up data via open ended questions shows the session was well received by participants as they could share their stories, think critically about their military experiences, and brainstorm solutions for mental health care. We conclude that using individual, confidential interviews to discuss sensitive topics for data collection with MMV is an area to continue developing. Conducting qualitative research with motivational interviewing strategies has the potential to be twofold: advance scholarship and inform practitioners, but also serve as a therapeutic platform for some participants.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-022-00837-z
       
  • When the Client is a Struggling Clinical Social Worker: Ethical Challenges

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      Abstract: Abstract Some clinical social workers encounter personal struggles and seek counseling services from other clinical social workers. These complex clinical relationships sometimes produce challenging ethical issues, particularly when treating social workers are concerned that their clients, who are also professional colleagues, may be impaired or have engaged in ethical misconduct. This article identifies challenging ethical issues and dilemmas that can arise when clinical social workers treat clinical social workers; reviews pertinent ethical standards; and discusses practical risk management protocols designed to protect clients, treatment providers, and employers. The author focuses especially on ethical issues related to consent-to-treatment agreements; release of information; confidentiality and its exceptions; management of social worker impairment; practitioner self-care; documentation; and boundary issues.
      PubDate: 2022-11-26
       
  • Supporting Clinical Development Through Integrative Continuing Education
           for Field Instructors

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      Abstract: Abstract Field education is the signature pedagogy of social work education, but there is no standardized mechanism to ensure field instructors are trained in the same clinical modalities as social work students or are well-trained in the provision of clinical supervision. Feasibility was assessed of providing field instructors (n = 9) with a continuing education (CE) program to train them in a specialized evidence-based practice, motivational interviewing (MI) in a recovery context, and strategies for supervision. Participants of the CE program gained confidence (p < .05) and knowledge in the spirit (p < .01) and skills (p < .001) of MI; while participants described initial reactions of disdain when role-plays were introduced in the training, they ultimately identified role-plays and facilitator modeling as key features in producing their own practice change and mimicked the use of parallel process – using MI as a way to teach MI – in their provision of supervision. Findings suggest that offering a CE program to train field instructors in a specialized evidence-based practice embedded in course work and strategies for supervision is feasible and may result in enhanced supervision in field education.
      PubDate: 2022-11-24
       
  • Body Dissatisfaction, Sexual Minority Stress, and Relationship
           Satisfaction Among Sexual Minority Men in Taiwan

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      Abstract: Abstract Sexual minority men are at a higher risk for body dissatisfaction (BD). Previous studies have found that experience of sexual minority stress heightens BD. The protective effects of satisfying relationships with one’s romantic partners and parents are underexplored in this population. This study examined the individual effects of sexual minority stress, romantic relationships, and child-parent relationship and explored the moderating effect of relationship satisfaction. Data came from a sample (n = 405) of gay (86.8%) and bisexual (13.2%) men (mean age = 28.54, SD = 5.6) in Taiwan who responded to an Internet-based survey containing questions about BD, sexual minority stress, satisfaction with romantic partnership, and the quality of relationship with parents. Multiple regression analysis shows that those with a higher level of BD reported a greater level of sexual minority stress and poorer relationship satisfaction with a romantic partner and parents. Meanwhile, relationship satisfaction could not buffer the adverse effect of sexual minority stress on BD. This study suggests that sexual minority men’s BD is modestly associated with sexual minority stress while satisfying relationships with a romantic partner and parents protect against BD. These findings highlight that social workers need to address the interpersonal-level factors when working with sexual minority men to promote a healthy body image.
      PubDate: 2022-11-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-022-00855-x
       
  • Correlates of Perceived School Safety Among Black Adolescents in Chicago:
           Are There Sexual Orientation Differences'

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      Abstract: Abstract The current study aims to explore whether the protective factors identified in the research literature for Black sexual minority adolescents in urban neighborhoods are similar to those of their heterosexual peers. Participants for the study consisted of 638 Black adolescents, aged 12 to 22 years, who resided in four neighborhoods in Chicago’s Southside. Findings indicated that for sexual minority adolescents, government assistance was negatively correlated with perceived school safety while having caring teachers was positively associated with perceived school safety. For heterosexual adolescents, caring parents, a lower level of peer victimization, caring teachers, and bonding to school were positively associated with perceived school safety. However, perceived connectedness to the neighborhood was negatively related to perceived school safety. Except for caring teachers, protective factors were not significantly associated with perceived school safety among sexual minority adolescents as they were for heterosexual adolescents. Overall, findings from the study demonstrate that although identifying protective factors is critical; for Black sexual minority youth, it is especially important to consider macrosystem-level factors that would impede feeling safe in school, such as the presence of racism and homophobia in the school environment.
      PubDate: 2022-10-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-022-00854-y
       
  • EMDR with First-Generation College Students At-Risk of Facing a Forced
           Marriage

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      Abstract: Abstract In forced marriage cases, individuals and couples are coerced by emotional and physical violence into marriage and risk ostracization from their community. Often compounding these complexities are the challenges many forced marriage survivors additionally have as first-generation college students (FGCS), specifically when wanting to pursue an education that conflict with the marriage chosen for them by their families. However, there are limited studies and clinical interventions addressing the nature of forced marriage and its emotional and psychological impact on at-risk adult survivors and FGCS in the United States. Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy (EMDR), a trauma intervention targeting post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety symptoms including guilt and shame, may help at-risk forced marriage survivors and FGCS address these symptoms. I hypothesize that using EMDR as a clinical intervention may empower at-risk adult forced marriage survivors, including those who also identify as FGCS, to free themselves from taking responsibility for their families, prioritize their emotional needs, and work towards independence.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-021-00828-6
       
  • Here We Go!

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      PubDate: 2022-08-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-022-00853-z
       
 
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