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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 243 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACOSS Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
African Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Argumentum     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Australian Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Bakti Budaya     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
British Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 104)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Care Management Journals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Social Work Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Comunitania : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ConCienciaSocial     Open Access  
Contemporary Rural Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Critical and Radical Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Critical Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Critical Social Work : An Interdisciplinary Journal Dedicated to Social Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuadernos de Trabajo Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Developmental Child Welfare     Hybrid Journal  
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
ECI Interdisciplinary Journal for Legal and Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
European Journal of Social Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Families in Society : The Journal of Contemporary Social Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Gambling Research: Journal of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Geopolitical, Social Security and Freedom Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Global Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access  
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Indonesian Journal of Guidance and Counseling     Open Access  
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Care and Caring     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Islamic Counseling : Jurnal Bimbingan Konseling Islam     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Janus Sosiaalipolitiikan ja sosiaalityön tutkimuksen aikakauslehti     Open Access  
Journal for Specialists in Group Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Journal of Baccalaureate Social Work     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Care Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Community Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Comparative Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Family Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Forensic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Rights and Social Work     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 394)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 235)
Journal of Public Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 205)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Jurnal Guidena : Journal of Guidance and counseling, Psychology and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Leidfaden : Fachmagazin für Krisen, Leid, Trauer     Hybrid Journal  
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Migration Action     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access  
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nordisk välfärdsforskning | Nordic Welfare Research     Open Access  
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Partner Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 239)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Policy Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Prospectiva : Revista de Trabajo Social e Intervención Social     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psikopedagogia : Jurnal Bimbingan dan Konseling     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Qualitative Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Qualitative Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Research on Social Work Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revista Brasileira de Tecnologias Sociais     Open Access  
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Katálysis     Open Access  
Revista Serviço Social em Perspectiva     Open Access  
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
SER Social     Open Access  
Service social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Serviço Social & Sociedade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Sexualidad, Salud y Sociedad (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access  
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 2)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Social Care and Neurodisability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)

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Similar Journals
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Clinical Social Work Journal
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.498
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 33  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-3343 - ISSN (Online) 0091-1674
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2658 journals]
  • Young Adult Depression and Anxiety Linked to Social Media Use: Assessment
           and Treatment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Studies suggest that more 30% of college students are currently depressed. A small but growing body of literature suggests that young adults’ social media use correlates with their depressive and anxious symptomology. As many as 90% of young adults use social media currently, compared to just 12.5% in 2005. Further, more than a quarter of college students report spending at least six hours per week on social media, compared to only 18.9% in 2007. Smartphone use within young adult populations also is extremely high: estimates of undergraduate smartphone ownership appear to be as high as 97%. Collectively, these trends suggest that social media and smartphones play an integral role in the routines and culture of young adults. The authors present the existing research linking social media use with depression and anxiety and utilize a case study to illuminate the relationship between young adult depression, anxiety, and social media use. The article provides clear recommendations for the assessment and treatment of social media use in depressed and anxious young adults.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-020-00752-1
       
  • Clinical Social Work in Ethiopia: A Field Study in Gondar

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Social work as currently practiced in Ethiopia does not commonly include mental health clinical interventions as traditionally practiced in the United States. Instead, the social work profession has had a sporadic presence throughout the years depending on government rule and the degree to which social problems have been relegated to community and volunteer systems. Today, social work in Ethiopia is heavily influenced by the rapid pace of technological change and economic development occurring in urban areas and to a limited extent in rural villages. Consequently, during the last fourteen years the number of universities offering social work educational programs (i.e., bachelor’s, master’s, or doctoral levels) has expanded to twelve, although these programs have neither official licensure nor designation. Likewise, the number of field placements for social work students is growing despite the lack of a professional workforce to provide field supervision. Relevant sociopolitical history, cultural themes, current mental health controversies, social work training and educational policies, social work research conducted are all reviewed in this article. The authors also interviewed social workers and their supervisors in Gondar, Ethiopia, to ascertain relevant theoretical frameworks, types of assessment and research, and perceived future needs for the profession of social work in general and clinical social work in particular.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-020-00757-w
       
  • A Case Study Using Shame Resilience Theory: Walking Each Other Home

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Homelessness is an epidemic that affects thousands of people in the United States, the majority being single adults. Stigma and shame are emotions that can saturate the homeless experience. People who are experiencing homelessness can be subjected to shame from society, their community, and themselves, but also by the very organizations and social workers who are meant to help end their period of homelessness. When a person feels shamed and stigmatized by a social worker or organization, they are less likely to seek out or return and receive the services that can help them change their circumstances. Incorporating the key components of shame resilience theory (SRT) into the engagement phase with people who are experiencing homelessness can have an immense impact on that person’s ability to navigate their experience and build resiliency. The case presented is that of a woman who experienced homelessness for three years. Her experience highlights how shaming interactions with providers can lead to disengagement from services, while experiencing empathy and building shame resilience can lead to drastic change. By integrating the components of SRT into clinical practice with people who are experiencing homelessness, social workers will be informed regarding how to build a strong empathic relationship that is crucial to helping the individual build shame resilience and the ability to change their circumstances.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-019-00745-9
       
  • Social Work and Psychedelic-Assisted Therapies: Practice Considerations
           for Breakthrough Treatments

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The re-emergence of therapeutic uses for mind-altering, psychedelic drugs has brought the field of mental health to a new frontier in research, practice, and policymaking. In the past two decades dozens of clinical trials investigating therapeutic applications of psychedelics—including MDMA, psilocybin, and ketamine—have shown promising results in the treatment of trauma-related disorders, some forms of anxiety, and depression. These substances have also garnered preliminary support from the Food and Drug Administration, which has fast-tracked their development. As the field of psychedelic science continues to grow, a serious consideration of these novel treatments in the context of social work practice and values is imperative. This paper offers a brief overview of MDMA-, psilocybin-, and ketamine-assisted treatments, and presents an initial discussion of questions pertinent to social work practice raised by their use, including: safety, efficacy, theory of change, training needs, and social justice considerations.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-019-00743-x
       
  • Restricting the Gendered Body: Understanding the Trans-masculine
           Adolescent with Anorexia

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      Abstract: In recent years, researchers discovered that transgender and gender expansive (TGE) individuals had elevated rates of eating disorders when compared with their cisgender peers. TGE clients experience an increased risk for developing eating disorders due to co-occurring gender dysphoria and trauma from gender minority stressors. An inspection of the literature reveals a gap when searching for the trans-masculine adolescent experience of eating disorder treatment, including nominal research targeting TGE clients with eating disorders and minimal exploration of treating these phenomena concurrently. Gender dysphoria creates unique challenges to body image, prompting some TGE clients to use eating disorder behaviors to change their bodies. Gender minority stressors, such as gender-based victimization and identity non-affirmation, increase vulnerability to identity-based traumas. As eating disorder behaviors can be used to cope with trauma, TGE clients are at further risk when experiencing co-occurring identity-based trauma and gender dysphoria. This composite case study seeks to contribute to the literature by providing a description of the therapy provided over the course of two years with a trans-masculine adolescent using restrictive behaviors to change his body to alleviate symptoms of gender dysphoria, as well as to numb against identity-based traumas. Interventions across each treatment phase are grounded in the gender affirmative model, suggesting opportunities to expand this approach to serve TGE clients in traditional eating disorder and trauma therapy.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-020-00758-9
       
  • Offsetting Racial Divides: Adolescent African American Males &
           Restorative Justice Practices

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Zero-tolerance suspensions are exclusionary practices that disrupt and deny students access to structured routines, academic instruction, and school-provided meals. Throughout the United States, statistical comparisons in zero-tolerance suspensions illustrate harsh racial disproportionalities, particularly for adolescent African American males. Inequities in disciplinary practices place adolescent African American males at higher risk for dropping out of high school, retention, and incarceration. Recent literature highlights the pathway of restorative justice as a tool to decrease inequities in zero-tolerance school suspensions. This case study applies the theoretical framework of Critical Race Theory (CRT) to examine this phenomenon by presenting the story of a 17-year-old African American male and his lived experience of a zero-tolerance school suspension and the social and emotional benefits of counter-storytelling as a restorative justice practice. This paper seeks to contribute to the literature by illustrating the inequities of mandated school suspensions and the observed outcomes when a social worker with experience in CRT and restorative justice intervenes.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-021-00794-z
       
  • Intimate Partner Violence Perpetrator Treatment: Tailoring Interventions
           to Individual Needs

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      Abstract: Intimate partner violence (IPV) remains a devastating public health issue in the United States. Given the high stakes of IPV, it is imperative that treatment provided to perpetrators be efficacious to prevent further victimization and not lull survivors into a false sense of security. Unfortunately, the historically dominant modalities of perpetrator treatment, group-based Duluth and cognitive-behavioral therapy, show small effects at best in deterring re-assault. Because of this, new directions are needed. In this article, we report on a literature review that centered on IPV perpetrator treatment. Results suggest a prominent theme in the literature is a shift from these blanket approaches to treatment based on individual need and co-occurring issues. Specifically, practitioners should be aware of (1) demographic factors affecting treatment completion and re-assault, (2) perpetrator typologies, (3) perpetrator readiness to change and use of motivation-based approaches, and (4) common individual co-occurring concerns, including substance use and mental health issues. For each of these, we discuss treatment implications and make recommendations for future research. We envision a future where the landscape of perpetrator treatment is tailored to individual treatment needs and argue that social work practitioners bring a critical person-centered perspective to IPV perpetrator treatment.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-020-00763-y
       
  • State of Clinical Social Work in South Africa

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      Abstract: Clinical social work has a long tradition in South Africa, with the first formal training program starting in 1977. More recently, clinical social work has been legislatively recognized as a specialization within social work, and clinical social workers will soon begin to register with this specialization. This article presents the only review of clinical social work in South Africa. It maps the history of the field, its current definition, training opportunities and registration (licensing) procedures. Drawing on a national survey of clinical social workers, the article describes the range of theories and practice modalities employed by clinical social workers, foregrounding the use of grief counselling, cognitive behavioral therapy, crisis intervention and psychodynamic therapy, and a predominance of individual work. Three case examples of clinical practice are advanced, related to a range of contemporary issues, including grief, violence, gender identity, sex work, migration and clinical work in macro contexts. The authors conclude with a reflection on the challenges and future directions for clinical social work, emphasizing clinical practice within a developmental social welfare approach and the need to address decoloniality and indigenous practice in the African context.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-020-00761-0
       
  • In the Fertile Minefield: Navigating Challenges and Opportunities with
           Facilitating Self-development and Growth in the Intercultural and
           Interracial Clinical Treatment Dyad

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The “use of self” is a powerful tool that social workers rely upon to facilitate treatment growth for their clients. Yet, for many ethnic and racial minority clinicians, their self contains personal, psychological, social, and cultural aspects that they must acknowledge, examine and negotiate as they enter into the clinical arena. The therapeutic world is increasingly diverse, therefore, the profession must address issues relating to researching, educating, training, supervising, and supporting clinicians from diverse backgrounds to attend with greater knowledge and self-examination. They must attend to the nuances of use of self with respect to issues of intersectionality in order to provide attuned, culturally responsive, and socially just treatment. This paper demonstrates how clinical social work practitioners can facilitate self-development and growth in clients through their strategic use of self as grounded in early British and American object relations theories and contemporary relational theory. The clinical materials in the composite case study (employed to protect the confidentiality of the clients) are used to illustrate that when clinicians embrace the challenges of working in the intercultural and interracial treatment arena and dive deeply beyond the choppy surface, there are many opportunities to further the therapeutic progress while providing a culturally sensitive and socially just clinical practice. Implications for clinical social work practice, education and research are identified.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-020-00775-8
       
  • A Reflection on Special Challenges and Amending Pedagogy in Clinical
           Social Work Practice Courses During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Abstract: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many social work students and educators had to switch gears quickly and replace face-to-face courses with online delivery. While most had had experience with remote learning, the unexpected and immediate transition was challenging. Students and educators who had chosen in-person instruction had to adapt quickly to a learning paradigm for which they had not planned, while simultaneously coping with the anxieties brought on by the pandemic, such as economic hardships, threat of illness, and new family responsibilities. The pandemic has engendered fear, trauma, grief, and loss, all of which negatively affect instruction and learning. This reflection paper identifies special challenges and issues with regard to teaching and learning in social work clinical practice courses brought on by the pandemic. Utilizing the theoretical frameworks of ambiguous loss, interpersonal neurobiology, and the here and now approach, this paper suggests effective teaching methods and collaborative learning strategies to inform social work education during academic disruption in this and future emergencies (e.g., natural disasters). It is suggested that social presence, as well as group cohesion among students and between students and instructors, can serve as a protective factor to ensure continued productive motivation for teaching and learning while facing the challenges that are experienced during such times.
      PubDate: 2021-08-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-021-00813-z
       
  • Effects of Video-Guided Group vs. Solitary Meditation on Mindfulness and
           Social Connectivity: A Pilot Study

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      Abstract: Interest in mindfulness meditation continues to grow as accumulating evidence suggests mindfulness training encourages more positive functioning. However, basic questions about the conditions best suited for realizing mindful states remain unanswered. Prominent among these is whether a group mindfulness practice setting is more effective for novice meditators than a solitary practice setting. Answering this question has assumed new urgency due to the imposition of physical distancing measures designed to stop the spread of COVID-19. In a time of limited social contact, is a simulated group practice setting better than practicing alone' This preliminary study investigated whether environmental setting impacted mindfulness practice experience by examining the effects of three simulated meditation practice environments (1. group practice, 2. nature practice, and 3. solitary practice) on state mindfulness and perceived social connectivity in a sample of novice meditators. Significant differences emerged across the three simulated practice settings. Findings suggest watching others meditate while meditating appears to most effectively induce a state of mindfulness and strengthen feelings of social connectivity. This study supports traditional beliefs about the benefits of group mindfulness practice. These findings also have implications for social workers struggling to stretch limited resources to address growing mental health demands, especially during times of heightened social isolation due to COVID-19. If a simulated group practice confers the same cognitive benefits as solitary practice while also conferring social benefits, simulated group instruction may be preferable for therapeutic and economic reasons.
      PubDate: 2021-06-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-021-00812-0
       
  • "A Home of My Own": The Experience of Children of
           International Migrants

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      Abstract: There is a lack of research on children’s acculturation processes following international migration. As such, this article presents a study conducted among 10 latency-age children (10–11 years old), living in Israel, whose parents were work migrants/refugees/asylum seekers, via their artwork and through the lens of Bronfenbrenner’s ecological model. The findings revealed that the migrant children expressed their acculturation and sense of belonging to the host country through three main themes: (1) a longing to have a room of their own; (2) a wish to separate and individuate, as is typical of pre-adolescents and adolescents universally; and (3) the need to rely on their youth movement as an alternative to the family and as a bridge to Israeli society. An examination of the weaknesses of the children’s microsystems and mesosystems highlights the need for continued efforts to strengthen their connection with the macrosystem, which provides them with a sense of home. Findings suggest that art is a useful mode of expression that can help migrant children explore their past, present, and future lives. They also highlight the importance of changing existing exclusionist policies in order to improve migrant children's sense of belonging and security.
      PubDate: 2021-06-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-021-00811-1
       
  • Use of Simulation Methods in Social Work Research on Clinical
           Decision-Making

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      Abstract: While simulation has become an increasingly sophisticated and standardized method of clinical teaching and performance assessment in social work, unlike other clinical and health care fields, it is not generally used in other areas of social work research. Yet, it has the potential to address challenges and limitations in several areas of social work research. For instance, in the area of professional decision-making, research has demonstrated high variability in the conclusions of not only different professionals encountering the same case, but also in a single professional encountering a case at different times. However, research that would elucidate differences in professional decision-making is complicated by logistical and ethical constraints of real-life practice, and the fact that professional decision-making occurs outside the realm of conscious deliberation rendering the individual unable to fully articulate the process by which they arrived at their final conclusion. Simulation research methods can address some of these challenges through providing the opportunity to: observe professional decision-making in real time; reflect on the decisional process while reviewing recordings; and compare the approaches of professionals to standardized cases. This paper reviews the use of simulation research methods in clinical and health science fields and the types of simulation research. It then describes the manner in which simulation methods have been applied to a specific program of social work research that examines professional decision-making in high stakes situations, contributing to clinical practice.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-020-00778-5
       
  • Decision-Making and Relationship Competence When Reporting Suspected
           Physical Abuse and Child Neglect: An Objective Structured Clinical
           Evaluation

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      Abstract: Mandatory reporting of suspected child abuse and neglect highlights the challenges between the ethical and legal obligations of social workers and the need to maintain the therapeutic relationship with the client. The ability to bridge this tension is paramount to ensure continued psychosocial treatment and the well-being of children. This paper discusses a study to determine the decision-making factors of social work students and practitioners when facing a suspicion of child abuse and neglect, how they justify their decision to report or not report to child protection services, and the current and future relationship repair strategies used with simulated clients during an objective structured clinical evaluation (OSCE). Nineteen BSW, MSW, and experienced practitioners (N = 19) underwent an OSCE with one of two child maltreatment vignettes, physical abuse or neglect. Fisher’s exact test was used to examine participants’ historical and current reporting behaviors. Independent samples T-tests, Cohen’s D, and qualitative content analysis was used to examine participants’ decision making and relationship repair strategies when faced with suspected child abuse and neglect. Results showed that six participants discussed the duty to report during the OSCE while 13 participants did not. Participants’ who discussed and did not discuss the duty to report during the OSCE articulated clear reasons for their decision and identified relationship repair strategies in working with the client. A sub-group of participants who identified the child maltreatment but did not discuss the duty to report, provided more tentative and complex reasons for their inaction and next steps in working with the client. All participants demonstrated a degree of competence and critical reflection in the OSCE, with integration for future learning. These findings are discussed and implications for future practice are offered.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-020-00785-6
       
  • Examining Cross-Cultural Child Welfare Practice Through Simulation-Based
           Education

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      Abstract: Simulation-based learning is an emerging pedagogical approach in social work education that is expanding to specialized areas of practice. This research examines the intersection of cross-cultural practice and child maltreatment investigations. Thirty-one (N = 31) BSW and MSW social work students participated in a three-hour voluntary child welfare simulation workshop and engaged with one of three child welfare scenarios: (1) an immigrant Chinese family, (2) an Indigenous family, and (3) a White youth. Drawing upon the concept of cultural agility, a theoretically-informed mixed methods approach was used to analyze the data. Fisher’s exact test and independent samples T-tests were used to examine participants social work education and experience, perceived competencies, acknowledgment of the simulated client’s culture, and evaluation of the simulation experience. Qualitative analysis examined participants’ critical reflection of their cross-cultural exchange with the simulated clients regarding allegations of child maltreatment. Statistical differences were noted among participants who engaged with each of the three child welfare scenarios. All participants expressed positive learning benefits through simulation, however, statistical differences were found between participants who acknowledged the client’s ethno-cultural identity versus those who did not with respect to their overall learning benefits, meta-competencies, and procedural competencies. Participants demonstrated various aspects of the cultural agility framework as they reflected upon their practice. Simulation-based learning offers the opportunity for students to critically examine and reflect upon the ways they operationalize culture and child maltreatment, and how to manage the complexities of working across difference. Future recommendations for research and practice are discussed.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-020-00783-8
       
  • Developing Engagement Competence for Public Child Welfare: Results of an
           Inter-University Simulation Project

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      Abstract: Strong clinical competence is required for the successful engagement of clients in public child welfare. Successful engagement is associated with increasing positive outcomes for families. Three universities partnered to implement a simulation based learning (SBL) project to better prepare Title IV-E students in engagement competence when working with clients in public child welfare. Over three years, 70 students participated in a two scenario Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE) interviewing an adolescent and her mother regarding an allegation of abuse with post interview reflection and feedback. The project was assessed using standardized rating tools and post interview reflection responses. Students consistently performed better with the adolescent than with the mother who presented with more resistance. Performance improved when completing the OSCE twice during an academic year and when specific learning modules were added. Student management of emotional regulation, interviewing challenges, and inconsistent awareness of diversity emerged as themes from student responses. Findings suggest transfer of learning from classroom to practice situations continues to be challenging. SBL can provide an important bridge by creating practice scenarios that challenge student emotional regulation, interviewing skills, and application of culturally responsive practice in a safe and controlled environment while providing rich opportunities for student learning and development. Increased collaboration between the academy and field internship sites are needed to maximize the potential of the SBL experience.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-021-00798-9
       
  • Using Evidence-Based Learning Theories to Guide the Development of Virtual
           Simulations

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      Abstract: Technology-enhanced training such as virtual simulations can be effective only to the extent evidence-based principles of learning are integrated into their training platforms. Assuming skill acquisition is the target of training, programs should include time and space for repeated practice opportunities structured through evidence-based learning theories (Amodeo et al. in Adm Soc Work 33:423–438, 2009). Essential learning attributes derived from Cognitive Load Theory (Sweller in Cognit Sci 12:257–285, 1988) and the Theory of Deliberate Practice (Ericsson et al. in Psychol Rev 100:363–406, 1993) can effectively integrate into virtual simulations intended to build expertise. Virtual Home Simulation (VHS) and Virtual Motivational Interviewing (VMI) are presented in this paper as an approach to develop virtual simulations that provide child welfare workers a means to deliberately practice essential skills toward competence before entering the workforce. This paper reviews the development process, specific design aspects, and lessons learned as a guide on how to integrate effective learning attributes. Implications for using virtual simulations, including cost-benefits, measuring performance over time, and addressing training complications due to Covid-19 or similar obstacles, are also provided.
      PubDate: 2021-05-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-021-00809-9
       
  • Guidelines for Using Simulation for Online Teaching and Learning of
           Clinical Social Work Practice in the Time of COVID

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      Abstract: Due to COVID 19, Monash University’s Social Work Department moved all clinical practice skills teaching in the Master of Social Work (graduate entry level) fully online using synchronous audio-visual conferencing platform Zoom for the first time from March to June 2020. The innovations associated with this move included the development of clinical practice laboratories (CPLs) to prepare 154 students for a modified version of an Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) and their first field education practicum. The use of simulated clients to facilitate experiential learning of active listening skills, rapport-building and empathic communication in this mode of delivery is described in detail to encourage overcoming previous issues in teaching clinical practice skills to students located at a distance from campus.
      PubDate: 2021-05-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-021-00807-x
       
  • Guidelines for Integrating Live Supervision in Simulation-Based Clinical
           Education: An Example for Teaching Motivational Interviewing

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      Abstract: During the past 20 years, social work education has built a bridge between the classroom and field using client simulation to learn clinical skills. This paper outlines an innovative model of simulation that incorporates LS used to teach motivational interviewing (MI). In addition, guidelines with specific steps for teaching MI with simulation and LS are discussed. Unfortunately, most present day simulation models leave out methods to instruct and supervise students in real time. When implementing clinical simulations there is little opportunity to correct a trainee’s behavior or to practice a new skill at the perfect teachable moment during an interview. This instruction must wait until the interview is finished and the debriefing has begun. With the addition of LS, the simulation experience is enhanced for students as the supervisor is now incorporated as an active participant in the interview. Using LS, the instructor can now direct and even model appropriate clinical responses and interventions. The use of simulation with LS is innovative and builds on social work’s evolving body of simulation-based education and further strengthens this approach. Results of this model suggest that students quickly learn to appreciate the value added of LS to simulation and that clinical skills learned resist decay overtime.
      PubDate: 2021-05-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-021-00805-z
       
  • Navigating Uncertainty in Clinical Social Work Practice: A Pilot
           Simulation-Based Study

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      Abstract: While clinical social work has a strong conceptual understanding of uncertainty, there is a lack of empirical data on how practitioners navigate uncertainty in practice. This paper reports findings of the data generated from a simulation-based pilot study designed to explore clinical social workers’ encounters with uncertainty and the strategies they use to navigate it. Experienced clinicians (n = 4), recent graduates (n = 4) and graduate students (n = 3) participated in a 30-min video recorded case-based simulated session with a live standardized client (SC). Using standardized clients, simulation-based research methodology allowed us to capture moment-to-moment practice behaviours and decisions among social workers. Following each simulation, participants reviewed the video-recorded sessions and engaged in an audio-recorded reflective dialogue with a researcher. Two themes emerged from the data sets: (1) there is a variation between less experienced participants who navigated uncertainty in pragmatic, task focused ways and more experienced practitioners who focused on the wider relationship with the client; and (2) less experienced practitioners tended towards struggling against uncertainty while more experienced practitioners demonstrated an ability to sit and wade within it. These findings offer several implications for clinical social work research and practice, including the important role that simulation methodologies have in exploring clinical practice and the need to understand specific aspects of uncertainty in clinical practice.
      PubDate: 2021-03-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s10615-021-00800-4
       
 
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