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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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Society and Mental Health
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.692
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 14  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2156-8693 - ISSN (Online) 2156-8731
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Psychosocial Coping Resources and the Toll of COVID-19 Bereavement

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      Authors: Matthew K. Grace, Jane S. VanHeuvelen
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic ushered in a bereavement crisis unparalleled in a generation, with devastating consequences for the mental health of those who lost a loved one to the virus. Using national survey data (n = 2,000) containing detailed information about people’s experiences of pandemic-related stressors, coping resources, and mental health, in this study we examine whether and how three psychosocial coping resources—mastery, self-esteem, and social support—moderate the association between COVID-19 bereavement and psychological distress. We find that coping resources have both expected and unanticipated effects on the relationship between bereavement and mental health. Consistent with the stress process model, higher levels of mastery uniformly reduce the damaging effects of bereavement on depressive symptoms and anger, whereas self-esteem mitigates the positive association between losing a close tie to the virus and reports of anger. Contrary to the stress-buffering hypothesis, however, higher levels of perceived support exacerbate the positive associations between bereavement and each indicator of psychological distress. Our findings suggest that the putatively advantageous aspects of social support may be compromised, or even reversed, in the context of constrained social engagement. We discuss the theoretical implications of these findings for sociological research on the stress process.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T06:37:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693221113221
       
  • Parent and/or Grandparent Attendance at Residential School and Dimensions
           of Cultural Identity and Engagement: Associations with Mental Health and
           Substance Use among First Nations Adults Living off Reserve

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      Authors: Tara Hahmann, Amanda Perri, Huda Masoud, Amy Bombay
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      Limited studies have assessed how parent and/or grandparent attendance at residential schools is associated with mental health and substance use among First Nations peoples living off reserve, while also considering how cultural dimensions relate to these outcomes. Analyses of the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey revealed that the odds of self-reported diagnosed mood and anxiety disorders, past-year heavy drinking, and frequent marijuana use were significantly higher among First Nations adults living off reserve who had either a parent and/or grandparent who attended residential schools, even when controlling for covariates. In predicting diagnosed mood disorder, positive cultural identity affect and cultural engagement moderated the effect of parent residential school attendance while cultural exploration moderated the effect of two generations of attendance. Cultural exploration was a protective factor for grandparent residential school attendance in relation to past-year frequent marijuana use. Interventions that are trauma-informed and culturally-based should be considered for this population.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-07-11T11:50:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693221108766
       
  • The Uneven Stress of Social Change: Disruptions, Disparities, and Mental
           Health

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      Authors: Phyllis Moen
      First page: 85
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      As the COVID-19 pandemic underscores, disparities in stress exposure, vulnerability, and protective resources are often magnified in times of rapid change. I argue that Leonard Pearlin’s integration of life course and stress process frameworks constitutes a useful model for advancing a research agenda on the stressors and corollary mental health impacts of the social disruptions and dislocations defining life in the early twenty-first century. Social changes interrupt life paths and produce potentially stressful circumstances at particular time points in biographies already defined, shaped, and constrained at the intersections of race, class, nativity, age, and gender. Critical for both science and policy development is a mental health research agenda on the nature and consequences of the uneven stresses of social changes as they play out at different life course stages in disparate ways depending on people’s intersecting social locations.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-05-25T08:43:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693221100171
       
  • Race, Socioeconomic Status, and Mothers’ Parental Stress

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      Authors: Xu Yan
      First page: 99
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      Studies on parenting and mental health have documented both racial differences in mothers’ parental stress levels and mixed evidence on the impacts of mothers’ socioeconomic status (SES) on their parental stress. Less is known about how the association between mothers’ SES and parental stress varies by race, or to what extent this variation contributes to racial differences in mothers’ levels of parental stress. This study addresses these questions using data from the second wave of Early Childhood Longitudinal Study: 2010–2011 Kindergarten Class (N = 8,548). The ordinary least squares (OLS) regression and Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition results show that compared with white and Asian mothers, low income and education have more detrimental impacts on black and Hispanic mothers’ feelings of parental stress. This racially diverse association between mothers’ SES and parental stress is an important reason why Asian mothers face higher parental stress than black and Hispanic mothers.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T07:19:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693221091690
       
  • COVID-19 Onset, Parental Status, and Psychological Distress among
           Full-time Employed Heterosexual Adults in Dual-earning Relationships: The
           Explanatory Role of Work-family Conflict and Guilt

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      Authors: Shirin Montazer, Krista M. Brumley, Laura Pineault, Katheryn Maguire, Boris Baltes
      First page: 119
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      We propose that the COVID-19 pandemic and the restrictions to daily life that followed had greater negative impact on the mental health, as measured by psychological distress, of employed parents than nonparents, because of an associated increase in both directions of work-family conflict and work-family guilt among this group of the population. To test this argument, we examined pooled data from two cross-sectional online surveys administered to heterosexual adults in dual-earning relationships living in the United States. The first data set was collected before the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic (N = 616), and the second data set was collected during the early months of the pandemic (N = 454). Results of multivariate analyses show that distress increased between the two surveys, but only among parents, as compared with nonparents, irrespective of gender of the respondent, or age of the youngest child. This association is due to a change in work-family conflict and guilt between the two surveys: among parents, the COVID-19 onset was associated with higher family-to-work conflict, work-to-family guilt, and family-to-work guilt; among nonparents the pandemic was associated with lower work-to-family conflict and work-to-family guilt. Our results suggest that the COVID-19 onset had contrasting effects on the lives of employed parents and nonparents.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-05-14T08:17:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693221096189
       
  • Health System Access for Precariously Housed Youth: A Participatory Youth
           Research Project

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      Authors: Naomi Nichols, Jayne Malenfant
      First page: 137
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      This article builds from young people’s experiences navigating health system organizations to identify concrete institutional and policy processes that pose problems for youth experiencing or at risk of homelessness, as well as those that show promise in terms of health promotion. Our participatory youth research team explored homeless youth’s health-seeking practices, the specific barriers they face, and relations between their health-seeking efforts and their homelessness. Youth and adult co-researchers interviewed 38 individual youth (aged 16–29) who completed 64 qualitative institutional history interviews. Their accounts illuminate a systemic lack of capacity to address the mental health needs of homeless youth. Unable to secure access to timely, sufficient, and suitable programs and services, youth navigate patchwork of crisis and emergency supports that undermine their autonomy, their health, and their housing stability. Finally, youth without stable housing—particularly those who are Trans* and non-binary youth and/or who use drugs—report discrimination in health care settings. Our results suggest that access to timely, appropriate, de-stigmatizing, and consistent (mental) health services is one way to prevent youth homelessness.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-03-11T06:54:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693221082206
       
  • From the “Magna Carta” to “Dying in the Streets”: Media Framings
           of Mental Health Law in California

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      Authors: Alex V. Barnard
      First page: 155
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyzes 575 newspaper articles across 53 years of reporting on California’s landmark 1967 Lanterman-Petris-Short (LPS) Act to examine framings of the challenges people with severe mental illness pose to the social order and shifting responses to them. The LPS Act restricted involuntary hospitalization which in the 1960s made it a “Magna Carta” that heralded a “mental health revolution” of voluntary, community-based care. Subsequently, coverage passed between four other framings that linked together different attributions of problems—like homelessness or suicide—with perceived flaws of the Act—such as encouraging the closure of hospitals or imposing barriers to forced treatment. Although previous research has focused on how the media amplifies fears of violence, this article shows how this framing is giving way to one focused on mentally ill people “dying in the streets” and the need for re-institutionalization to save them. By comparing media representations with other documentation from each period, this article demonstrates how these frames have continuously misattributed the consequences of complex policy and social changes to the granting of civil rights by the LPS Act.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-01-22T09:20:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693211068841
       
 
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