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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.649
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1049-2089 - ISSN (Online) 1548-6869
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • Money Matters

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      Abstract: Two separate volumes make up our final issue of the year—the regular issue and a supplement titled Public-Private Partnerships and Health Equity. The latter, thanks to the financial support of the sponsor, CVS Health/Aetna, is entirely open access.The regular issue includes several interesting papers bringing to the fore the ways that money and socioeconomic status are inextricably linked to health. The first two explicitly concern money. Hubbard and Chen analyzed data from the National Financial Capability Study to examine household medical debt and delayed prescriptions. They found that American Indian/Alaska Native households were significantly more likely than non-Hispanic White households to bear medical debt ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Exploring Opportunities to Optimize Stress and Trauma-Focused Primary Care
           with Low-Income Midlife and Older Women

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      Abstract: Up to 90% of older adults have experienced trauma.1 The cumulative effects2 of trauma may be especially deleterious among midlife and older women. Yet, trauma and related symptoms often remain hidden in older populations,1–4 particularly low-income older women.5,6 Women who have experienced trauma commonly present to primary care with trauma-linked health concerns (e.g., depression, sleep problems),7,8 and have a two- to three-fold higher risk for developing post-traumatic stress disorder than men.9 However, older women are infrequently asked about trauma histories,10 and trauma-related symptoms are commonly misinterpreted by clinicians.11 Older women often experience difficulty accessing services, delayed trauma ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • County-Level COVID-19 Vaccination Rates, Non-Communicable Diseases, and
           Socioeconomic Inequities: Applying Syndemic Theory to Vaccines

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      Abstract: In the early course of the pandemic, Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief of The Lancet, called the coronavirus diseases 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic a syndemic.1 He used this word to describe how COVID-19 clusters with pre-existing chronic comorbidities and social conditions, and how it interacts with them. The syndemic approach was first described in the 1990s, and reveals biological and social interactions that are important for prognosis, treatment, research, and health policy.2,3,4 According to the syndemic theory, structural inequalities drive diseases to cluster, resulting in interactions that aggravate health outcomes at the population level.5 Limiting the harm caused by COVID-19 requires great attention to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Development of an Effective Electronic Medical Record for Student-Run Free
           Health Fairs Using Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) Software

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      Abstract: A robust electronic medical record (EMR) is an essential requirement for a functioning health care practice. The most basic EMRs have been around for almost 50 years, intended to create more efficient and personalized health care.1 EMRs encompass all aspects of patient care including patient registration, results, note-writing, orders, and billing. By fulfilling these needs, EMRs allow for comprehensive and longitudinal health care by serving as a log for all patient interactions. However, commercial EMRs are very expensive, often more than $25,000 per physician or $40 per patient when being implemented.2,3 The high price tag is cost-prohibitive for most free health care services that often rely on minimal ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Falling Short: Examining Medical Debt and Cost Avoidance in American
           Indian and Alaska Native Households

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      Abstract: In America, there exists a complex combination of overlapping racial disparities. The overlapping nature of these disparities may be most pronounced in the areas of financial security and health care, where a lack of one can cause a lack of the other. The relationship is seen in data showing that those who face the negative side of financial and economic disparities, such as African Americans, Latinos, and American Indians and Alaska Natives/Native Americans (AI/ANs) are likely to face health care disparities.1–7 Compared with other groups in the United States, AI/ANs have a lower life expectancy and higher rates of chronic illnesses, such as diabetes, chronic liver disease, and cirrhosis.8–10 They also have higher ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "I Feel Like That Was the Only Option I Had:" A Qualitative Study of
           

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      Abstract: The United States maternal mortality rate (23.8/100,000 live births) is the highest of all countries in the developed world.1 Rates of severe maternal morbidity (SMM) and maternal mortality have increased over the last 30 years, disproportionately affecting Black birthing people.2,3 Yet, counties across the country are steadily losing maternity care services. Between 2003 and 2013, 10% of all obstetric (OB) units in the United States closed.4 Black communities are significantly more likely to lose an OB unit than White communities.4 The rapid loss of hospital-level OB services can create substantial barriers to access for birthing people at the time of delivery, as well as in the prenatal and postpartum periods.The ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • ICD Knowledge and Attitudes at End of Life in a Diverse and Vulnerable
           Patient Population

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      Abstract: Current guidelines recommend placement of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) for the prevention of sudden cardiac death in appropriately selected patients.1 Despite frequent device implantation in patients with systolic heart failure, with over 700,000 ICDs implanted annually, multiple studies show a significant portion of patients with ICDs have misperceptions and poor understanding of the device's purpose.2–4 Lack of understanding precludes the patients' ability to make informed decisions regarding ICD settings and function as their circumstances change.Of paramount importance are ICD settings at end of life (EOL): up to one-third of patients nearing EOL may experience ICD shocks.5,6 Such shocks ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Socioeconomic Disparities in Method of Anesthesia for Knee Arthroplasties
           in the US

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      Abstract: The International Consensus on Anaesthesia-Related Outcomes after Surgery (ICAROS) group recently published two metanalyses examining the impact of anesthesia type on patient outcomes after knee arthroplasty (KA) surgery. The ICAROS group reported better outcomes with either neuraxial anesthesia (NA) compared with general anesthesia (GA). Neuraxial anesthesia was defined in the metanalysis as the use of spinal or epidural analgesia for surgical anesthesia. Neuraxial anesthesia was associated with a decrease in pulmonary complications, renal failure, deep venous thrombosis, postoperative infections, and transfusions when compared with GA.1 The ICAROS group also reported the use of peripheral nerve blocks (PNB) for ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Impact of Temporary Housing Assistance Expenditures on Subcategories
           of Health Care Cost for U.S. Veterans Facing Housing Instability

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      Abstract: The number of individuals counted as experiencing homelessness during the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's 2020 Annual Point-in-Time count on a single night in January 2020, just a few weeks before the COVID-19 pandemic hit the U.S., rose 2.2% compared with the same count in 2019.1 This was the fourth consecutive increase in the annual homelessness count following declines during the early 2010s. With the economic recession and high levels of unemployment caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, some are predicting an increase in U.S. homelessness of as much as 45%.2 With a greater prevalence of homelessness, it is important to understand the impact of interventions designed to facilitate stable ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "Everything is a Mess. I'm Just Trying to Survive It.": Impacts of
           COVID-19 on Personal Assistance Services

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      Abstract: "I don't have help. I'm not managing very well at all. I don't know what else to tell you. Everything is a mess. I'm just trying to survive it."This paper explores the impact of going without personal assistance services during the COVID-19 pandemic. Given the opportunity to share about their experiences, many people such as Keith expressed how the pandemic left them without the options and care they needed to live independently in their homes. Already marginalized, people with disabilities* have faced greater disparities during this pandemic than people without disabilities.1 Even before the global health crisis, compared with their peers, disabled people were more likely to report unmet medical needs, were less ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Exploring Access and Utilization of Early Intervention Services Among
           Families Experiencing Homelessness: A Qualitative Study

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      Abstract: In 2018, nearly half of children living in federally-funded emergency and transitional housing programs were ages five or younger.1 Nearly 18,000 people experience homelessness at any given time; of that total, nearly 4,000 (22%) are in homeless family households. Experiencing homelessness in early childhood has been associated with an increased likelihood of chronic illnesses, developmental delays, and compromised readiness for school.2–6 Homelessness and associated adverse childhood experiences—including but not limited to maternal depression, exposure to intimate partner violence, and exposure to substance use—have repeatedly been shown to have lasting and cumulative impacts on health outcomes into adolescence ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy among Clinical Medical Students in Enugu, South
           East Nigeria

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      Abstract: Following series of pneumonia cases of unknown etiology in Wuhan, China in December 2019 and subsequent DNA sequencing of sample from the lower respiratory tract of affected patients, a novel coronavirus was discovered.1 The virus named Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is an RNA virus of the family Coronaviridae. SARS-CoV-2 infection is the cause of the coronavirus disease known as COVID-19.2 The rapid spread of the disease globally resulted in the World Health Organization (WHO) declaring the disease a global pandemic on March 11, 2020.3Over 360 million cases have been confirmed globally with over 5.6 million deaths recorded as of January 27, 2022.4 Nigeria is not left out of this ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Cross-Sectional, Mixed-Methods Analysis to Identify the Relative
           Importance of Factors Students and Providers Evaluate When Making a Job
           Choice

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      Abstract: Nearly 20% of Americans live in rural areas and experience consistent and increasing health disparities relative to their non-rural counterparts.1–3 According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), those who live in rural areas are more likely to experience higher rates of negative health outcomes, such as higher rates of mortality from heart disease, cancer, unintentional injury, chronic lower respiratory disease, and many others compared with those who live in more suburban and urban areas. Americans in rural areas are also more likely to have high blood pressure when compared with Americans who live in suburban and urban areas.2–4 A recent CDC report found that Americans in rural areas are less ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Impact on Heath Services Utilization, Payment, and Quality in Federally
           Qualified Health Centers of Washington State's Value-Based Payment Model

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      Abstract: Federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) were created in 1965 to provide comprehensive primary, behavioral health, and dental care as well as enabling services that include transportation, translation, and case management services to all Americans regardless of their insurance status or ability to pay.1 As of 2021, more than 1,400 health centers with over 12,000 care sites provided health services to nearly 30 million individuals (8% of the United States population).2 Federally qualified health centers must either be in medically underserved areas (MUA) or serve medically underserved populations (MUPs), as a result, FQHCs are a critical source of care for the most vulnerable Americans. For example, approximately ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Care coordination Experiences of Low-Income Parents of Children and Youth
           with Special Health Care Needs: An Exploratory Study

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      Abstract: One in four households in the U.S. have one or more children with special health care needs. According to most recent estimates, there are 13.6 million children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) in the U.S. representing 18.5% of the population between 0 to 17 years.1 The U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau defines CYSHCN as children "who have or are at increased risk for a chronic physical, developmental, behavioral, or emotional condition and who also require health and related services of a type or amount beyond that required by children generally."2[p.1],3 Common health conditions among CYSHCN include attention-deficit disorder/attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD), autism ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Does the Use of Social Media Affect Online Health Information-Seeking
           Behaviors among Underserved African Americans in Rural Alabama'

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      Abstract: U.S. households have increasingly turned to the Internet (e.g. via Google, Yahoo, Web page searches) as a whole, and social media platforms (e.g. Facebook, Twitter) specifically, to seek information regarding their health and to access concrete health supports.1,2,3 In a study using four administrations of the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) from 2008 through 2017, more than 61% of American adults reported turning to the internet for health advice in 2008; this number increased to nearly 75% in 2017.4 In a separate survey in 2012, close to 50% of U.S. individuals indicated that they were more likely to search the web than to seek out support from treatment providers when making health care ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Social and Economic Factors Related to Healthcare Delay Among Low-Income
           Families During COVID-19: Results from the ACCESS Observational Study

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      Abstract: During COVID-19, many risk factors influenced parents' health-seeking behaviors for themselves and their young children.1 On March 13th, 2020, the U.S. government declared a national state of emergency concerning the COVID-19 pandemic. Three months later, in June 2020, 40% of a national sample of children reported delaying emergency and preventive health care services.2 By April 2021, this rate had gone down; but 19% of parents still reported delaying medical care for their children3,4 compared with 4% in 2018.5 As the pandemic progressed, parents reported delaying non-COVID essential medical care such as well child visits,2 child immunizations,6,7 dental care,8 behavioral health,2 and emergency department visits.9 ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • U.S. Vietnamese Mothers' HPV Vaccine Decision-Making for Their
           Adolescents: A Qualitative Study

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      Abstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is an effective and safe method conferring long-lasting and close to 100% protection against genital warts and several HPV-related cancers (e.g., cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, anus, or oropharynx).1,2 The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the HPV vaccine for routine vaccination at age 11 or 12, though the vaccine series can be started at age 9.3 The American Cancer Society recommends that health care providers routinely offer the HPV vaccine series for those ages 9 to 12.4 Both organizations recommend catch-up vaccination through the age of 26. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends starting the HPV vaccine series between ages ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Vaccine Hesitancy versus Vaccine Behavior in Patients with Chronic Illness

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      Abstract: The World Health Organization cited vaccine hesitancy as one of 2019's top 10 threats to global health,1 a threat exacerbated by the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic (COVID-19). COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy has been studied in the United States, with research indicating younger age, female sex, Black race, Hispanic/Latino ethnicity, lower household income, larger household size, low educational attainment, conservative political views, and declining an influenza vaccination in the prior year are associated with greater COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy.2–6 COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy largely stems from vaccine-specific concerns (e.g., side effects, efficacy, novelty, rigor of testing), a need for more vaccine-related information (e.g. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Centering Community Voices: Establishment of a Community Advisory Board at
           a Student-Run Free Clinic

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      Abstract: Student-run free clinics (SRFCs) are widespread in the United States. They often provide care in medically underserved communities.1 Research has shown that SRFCs offer numerous potential benefits, such as enhanced trainee learning2 and patient health3 outcomes. Although SRFCs may assess community needs through surveys and electronic health records,4 meaningful elevation of community perspectives remains elusive.5–7 This is a matter of particular concern given that—due to structural barriers historically limiting access to higher education—there are generally marked differences between the sociodemographic profiles of health professions trainees and underserved communities visiting SRFCs.8 Despite the beneficial ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Development of a Medication Management Program in Permanent Supportive
           Housing

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      Abstract: Chronically homeless individuals, defined below*, are at disproportionate risk for poor health outcomes. They often face complex medical diagnoses with co-morbid mental health and substance use conditions, making treatment and health maintenance difficult.1 Higher utilization of expensive services such as emergency room visits; multiple, lengthy hospitalizations; and incarceration increase costs to the public sector and contribute to the earlier mortality experienced by homeless individuals, up to 20 years younger than non-homeless counterparts.2Adherence to prescribed medications is an important part of successful treatment for anyone living with chronic illness. Identified barriers to medication adherence for ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Hmong Stroke Knowledge Survey

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      Abstract: The Hmong are an ethnic group consisting of 18 clans from Southeast Asia with origins in China. They reside in several countries such as China, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, and Thailand, but do not have their own country.1 The Hmong world population was estimated between 4.4 and 5.5 million, according to a study published in 2005, with about half of the population residing in China.2 The Hmong were strategic allies of the United States during the Vietnam War. After the war ended, a large number of Hmong moved to the United States, with the last wave of refugees arriving in the early 2000s.3 In 2017, the United States Census Bureau estimated the total Hmong population at about 0.1% of the nation's total population. The ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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