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Mental Health and Social Inclusion
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.223
Number of Followers: 36  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 1 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 2042-8308 - ISSN (Online) 2042-8316
Published by Emerald Homepage  [360 journals]
  • Evaluating the need for supervision of advanced mental health
           practitioners in psychiatric practices in Saudi Arabia

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      Authors: Seham Mansour Alyousef , Sami Abdullrahman Alhamidi
      Abstract: Research supports the value of clinical supervision as an essential aspect of mental health nursing. Despite the need for this, there appears to be a deficit in qualified supervision in the mental health field, although efforts have been made toward advanced mental health practitioner nursing. This study aims to characterize the ideas that advanced mental health nurse practitioners hold about supervision in practice and to consider what is required to support changes to advanced mental health nursing in Saudi Arabia. This study adopted a qualitative exploratory design that applied a phenomenological approach as the research method. Twelve postgraduate mental health nurses were recruited through purposive sampling. The data analysis generated the central theme, which indicates the attributes of a competent supervisor of advanced mental health nurse practitioners. The components of a supervisor’s competence had the following three main themes: nursing competencies, professional characteristics and communication. A limitation of this study is that the data was collected from practicing advanced care mental health practitioners in Saudi Arabia. Further research conducted in different geographical areas and with different categories of staff is warranted. The results of those studies could be compared against the results presented here. Best practice measures indicated that mental health nurse practitioners working in mental health settings and private practice should receive supervision to help them reflect upon their daily nursing practice challenges. The findings of this study indicate that to support mental health practitioners and advanced mental health practitioners working in private practice, competent supervisors need to be on hand and willing to invest in creating a supportive culture in practice.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-07-2022-0043
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Loneliness and community mental health

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      Authors: Melvin Bradley
      Abstract: In this paper I will discuss loneliness in the community. Finding a non-medical way to support people who feel lonely is really important. Many will never have considered joining groups of identity like the offer briefly discussed. In future community mental health features, the author will consider topics such as community mental health advocacy, debt, benefits and finance, housing and self-help. In this column, the author briefly considers the concepts of loneliness, social isolation and solitude; review some research; and offer ideas about how help may be given in community settings.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-08-05
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-07-2022-0045
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The social construction of mental illness in contrast to medical models

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      Authors: Melvin Bradley
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to discuss a social constructionist point of view about mental health in contrast to the medical model. This is a discussion paper bringing together two systems of thought concerning mental health and its origins. It is not clear that there is any substantive evidence to support the medical model of mental illness. Researchers may be helped to consider a qualitative approach to knowledge rather than the traditional positivist approach. This paper will help people to think about mental health in a way that is not orthodox. It will bring an understanding that even though mental illness is not an illness in the traditional sense, there is still no blame or shame associated with it. The author is an active operational senior manager at a user-led community mental health organisation with over 20 years’ experience in the field. The organisation and its services track a social constructionist philosophy.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-08-02
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-07-2022-0042
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Recovery college intervention for people living with BPD

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      Authors: Colette Lane
      Abstract: Literature regarding recovery has focussed on diagnoses such as schizophrenia, with few papers focussing on borderline personality disorder (BPD). This is a significant area in need of change because a lack of research concentrating on recovery from BPD could be seen to perpetuate the view that recovery from this condition may not be possible. Recovery Colleges (RCs) in the UK began in 2009and aim to offer co-produced and co-facilitated psychoeducational courses to encourage recovery and enable people to develop skills and knowledge so they become experts in the self-management of their difficulties. Given the gaps within the recovery literature, it is unclear how Recovery Colleges can support recovery for people diagnosed with BPD. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of a Recovery College course for people diagnosed with BPD. Using participatory methods, this paper aims to explore the question of what personal recovery looks like for people with BPD and how this may prove useful in developing future practice in RCs. Qualitative feedback data was collected from 51 managing intense emotions courses delivered to 309 students using a patient reported experience measure between Autumn 2015 and Autumn 2021. The results of this study indicate that people with BPD can experience recovery, whilst still experiencing symptoms, as long as they receive appropriate co-produced, recovery-orientated support and services. Further research in this area could help shape future clinical practice by embedding a recovery-focussed programme into community services. Literature regarding recovery has focussed on diagnoses such as schizophrenia withfew papers focussing on BPD. This is an area in need of change because a lack of research on recovery from BPD could be seen to perpetuate the view that recovery from this condition may not be possible. RCs offer co-produced and co-facilitated psychoeducational courses around recovery, enabling people to develop skills and knowledge to become experts in the self-management of their difficulties. Given the gaps within the recovery literature it is unclear how RCs can support recovery for this group of service users.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-07-29
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-07-2022-0044
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The importance of social connections in combating compulsive exercise
           among group-exercise participants: a network analysis

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      Authors: Megan S. Patterson , Christina Amo , Allison N. Francis , Katie M. Heinrich , Tyler Prochnow , Jocelyn Hunyadi , Sydney Miller
      Abstract: This paper aims to use social network analysis (SNA) to determine whether compulsive exercise (CE) was related to social connections and network position among participants of group-exercise programs. Members from two group-exercise programs (Gym 1: n = 103; Gym 2: n = 56) completed an online survey measuring their social connections within the program, CE, depressive symptoms and sense of belonging. Network position was calculated for each person based on network centrality scores (i.e. closeness, eigenvector centrality). Linear network autocorrelation models determined whether respondents reported similar CE as their network ties (i.e., network effects) and whether network position was related to CE in these networks. Eigenvector centrality (i.e., being connected to popular/important people within the network; Gym 1: parameter estimate [PE] = 0.51, p < 0.01, Gym 2: PE = 0.39, p = 0.02) and network effects (i.e. having similar CE scores as direct network ties; Gym 1: PE = 0.07, p < 0.01, Gym 2: PE = 0.19, p < 0.01) were related to CE among participants in these programs. This study builds on existing SNA research suggesting the importance of social connections and network position on CE, and, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, is the first to explore these effects among group-exercise participants. This study describes how the social environment can impact, both positively and negatively, someone’s susceptibility for CE and supports fostering social connections within group-exercise programs as a way to potentially combat harmful CE among its participants.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-07-25
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-03-2022-0016
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Laughter and mental health: a case study of Merv Neal

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      Authors: Merv Neal , Freda Gonot-Schoupinsky
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to engage with, and elicit insights from, Merv Neal, a laughter professional, on the use of laughter to benefit mental health. This case study is presented in two sections: a biography of Merv Neal, followed by a ten-question interview with him. Many insights on laughter are shared. Merv lists five benefits for mental health: laughter brings you into the present moment; laughter is a distraction; laughter breaks negative thought patterns; laughter silences the inner critical voice; and laughter brings joy. This is a personal narrative, albeit from someone who has professionally used laughter to support mental health issues for over 15 years. Laughter can be beneficial to support mental health. More evidence for its impact on mental health is needed. Prescribing laughter has been largely overlooked as a way to harness laughter for mental health to date. Investigating how and when to prescribe laughter for mental health is recommended. Mental health issues can vary enormously, but loneliness is often involved. Encouraging social laughter is therefore important, including, surprisingly perhaps, by also practicing laughing alone. Laughter, accessible to all, presents itself as a free and easy way to support community mental health. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case study and interview with a long-standing laughter professional on the topic of laughter and mental health.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-07-21
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-06-2022-0039
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • An exploration in to how young-people from ethnic-minority backgrounds
           interact with online counselling

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      Authors: Aashiya Patel , Aaron Sefi , Terry Hanley , Charlotte Conn , Julie Prescott
      Abstract: Literature suggests young people (YP) from ethnic minority backgrounds face barriers in accessing mental health support due to discrimination and stigma and so this study aims to explore how YP from ethnic minority backgrounds interact with online counselling. The study used secondary data provided by Kooth, a digital mental health service for YP, for users who accessed the service from September 2020 to 2021 (N = 118,556). The users measure of need (YP-CORE) was assessed upon sign up to the service, and they also chose the ethnicity and background they felt best represented by. The study hypothesised the following: H1. There would be a significant difference between ethnic group of YP and source of referral; H2. There would be a significant difference in ethnic group of YP and YP-CORE score. The one-way ANOVA and chi-squared analyses demonstrated a significant difference for both hypotheses indicating a significant association between source of referral and ethnicity, and a significant difference in measure of need when comparing YP who self-identified as White to those who self-identified as Asian. Findings reveal school-based services are the most popular source of referral for all YP; however, a higher number of YP from Asian and Black ethnicities reached out through informal sources such as Google as opposed to health professionals such as GPs. From the data, YP who identified as Indian, Chinese and African present to online counselling at a lower level of distress compared to their White British counterparts, contradictory to findings investigating measure of need in face-to-face settings.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-07-12
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-05-2022-0032
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • A reflection on the development and delivery of a community peer support
           service for clients experiencing anxiety and depression

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      Authors: Nicky Lidbetter , Nic Seccombe , Ember Girling Rogers , Tina Lee
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to describe the development, implementation, delivery and evolution of a community-led, comprehensive, peer support service, including co-production approaches, peer support worker role development, outcomes, acceptability and lessons learnt over a five-year timeframe. This case study presents a reflection on a charity’s peer support service development along with outcomes to highlight client progress. Improvement in well-being as measured through the Warwick Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (WEMWBS) was evidenced along with demonstrating that the peer support service offers complementary support to Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services. There was limited quantitative data, and that which existed was analysed on a service-wide basis as opposed to looking at individual components of the service. This paper demonstrates the value of peer support provision as part of an overall primary care, community-based mental health service, including findings that suggest that for some individuals, where IAPT services did not help them as much, a peer-based service appeared to be more suitable. The peer support service provided a complementary and alternative service to conventional primary care mental health services whilst offering individuals with lived experience to gain volunteering, employment and development opportunities. Whilst peer support services have been well documented in the literature for clients experiencing serious mental illness, research on the use of such approaches in the management of common mental health difficulties including anxiety and depression is not as well established. The aim of this paper is to detail the experiences of a user-led charity in developing and delivering peer support services, including challenges encountered. Furthermore, this paper describes a peer support service that has been integrated with a co-existing low intensity IAPT service, reporting recovery rates for clients that have accessed both peer support and IAPT services.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-06-29
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-05-2022-0030
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • I never wanted to just sit around smoking cigarettes and drinking coffee

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      Authors: Andrew Voyce
      Abstract: Essay asks questions about people with schizophrenia and recovery. The essay is written in an autoethnographic style. The purpose of this paper is to portray the actual outcome for a person with schizophrenia, in the context of recovery and the achievement of independence. Statistics are from review of various sources and are compared with autoethnographic data. The implications are to confirm social exclusion for the cohort of people with schizophrenia. Practical implications include the recognition of the unusual destinations for those with schizophrenia. Independence is a desirable and much espoused social outcome and yet so few people with schizophrenia are empowered in this way, meaning that they fail to share a social dialogue with many of their fellow citizens. This essay details a struggle to live up to social norms which are hindered because of a life with schizophrenia.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-06-28
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-05-2022-0036
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The efficacy of mHealth for stress and burnout in clinical settings and
           supervisions

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      Authors: Julie Prescott , Amy Rathbone
      Abstract: Stress and burnout are continuous concerns in clinical settings. This has been exacerbated due to the recent COVID-19 pandemic which has impacted health-care professionals globally. Supervision can support staff in clinical setting and help prevent stress and burnout. The purpose of this review is to consider the efficacy of mobile apps for reducing stress and burnout in clinical settings and supervisions. A comprehensive literature search was carried out using online databases such as Scopus, PubMed, CINAHL, PsychINFO, PsychARTICLES, MEDLINE and SAGE. From the searches, nine studies were included in the review after meeting the inclusion criteria. Of the nine studies, eight related to stress and/or burnout and one related to work engagement. There were no specific studies which related directly to the use of mobile health (mHealth) for clinical supervision. Through a focus on the efficacy of mHealth for stress and burnout in clinical settings and supervisions, the review highlights the efficacy of mHealth apps used in for stress and burnout in clinical settings and the importance of engagement of clinical staff. This will not only provide a higher quality of empirical evidence, but it will also lead to more positive outcomes for the mental health of clinical staff. This review focussed upon the efficacy of mHealth for stress and burnout in clinical settings and supervisions. In comparison to previous reviews, this review differs because it combines both stress and burnout and clinical supervisions as the focal areas for improvement via the use of mHealth.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-06-09
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-04-2022-0025
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Ideas of how peer support workers facilitate interprofessional learning in
           mental health care teamwork: conceptual paper

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Tuija Viking , Lena Nilsson
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to contribute theoretical ideas of how peer support workers (PSWs) bring added value to interprofessional learning (IPL) in mental health care teamwork. The question is: How can we theoretically understand the value of PSWs’ expertise for IPL in mental health care teamwork' Initially, the authors formulate a hypothesis. Then, the authors describe the focus and context in IPL and PSWs, respectively, and the PSWs’ and mental health professions’ different roles, expertise and perspectives. The authors also refer to some peer provided programs related to IPL. Finally, the authors construct an outline and apply ideas from Wenger’s Communities of Practice (CoP). Using CoP, the PSWs as newcomers can by their perspectives change mental health professions’ perspectives and stimulate IPL in teamwork. The paper gives theoretical insights of how PSWs can facilitate IPL in mental health care teamwork.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-05-26
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-01-2022-0004
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Online self-disclosure and well-being among Vietnamese adolescents: online
           social support as a mediator

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      Authors: Hung Thanh Nguyen , Thi Truc Quynh Ho
      Abstract: Online self-disclosure and online social support have important effects on well-being. The purpose of this study was to examine the indirect effect of online social support through social networking sites (SNSs) in the link between online self-disclosure through SNSs and well-being among Vietnamese adolescents. Using a convenience sample of 980 Vietnamese adolescents (332 men, 648 women) and three scales (the Subjective Happiness Scale, the Self-Disclosure Scale and the Two-Way Social Support Scale), this study investigated whether online self-disclosure has a direct and indirect effects on well-being when mediated by online social support. Mediation analysis showed that online social support partially mediated the link between online self-disclosure and well-being among Vietnamese adolescents, β = 0.008, standard error = 0.004, confidence interval = [0.001, 0.017]. This study provides an important practical basis for developing interventions to improve the well-being of adolescents who use SNSs. This finding indicated that adolescents’ well-being can be enhanced through online self-disclosure and online social support.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-05-25
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-01-2022-0003
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Co-production of digital mental health technologies to support individuals
           in mental health crisis

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      Authors: Tula Brannelly , Steven Trenoweth , Josie Tuck
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a discussion between people who use crisis services and academics about the development of a mental health digital technology app. The approach is underpinned by participatory methods that centralise the voice of lived experience in the development or delivery of mental health responses. The people who contributed to the conversation identified that the app may reflect a recovery approach to mental health whilst also supporting self-management. The app design was a central repository with links to other apps for self-monitoring or interventions. The app was designed with people with lived experience with an explicit aim to understand what people with lived experience would want from a mental health digital technology.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-05-25
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-04-2022-0019
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Remarkable lives: Khia Stacey in conversation with Robert Hurst

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      Authors: Khia Stacey , Robert Hurst
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to share Khia Stacey’s story. Khia Stacey wrote a short piece detailing her journey, and she was then interviewed by Robert Hurst. Khia Stacey spoke about experiencing trauma, facing difficulties within child and adolescent mental health services and how she chose to fight on. Recovery narratives such as the current one give the readers an overview of only a single person’s experiences. However, they allow the person with lived experience to explore their story in depth. Khia Stacey stresses the importance of listening to service users and gives advice on how mental health professionals can better support those in services. There is so much to learn from a story such as Khia’s – for those who have had similar experiences and for those who work in mental health services. This is the first time that Khia has chosen to share her unique story. Its value is apparent immediately upon reading it.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-04-13
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-03-2022-0015
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Bibliometric analysis of peer-reviewed literature on mental health and
           well-being of LGBT adolescents

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      Authors: Waleed Sweileh
      Abstract: The lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people face discrimination, verbal harassment, rejection and physical violence that affect their mental health and well-being. Adolescence is a critical period for the development of mental health and well-being. The purpose of this study is to analyze research publications on the mental health and well-being of LGBT adolescents. A comprehensive research strategy was implemented using the SciVerse Scopus database to accomplish the objective of the study. The study period was all times up to 2020. VOS viewer program was used for mapping of frequent author keywords, journal citations and research collaboration. The search strategy found 1,167 documents authored by 4,067 researchers and disseminated through 321 scientific journals. Research on the topic started half a century ago but showed a visible steep growth after 2008.
      Authors and institutions in the USA dominated the field. Northwestern University, based in the USA, was the most active institution. No significant cross-country collaboration was observed in this field. The most active journal was Journal of Adolescent Health (n = 67, 5.7%), followed distantly by the Journal of LGBT Youth (n = 48, 4.1%). The contribution of journals in the field of mental health to the topic was limited. Documents on family acceptance, suicidality and school victimization/violence received the highest number of citations. The retrieved documents in the field had five major topics: suicide, mental health/depression, bullying/victimization, substance use/alcohol and violence. The present study has a few limitations that are typical of any bibliometric study. Both the search strategy and the use of Scopus are inherent limitations of bibliometric studies. Policymakers and public health experts in various countries need to prioritize research on the mental health and well-being of LGBT adolescents based on the number of publications produced by the country. The finding that certain world regions have limited research contribution does not mean the absence of mental health problems of LGBT adolescents. The limited number of scholars in the field of sexual health, the cultural barriers are the main obstacles for publishing in this field. Research on LGBT adolescents’ mental health and well-being should be prioritized in countries and world regions with limited research in this field. Therefore, journal editors should endorse publications in this field through publishing thematic issues in this field. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to assess the scientific research publications on the mental health of the LGBT people as an indication of interest and social problems facing this community.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-04-08
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-02-2022-0013
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The early and later-life care experiences of individuals using short-term
           homeless services: an attachment-informed interpretative phenomenological
           analysis

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      Authors: Lara Howe , Ben Grey , Paul Dickerson
      Abstract: This paper aims to explore the care experiences of individuals using short-term homeless services in the UK, who identify as being neglected in childhood. The study endeavours to give voice to the subjective experiences of homeless individuals in these specific domains and optimise therapeutic and housing services provided to individuals from this sub-population. Semi-structured interviews containing elements of the “Adult Attachment Interview” (AAI) were conducted with eight individuals who had experienced childhood neglect and used short-term homeless services in adulthood. Interviews were analysed using an attachment informed version of Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (AI-IPA). Analysis parsed participants’ data into four master themes: “Everything was wrecking all the time”: Unsafe spaces; “Kind of pretending I was […] dead”: Strategies for survival; “My mum didn’t believe me”: Traumatic self-shaping; and “My first reckoning with self”: Restoration & Recovery. Together, themes indicated that participants had undergone traumatic early and later-life care experiences but were engaged in idiosyncratic recovery journeys. The meanings that participants derived from their past experiences of neglect were nuanced and interacted with their current relationships in complex and highly personal ways. By applying an innovative methodology to a predominantly unchartered empirical area, this project extends existing research and presents a meaningful set of results. Implications for the delivery of short-term homeless services and therapeutic practitioners are discussed.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-03-08
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-12-2021-0088
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Editorial – Remarkable Lives: the next steps

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      Authors: Jerome Carson , Robert Hurst
      Abstract: Editorial – Remarkable Lives: the next steps
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-06-29
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-08-2022-099
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Social barriers affecting participation in chosen instrumental activities
           of daily living among community-dwelling persons with schizophrenia in
           Rwanda

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      Authors: Pierre Damien Turikumana , Lizahn G. Cloete , Jerome Peter Fredericks
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to explore social barriers affecting participation in chosen instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) among community-dwelling persons with schizophrenia in Rwanda. A qualitative study used an embedded single case study design and constructivist epistemology paradigm. Purposive sampling and semistructured interviews of 10 persons with schizophrenia and their 10 caregivers were conducted. Data analysis was done thematically using an inductive analysis approach, following within-case and cross-case analysis. The hindrances to participation and community negative attitudes were explored as the two themes. This study focuses on the community negative attitudes including family exclusion and stigmatization, which hinder the participation of persons with schizophrenia in their chosen IADLs. This study highlights the need for psychoeducation about mental illness for the caregivers of the persons with schizophrenia, community outreach activities for sensitizing about mental illness to address stigma toward persons with mental illness and strengthening the activities which promote the social interaction and sense of belonging of persons with mental illness. Persons with schizophrenia are facing maltreatment and stigma from the community members while participating in their chosen IADLs. Awareness raising of the support needs of persons living with schizophrenia will contribute to relevant stakeholders advocating for inclusion into families and communities.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-04-2022-0028
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Online counselling and therapy

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      Authors: Julie Prescott
      Abstract: In this edition of digital innovations I will briefly discuss online therapy/counselling. The online environment can offer a safe space for many individuals to seek support. The virtual world affords many features the offline world does not. In this and the next digital innovations feature I want to look at this online support and how people provide, as well as, seek support virtually. In this edition I will briefly look at online counselling with a focus on young people, who are a client group, research has found, often prefer to access mental health services online.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-05-31
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-04-2022-0029
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Mental health, art and creativity: re-discover the child within

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      Authors: Mats Niklasson
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper was to investigate, using a “dipole model” of the brain as the foundation, if there could be a common denominator between the different concepts of mental health, art and creativity. After a discussion of the three concepts of mental health, art and creativity, respectively, they were elaborated and compared in contrast to Bergström’s “dipole model” of the brain with the aim to look for a common denominator. The findings tentatively suggest that playfulness over the lifespan might be a common denominator for the gaining and keeping of mental health. The author presents his personal perspective on these topics. There are many contrasting ways to view them. A recognition of the importance of lifelong playing might contribute to improved mental health. Allowing a more playful behaviour through the lifespan could have a healthy impact for a society. This conceptual paper might possibly add to the present literature through its emphasis on the importance of lifelong playfulness, which is suggested to be added within the frames of the concepts of mental health, art and creativity.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-04-2022-0022
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Impact evaluation of the “ABCs of Mental Health” in Denmark and the
           role of mental health-promoting beliefs and actions

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      Authors: Ziggi Ivan Santini , Malene Kubstrup Nelausen , Amalie Oxholm Kusier , Carsten Hinrichsen , Frederik Schou-Juul , Katrine Rich Madsen , Charlotte Meilstrup , Robert J. Donovan , Vibeke Koushede , Line Nielsen
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the overall campaign reach and impact of the ABCs of Mental Health in Denmark; a secondary objective is to investigate how mental health-promoting beliefs and actions are associated with good mental health. A questionnaire was administered to two representative cross-sectional samples of the Danish population (1,508 respondents in 2019; 1,507 respondents in 2021) via an online survey. The data were subsequently pooled together into one sample consisting of 3,015 respondents. In addition to questions pertaining to campaign reach and impact, the questionnaire also included a validated scale for mental well-being and questions about beliefs and actions in regard to enhancing mental health. About 7.6% had been reached by the campaign (familiar with ABC name or messages), or 11.9% when also counting familiarity with campaign slogans. Among these, respondents reported (proportions in parentheses) that the campaign had 1) made them reflect on their mental health (74.2%), talk to friends and family about mental health (35.5%), given them new knowledge about what they can do to enhance mental health (78.4%), or take action to enhance their own mental health (16.2%). An internal well-being locus of control and proactive behaviours towards enhancing mental health are shown to be associated with higher mean scores on mental well-being, lower odds of low mental well-being and higher odds of higher mental well-being. An internal well-being locus of control and proactive behaviours towards enhancing mental health are suggested to both prevent low levels of mental well-being and promoting high levels of mental well-being. The results indicate that the ABCs of Mental Health campaign may be implemented to promote such beliefs and actions universally throughout the population.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-05-05
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-03-2022-0014
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • A systematic scoping review of interventions delivered by peers tosupport
           the resettlement of refugees and asylum seekers

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      Authors: Daryl Mahon
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to conduct a systematic search of the literature as it pertains to interventions delivered by peers to refugees and asylum seekers during the resettlement process. A preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis-compliant scoping review based on Arskey and O’Malley’s (2006) five steps was used. Four databases, Scopus, Embase, Ebsco and ScienceDirect, were searched for peer-reviewed articles published in English from 2000 to 2021. Studies were included if they reported on interventions, outcomes or the training received by adult peers to support refugees and asylum seekers during the resettlement process. Of an initial 632 journal articles retrieved, 14 met the inclusion criteria for this review. Most included studies were conducted in Western high-income countries, with the exception of one. Studies were heterogeneous in terms of the nationalities of peers and those receiving peer interventions, the outcomes reported on, the content of interventions and the methodologies used. Findings suggest that peer interventions seem to be effective in addressing many of the challenges faced by refugees and asylum seekers. Community integration, acculturation and reductions in psychological distress are some of the key benefits. When such interventions are co-produced in participatory research involving refugees, asylum seekers and the civil society organisations that support this population, they are naturally culturally responsive and can, therefore, address issues relative to different ethnic needs during the resettlement process. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first scoping review to be conducted in this area and adds to what is a very limited body of research.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-04-21
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-12-2021-0085
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • A sociological study of patterns and determinants of farmer suicide in
           India

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      Authors: Sumant Kumar , Barsa Priyadarsinee Sahoo , Avanish Bhai Patel
      Abstract: Farmer suicide as a social issue has existed in India since past three decades. Though many studies have been conducted from different perspectives to understand the causes and consequences of farmer suicide, very few studies have looked at the issue from a multidimensional perspective. By using the Durkheimian view of suicide, this paper aims to analyse the subjective meaning behind the social fact of suicide. It accesses the nature and pattern of suicide and examines the determinants of suicide from a socio-ecological paradigm. The present study mostly relies on National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) data on “accidental deaths and suicide in India” for the year 2018, 2019 and 2020 for the analysis of pattern and determinants of farmer suicide in India. The analysis of the data has been done in Excel, and descriptive statistics have been presented through simple contingency table. The study found that in the past ten years, there has been a steady decline in the number of farmer suicide in India; however, some states such as Maharashtra and Karnataka continue to report high incidence of farmer suicide. Using a socio-ecological paradigm, the paper found that the farmer’s social system which is constituted of individual characteristics and societal characteristics has a direct impact on the tendency of a farmer to commit suicide. It was observed that the stronger the relationship between an individual and its microsystem, there is less chance of a person to commit suicide. This is an original paper based on NCRB data for the year 2018, 2019 and 2020. The data for the farmer suicide has been calculated including the suicide of the agricultural labourers and the farmers/the cultivators.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-04-21
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-02-2022-0006
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Working with the chaos in an adult inpatient mental health setting: the
           role of an integrated therapies team

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      Authors: Pádraig Cotter , Eirini Papasileka , Mario Eugster , Varsha Chauhan , Eshia Garcha , Marie Kunkler , Michelle Brooks , Iulia Otvos , Abberaame Srithar , Irene Pujol , Christina Sarafi , Tom Hughes
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to outline a process-oriented psychology informed view of the impact of ever-increasing acuity within an adult inpatient system and conceptualise how an integrated therapies team (ITT) can work with the chaos that this brings. A reflective scientist-practitioner based approach was used over a two-year period. Several factors lead to “chaos” in an inpatient unit, including societal inequality, the trauma and adversity it creates and the impact of this at a systemic, interpersonal and intrapersonal level. Chaos is one means of coping and can dominate inpatient working, whereas understanding the underlying distress is often marginalised. Developing an ITT can support working with chaos. The ITT holds the therapeutic perspective for the wider multi-disciplinary team (MDT) and therapeutic and facilitation skills are central to how it operates. Processing the chaos and working with the underlying distress is its overarching function. Developing an ITT offers a robust structure for evolving inpatient MDT working to cope with increasing acuity in a psychologically informed way. The chaos in question is often viewed as patients’ issue but from a collectivist perspective it is something that all members of society are responsible for. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first paper to conceptualise the chaos on an inpatient ward as a process needed by the system as a way of coping and propose the addition of an ITT to inpatient working.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-04-19
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-02-2022-0012
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Applying the national mental health policy in conflict-affected regions:
           towards better social inclusion (Ukrainian case)

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      Authors: Eleanor Quirke , Vitalii Klymchuk , Nataliia Gusak , Viktoriia Gorbunova , Oleksii Sukhovii
      Abstract: The ongoing armed conflict in Ukraine has had wide-ranging health, social and economic consequences for the civilian population. It has emphasised the need for comprehensive and sustainable reform of the Ukrainian mental health system. The Ukrainian Government has approved a vision for national mental health reform. This study aims to draw on the lessons of mental health reform in other conflict-affected settings to identify areas of priority for applying the national mental health policy in conflict-affected regions in the direction of better social inclusion of people with mental health conditions (Donetsk and Luhansk regions, directly affected by the conflict). A literature review was conducted to identify lessons from implementing mental health reform in other conflict-affected settings. Findings were summarized, and best practices were applied to the national and regional policy context. The literature described emergencies as an opportunity to build sustainable mental health systems. A systematic and long-term view for reform is required to capitalise on this opportunity. For better social inclusion, implementation of the concept for mental health and mental health action plans in Donetsk and Luhansk regions should prioritise raising mental health awareness and reducing stigma; developing the capacity of local authorities in the development and coordination of services; tailoring mental health service provision according to the availability of services and population need; targeting the needs of particularly vulnerable groups and embedding the activities of humanitarian actors in local care pathways. This study summarises the literature on mental health reform in conflict-affected settings and applies key findings to Eastern Ukraine. This study has drawn on various sources, including peer-reviewed journals and grey literature and made several practical recommendations. Nevertheless, potentially relevant information could have been contained in sources that were excluded based on their publication in another language (i.e. not in English). Indeed, while the included studies provided rich examples of mental health reform implemented in conflict-affected settings, further research is required to better understand the mechanisms for effecting sustainable mental health reform in conflict-affected settings The paper describes opportunities for developing a local community-based mental health-care system in Ukraine, despite the devastating effects of the ongoing war.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-04-19
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-01-2022-0002
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Mental Health and Social Inclusion

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