A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2        [Sort alphabetically]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 278)
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 141)
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 129)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 112)
Violence and Victims     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
British Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Qualitative Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Advances in Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Research on Social Work Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Clinical Social Work Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Family Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
The Milbank Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Qualitative Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Social Work & Social Sciences Review     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Critical and Radical Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Asian Journal of Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Public Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Critical Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Policy Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 13)
Social Work Education: The International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Contemporary Rural Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Community Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Families in Society : The Journal of Contemporary Social Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Forensic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Partner Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Service social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Care Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Social Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Work With Groups     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Global Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
African Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australian Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Care Management Journals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
ACOSS Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Comparative Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Third Sector Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sociedade e Estado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 2)
African Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Social Work and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geopolitical, Social Security and Freedom Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Human Rights and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal for Specialists in Group Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Groupwork     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Islamic Counseling : Jurnal Bimbingan Konseling Islam     Open Access  
Tidsskriftet Norges Barnevern     Full-text available via subscription  
Tidsskrift for velferdsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for omsorgsforskning     Open Access  
Nordisk välfärdsforskning | Nordic Welfare Research     Open Access  
Socialinė teorija, empirija, politika ir praktika     Open Access  
Revista Serviço Social em Perspectiva     Open Access  
ConCienciaSocial     Open Access  
Bakti Budaya     Open Access  
Voces desde el Trabajo Social     Open Access  
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access  
Janus Sosiaalipolitiikan ja sosiaalityön tutkimuksen aikakauslehti     Open Access  
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Leidfaden : Fachmagazin für Krisen, Leid, Trauer     Hybrid Journal  
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Prospectiva : Revista de Trabajo Social e Intervención Social     Open Access  
International Journal of Care and Caring     Hybrid Journal  
Volunteer Management Report     Full-text available via subscription  
Social Work / Maatskaplike Werk     Open Access  
Argumentum     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Guidance and Counseling     Open Access  
Trabajo Social Global - Global Social Work     Open Access  
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
unsere jugend     Full-text available via subscription  
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Trabajo Social     Open Access  
Developmental Child Welfare     Hybrid Journal  
Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri     Open Access  
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access  
Soziale Passagen     Hybrid Journal  
Tempo Social     Open Access  

        1 2        [Sort alphabetically]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Mental Health and Social Inclusion
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.223
Number of Followers: 36  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2042-8308 - ISSN (Online) 2042-8316
Published by Emerald Homepage  [360 journals]
  • Mental health, art and creativity: re-discover the child within

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mats Niklasson
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper was to investigate, using a “dipole model” of the brain as the foundation, if there could be a common denominator between the different concepts of mental health, art and creativity. After a discussion of the three concepts of mental health, art and creativity, respectively, they were elaborated and compared in contrast to Bergström’s “dipole model” of the brain with the aim to look for a common denominator. The findings tentatively suggest that playfulness over the lifespan might be a common denominator for the gaining and keeping of mental health. The author presents his personal perspective on these topics. There are many contrasting ways to view them. A recognition of the importance of lifelong playing might contribute to improved mental health. Allowing a more playful behaviour through the lifespan could have a healthy impact for a society. This conceptual paper might possibly add to the present literature through its emphasis on the importance of lifelong playfulness, which is suggested to be added within the frames of the concepts of mental health, art and creativity.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-04-2022-0022
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Impact evaluation of the “ABCs of Mental Health” in Denmark and the
           role of mental health-promoting beliefs and actions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ziggi Ivan Santini , Malene Kubstrup Nelausen , Amalie Oxholm Kusier , Carsten Hinrichsen , Frederik Schou-Juul , Katrine Rich Madsen , Charlotte Meilstrup , Robert J. Donovan , Vibeke Koushede , Line Nielsen
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the overall campaign reach and impact of the ABCs of Mental Health in Denmark; a secondary objective is to investigate how mental health-promoting beliefs and actions are associated with good mental health. A questionnaire was administered to two representative cross-sectional samples of the Danish population (1,508 respondents in 2019; 1,507 respondents in 2021) via an online survey. The data were subsequently pooled together into one sample consisting of 3,015 respondents. In addition to questions pertaining to campaign reach and impact, the questionnaire also included a validated scale for mental well-being and questions about beliefs and actions in regard to enhancing mental health. About 7.6% had been reached by the campaign (familiar with ABC name or messages), or 11.9% when also counting familiarity with campaign slogans. Among these, respondents reported (proportions in parentheses) that the campaign had 1) made them reflect on their mental health (74.2%), talk to friends and family about mental health (35.5%), given them new knowledge about what they can do to enhance mental health (78.4%), or take action to enhance their own mental health (16.2%). An internal well-being locus of control and proactive behaviours towards enhancing mental health are shown to be associated with higher mean scores on mental well-being, lower odds of low mental well-being and higher odds of higher mental well-being. An internal well-being locus of control and proactive behaviours towards enhancing mental health are suggested to both prevent low levels of mental well-being and promoting high levels of mental well-being. The results indicate that the ABCs of Mental Health campaign may be implemented to promote such beliefs and actions universally throughout the population.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-05-05
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-03-2022-0014
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • A sociological study of patterns and determinants of farmer suicide in
           India

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sumant Kumar , Barsa Priyadarsinee Sahoo , Avanish Bhai Patel
      Abstract: Farmer suicide as a social issue has existed in India since past three decades. Though many studies have been conducted from different perspectives to understand the causes and consequences of farmer suicide, very few studies have looked at the issue from a multidimensional perspective. By using the Durkheimian view of suicide, this paper aims to analyse the subjective meaning behind the social fact of suicide. It accesses the nature and pattern of suicide and examines the determinants of suicide from a socio-ecological paradigm. The present study mostly relies on National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) data on “accidental deaths and suicide in India” for the year 2018, 2019 and 2020 for the analysis of pattern and determinants of farmer suicide in India. The analysis of the data has been done in Excel, and descriptive statistics have been presented through simple contingency table. The study found that in the past ten years, there has been a steady decline in the number of farmer suicide in India; however, some states such as Maharashtra and Karnataka continue to report high incidence of farmer suicide. Using a socio-ecological paradigm, the paper found that the farmer’s social system which is constituted of individual characteristics and societal characteristics has a direct impact on the tendency of a farmer to commit suicide. It was observed that the stronger the relationship between an individual and its microsystem, there is less chance of a person to commit suicide. This is an original paper based on NCRB data for the year 2018, 2019 and 2020. The data for the farmer suicide has been calculated including the suicide of the agricultural labourers and the farmers/the cultivators.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-04-21
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-02-2022-0006
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • A systematic scoping review of interventions delivered by peers tosupport
           the resettlement of refugees and asylum seekers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Daryl Mahon
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to conduct a systematic search of the literature as it pertains to interventions delivered by peers to refugees and asylum seekers during the resettlement process. A preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis-compliant scoping review based on Arskey and O’Malley’s (2006) five steps was used. Four databases, Scopus, Embase, Ebsco and ScienceDirect, were searched for peer-reviewed articles published in English from 2000 to 2021. Studies were included if they reported on interventions, outcomes or the training received by adult peers to support refugees and asylum seekers during the resettlement process. Of an initial 632 journal articles retrieved, 14 met the inclusion criteria for this review. Most included studies were conducted in Western high-income countries, with the exception of one. Studies were heterogeneous in terms of the nationalities of peers and those receiving peer interventions, the outcomes reported on, the content of interventions and the methodologies used. Findings suggest that peer interventions seem to be effective in addressing many of the challenges faced by refugees and asylum seekers. Community integration, acculturation and reductions in psychological distress are some of the key benefits. When such interventions are co-produced in participatory research involving refugees, asylum seekers and the civil society organisations that support this population, they are naturally culturally responsive and can, therefore, address issues relative to different ethnic needs during the resettlement process. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first scoping review to be conducted in this area and adds to what is a very limited body of research.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-04-21
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-12-2021-0085
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Applying the national mental health policy in conflict-affected regions:
           towards better social inclusion (Ukrainian case)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Eleanor Quirke , Vitalii Klymchuk , Nataliia Gusak , Viktoriia Gorbunova , Oleksii Sukhovii
      Abstract: The ongoing armed conflict in Ukraine has had wide-ranging health, social and economic consequences for the civilian population. It has emphasised the need for comprehensive and sustainable reform of the Ukrainian mental health system. The Ukrainian Government has approved a vision for national mental health reform. This study aims to draw on the lessons of mental health reform in other conflict-affected settings to identify areas of priority for applying the national mental health policy in conflict-affected regions in the direction of better social inclusion of people with mental health conditions (Donetsk and Luhansk regions, directly affected by the conflict). A literature review was conducted to identify lessons from implementing mental health reform in other conflict-affected settings. Findings were summarized, and best practices were applied to the national and regional policy context. The literature described emergencies as an opportunity to build sustainable mental health systems. A systematic and long-term view for reform is required to capitalise on this opportunity. For better social inclusion, implementation of the concept for mental health and mental health action plans in Donetsk and Luhansk regions should prioritise raising mental health awareness and reducing stigma; developing the capacity of local authorities in the development and coordination of services; tailoring mental health service provision according to the availability of services and population need; targeting the needs of particularly vulnerable groups and embedding the activities of humanitarian actors in local care pathways. This study summarises the literature on mental health reform in conflict-affected settings and applies key findings to Eastern Ukraine. This study has drawn on various sources, including peer-reviewed journals and grey literature and made several practical recommendations. Nevertheless, potentially relevant information could have been contained in sources that were excluded based on their publication in another language (i.e. not in English). Indeed, while the included studies provided rich examples of mental health reform implemented in conflict-affected settings, further research is required to better understand the mechanisms for effecting sustainable mental health reform in conflict-affected settings The paper describes opportunities for developing a local community-based mental health-care system in Ukraine, despite the devastating effects of the ongoing war.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-04-19
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-01-2022-0002
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Working with the chaos in an adult inpatient mental health setting: the
           role of an integrated therapies team

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Pádraig Cotter , Eirini Papasileka , Mario Eugster , Varsha Chauhan , Eshia Garcha , Marie Kunkler , Michelle Brooks , Iulia Otvos , Abberaame Srithar , Irene Pujol , Christina Sarafi , Tom Hughes
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to outline a process-oriented psychology informed view of the impact of ever-increasing acuity within an adult inpatient system and conceptualise how an integrated therapies team (ITT) can work with the chaos that this brings. A reflective scientist-practitioner based approach was used over a two-year period. Several factors lead to “chaos” in an inpatient unit, including societal inequality, the trauma and adversity it creates and the impact of this at a systemic, interpersonal and intrapersonal level. Chaos is one means of coping and can dominate inpatient working, whereas understanding the underlying distress is often marginalised. Developing an ITT can support working with chaos. The ITT holds the therapeutic perspective for the wider multi-disciplinary team (MDT) and therapeutic and facilitation skills are central to how it operates. Processing the chaos and working with the underlying distress is its overarching function. Developing an ITT offers a robust structure for evolving inpatient MDT working to cope with increasing acuity in a psychologically informed way. The chaos in question is often viewed as patients’ issue but from a collectivist perspective it is something that all members of society are responsible for. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first paper to conceptualise the chaos on an inpatient ward as a process needed by the system as a way of coping and propose the addition of an ITT to inpatient working.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-04-19
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-02-2022-0012
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Remarkable lives: Khia Stacey in conversation with Robert Hurst

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Khia Stacey , Robert Hurst
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to share Khia Stacey’s story. Khia Stacey wrote a short piece detailing her journey, and she was then interviewed by Robert Hurst. Khia Stacey spoke about experiencing trauma, facing difficulties within child and adolescent mental health services and how she chose to fight on. Recovery narratives such as the current one give the readers an overview of only a single person’s experiences. However, they allow the person with lived experience to explore their story in depth. Khia Stacey stresses the importance of listening to service users and gives advice on how mental health professionals can better support those in services. There is so much to learn from a story such as Khia’s – for those who have had similar experiences and for those who work in mental health services. This is the first time that Khia has chosen to share her unique story. Its value is apparent immediately upon reading it.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-04-13
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-03-2022-0015
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Bibliometric analysis of peer-reviewed literature on mental health and
           well-being of LGBT adolescents

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Waleed Sweileh
      Abstract: The lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people face discrimination, verbal harassment, rejection and physical violence that affect their mental health and well-being. Adolescence is a critical period for the development of mental health and well-being. The purpose of this study is to analyze research publications on the mental health and well-being of LGBT adolescents. A comprehensive research strategy was implemented using the SciVerse Scopus database to accomplish the objective of the study. The study period was all times up to 2020. VOS viewer program was used for mapping of frequent author keywords, journal citations and research collaboration. The search strategy found 1,167 documents authored by 4,067 researchers and disseminated through 321 scientific journals. Research on the topic started half a century ago but showed a visible steep growth after 2008.
      Authors and institutions in the USA dominated the field. Northwestern University, based in the USA, was the most active institution. No significant cross-country collaboration was observed in this field. The most active journal was Journal of Adolescent Health (n = 67, 5.7%), followed distantly by the Journal of LGBT Youth (n = 48, 4.1%). The contribution of journals in the field of mental health to the topic was limited. Documents on family acceptance, suicidality and school victimization/violence received the highest number of citations. The retrieved documents in the field had five major topics: suicide, mental health/depression, bullying/victimization, substance use/alcohol and violence. The present study has a few limitations that are typical of any bibliometric study. Both the search strategy and the use of Scopus are inherent limitations of bibliometric studies. Policymakers and public health experts in various countries need to prioritize research on the mental health and well-being of LGBT adolescents based on the number of publications produced by the country. The finding that certain world regions have limited research contribution does not mean the absence of mental health problems of LGBT adolescents. The limited number of scholars in the field of sexual health, the cultural barriers are the main obstacles for publishing in this field. Research on LGBT adolescents’ mental health and well-being should be prioritized in countries and world regions with limited research in this field. Therefore, journal editors should endorse publications in this field through publishing thematic issues in this field. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to assess the scientific research publications on the mental health of the LGBT people as an indication of interest and social problems facing this community.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-04-08
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-02-2022-0013
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The early and later-life care experiences of individuals using short-term
           homeless services: an attachment-informed interpretative phenomenological
           analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lara Howe , Ben Grey , Paul Dickerson
      Abstract: This paper aims to explore the care experiences of individuals using short-term homeless services in the UK, who identify as being neglected in childhood. The study endeavours to give voice to the subjective experiences of homeless individuals in these specific domains and optimise therapeutic and housing services provided to individuals from this sub-population. Semi-structured interviews containing elements of the “Adult Attachment Interview” (AAI) were conducted with eight individuals who had experienced childhood neglect and used short-term homeless services in adulthood. Interviews were analysed using an attachment informed version of Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (AI-IPA). Analysis parsed participants’ data into four master themes: “Everything was wrecking all the time”: Unsafe spaces; “Kind of pretending I was […] dead”: Strategies for survival; “My mum didn’t believe me”: Traumatic self-shaping; and “My first reckoning with self”: Restoration & Recovery. Together, themes indicated that participants had undergone traumatic early and later-life care experiences but were engaged in idiosyncratic recovery journeys. The meanings that participants derived from their past experiences of neglect were nuanced and interacted with their current relationships in complex and highly personal ways. By applying an innovative methodology to a predominantly unchartered empirical area, this project extends existing research and presents a meaningful set of results. Implications for the delivery of short-term homeless services and therapeutic practitioners are discussed.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-03-08
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-12-2021-0088
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Editorial: A new era and moving forward

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jerome Carson , Julie Prescott
      Abstract: Editorial: A new era and moving forward
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-04-21
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-05-2022-098
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Digital technology to support mental health: a brief introduction to what
           it is and why it is important'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Julie Prescott
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to provide an introduction to a new regular series for this journal, Mental Health and Social Inclusion, on digital innovations. In this first of a regular series of articles, this paper introduces the reader to the area of digital technology to support mental health and why it is important. Technological developments and the recent COVID-19 pandemic have all contributed to an increasing interest and adoption of digital innovations to support people’s mental health, from both service providers and service users. This regular series will look at research into digital technologies for support of mental health and well-being. The series will also consider the implications of various digital technologies for the support of mental health and well-being for different groups of people. Different technologies, approaches and points of view will be considered in relation to their impact on mental health and well-being. Over the past ten years the author has developed an interest in the use of digital technologies to support mental health. The author has recently edited a book, published by IGI Global, on the topic and feels it is an important regular topic for the Journal of Mental Health and Social Inclusion.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-04-06
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-02-2022-0010
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Remarkable recoveries: an interpretation of recovery narratives using the
           CHIME model

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Robert Hurst , Jerome Carson , Aishath Shahama , Hollie Kay , Courtney Nabb , Julie Prescott
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to review the 16 published non-student Recovery Heroes and Remarkable Lives accounts published in Mental Health and Social Inclusion, using the connection, hope, identity, meaning and empowerment (CHIME) framework. All 16 accounts were rated independently by four researchers and evaluated in terms of whether each account met the five criteria for the CHIME model. All accounts met the criteria for the CHIME model, with the exception of one, which still met four of the five criteria. Evidence was presented which suggests that the model can be extended to creativity, connectedness, hope, identity, meaning and empowerment (C-CHIME), to incorporate creativity. While a certain level of subjectivity is required in deciding how each account meets the CHIME criteria, there were high levels of inter-rater reliability within the research team. Creativity had a central place in all the accounts. The revised C-CHIME model can be used by practitioners to examine accounts of recovery in a more focussed manner and may also help in devising recovery action plans. The recovery model privileges both professional and lived experience perspectives on recovery. The current review highlights how much we can benefit from the wisdom contained in first person accounts. This review adds to the existing literature and highlights the importance of creativity for mental health recovery.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-02-28
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-01-2022-0001
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Remarkable lives: Paul Makin in conversation with Jerome Carson

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Paul Makin , Jerome Carson
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to provide a profile of Paul Makin. In this case study, part of the Remarkable Lives series, Paul gives a short account of his background and is then interviewed by Jerome. Paul talks about his recovery from alcohol addiction, then a period of complete wellness, until he developed a psychosis. He talks about how unbearable his admission was to an acute unit. Every single story in the Remarkable Lives series teaches us something different about mental health problems. Paul’s story is no exception. We need to think how we can make the admission process to hospital as peaceful and positive as we can. This is easier said than done. Paul suggests they need to get more recovery stories out there to the general public, so they can see it is possible to make a recovery from mental health problems. I am not sure I have come across many people like Paul. He battled for many years with an alcohol addiction, which he managed to overcome. He then slowly developed a psychotic illness, which led to an acute admission. The process of recovery has now started a second time.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-12-23
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-11-2021-0084
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Bring recovery to young people: the development of a “discovery
           college” in Ireland

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chloe Costello
      Abstract: Discovery Colleges are new, exciting innovations. The purpose of this paper is to describe the process of developing and implementing the first pilot of a Discovery College for young people in Ireland. This paper aims to assist in providing direction for future comparable projects. The author takes a narrative approach to highlight the rationale for introducing the Discovery College model into an Irish context and to outline the project phases and participant feedback. The pilot project is outlined and the key learnings are explained. Recovery Education is a growing model both nationally and internationally, and this pilot was an innovative project, the first of its kind to bring Recovery Education to a younger audience in Ireland. This paper aims to assist in providing direction for future comparable projects.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-12-23
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-11-2021-0078
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Social determinants of mental well-being: senses of powerlessness and
           empowerment among Romani in Ukraine

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Viktoriia Gorbunova , Natalia Gusak , Vitalii Klymchuk , Valeriia Palii , Vitalina Ustenko , Zemfira Kondur , Viola Popenko , John Oates
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to explore senses of powerlessness and empowerment among Romani in Ukraine in relation to such social circles as the extended family, the Romani local community and the whole Ukrainian society. The main research interest is focused on situations and factors that make people feel powerless or empowered. The study was conducted using a semi-structured interview method via telephone. Romani NGO experts approved the interview content. Trained Roma-facilitators were interviewers. Every interview was transcribed for further thematic analysis. The most prominent empowerment factors for Romani people are located within their families and local communities, while the bigger society (Ukrainians themselves and Ukrainian public institutions) is a main source of powerlessness. At the same time, the rigid role of family and community expectations is seen as detrimental for both males and females. The paper is original in terms of its topic (senses of powerlessness and empowerment among Romani in Ukraine as social determinants of mental well-being) and research strategy (engagement of Roma-facilitators as interviewers).
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-12-14
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-11-2021-0081
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Mental health support needs within Gypsy, Roma, and Traveller communities:
           a qualitative study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rebecca May Thompson , Bridie Victoria Stone , Philip John Tyson
      Abstract: Gypsy, Roma and Traveller (GRT) people within the UK and the Republic of Ireland are underrepresented within research and policies despite high rates of mental illness and suicide. This study aims to explore the mental health (MH) support needs for GRT people within the British Isles. This study was a thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews with nine self-identified GRT people. The analysis revealed a longing for acceptance, both within and outside the GRT community; barriers to help seeking, specifically unsuitable services, poor awareness, stigma and distrust; and increased vulnerability owing to participants’ perceived lack of prospects and adverse life events. Despite increased vulnerability, MH services are underutilised by GRT people for a variety of cultural and practical reasons. To reduce the current inequality, it is imperative that services take steps to increase accessibility. This study expands upon previous research by using the voices of GRT people themselves, creating a narrative built from their own emic perspectives. Unlike previous research, this study focuses exclusively on the MH of participants and includes participants from across the British Isles.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-11-01
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-09-2021-0066
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • The risk of risk management: adopting critical theories to explore
           clinical risk concerns in mental health care

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kris Deering , Jo Williams , Rob Williams
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to outline several critical risk theories and explore their application to risk concerns in mental health care. This will contribute to the on-going debate about risk management practices and the impact these might have on recovery and social inclusion. Notably, while risks like suicide can be therapeutically addressed, risk management may involve paternalistic practices that exclude the participation needed for recovery. A viewpoint of key risk theories will be presented to provide a critical eye about some clinical risk concerns in mental health care. Implications for recovery and social inclusion will then be discussed alongside direction for practice and research. Clinical concerns seemed to involve difficulties with uncertainty, holding onto expertise, and the othering of patients through risk. These concerns suggest the patient voice might become lost, particularly within the backdrop of clinical fears about blame. Alternatively, a relational approach to risk management could have merit, while patient expertise may develop understanding in how to improve risk management practices. Clinical concerns appear more than managing potential harms; it can involve appraising behaviours around societal norms, explaining to an extent why mental illness might be addressed in terms of risks. While the points raised in the paper support existing findings about risk management, the underlying reasons drawing on the critical risk theories are less explored.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-10-11
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-09-2021-0061
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Restraint and confinement of psychiatric patients in community: a scoping
           review of in Indonesia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dahniar Dahniar , Rini Asnurianti , Nurul Amna , Marthoenis Marthoenis
      Abstract: The practice of restraint and confinement of patients with mental disorders is common in Indonesia. This practice is known as pasung and is usually carried out by the family or the villagers in community settings. The previous separated studies have investigated the reasons for, methods, duration and consequences of applying pasung to the patients. A scoping review is needed to study the existing practice of restraint and confinement in Indonesian communities. This study aims to review the published studies on the practice of restraint and confinement of people with mental illness (PWMI) in Indonesia. A scoping review method was used to identify studies on the practices of restraint and confinement of PWMI. A search of Science Direct, PubMed database and Google Scholar for articles was conducted. There is an increasing interest in studying the pasung-related aspects among Indonesian mental health practitioners. The studies included the patients, family, caregivers and community as the research subjects. Various elements of pasung; the actors, duration, reason, the consequences and the challenges in releasing pasung have been reported. Stakeholders should consider many factors related to pasung to achieve the free pasung program in Indonesia. Pasung is a practice that exists in a significant number in Indonesia. Although researchers have sounded the importance of the pasung as a problem in the community, much has to be done to alleviate the inhuman treatment of PWMI. This paper adds to the literature on the research concerning the practice of restraint and confinement of PWMI. The findings could be uses as the basis of the improvement of policy on mental health services, not only in Indonesia but also in other countries where the practice of restraint and confinements of PWMI in the community settings is existing.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-10-11
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-08-2021-0058
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Hosting persons with mental illness: narrative study on the experiences of
           a female caregiver managing a mental home in Ghana

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Salome Amissah-Essel , Nancy Innocentia Ebu Enyan , Christiana Asiedu
      Abstract: Persons with mental illness (PWMI) need to be housed and cared for properly. Providing this support can be physically, financially and psychologically exhausting for the caregiver. The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experiences of a caregiver managing a mental home in Ghana and to get a deeper understanding of what it really takes to host and care for PWMI. A narrative research design was used. The narrative approach was used to gather the stories of the caregiver. Data was collected through in-depth face-to-face interview, informal conversations and field notes. Thematic analysis was performed focusing on both the personal and social experiences of the participant. Three main themes emerged from the participant’s experience as follows: stigma and rejection, burden of hosting and support from others. The study also found that what it takes to host and care for PWMI is psychological resilience as follows: determination and love. An appeal is made to individuals to also support PWMI instead of the government alone. The outcomes of this study indicate that the life of a caregiver managing a mental home is a journey characterized by stigma, rejection and financial burden. It highlights the importance of support from others for the caregiver to keep providing optimal care. This paper contributes to the literature on carer resilience by providing evidence that once there is determination and love, PWMI can be housed and cared for in Ghana.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-07-2021-0041
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Remarkable lives: Zoe Riley in conversation with Jerome Carson

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zoe Riley , Jerome Carson
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to provide a profile of Zoe Riley. Using a case study approach, Zoe provides an account of her background and is then interviewed by Jerome. Zoe’s account reveals a remarkable resilience developed through adversity but nurtured by the love of her grandparents. Mental illness surrounded Zoe when she was growing up. Her own mother experienced years of distress. Her grandfather effectively was her father. Despite the childhood adversity and her own teenage problems, she came through it all. These are the stories you read about in textbooks. Zoe reminds us that people in distress want to find connection. They do not want us sitting there writing notes and not even looking at them! The authors talk about “wounded healers”. Dr Glenn Roberts said that his own bouts of depression made it easier for him to sit with people in similar turmoil. The value of peer support has been underrated by many. It is of course a truism to say that everyone’s journey of recovery is unique. The author knows Zoe has already touched the lives of many people. The author is sure she has so much more to contribute.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-08-12
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-07-2021-0040
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Mental Health and Social Inclusion

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.236.50.252
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-